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PostPosted: 02 Jun 2008 11:37 
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Religion of Peace in BDLand strikes -

Quote:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7430588.stm

At least 30 people have been injured in a series of explosions at a multi-storey hotel in the Bangladeshi capital, Dhaka, police said.

The blasts at the Orchard Plaza hotel in the city's Nayapaltal area set two upper floors on fire, they said.

It is not clear what caused the blasts but some reports blamed them on "gas explosions".

In recent years, Bangladesh has seen political instability and several blasts blamed on Islamic militants.

"We are checking the whole place. Bomb or gas, it's a serious incident and we taking it seriously from security point of view," news agency Reuters quoted a senior police officer on the scene as saying.

Fire-fighters were called to douse the fire and evacuate guests from the hotel.

Reports said several injured have been admitted to the burn unit of Dhaka hospitals.

The victims included at least one Sri Lankan national, officials said


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PostPosted: 03 Jun 2008 23:12 
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After Jaipur attack, India asks B'desh to stop infiltration

Hindustan Times

Quote:
With investigations in the Jaipur serial blasts indicating links to Bangladesh, New Delhi has pressed Dhaka to end cross-border infiltration and launch a crackdown on anti-India elements operating from its soil.

At a meeting of the Joint Working Group (JWG) here, serious concern was expressed over "continuous flow of illegal immigrants" from Bangladesh in the backdrop of the recent terror attack in Jaipur in which over 60 people were killed last month.

The meeting of the JWG last weekend was held after five years. The Indian side was led by Joint Secretary (North East) in the Union Home Ministry, Naveen Verma while the Bangladeshi team was headed by that country's Joint Secretary (Political) M H Chowdhury.

India and Bangladesh have a three-tier mechanism with one at the Home Secretary level and another at the level of BSF and BDR, besides the JWG which had last met in 2003.

Sources said India's concern over infiltration from Bangladesh side came in the wake of intelligence inputs that the banned Harkat-ul-Jehadi Islami (HuJI), operating from Bangladesh, could be behind the serial blasts that rocked the tourist city on May 13.

Reports say HuJI has managed to establish cells in Rajasthan and that the outfit was responsible for previous major terror attacks including the New Year eve attack on CRPF camp in Rampur and serial blasts three other places in Uttar Pradesh. The HuJI outfit was also suspected to be behind the blast at the Dargah of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti in Ajmer last year.


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PostPosted: 03 Jun 2008 23:13 
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Sure!! Bangladesh will definetely listen to the big brother and stop infiltrating.


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PostPosted: 03 Jun 2008 23:43 
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Quote:
Harkat-ul-Jehadi Islami (HuJI), operating from Bangladesh, could be behind the serial blasts


You mean we still don't know :roll:
How about busting few sleeper cells and making example of terrorists by hanging them upside down rather than requesting BD / Pak to stop infiltration.


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PostPosted: 04 Jun 2008 07:43 
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Give it a couple of days. BD will request India to stop Indian citizens from crossing into BD due to better living conditions there.


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PostPosted: 04 Jun 2008 13:20 
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Two news items on the BDs from a Paki rag
Clicky
[quote]
Two top generals removed in Bangladesh

Two top-ranking army generals have been removed from key positions, an official said on Tuesday, as the military chief consolidates power in emergency-ruled Bangladesh.

Principal staff officer lieutenant general Masud Uddin Ahmed Chowdhury, considered the second most powerful general in the military, has been transferred, an armed forces official said.

He has been appointed commandant of the National Defence College, a low-key post, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity. Lieutenant general A.T.M Jahirul Alam has been made an ambassador, he said, adding that the foreign ministry would announce his destination.

The official described the transfers as a “routine affairâ€


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PostPosted: 13 Jun 2008 00:49 
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Bangladesh former PM flies to US

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DHAKA (Reuters) - In a move that could ultimately help Bangladesh's army-backed government achieve credible elections, former Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina left Dhaka on Thursday for foreign medical treatment.

Hasina's Awami League, one of the country's top political parties, has been at loggerheads with the self-defined "interim authorities" over her detention on graft charges, and reluctant to commit to participating in a parliamentary election set for December.


Bangladesh ex-PM trip points to political shift
Quote:
"Similarly necessary arrangement will be made by the government through coordination of legal process regarding the treatment of former Prime Minister Begum Khaleda Zia either at home or abroad," the statement said.

Zia, who heads Bangladesh Nationalist party, is also in detention since her arrest in September on graft charges but has refused to go abroad.

The BNP chief said she was happy that Hasina had been freed but demanded that her two sons detained since last year on graft charges should also be sent abroad immediately for better treatment.


:rotfl:

Zia may follow suit


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PostPosted: 13 Jun 2008 19:36 
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Looks like BDA is cracking down on Islamists.

Bangladesh enacts tough anti-terrorism law

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A vast array of crimes, including money laundering, arms running and financing terror attacks, have been made non-bailable offences -liable to death penalty and life imprisonment - under a new anti-terrorism law in Bangladesh.

The provision of death penalty has been provided for terror financing and staging murder to create panic and jeopardise the country's sovereignty. Special tribunals will be constituted to deal with such offences, the United News of Bangladesh (UNB) news agency reported.

Anyone resorting to murder, kidnapping or damaging property to create panic among the people and jeopardise the country's security by using explosives, arms and chemicals, will be charged with committing terrorist offence.

The time-frame for resolving a terrorism case has been fixed at six months after the framing of charges. The ordinance provides the maximum punishment of seven years of imprisonment with fines for a member or supporter of an outlawed organisation.

In the past few years, Bangladesh has proscribed Jamaat ul Mujahideen Bangladesh (JMB), Harkat ul Jehad Islami (HUJI), and other Islamist militant bodies.


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PostPosted: 18 Jun 2008 09:53 
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India deports over 100 Bangladeshi women


http://www.bangladeshnews.net/story/372085


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PostPosted: 21 Jun 2008 02:30 
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NDTV debate on bangladesh


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PostPosted: 21 Jun 2008 09:42 
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Bangladesh war killed four times more than thought earlier: report
June 20th, 2008 - 6:51 am

By Dipankar De Sarkar

London - The war leading up to the liberation of Bangladesh in 1971 killed 269,000 people - nearly five times the number previously estimated, a new study says. The study by researchers from Seattle, US - published by the British Medical Journal - says globally war has killed three times more people than previously estimated, and there is no evidence to support claims of a recent decline in war deaths.

