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PostPosted: 28 Mar 2015 08:42 
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Why a Mongolia thread?

In honor of Ulan Batori?

PS: seriously, it is part of Look East.


Last edited by A_Gupta on 28 Mar 2015 09:16, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 28 Mar 2015 08:43 
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http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-new ... 31355.aspx

Quote:
Modi will undertake a three-nation tour of China, Mongolia and South Korea from May 14 to 19.
...
...
Mongolia and India are keen to move forward on the MoU for Uranium supply that the two countries had entered in 2009. Mongolia is keen on Indian helping the country in cyber security. Help in border patrolling is another area where the two countries will be stepping up the ties.


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PostPosted: 28 Mar 2015 08:48 
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A couple of months old:
http://articles.economictimes.indiatime ... nvironment

Quote:
GWALIOR: The Indian and Mongolian armies today began a 15-day joint training exercise here with an aim to enhance interoperability between the security forces of the two nations during UN peacekeeping missions.

The tenth India-Mongolia Joint Training Exercise is focussed on allowing both armies to acquaint with each other's operating procedures in the backdrop of a counter insurgency and terrorism environment, an official statement said.


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PostPosted: 28 Mar 2015 09:04 
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India-Mongolia relations per Wiki:

Quote:
The relations between India and Mongolia are still at a nascent stage and Indo-Mongolian cooperation is limited to diplomatic visits, provision of soft loans and financial aid and the collaborations in the IT sector.

India established diplomatic relations in December 1955. India was the first country outside the Soviet block to establish diplomatic relations with Mongolia. Since then, there have been treaties of mutual friendship and cooperation between the two countries in 1973, 1994, 2001 and 2004.

Mongolia supports India's candidature as a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council while India supported the inclusion of Mongolia as a full member of the Non-Aligned Movement.


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PostPosted: 28 Mar 2015 09:06 
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Mongolians in India, per Wiki:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolians_in_India

Excerpts:

Quote:
Ties between Mongolia and India were expanded by the efforts of the 19th Kushok Bakula Rinpoche. He was originally from Ladakh in India, but went to Lhasa to study at Drepung Monastery in the 1930s. He was instrumental in reviving Buddhism in Mongolia, arranging the Dalai Lama's visit to Mongolia in 1979, which resulted in an agreement for monks from Mongolia to come to India to study Buddhism. During his service as India's ambassador to Mongolia he encouraged more Mongolian monks to come to India and study at the Institute of Buddhist Dialectics in Dharamsala, in Karnataka at the Drepung Gomang in Mundgod or the Sera Monastery in Bylakuppe, and in other places. Due to his efforts the number of scholarships for Mongolians to study in India expanded from just a few to over one hundred.

In January 2004, India and Mongolia also signed an agreement to construct a Mongolian-run Buddhist monastery in Bodh Gaya, Bihar, where according to Buddhist tradition Gautama Buddha attained enlightenment. The Bihar government gave a free grant of land on which to build the monastery; then-Prime Minister of Mongolia Nambaryn Enkhbayar personally laid the foundation stone. Construction was delayed due to a dispute with the local government, but was expected to finish by mid-2010.

Penor Rinpoche's Kunzang Palyul Choling, in partnership with the Khamariin Khiid in Sainshand Sum, Dornogovi Province, Mongolia, began sponsoring Mongolians to study Buddhism in India at the Namdroling Monastery in Bylakuppe in 2005. Two came the first year. In 2006, American Buddhist author B. Alan Wallace sponsored eight more young men to join them. A group of nine Mongolian women entered the neighbouring Tsogyal Shedrup Dargyeling nunnery in 2008.

As of 2009 the office of the president of Mongolia estimated that more than 500 Mongolian citizens were living in India. About 300 of them were students in Indian universities and colleges, a third in Delhi alone. About 20 Mongolian students were taking EFL courses at the International School of English Language in Solan, Himachal Pradesh as of 2009, and another 20 at the English and Foreign Languages University in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh. In Pune that same year, there were 10 or so Mongolian information technology trainees and students. More than 230 Mongolian student-monks were living in Mundgod as of 2011. In 2012 the Indian government announced that it would give 50 scholarships to Mongolian students to study in India.