By employing new methods of counting the report has also scaled up estimates of the current conflict in Sri Lanka, saying 215,000 people have been killed between 1975 and 2002, compared to previous estimates of 61,000.

The largest differences, the report says, were in Bangladesh and Zimbabwe. During Bangladesh’s war for independence, it estimates there were 269,000 violent war deaths, compared to previous estimates of 58,000. The figure for Zimbabwe is 130,000 deaths, compared to previous estimates of 28,000.

The new figures for Bangladesh are set to revive a debate about the victims of the independence war in that country, which saw a three-way conflict pitting Pakistani troops against Bangladeshi freedom-fighters and Indian soldiers.

The real casualty figure has always been a contentious issue - while the official Pakistani estimate is a low 26,000, successive governments in Bangladesh have maintained that up to three million people died in the brutality unleashed by Pakistani soldiers.

Bangladeshi authorities officially employ the term ‘genocide’ for the Pakistani killings and compare their independence casualties with the infamous Pol Pot genocide in Cambodia.

Current survey-based techniques used to estimate violent war deaths have been criticised for their potential biases and inaccuracies. For instance, surveys estimating war deaths on the basis of household deaths, such as those recently done in Iraq, were alleged to be statistically invalid, and to incorporate “politically motivated over-reporting of deaths”, the BMJ says.

But the alternative technique used during most ongoing conflicts such as Iraq - collecting from eyewitnesses and media reports - is also subject to “major biases”, including the fact that high levels of war deaths occur in dangerous areas where eyewitnesses are least likely to go.

To overcome some of these problems, Ziad Obermeyer and colleagues from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation in Seattle, US, designed a new method of estimating violent war-related deaths using data on the siblings of respondents in large household surveys conducted in peacetime.

According to the researchers, by comparing “passive surveillance data” of violent war deaths (mainly from eyewitnesses and the media) in 13 countries over the past 50 years, to peace time data collected after conflicts in the UN’s World Health Surveys, they were able to provide more accurate data on war deaths.

For example, say the researchers, the new technique avoids the “constraints imposed by active combat”, and using siblings’ histories rather than household deaths, reduces double counting and exaggeration of deaths.

They estimate that 5.4 million deaths occurred as a result of war in the 13 countries studied between 1955 and 2002 - ranging from 7,000 in the Democratic Republic of Congo to 3.8 million in Vietnam.

The researchers point out that these estimates are on average three times higher than those obtained from previous reports. For example, they estimate that 378,000 people died a violent death as result of war each year between 1985 and 1994, compared to previous estimates of 137,000.

Importantly, say the authors, these new data do not support the prevailing view that war deaths are declining and have been since the mid-twentieth century, or that recent wars have killed relatively few people thanks to technological and strategic innovations designed to minimise civilian deaths.

In light of the substantial differences in estimates, conclude the authors, these claims need to be re-evaluated.

Even these figures are still likely to underestimate the importance of conflict as a cause of death because they only address violent deaths, cautions Richard Garfield, a professor from Columbia University.

“In the poorest countries, where most conflicts now occur, a rise in deaths from infectious diseases often dwarf the number of violent deaths during a conflict.”

In an accompanying article in the BMJ, Garfield predicts that the “promising method” pioneered by Obermeyer and his team will force a re-evaluation of commonly-held assumptions about these deaths.

“The importance of war as a public health problem and a social problem makes this imperative,” he says.

The 13 countries studied by the team are: Bangladesh, Bosnia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guatemala, Laos, Myanmar, Namibia, Philippines, Republic of Congo, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and Zimbabwe.


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PostPosted: 21 Jun 2008 09:46 
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Militant says Islamist militants regrouping in Bangladesh
Calcutta News.Net
Friday 20th June, 2008

An Islamist militant undergoing trial on terrorism charges in a special court in Bangladesh has claimed the banned Jamiatul Mujahideen Islamic group is reorganising after several of its leaders were hanged two years ago.

Jawaid Iqbal, a former regional commander of the mujahideen, said a new leader, Abu Qaued Talim, had taken over the group which was thrown into disarray after the execution of its two founders.

Earlier, Iqbal told Judge Shafiqul Karim of the special court in the southern port city of Chittagong that he felt no remorse over his attempt at blowing up the high security court complex in the city.

Although the court buildings were barely touched by the bomb, the explosion killed three people, including a police guard.

Karim handed down life term to Iqbal and one of his absconding accomplices for their role in the November 2005 bomb attack.


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PostPosted: 23 Jun 2008 05:50 
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Quote:



Zia son has broken spine

Khaleda Zia
Dhaka, June 22 (PTI): Tarique Rahman, the detained elder son of Bangladesh’s former Prime Minister Khaleda Zia, needs treatment abroad as his spinal cord is “broken”, doctors treating him said today.

“Rahman’s condition has deteriorated as his broken spinal cord was causing acute pain in his waist and neck,” Rahman’s physician Yunus of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, where he is being treated under custody, was quoted as saying by Channel i.

Rahman, in his 40s, is considered Zia’s heir apparent and was arrested in march last year under the military-backed government’ massive anti-graft drive. He is being tried for several corruption and criminal cases.

Yunus’s statement came a week after Zia, who is also under detention since September along with her younger son Arafat Rahman Koko, blamed the interim government in Emergency-ruled Bangladesh of worsening the health conditions of her two sons.

“When they (her sons) were arrested, they were in good health, they walked down to courts. Now they can’t and the government is responsible for this,” the Bangladesh Nationalist Party leader told reporters after she appeared before a special court.

The former premier demanded immediate release of her two sons and their treatment abroad.

Rahman’s lawyer Rafiqul Islam Miah had also alleged that his client was “badly tortured” during interrogations and faced the risk of being crippled permanently.

Senior government officials had said processes were underway for the release of Zia and her sons for necessary treatment if required abroad “on humanitarian grounds



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PostPosted: 23 Jun 2008 10:20 
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Paul wrote:
“When they (her sons) were arrested, they were in good health, they walked down to courts. Now they can’t and the government is responsible for this,” the Bangladesh Nationalist Party leader told reporters after she appeared before a special court.

bangladesh well on it's way to become a carbon copy of pakistan.


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PostPosted: 24 Jun 2008 00:47 
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Quote:
‘We never recognised Indian sacrifices, history will not pardon us’

Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen was forced to leave her country after she criticised the establishment there.
Another author from Bangladesh, Salam Azad, invited the wrath of the Bangladesh government for similar reasons. Consequently, he has been living in exile in Delhi for the last four years.

Azad, whose book ‘Role of Indian People in Liberation War of Bangladesh’ was published in January this year in Delhi, points out that Indian sacrifices in the Bangladesh War of Liberation were never recognised by his country.

The Indian government spent Rs 7,000 crore during the war. While 3,630 Indian Army personnel lost their lives in the war against Pakistan, 9856 soldiers were injured and nearly 210 are still missing.

His book dwelt at length on the roles of states like West Bengal, Tripura, Assam and Meghalaya, where most of the Bangladeshi refugees took shelter. He also pointed at the role of the Indian political parties in securing the release of the legendary Bangladeshi leader, Shaikh Mujibur Rahman.

“The people of West Bengal made sacrifices during the war, when lakhs of Bangladeshies took refuge in India. No memorial was erected anywhere in Bangladesh in the memory of the Indian martyrs. History would not pardon us for this,” Azad told The Indian Express.

“Two things that can unite the two sides of Bengal are Rabindranath Tagore and the Bangladesh War of Independence. They are acceptable to both East and West Bengal,” said Azad.

The author has to his credit 46 books including novels, fiction, anthology of short stories and essays.

He is presently writing a novel on the language riots at Silchar in Assam on May 19, 1961 in which 11 people had died in the police firing.

“Very few people are aware of the event. My novel, Unishe May (May 19), will be published in Bengali, Hindi and English,” said Azad, who calls himself a warrior for the cause of Bengali language and Bengali brotherhood.


http://www.expressindia.com/latest-news/We-never-recognised-Indian-sacrifices-history-will-not-pardon-us/326387/


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PostPosted: 13 Jul 2008 17:54 
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'I'm just here for survival'

Daulatdia, in Bangladesh, is one of the largest brothels in the world - a village of 1,600 women who sell sex to 3,000 men every day. As Claudia Hammond found, it is a punishing place that few will ever leave.

Claudia Hammond
The Guardian, Wednesday January 9, 2008

Arriving at the port of Goalundo Ghat, you would never guess that it houses a brothel visited by 3,000 men every day. It is a dusty town filled with long queues of trucks, shops with corrugated iron roofs lining the main street either side of an old railway line, and men, boys and the occasional goat strolling around. Walk just a few paces down a tiny sidestreet, though, and you come to another world entirely: Daulatdia, the biggest brothel in Bangladesh. A settlement big enough to count as a village in its own right, this mass of alleyways is where 1,600 women and girls live and sell sex.

The brothel opened 20 years ago, making it the newest and largest of the 14 recognised brothels in the country. It is set on the meeting point of two vast rivers, the Jamuna and the Ganges (known locally as the Padma), which makes this a very busy place to catch a ferry. Trucks carrying rice, jute, sugar cane and fish from the west and south-west of the country queue here for two or three days at a time to cross the river for the drive to the capital, Dhaka. In Bangladesh on a BBC World Service boat to look at the impact of climate change, I was surprised to find that an unexpected consequence of rising water levels is the growth in demand for prostitution. River erosion has meant the closure of some ferry berths, so men wait even longer to cross the river. And, while they wait, many of them pass the time in the company of Daulatdia's women.

The brothel feels like a vast street market. There are lines of fruit and vegetable stalls, tea stands and even a TV repairer. The only immediately visible difference between this and all the other small towns I've visited in Bangladesh is the presence of so many women in public. These alleyways hold 2,300 single-storey rooms with corrugated iron ceilings and cloth walls. Late morning is the peak time for business, and there is a long taxi rank of cycle rickshaws waiting to take the men back to the quayside when they have finished.

Bangladesh isn't the only country with entire villages devoted to prostitution. In Cambodia there's the notorious Svay Pak, and there are Indonesian villages that house 600 prostituted women at a time. The extraordinary thing about Daulatdia is its size and its unexpectedly open atmosphere. Turning down an alleyway, I am directed past a piece of fabric draped across a doorway and find myself in the middle of someone's room. A post-coital client is enjoying a cigarette, and hurriedly ties a sarong around his waist, scuttles off the bed and away. There's a TV, a DVD player, a fan and a glass cabinet containing clothes. This is one of the better rooms. The woman who rents it can afford to employ a cook - a retired prostitute who is crouching outside in the narrow alleyway, preparing a chilli omelette.

In the next cubicle I meet Parveen, who is happy to show me around. Her double bed is covered with a bright sunflower-patterned throw and she has cut hundreds of tiny holes in the dark red fabric that hangs as a wall behind her bed, giving the impression of fairy lights. She says it's not hard to find clients. "It's OK because I groom myself well. I spend two hours getting ready and then I wait outside. If I want to earn 100 taka [75p] I have to spend at least 40 taka on my face and clothes." One hundred taka buys two big bottles of Coke. Parveen is in her 20s, so her fee is lower than for some; the underage girls can earn as much as 10 times this amount.

As an independent prostitute, Parveen can keep any remaining money once she has paid the high electricity charges, her rent and the cost of childcare in a local village. "I left my two children outside the brothel because I don't want them to grow up in this environment." Yet more than 300 children do live inside the brothel with their mothers, kept under the bed or outside with the cook when a client arrives. The women I meet tell me that whenever they're pregnant, they hope for daughters who can join them working in the brothel as soon as they are old enough.

The bonded prostitutes, known as chukri, have the least freedom. Their average age on entering the brothel is 14; they have usually been kidnapped by gangs, sold by stepmothers, or lured here by boyfriends with promises of good jobs. I meet a bonded woman who is dressed in a pretty red sari. She tells me that she must see three or four clients each day and then another during the night. "I've been here 10 years after I was trafficked and someone sold me. I'm from Chittagong, a port far away from here." She pauses and then says: "I'm really not happy." After a fixed period of time, bonded women can buy their freedom. She hopes to do so within the next year or two. No longer a slave, she would in theory be free to leave. But despite the fact that she was kidnapped, her family won't have her back because of the shame associated with her job, so the most likely outcome is that she will stay here and become an independent prostitute.