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PostPosted: 28 Mar 2015 09:10 
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Website of Indian Embassy in Ulaan Baatar:
http://www.eoi.gov.in/ulaanbaatar/

Brief on India-Mongolia relations:
http://www.eoi.gov.in/ulaanbaatar/?1051?000

Mongolia in India: In addition to Mongolia's embassy in New Delhi, Mongolia has 4 other representations in India. These representations include consulates in Bangalore, Chennai, Kolkata, and Mumbai.

Embassy of Mongolia in India: http://www.delhi.mfa.gov.mn/


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PostPosted: 07 May 2015 16:09 
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http://zeenews.india.com/news/india/dem ... 91040.html

Quote:
New Delhi: Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Wednesday termed Mongolia as India`s `spiritual friend`, adding that shared values of democracy and Buddhism bind the two countries.

The Prime Minister took to twitter to share his views.

"Honoured to get the opportunity to address the Great Khural on 17th May. I reassure India`s continued support in all areas to Mongolia," he posted.

"Democracy and Buddhism bind India with Mongolia - our spiritual friend. Looking forward to more trade and investment ties with Mongolia," he added.

"Glad to visit Mongolia on 17th May to commemorate 60th year of our diplomatic relations and the silver jubilee of Mongolia`s democracy," he further wrote.

In addition, the Prime Minister also posted his message his Mongolian in the Cyrillic script.

Prime Minister Modi`s visit to Mongolia will be the second leg of his six-day, three nation tour, which also includes visits to China and South Korea.

India was the first country outside the Socialist bloc to establish diplomatic relations with Mongolia. India supported Mongolia in having UN and NAM memberships. The year 2015 marks the 60th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between New Delhi and Ulan Bator.
ANI


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PostPosted: 09 May 2015 06:56 
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Mongolian artist zanabazar form the 17th Century -- anyone else think these resemble Indian sculptures from that period a lot?

http://ubpost.mongolnews.mn/?p=14334

Image

Quote:
During the excavation and research of the Saridag monastery, approximately 1,300 artifacts connected to Zanabazar were found. Only 100 of these findings will be presented at the Zanabazar Museum of Fine Arts from April 27 to May 28.
The construction of Saridag monastery in Erdenet soum of Tuv Province started in 1654, by the request of
Zanabazar, and finished in 1680. Historians say that the monastery is related to the Khalkh Buddhist Center.
To develop Buddhism in Mongolia, Zanabazar established many monasteries in the country. Zanabazar was born in 1635, as the second son of Tusheet Khaan Gomdoborj, in Zuil soum of Uvurkhangai Province.

In 1639, at the age of five, Zanabazar was raised as the head of the Buddhist religion by Khalkh nobles, such as Tusheet Khaan Gombodorj, Setsei Khaan Sholoi, and 108 boys were appointed as his disciples. Zanabazar is from the same clan as Chinggis Khan, Altan Urag. He was an influential person of the state and religion in the 17th century.

Besides being an educated lama, he was an artist, painter, poet and a craftsman. His sculptures, such as, “21 White Tara” and “White, Green Tara” are popular as “Zanabazar design” not only in Mongolia but throughout the world.


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PostPosted: 09 May 2015 07:03 
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op-ed on Russia-mongolia-china economic activity.

Quote:
In the coming month, President of Russian Federation Vladimir Putin will visit the country on 75th Anniversary of joint Mongolian and Soviet Khalkhin Gol Battle against Japanese Empire. In conjunction, President of PRC Xi Jinping will pay high level official visit to the country. This could be a decisive and next level cooperation between the countries in the new changing economic and political environment. Also, it could be a stepping stone on country’s ambition on becoming integrated with newly establishing logistic route from Asia to Eurasia and Europe.

Bank of China, a first Chinese bank, opened its representative office in Mongolia last year, and this year, it would become eligible to open its official branch according to the country’s law. It already issued its multimillion dollar loan to local Tuushin Group earlier this year. Also, it would facilitate new investments in the country through project financing and short-term loans.
- See more at: http://www.business-mongolia.com/mongol ... vnBuj.dpuf


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PostPosted: 09 May 2015 07:06 
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Mongolian article on Turko-Russian tribes native to Mongolia.

Who Are The Tsaatan – Forest People?

http://www.mongoliatoday.com/?p=34

Quote:
Tsaatans are Turkic people from Tannu Tuva, a republic belonging to Russia and just across the border from Huvsgul province of Mongolia.