In the brothel hierarchy, those who are bonded have the least freedom, but even those who chose to come here tell me that they felt they had no alternative. In research at this brothel in 2005, the humanitarian organisation Terre des Hommes found the main reasons for entering the brothel to be poverty, deception, abuse and coercion. Parveen arrived 10 years ago to escape from a husband so abusive that it was worth the risk of meeting violent clients here, she says. "I was married, but my husband violated me so often that in the end I couldn't bear it any more, so I came here."

Despite Muslim strictures on sex outside marriage, there are 100,000 women selling sex in Bangladesh. And clients are surprisingly open about the fact that they visit them: my BBC baseball hat and large microphone didn't deter them from speaking to me. "I'm a businessman," says one, "so I stay in the port overnight and then leave next day. I always visit the same sex worker." Is he married? He nods. And does his wife know he comes here? He laughs, "Oh, no, she doesn't know."

Landlords and madams profit from the women selling sex, but so do others. The grocery shops, tailors and fruit stalls all overcharge for goods sold inside the brothel. Affording the basics is so difficult that hope of winning the star prize of a plastic cup or a bar of soap attracts plenty of women to the safe sex workshops held in the afternoon. They sit on mats in a leafy courtyard, immaculately dressed in red, orange and yellow saris, while a plastic phallus is passed around for condom-unrolling practice. The safe sex workshops are run by the Bangladesh Women's Health Coalition (BHWC), with funding from the World Bank and the Department for International Development. The women sleep with an average of 19 clients a week, and 60% say their last client didn't use a condom. Despite this, the official HIV rate among sex workers is low - just 1%.

A group of prostituted women have been specially trained to teach the others about safe sex. Mrs Pankee, who is running today's class, holds up an unforgettable, laminated photograph of ulcerated penises covered in suppurating sores, warning the women to avoid touching them. The women are assertive and seem to know plenty about safe sex, telling me they throw men out if they refuse to use a condom. The bonded prostitutes are most at risk because their madams often agree to let men pay more for not using a condom. Ever determined to find a way to get the message across, the BHWC has introduced the Best Madam award for the madam who knows the most about safe sex.

But there is one group of clients that doesn't traditionally use condoms. These are the women's long-term lovers - known as babus - who often run shops within the brothel. The women tell me, "We've known the lovers a long time, so we don't mind not using condoms with them. We love them, so we trust them." But with many of the babus having wives back at home, the fear is that they might act as a bridge population spreading disease into or out of the brothel. A group of babus cheerfully tell me that they enjoy the men's safe-sex classes so much that they come every afternoon. Each of the eight men insists that they always use a condom. As we turn to leave the courtyard, though, BWHC's deputy executive director, Julia Ahmed, says: "They are lying to you. I really don't think it is the whole truth."

The far end of the main alleyway gives way to a green field where a few goats are grazing. For the first time I can see the sky and hear the birds singing. This is where some of the women will end up. In 2000, the high court in Bangladesh declared that prostitution is not illegal, but there's no doubt that it remains taboo: women in prostitution here have no rights to burial in consecrated ground, so this peaceful field behind the brothel is their graveyard.

Not that anyone I meet intends to spend their whole life here. Each has a plan to leave, just not quite yet. "I know I have to go out at some time," says Parveen. "I'll stay here maybe one or two more years. I would prefer to leave the country, but I don't know what sort of job I could do." The women know that they will find it hard to start anew due to the way they are viewed by the rest of society; the same society from which 3,000 men come to visit them every day. To rid themselves of the shame they feel, the women often give some of their hard-earned cash to the beggars hanging around hopefully in the brothel's alleyways. One woman tells me she has been thinking about leaving for 10 years in order to build a small house for her and her two children. But Ahmed isn't optimistic about their life chances outside Daulatdia. "Sometimes they leave, but they always come back. They can't get work outside. They get habituated to this profession and this environment, and they find it cosier here."

Intrigued, I ask one woman whether there is anything good about living here. I'm hoping it's not all as bleak as is seems, that perhaps she will tell me there's a sense of camaraderie among the women and girls. Instead she looks at me with dull eyes and says: "What could be good about living here? I'm just here for survival. If I were outside, I'd have my husband and my family, but in here I have to receive different clients all the time. You want to know what life's like here? We don't have a life".


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PostPosted: 13 Jul 2008 17:56 
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Under pressure, Dhaka coughs up militants
7/13/2008 7:59:04 AM
Image
Military training camps spread in Bangladesh

Bangladesh has repeatedly denied any terror infrastructure on its soil. But there's a clear indication that terror organisations on the run in India are setting base in Bangladesh. For the first time ever Bangladesh has handed over such insurgents to India.

The Bangladesh police handed over three Indian insurgents over to India. Three among the four men handed over by Bangladesh belong to the banned National Democratic Front of Bodoland and had sneaked across the porous border to train there.

Their deportation corroborated TIMES NOW's chilling expose of how Bangladesh was fast becoming the training hub for Indian insurgent groups. The intelligence map that TIMES NOW acquired clearly showed the training camps of various banned militant outfits spread across Bangladesh.

Bangladesh has denied this fact time and again. But with India stepping up diplomatic pressure on Bangladesh, Dhaka had few options but to start the process of deporting insurgents.


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PostPosted: 13 Jul 2008 19:20 
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Some positive movement on Bangladeshi Military's part. This is not surprising since it is under tremendous
pressure from the UK to mend its fences with India. Interestingly, Bangladesh listens more to UK than US
due to a long economic-immigration-expat bond with the UK. UK is more scared about its huge BDeshi expats
who can be recruited by the AQ for more trouble. Anyway, the BD army, which currently has the UK's blessing,
has been given a free hand to deal with the two warring ladies, and take a tough stand against islamists. Since
the islamists under ISI's tuteledge are pampering the NE secessionists, hence the pressure to stop that too.

Read the most recent article on BD-India relation at the South Asia Analysis website. BD Army has been making
overtures and sending positive signals for the last one year to India.