After WWII when Tuva was separated from Mongolia and joined to the former USSR, there were attempts to move Tsaatans back to Tuva by force. But Tsaatans braved high mountains, fast rivers and border posts to return back to their ancestors’ place in northern Huvsgul.

So, a small Turkic speaking tribe lives amidst the remote stretches of Northern Mongolia preserving their lifestyle, culture and traditions, ancient beliefs.

No one knows exactly how many of them are there. Tsaatans themselves estimate around 200 people with 400 raindeers.. The latest population census of 1979 recorded 480 people in Tsagaan Nuur area listed as Uighurs.
Tsaatan woman

Tsaatan woman

“My daughter is now 24 year old. I wonder whether she will make fire at her own family hearth… No man around. She can not ride in forests looking for a man to marry. Maybe she should just make a baby, who will support her later on,” sighs old Tsend. Three of them – an old mother, her daughter and 6-yer-old grandson from her elder son – live in Eastern Taiga area. All they have are five raindeers.

“No raindeers, no Tsaatans,” they say bitterly. They still wait for raindeers to be imported from Tuva as the government promised a decade ago. Recently the SOS-Taiga Foundation set up by David Vellatalla, an Italian ethnographer raises funds to continue the project. This is the only hope left for the Tsaatan people.


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PostPosted: 09 May 2015 18:10 
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Tuvaluan wrote:
Mongolian artist zanabazar form the 17th Century -- anyone else think these resemble Indian sculptures from that period a lot?

http://ubpost.mongolnews.mn/?p=14334

Image

Quote:
During the excavation and research of the Saridag monastery, approximately 1,300 artifacts connected to Zanabazar were found. Only 100 of these findings will be presented at the Zanabazar Museum of Fine Arts from April 27 to May 28.
The construction of Saridag monastery in Erdenet soum of Tuv Province started in 1654, by the request of
Zanabazar, and finished in 1680. Historians say that the monastery is related to the Khalkh Buddhist Center.
To develop Buddhism in Mongolia, Zanabazar established many monasteries in the country. Zanabazar was born in 1635, as the second son of Tusheet Khaan Gomdoborj, in Zuil soum of Uvurkhangai Province.

In 1639, at the age of five, Zanabazar was raised as the head of the Buddhist religion by Khalkh nobles, such as Tusheet Khaan Gombodorj, Setsei Khaan Sholoi, and 108 boys were appointed as his disciples. Zanabazar is from the same clan as Chinggis Khan, Altan Urag. He was an influential person of the state and religion in the 17th century.

Besides being an educated lama, he was an artist, painter, poet and a craftsman. His sculptures, such as, “21 White Tara” and “White, Green Tara” are popular as “Zanabazar design” not only in Mongolia but throughout the world.

Quote:
j~nAnavajra

j~nAnavajra (Mongolian: oender-gegen zanabazar), descendent of Chingiz Kha’Khan via Tusheet Khan and Kandjamts Khatun was undoubtedly one of the greatest figures in Central Asia after his illustrious ancestors. j~nAnavajra saw himself as the merger of two lineages of the tradition of the bauddha kaula tradition. The first of these is traced to the brahminical nAstika kaula tantric vAgIshvarakIrti from vikramashIla in the 800s of CE, who composed several stotra-s to tArA and founded the mR^ityu-hAraka tArA prayoga. From him the tradition eventually passed to the kShatriya tantric dIpA~Nkara-shrIj~nAna, who transmitted it to the upachIna-s of Tibet. He composed the famed ekavimshati tArA stotra, one of the sublime stotra-s to the devI. From his Tibetan successors it passed to the Mongol j~nAnavajra, who was aged 14 at the time of his dIkSha. His kula-dUti was dorjiinnal-jirmaa. j~nAnavajra also believed that he received a second transmission of the kaula doctrine innately because he felt he was a reincarnation of the Tibetan Lama tAranAtha, who himself traced his lineage from dIpA~Nkara-shrIj~nAna. tAranAtha had written the famous work on the origin of the tArA tantra-s. Beyond being one of the greatest of the Mongolian tantrics, j~nAnavajra’s role was profound in spreading Sanskrit scholarship in Mongolia, composing several new stotra-s in Sanskrit, contributions to Mongolian music, discursions on tantric texts and the invention of a new Mongolian script, Soyombo, to allow accurate accommodation of Sanskrit phonetics in the Mongolian context. j~nAnavajra also transmitted a peculiar tantric text termed the guhyAgnichakra that is now lost in India in its original. This text preserves material from the now lost ancient kaumAra tantra-s. He often visited the Burkhan Khaldun Mountain, where his ancestor Chingiz Kha’Khan often journeyed to seek the aid of the original Mongol deity Koeke Moengke Tengri.