================================================================================

B'desh hands over 4 Indian militants

13 Jul 2008, 0944 hrs IST,PTI, TOI

SHILLONG: Virtually endorsing India's contention on the presence of militants in its soil, Bangladesh on Saturday handed over four insurgents convicted by it to the Assam police in the presence of BSF officials at Dalu outpost in Meghalaya. ( Watch )
The Assam-based militants have been identified as M. Khorang alias Khorang Mushahary, M Daku alias Deba Mushahary, Parameshwar Chouhan and Sanjay Das, BSF sources said.
The first two were stated to be National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB) cadres and intelligence slueths are now looking into the connection between the other two and banned ULFA.
The four militants were among the list of 12 given by Bangladesh Rifles to BSF for handing over.
The list also includes the name of ULFA general secretary Anup Chetia but his handing over would take some time because of legal formalities in a Dhaka jail.
Chetia was arrested by Bangladesh authorities in 1997 on charges of illegally entering that country with forged document and possessing a satellite phone and foreign currencies.
India has been requesting for his hand-over after he completed a seven year-term and was released in 2005.
Bangladesh has denied the presence of Indian insurgent groups on their soil time and again. But with India stepping up diplomatic pressure on Bangladesh, Dhaka had few options but to start the process of deporting insurgents.


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 11:36 
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Two BDR men killed in BSF firing: Indian intrusion into territory condemned, one Indian smuggler captured; 2 Indian BSF killed, several BSF injured, 1 Indian arrested, BSF speedboat, wireless sets & ammo recovered, 28-man BSF platoon attacks a 4-man BDR team

Staff Reporter


Two jawans of Bangladesh Rifles (BDR) were shot dead by Indian Border Security Forces (BSF) 1.5 km inside Bangladesh territory in Shibganj upazila of Chapainawabganj Thursday midnight.

Patrol Commander Havildar Mohammad Abdul Hannan and Lance Nayek Krishna Pada Das were shot to death. Foreign Affairs Adviser Dr Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury in his instant reaction condemned the killing of BDR personnel saying such incidents are totally unacceptable.

Chief of Bangladesh Rifles Maj Gen Shakil Ahmed said Indian troops had fired without provocation near the border.

Local source said Indian BSF entered the Bangladesh territorial water Thursday midnight while chasing some smugglers by speedboats in the Padma River, perhaps without informing the BDR force. As a BDR patrol team challenged, the Indian BSF opened fire killing two Bangladeshi border guards on the spot. BDR retaliated forcing the Indian BSF to retreat.

The gunfight between the border guards of the two countries took place as the foreign secretaries of Bangladesh and India were holding meeting in New Delhi to resolve various bilateral issues including border demarcation and prevention of cross-border smuggling.

The two countries share a long and porous border, mostly not properly demarcated. Over the past decade they have regularly exchanged shelling and small arms fire over the frontier.

Source said that such incident has not seriously interfered with generally friendly relation between Delhi and Dhaka.

However, tensions increased in 2006 when India began fencing off the 4,000km border to keep out what it described as illegal immigrants and "cross-border insurgents."

The borders in the country's northern region were put on alert after the incident.

A flag meeting between BDR and BSF began at 2:10pm near Bangladesh border in Shibganj upazila over the incident. The meeting ended at about 5:30pm.

In the Flag meeting the BDR authority urged for joint investigation of the incident and the BSF said they would convey the BDR request to their higher authority.

At a hurriedly called press briefing at the BDR HQs yesterday afternoon, Col MA Halim, Director Operations & Training, said that Indian BSF's trespass and attack on BDR men could be termed as aggressive mentality towards Bangladesh.

"If someone does not abide by rules it could tantamount to aggressive mentality or disobedience to rules," he told a questioner.

Col Halim said there is no problem from the BDR personnel who always respect the border guidelines. He said the BSF should have restrained them in this unprovoked situation.

He said the incident shows that the Indian BSF members were either panicky or there might be a different motive behind it.

Narrating the Thursday night's shootout, Col Halim said the BSF troops of Indian Thakurbari BOP entered 1.5 kms of the Padma River inside the Bangladesh territory on a speedboat and an engine-boat at midnight.

A BDR patrol team of Raghunathpur BOP boarding a mechanized boat challenged the BSF team. Without giving their identity, BSF members sprayed bullets on BDR personnel causing instant death of Havildar Hannan Sarker, 53, of Kritunia village in Gabtali upazila of Bogra district, and Lance Nayek Krishna Pada Das, 45, of Kholabari village in Shalikha upazila of Magura district.

Other BDR members opened counter-fire forcing the speedboat carrying BSF personnel to retreat, but the engine-boat of BSF was seized. BDR men captured an Indian national Anjam Hossain suspected to be a cattle smuggler and recovered two walkie-talkies and uniforms from the boat.

Col Halim said they have received reports from local sources that one BSF man being hit by bullets jumped into the Padma River and died.

Our correspondent said that the two BDR personnel of the team escaped unhurt during the fire and returned to the shore with the bodies of their two colleagues.

The postmortem of the bodies were done at Chapainawabganj Sadar Hospital.

After the incident, BSF and BDR traded bullets for about half an hour, but no injury was reported.

BDR Rajshahi Sector Commander Col. Iqbal rushed to the spot yesterday morning.

A tense situation was prevailing on the border areas following the incident of firing.

Meanwhile, a press release issued by the Indian High Commission in Dhaka last night while expressing concern at the inaccurate reports in some sections of the media said on the basis of a specific input on the cattle smuggling along river Padma on the night of the July 17 to 18 the 108 Battalion of BSF noted movement of cattle and their smugglers in the area of Border Outpost Nimitita (Malda sector of West Bengal). The BSF river wings pursued the cattle smugglers who were traveling in boats in Indian territory.(!) These smugglers fired at BSF upon which BSF retaliated.(!) During the exchange of fire, one BSF constable sustained serious injuries.

Image
The bodies of BDR personnel Hannan and Krishapada
who were killed in BSF firing being taken to Chapainawabganj
outpost. Focus Bangla


Image
Colonel Abdul Halim briefing the press at the BDR
Headquarter in the city yesterday. Colonel Abdul Halim
briefing the press at the BDR Headquarter in the city
yesterday.



(http://nation.ittefaq.com/issues/2008/0 ... ws0996.htm)


Last edited by Rahul M on 19 Jul 2008 12:35, edited 1 time in total.
Do not use large fonts.


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 12:32 
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1) Whatever the excuse provided by BSF, intrusion into Bangladesh territory is an open violation of international law, showing India's total disrespect for it and New Delhi's hegemonistic demeanor.

2) The 4-men team of BDR rushed into the spot to identify the speedboat and the criminals in it. If their intention was of fighting at the first place, they would have been there with a whole bunch of troops (i.e. at least a platoon).

3) BSF had always involved themselves in rampant cross-border smuggling, aiding Indian smugglers with firepower and this has been repeatedly reported in the past without any proper subsequent action taken by the Indian government. The issue has also been raised at several flag meetings. Smuggling of Indian goods into Bangladeshi territory frees Indian smugglers of Bangladesh government taxes, increasing the profit, a part of which passes into BSF pockets. Continual smuggling is damaging to BD economy and immediate reinforcement of BDR personnel is necessary and imminent.

4) This is not the first time BSF has intruded Bangladeshi territory, but is reminiscent of the 2001 incident when BSF aided by Indian Army (violation of border law), at a total number of 300, entered deep into Bangladeshi territory.

5) In the meantime, certain Indian media are busy fabricating stories of the incident in favour of the violators. This is evident by the fact that every Indian website has a different story to tell, some with major variations and some claiming 4 BDR men fired first at 28-strong BSF troops - a totally unrealistic and illogical claim, and some also going to the length of claiming that BDR was involved in smuggling; the Indian government has avoided commenting on BDR deaths altogether.

6) For every single drop of Bengali blood, there will be buckets of enemy blood. We bengalis have provided the utmost resistance since the late 1700s to the much powerful British colonial army, in sharp contrast to the North Inidans edited. We Bengalis went into war, with certain death in our minds, against the 1971 Pakistan Army, one of the largest in the world and more sophisticated than Indian army at the time. Now what makes the edited government of New Delhi think we Bengalis would keep it down this time? Nukes in the hands of a terrorist army? There are nukes above and beside you - so go ahead. We Bengalis may not win the direct War, but we'll sustain long enough to bleed the Delhi Sultanate. Destroy all our infrastructure if you dare, and 140 million Bengalis would spread to every corner of India and set it on flames.

7) This illegal aggression is an unofficial declaration of war.


Last edited by Rahul M on 19 Jul 2008 12:53, edited 1 time in total.
edited the offensive words. plz notify if there are others. user warned.


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 12:34 
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2 BDR men shot dead while helping Bangladeshi cattle smugglers
http://www.thestatesman.net/page.news.p ... &id=214448

Statesman News Service

KOLKATA, July 18:

Two men belonging to Bangladesh Rifles (BDR) were shot dead by a constable of the Border Security Force (BSF) near the Nimtita border outpost in Murshidabad last night while they were escorting a group of cattle smugglers to Bangladesh. “The BSF constable, belonging to the Nimtita border outpost, who fired the shots, had no idea that the cattle smugglers were being escorted by BDR jawans,” Mr CV Murlidhar, inspector-general, BSF, South Bengal Frontier, said.

According to reports, the BSF constable, Mr RK Pandey, was patrolling the riverine border in a boat when he noticed a group of people taking some cattle towards Bangladesh. The cattle smugglers fired at Mr Pandey when he had asked them to surrender.

After sustaining bullet injuries in his left leg, Mr Pandey retaliated with counter firing. The shootout lasted for three minutes. Mr Pandey had fired 19 rounds at the cattle smugglers. After Mr Pandey's boat was surrounded by the cattle smugglers, he jumped into the river and managed to escape. Four people who were on the boat had also plunged into river to save their lives.

The smugglers later took the boat to Bangladesh, Mr Murlidhar said.

“Early today, BDR officers had contacted their counterpart in the BSF at New Delhi and said that two BDR jawans were killed in the firing. Mr Pandey had fired at cattle smugglers and he had no idea that they were being escorted to Bangladesh by BDR jawans. A flag meeting was held at Sovapur tent post today to defuse tension along the riverine border,” Mr Murlidhar said. Mr Pandey was admitted to a hospital in Malda with two bullets in his leg.

He said, the relation between the border forces of two countries has improved in recent times and the BSF will try to ensure that such misunderstanding doesn't occur in future.

Mr Murlidhar added that the BSF's south Bengal frontier has seized 1,602 cattle from various places along the border this month. BSF officers said that cattle smuggling has come down this year owing to better surveillance.


Last edited by Avinash R on 19 Jul 2008 12:52, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 12:40 
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guys, please edit your posts to return to normal size fonts.

No need to shout.


shakilanam, both sides view these incidents differently. on this side, we are as convinced of bd's guilt as you are of ours.

even so, this is an Indian site and if you can't discuss in a civil manner and indulge in name calling (e.g criminal Indian govt) you will have to go.

edit your posts or pay for it.


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 12:53 
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Rahul M wrote:
guys, please edit your posts to return to normal size fonts.

No need to shout.


shakilanam, both sides view these incidents differently. on this side, we are as convinced of bd's guilt as you are of ours.

even so, this is an Indian site and if you can't discuss in a civil manner and indulge in name calling (e.g criminal Indian govt) you will have to go.

edit your posts or pay for it.


Dear Rahul M,

Large font doesn't necessarily mean shouting, but it's meant to call attention to that piece of text. If it is against the forum rules, I would really apologise for that. I've noticed that you did edit my post to change the font size but Avinash remains immune.

"Criminal" is not a swear word, nor an inappropriate slang. It's an opinion and/or a fact. And it's nothing compared to the uncivilized behaviour and utterly distasteful words thrown at me by some of the forum members here since the beginning. You might disagree with me my viewpoint, but it's just that - our viewpoint, being the victims. Since this is an Indian forum, it may be removed if you insist.


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 15:09 
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Dear Victim,

I apologise on behalf of the forum members (myself included)who threw distasteful words at you ,yes we must discuss in a civil manner, hold meaningful debate and respect each others viewpoints. However, for that to happen, you must shed this victim complex and face up to the reality that Bangladesh is going down either due to the Jeehardis and their silent supporters or through climate change.

If you continue to hold on the false sense of superior Bangladeshi culture and other such tripe then you will continue to be ridiculed here, nobody will take you seriously and, as you would have noticed, we are not averse to thrashing a troll before booting him out.

And, semi-pakiness seeps out of the news article you posted , 28 BSF men attacked a 4 man BDR team and yet killed only 2 , seems like you Bangladeshis consider yourselves a wee bit inferior to the blue blooded Pakis, surely you can come up with something better than the 1:7 ratio.

Finally, what was the lone captured Indian smuggling? must be the same strong stuff that your star reporter was having before coming up with that piece
:rotfl: Thanks for the fine start to the morning,perhaps I should visit Bangladeshi portals for my early morning laughs

Have a nice day


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 16:12 
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Quote:
We bengalis have provided the utmost resistance since the late 1700s to the much powerful British colonial army, in sharp contrast to the North Inidans


How much resistance did you Bengali Muslims provide to Islamic barbarians that descended upon your land from Afghanistan? Most North Indians are still Hindus. We succumbed neither to the Muslims nor to the British. They may have ruled us but finally they were sent packing home, and we managed to protect our religion and culture. We are still the oldest living civilisation in the world.