The real significance of j~nAnavajra was his art – it was one of the last of the great examples of the artistic expression of the mantra-shAstra. This was something lost in part in even in the Hindu world outside of Nepal. j~nAnavajra’s remarkably prefect productions of images of devatA-s following the dhyAna shlokha-s of their sAdhana-s literally help the dhyAna come alive. A key to the practice of the mantra at one level is the dhyAna or dhAraNI producing a persistent image of the devatA for the sAdhaka. A sAdhana mUrti made per the specifications can produce this effect directly to the practicing deshika and can raise the sAdhAna towards perfection by its very presence. It may be considered a direct expression of the mantra and is a tremendous – only a few master artists can produce such sAdhana mUrti-s that can produce the effect of the mantra on their own. j~nAnavajra’s work it the epitome of such productions – being a great tantric himself, he was able to achieve this perfection that is one of its kind. His greatest pieces were of course the 21 forms of tArA as invoked in the ekavimshati tArA stotra (including that identified with karNamoTini), chakrasaMvara conjoined with vajravArAhI and vajradhara.

Of these the image of chakrasaMvara conjoined with vajravArAhI is of great importance to the Astika deshika, because of the closeness of the early laghushamvara tantra, the chakrasaMvara tantra, and the later chakrasaMvarodaya tantra followed by j~nAnavajra’s and his predecessors to the early yoginI tantra-s of the kula path and the shaiva bhairava tantra-s. A study of these tantra-s reveals their derivation from the bhairava tantra-s that were collected in the mantra pITha alluded to by abhinavagupta. It becomes clear that the depiction of chakrasaMvara and vajravArAhI is the cognate svachChandabhairava conjoined with aghoreshvarI from the svachChanda-bhairava tantra. Their maNDala of yoginI-s is drawn from the siddhayogeshvarI-mata. The prayoga-s of vajravArAhI and her depictions closely follow those of the glorious kaula tantra the yoginI-jAla-shaMbara. In this context it is interesting to note that the name of the composer of the primary prayoga paddhati of chakrasaMvara conjoined with vajravArAhI (i.e. vajravArAhI sAdhana) is umApatideva. The perfect sAdhana-mUrti-s of svachChanda-bhairava in the form conjoined with aghoreshvarI have become exceptionally rare or extinct in India – but in j~nAnavajra’s chakrasaMvara we have a template to conceive the iconography of this devatA if form quite close to the original.

Mongolian recitation of the karaNDavyUha and avalokiteshvara shaDakSharI sampuTikaraNa

https://app.box.com/s/vqap31malovx4pws83rtdqidbewewrkm

https://manasataramgini.wordpress.com/2 ... nanavajra/


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PostPosted: 09 May 2015 18:11 
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Quote:
The Indo-Mongolian Relationship: A Retrospective
Outlook On Buddhism

Prof. Sh. Bira (Mongolia)

Even now Sanskrit words are used not only in literary but also in colloquial Mongolian. It is interesting to note that in Mongolia when the need arises for new scientific terms it is often preferred to have them adopted from Sanskrit, rather than from Latin or any other languages. Sanskrit terms relating to diverse branches of science and philosophy, from cosmonautics to medicine and botanics have been adopted in modern Mongolian terminological lexicon. The names of planets and stars, including the cosmos, in modern Mongolian are named in Sanskrit...

http://www.mongolianculture.com/ProfBira-Lect.htm


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PostPosted: 09 May 2015 18:42 
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^^^ Surasena, good stuff, thanks!


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PostPosted: 10 May 2015 02:27 
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For many of us, Mongolia is still sort of remote. I knew only one good friend from Mongolia.
My interest was also due to Feynman "adventure" regarding Tuva, which he wanted to visit.
(Tuva (whose capital is (Kyzyl !)is just outside Mongolia (between Russia/Mongolia). (Check out 'Tuva or bust' - I always wanted to visit)

I get new respect to NaMo.. some obvious reasons for the trip..