What about you? You are the defeated Hindus and Buddhists who succumbed and abandoned everything that arose from your land. You instead chose to sing songs about the glory of the Arab race, adopt their names, speak their language and worship their God. What happened to your famed resistance?


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 17:05 
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I'm unsure what is more hilarious - our Bangla friend's generalizations about Bengalis being this and that while forgetting that a good number of Indians are Bengalis too. Or Sanjay's ridiculous jeremiad asking for this chap to take ownership of things that occured at a time none of us were around. :rotfl:


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 17:08 
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ShakilAnam wrote:
Dear Rahul M,

Large font doesn't necessarily mean shouting, but it's meant to call attention to that piece of text. If it is against the forum rules, I would really apologise for that. I've noticed that you did edit my post to change the font size but Avinash remains immune.

internet culture code says large fonts/all caps => shouting.
I didn't have to ask avinash specifically because I trust him enough to know that he will edit his post himself, as he eventually did.

ShakilAnam wrote:
"Criminal" is not a swear word, nor an inappropriate slang. It's an opinion and/or a fact. And it's nothing compared to the uncivilized behaviour and utterly distasteful words thrown at me by some of the forum members here since the beginning. You might disagree with me my viewpoint, but it's just that - our viewpoint, being the victims. Since this is an Indian forum, it may be removed if you insist.

well, you can of course think that you are the victims. reality may point in the opposite direction.

anyway, just answer the following questions :
Quote:
1) Whatever the excuse provided by BSF, intrusion into Bangladesh territory is an open violation of international law, showing India's total disrespect for it and New Delhi's hegemonistic demeanor.

If we were hegemonistic, 71 would have been the perfect time to put that into practice. since then, BD has given India enough excuses to resort to force to resolve the problems. BD keeps supporting separatist movements against India, nurtures the islamic terrorist camps and keeps pushing thousands of BD refugees into India, so much so that the demography has been reversed in some WB and Assam districts bordering BD.
I haven't even mentioned the BD attacks on Indian border check posts with small arms and mortars during late 90s.
In the face of all this, India has shown remarkable restraint.
and we are still hegemonistic ?? :D
Shakil, don't blindly believe everything your govt tells you, lots of the things they say are to divert the common people's attention from poor governance. otherwise your people will suffer
from the same ills that come from such delusional thoughts. look at pakistan for understanding this point.
Quote:
2) The 4-men team of BDR rushed into the spot to identify the speedboat and the criminals in it. If their intention was of fighting at the first place, they would have been there with a whole bunch of troops (i.e. at least a platoon).

how can you be sure this version is correct ? :wink:
Quote:
3) BSF had always involved themselves in rampant cross-border smuggling, aiding Indian smugglers with firepower and this has been repeatedly reported in the past without any proper subsequent action taken by the Indian government.

India accuses BDR of the same. again how do you know your version is true ?
Quote:
The issue has also been raised at several flag meetings.

so has BSF.
Quote:
Smuggling of Indian goods into Bangladeshi territory frees Indian smugglers of Bangladesh government taxes, increasing the profit, a part of which passes into BSF pockets. Continual smuggling is damaging to BD economy and immediate reinforcement of BDR personnel is necessary and imminent.

smuggling, (if it happens) also denies the GoI of export duties. how can smuggling be in India's advantage ? smuggling of consumer goods is necessary in many cases for BD.
e.g during India's ban on export of food grains, it was smuggling that kept food prices in BD within reach of the common people.
do you actually know what happens at the borders ? both BSF and BDR have their share of corrupt people and both get a cut of the profit during smuggling. In many cases prices of necessary food items in India increase to astronomical levels (in border districts) due to smuggling into BD.
visit the benapole land port when you visit BD next time, and spend a night there, you'll get the real picture. the situation is not as simple as it looks from in front of a PC screen in the US.
Quote:
6) For every single drop of Bengali blood, there will be buckets of enemy blood.

ya sure ! but you are bangladeshi aren't you ? don't your BMF cousins jump on people who refer to BDs as bengalis ? :wink:
Quote:
We bengalis have provided the utmost resistance since the late 1700s to the much powerful British colonial army, in sharp contrast to the North Inidans edited.

who are these we bengalis ? I'm sure you mean bangladeshi muslims. unfortunately history hasn't found any such person who was important enough to be recorded. look at the freedom struggle of 1947 and show me one BD muslim freedom fighter.
Freedom fighters and leaders from north India are many and I won't disrespect them by mentioning their name in response to a petty and misinformed comment like yours.
Quote:
We Bengalis went into war, with certain death in our minds, against the 1971 Pakistan Army, one of the largest in the world and more sophisticated than Indian army at the time. Now what makes the edited government of New Delhi think we Bengalis would keep it down this time? Nukes in the hands of a terrorist army? There are nukes above and beside you - so go ahead.

look, we have NO intention to attack BD and nor will we. keep to your part of the land and we get to stay in mutual peace. try and poke in our affairs, we'll see what happens to your nation.
Quote:
We Bengalis may not win the direct War, but we'll sustain long enough to bleed the Delhi Sultanate. Destroy all our infrastructure if you dare, and 140 million Bengalis would spread to every corner of India and set it on flames.

we are resigned to the fact that we got two basket cases for neighbours, one of which is ungrateful and treachourous to boot. but meddle in our affairs and you get a bloody nose you won't forget in a hurry.
hint : pak tried in 71, look what happened to them !


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 17:14 
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Quote:
We Bengalis may not win the direct War, but we'll sustain long enough to bleed the Delhi Sultanate. Destroy all our infrastructure if you dare, and 140 million Bengalis would spread to every corner of India and set it on flames.


Actually, Adminji Rahul M, is this kind of language halal on Pee Aref? What is it if it isn't a flame bait? that too coming from someone who claims to be educated and a university student in Singabangladesh. This is after all and Indian site so we are not obliged to put up with such rubbish even for the sake of argument. Rest is left to your judgement.


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 17:21 
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thanks for highlighting that vaman saab, I have already asked posters to notify any additional parts that needed moderation. But I will let it stay this time, just to show the intellectual standard of these NRBs !! and these are supposed to be the educated ones !! :shock:

anyway, I've already warned him once.
regards.