- Mongolia's Uranium.. (+ other resources like copper, coal etc which India can use) Mongolia was among the first few countries to sign a uranium deal with India. (way back in 2007 or before ) .. but MMS, though he wanted to, never visited it.

Wonder if long awaited import of U from Mongolia finally gets momentum..

(I believe China is very closely watching Modi's trip..)


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PostPosted: 10 May 2015 06:10 
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Home Sweet Home!


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PostPosted: 10 May 2015 07:34 
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UlanBatori wrote:

Sweet ! Difficult to imagine that this idyllic world was once home to barbarian tribes who completely destroyed the prospects of most of civilized Asia - with India right on top as most affected.


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PostPosted: 10 May 2015 07:53 
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Arjun wrote:
Sweet ! Difficult to imagine that this idyllic world was once home to barbarian tribes who completely destroyed the prospects of most of civilized Asia - with India right on top as most affected.

Mongol heathens never ruled India.

Turko-Mongol converts to Islam did rule India and destroyed India because of Islam not because they were Mongols.

The Mongols of Chingiz Khan to Kublai Khan day ruled well after the initial conquest, Kublai built thousands of schools, promoted astronomy etc.

Likewise under the initial period of Ilkhanate (pre-Islamic subversion) Mongols brought religious freedom, temples were built in Baghdad, and learning sponsored including an attempt at a "world history" with a section dedicated to India by the Jew Rashid al-Din (several Jews achieved high positions in the Ilkhanate).

Quote:
Some notes on Rashid ad-Din bin Imad ud Dawla Abu’l Khair and his times

There are many ironies that are iconic of the Mohammedan world. One such is a monument in the modern Islamic state that occupies Iran with a gigantic statue depicting a Jewish intellectual from the 1200-1300s: Rashid ad-Din. The tale of Rashid ad-Din is well known to connoisseurs of Mongol history for he was the author of the famous Jami at’ Tawarikh. We record some notes on him in the context of Mongol history and its intersections with Indic history. The remarkable vicissitudes of history come to fore in the restoration of heathen tradition in Mesopotamia by the Mongols followed by its subversion and destruction by Mohammedanism. The Mongol irruptions had tremendous, even if transient, impact on the religious landscape of Asia. The Mongols were rather tolerant and allowed the practice of all religions without obstruction in their realms though they themselves were originally followers of the Altaic system of Tengri. Indeed, they were one of the first people in history to establish a truly secular state (unlike the pseudo-secular state that adorns modern India or the secularized Abrahamistic states that are common in the Western nations with elevated economies). We had earlier spoken of how the model of the Tantric state had been successfully exported from India and adopted by several Central Asian potentates like the Tibetans and Uighurs and also to a degree in China and Japan. Through their Uighur and Tibetan interlocutors the Mongol elite became acquainted with the mantrayAna and the Yuan, Chagadai and Il Khanates were transiently influenced by the Tantric state model to differing degrees. However, the religious latitude offered by the Mongol state did not result in a top-down imposition of the Tantric state model onto the masses. With the result the masses generally retained their old religion or simply followed the dominant proselytizing forces around them. Consequently, in China the undercurrent resentment against mantrayAna, which was always in play since the reactionary emperor of the Tang, Wu-zong, came back with a vengeance against the foreign Mongol rulers of the Yuan Khanate who practiced the path of mantrayAna. In the Chagadai ulus and the Il Khanate the proselytizing force of Islam eventually destroyed the practice of mantrayAna by the Mongol elite. To better understand these historical events, we shall use the life and times of Rashid ad-Din...

https://manasataramgini.wordpress.com/2 ... his-times/


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PostPosted: 10 May 2015 07:59 
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I was referencing the Turks when it came to India...Mongolia is original homeland of both Turks and Mongols.

Mongols were the bigger WMD as far as rest of world was concerned - but not from India's POV


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PostPosted: 10 May 2015 20:26 
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Mongolia has huge wind energy potential and little domestic requirement. Recently identified sources of Copper and uranium mines would require energy in large measures. Even after that there would be surplus if wind energy is tapped. It can be exported to other nations. The only problem is it is totally landlocked country and it can export to china as captive producer. But if China allows transmission grid through it, Mongolia can become net exporter of electricity. It can form part of regional transmission grid and could serve as a source of stabilising power in such a grid connecting various renewable and non renewable energy sources.