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 20:11 
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vaman wrote:
Quote:
We Bengalis may not win the direct War, but we'll sustain long enough to bleed the Delhi Sultanate. Destroy all our infrastructure if you dare, and 140 million Bengalis would spread to every corner of India and set it on flames.


Actually, Adminji Rahul M, is this kind of language halal on Pee Aref? What is it if it isn't a flame bait? that too coming from someone who claims to be educated and a university student in Singabangladesh. This is after all and Indian site so we are not obliged to put up with such rubbish even for the sake of argument. Rest is left to your judgement.

Vaman,

Let him speak. He has actually splilled the beans. Demography as a decisive weapon is perhaps a policy, BD's will never admit. It is in these weaker moments when H&D is at stake in a shouting match, things are said.

Rahul,

1700 AD is good starting point. Did I hear Mir Jaffer? :D


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 20:14 
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ShakilAnam,

Large fonts and ALL CAPS are equivalent to Shouting. So please refrain from posting them. If members want to read it in large font, they will increase font size in their browser.

Also as Rahul has noted - The word Criminal appended in front of anything 'Indian' is a flame bait.

We are all open to listening to the Bangladeshi point of view, but it should be presented in a civil and a non-provoking manner. If you think you cannot do that, your posts will keep getting edited, you will keep getting warnings till the software / warn limit evicts you automatically.

Ofcourse you can get there by a short cut by giving unprovoked or disguised threats as well .

The gist of it is - the length of participation in this board and How to do it positively and contribute to the discussions is completely in your hands.

-Jagan


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PostPosted: 19 Jul 2008 20:15 
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SRoy wrote:
Rahul,

1700 AD is good starting point. Did I hear Mir Jaffer? :D

ouch !! :twisted:
dunno how I missed that one !


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PostPosted: 20 Jul 2008 00:39 
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deleted and warned.

Jagan, I think both of us edited this post at the same time.
I've already banned this user. This is probably the third or fourth time he is posting like this.
Rahul.


Last edited by Rahul M on 20 Jul 2008 01:12, edited 3 times in total.
deleted and warned - A similar post like this and it will be the end of the road


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PostPosted: 21 Jul 2008 16:37 
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Beggar in India is a millionaire in Bangladesh


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PostPosted: 21 Jul 2008 17:47 
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I urge members from other parts of India to remember that the bangladeshis DO NOT have ownership of the Bengali identity. they only have a part of it, we don't need to debate the history of how they got to where they've got to, except to acknowldge, that like their erstwhile cousins, they have been sufficiently brainwashed into their new way of being. Indian Bengalis - whether Hindu or Muslim are exactly that - INDIAN


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PostPosted: 21 Jul 2008 19:46 
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lalmohan ji, don't worry, I usually keep an eye open for this thread.
and BRFites are quite knowledgeable of the difference, IMO.


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PostPosted: 22 Jul 2008 00:07 
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If i understand correcetly Bangle-desh is challenging the fathers of its independence existence?
Sumit Mian must answer how his ancestors resisted the barbaric Islamist onslaught on their womenfolks.


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PostPosted: 22 Jul 2008 00:25 
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prem, sumit mia is not around to answer your questions. he has received the regulation 72 ...!


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PostPosted: 22 Jul 2008 02:09 
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ShakilAnam wrote:
1) Whatever the excuse provided by BSF, intrusion into Bangladesh territory is an open violation of international law, showing India's total disrespect for it and New Delhi's hegemonistic demeanor.

2) The 4-men team of BDR rushed into the spot to identify the speedboat and the criminals in it. If their intention was of fighting at the first place, they would have been there with a whole bunch of troops (i.e. at least a platoon).

3) BSF had always involved themselves in rampant cross-border smuggling, aiding Indian smugglers with firepower and this has been repeatedly reported in the past without any proper subsequent action taken by the Indian government. The issue has also been raised at several flag meetings. Smuggling of Indian goods into Bangladeshi territory frees Indian smugglers of Bangladesh government taxes, increasing the profit, a part of which passes into BSF pockets. Continual smuggling is damaging to BD economy and immediate reinforcement of BDR personnel is necessary and imminent.

4) This is not the first time BSF has intruded Bangladeshi territory, but is reminiscent of the 2001 incident when BSF aided by Indian Army (violation of border law), at a total number of 300, entered deep into Bangladeshi territory.

5) In the meantime, certain Indian media are busy fabricating stories of the incident in favour of the violators. This is evident by the fact that every Indian website has a different story to tell, some with major variations and some claiming 4 BDR men fired first at 28-strong BSF troops - a totally unrealistic and illogical claim, and some also going to the length of claiming that BDR was involved in smuggling; the Indian government has avoided commenting on BDR deaths altogether.

6) For every single drop of Bengali blood, there will be buckets of enemy blood. We bengalis have provided the utmost resistance since the late 1700s to the much powerful British colonial army, in sharp contrast to the North Inidans edited. We Bengalis went into war, with certain death in our minds, against the 1971 Pakistan Army, one of the largest in the world and more sophisticated than Indian army at the time. Now what makes the edited government of New Delhi think we Bengalis would keep it down this time? Nukes in the hands of a terrorist army? There are nukes above and beside you - so go ahead. We Bengalis may not win the direct War, but we'll sustain long enough to bleed the Delhi Sultanate. Destroy all our infrastructure if you dare, and 140 million Bengalis would spread to every corner of India and set it on flames.

7) This illegal aggression is an unofficial declaration of war.


What makes you think that 1.1 billion Indians, including million strong army would give you a safe passage? Why would they let you use their trains, buses and personal vehicles, of course free of cost, to get to every corner of India and set it ablaze? Don't you think it is more likely that 1.1 billion Indians will shred your man in pieces, rape your women before burning them alive and put your children for adoption by citizens of wealth Christian nations if you try to burn their families, home, cities, villages and homes?


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PostPosted: 22 Jul 2008 02:20 
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katare, no need to respond in the same tongue.
hate to see a respected BRFite posting about Indians raping and what not, even under provocation.

may I remind you of a cardinal law of the internet ?

Never wrestle with a pig, you get dirty - and the pig likes it.


OTOH, bd launching a frontal attack on us won't be such a bad thing. would give us a chance to tie up many loose ends ! :twisted:


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