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PostPosted: 10 May 2015 20:39 
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Mongolia's entire population seems to be restricted to a few cities, with the rest of the country populated by nomads. The british actor Ewan McGregor released a documentary called "the long way home" which takes him across various parts of Europe (and he gives up in Russia after a certain point). Anyway, Mongolia is mostly desertland as he drives across it. The population density map of mongolia says as much, so even if there is a lot minerals and energy -- there is not enough people or techology to get this out of the ground, since most of these seem to be in unpopulated areas.


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PostPosted: 11 May 2015 00:22 
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Quote:
so even if there is a lot minerals and energy -- there is not enough people or techology to get this out of the ground, since most of these seem to be in unpopulated areas.

Could the same not be said of Saudi Arabia?


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PostPosted: 11 May 2015 05:47 
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Quote:
Could the same not be said of Saudi Arabia?


Of course, but without the US, the saudis would not be getting all the stuff out of the ground and enriching themselves, but mostly the people who are getting the stuff out of the ground -- Aramco has a wall full of pictures of what Dammam was like before the US and its transformation into a large shopping mall after the US and everyone showed up to take saudi money to construct saudi arabia. I am just saying there is an opportunity here...you would think the chinese would have already settled in there by now...

The "ishtaarted in the dejert" video made by the pakis has some images from what Saudi arabia was like before they got all rich..the matching lyrics were " there was nothing in the dejert, nothing in the dejert".


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PostPosted: 11 May 2015 06:43 
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Yes, I can't figure out either why PeeAllSee has allowed Mongolia to continue independent while Tibet was gobbled. Fear of the Russians? The main school in Ulan Bator seems to be the Russian-Mongolian School, which looks like a long Soviet style building. There must have been/ be a large Russian community.


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PostPosted: 11 May 2015 07:15 
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UlanBatori wrote:
Yes, I can't figure out either why PeeAllSee has allowed Mongolia to continue independent while Tibet was gobbled. Fear of the Russians? The main school in Ulan Bator seems to be the Russian-Mongolian School, which looks like a long Soviet style building. There must have been/ be a large Russian community.

PRC isn't able to muscle in easily because of Rus influence, it was a Soviet satellite and Mongols are wary of Chinese.

There never was a large Rus settler community compared to other Central Asian countries.

If it wasn't for Stalin's ambitions, PRC would have colonized it and made it a permanent part of PRC while reducing Mongols to a minority (as they have done in colonized South Mongolia). Before PRC came into being, the KMT tried to colonize it until they were expelled by Baron Sternberg.


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PostPosted: 11 May 2015 10:06 
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From wiki:

Image

Credit: Lady Anu - Own work
Caption: White Tara by Öndör Gegeen Zanabazar, 17th century, Mongolia. At the Fine Arts Museum, Ulaanbaatar


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PostPosted: 11 May 2015 10:17 
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Surasena wrote:
Quote:
The Indo-Mongolian Relationship: A Retrospective
Outlook On Buddhism

Prof. Sh. Bira (Mongolia)

Even now Sanskrit words are used not only in literary but also in colloquial Mongolian. It is interesting to note that in Mongolia when the need arises for new scientific terms it is often preferred to have them adopted from Sanskrit, rather than from Latin or any other languages. Sanskrit terms relating to diverse branches of science and philosophy, from cosmonautics to medicine and botanics have been adopted in modern Mongolian terminological lexicon. The names of planets and stars, including the cosmos, in modern Mongolian are named in Sanskrit...

http://www.mongolianculture.com/ProfBira-Lect.htm

Excellent link sir, thanks for sharing. Posting some snippets I found very interesting:

Quote:
Sanskrit Mongolian
Adya Adya (Sunday, Sun)
Somya Sumya (Monday, Moon)
Angäraka Angaraq (Tuesday, Mars)

It is worthwhile to mention that some Sanskrit words have been Mongolized to such an extent that the Mongols do not event suspect their foreign origin:

Sanskrit Mongolian
Sansāra Sansar (space)
Abhyasa Avyas (talent)
Punya Buyan (good deeds)
Kšana Agshin (instant)
Dvipa Tiv (continent)
Graha Garig (planet)
Jātaka Tsadig (tales, stories)
Šloka Shuleg (poems, verses)
Padaka Badag (strophe)
Rašayana Arshan (mineral water, nectar)


The Mongols have a long tradition of having Sanskrit names:

Sanskrit Mongolian
Arya Arya
Aditya Adya
Vajravali Ochirbal
Dharma Darma
Čandra Zandra
Ratna Radna
Utpala Udval


Last edited by arshyam on 11 May 2015 10:24, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 11 May 2015 10:23 
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[OT] UB saar, bhyphor you didn't share some of your insights on Mongolia's Indic connections when taking break from your yak-herding :P . Never even knew about it till now :(( [/OT]


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PostPosted: 11 May 2015 19:22 
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- Not only Uranium, copper and coal, Mongolia has plenty of minerals which India can use (gold, molybdenum, tin, tungsten etc) - expect/hope to see some deals...(as said before it was one of the first country to sign U deal with India - though the flow did not start mainly due to red tape - hope Modi changes that) (Mongolia, which now has different (>1 party system) govt wants to learn more languages than Chiniese and Russian)

- It is very interested and wants India to help open good schools in Mongolia. There is already Rajiv Gandhi Art and Production School in Ulan Bator. Expect Modi to make a few announcements/upgrades about a few good schools-- like Atal Behari Vajpayee Centre for Excellence in Information and Communication Technology Education ..

- I am of course also interested in Mongolian throat singing.. ( for many Tuva's throat singing is Introduced to US by Feynman ) .. Check out wiki or this nice youtube ..https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wHbIWH_NGc

BTW, India was the first country outside the Socialist bloc to establish diplomatic relations with Mongolia (in 1955)... (Before 1920's - or even now,Taiwan, for example, consider Mongolia as part of China etc) (India also helped/supported Mongolia in having UN and NAM memberships - Dr. S. Radhakrishnan visited it as early as in late 50's)..

There is modest PIO in Mongolia - a few in prestigious political positions - who knows MaMo even speak there..( From what I know, there are about 200 PIO's in Ulan Bator)


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PostPosted: 11 May 2015 19:39 
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Quote:
Yes, I can't figure out either why PeeAllSee has allowed Mongolia to continue independent while Tibet was gobbled. Fear of the Russians? The main school in Ulan Bator seems to be the Russian-Mongolian School, which looks like a long Soviet style building. There must have been/ be a large Russian community.


As said before, Taiwan still considers Mongolia as part of "China".
Also, Indian community wanted (and Mayor of UB was in full favor) to open an Indian school for the Indian community..so look at "Khoroo 2, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia" (It does have a google+ / facebook page).


Image of Mongolian-Indian school. Ulaanbaatar. Mongolia.
^^^


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PostPosted: 11 May 2015 20:48 
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Even if China is making claims about owning Mongolia, like they claim to own everyone else's territory, the question still remains, what is stopping China from doing a Tibet on Mongolia and taking over their resources? Most of Mongolia is uninhabited and there should be nothing stopping China from sending their minions over in droves to dig up all the resources out of mongolian soil. It is possible that they don't really care for the parts of mongolia they are not occupying de facto. So looking at the parts that they have already taken over may provide some answers.


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PostPosted: 12 May 2015 06:43 
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Yak == 'Yaksha'


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PostPosted: 12 May 2015 07:04 
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Looking at the mineral map of Mongolia -- all of the resource rich areas are to the north, so it is not surprising the Chinese Communists are not making a rush to occupy the barren desert sands of South mongolia on the pretext that Emperor Wang Doodle of the Dingdong dynasty of the 8th century occupied those parts.

All the population rich and resource rich parts of Mongolia border Russia and not china.

http://www.mapsofworld.com/mongolia/mongolia-mineral-map.html

https://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/389335/Mongolia/images-videos/73662/mongolia-population-density


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PostPosted: 13 May 2015 06:02 
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Image

Chinese are perhaps wary of this historical Mongolian map which goes counter to their claims of having owned the world since the beginning of time.


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PostPosted: 13 May 2015 16:23 
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History of India-Mongolia relations:
http://www.livemint.com/Politics/niSFjF ... -mode.html

excerpt: (because of the humor in the code names)
Quote:
On the defence and security side, a key thrust area between the two countries, India has been instrumental in modernizing Mongolian weaponry. When President Patil visited the country in 2011, India and Mongolia signed a defence cooperation agreement, which included the conduct of joint defence exercises code-named Nomadic Elephant. India is also an active participant in an annual week-long joint training exercise called the Khaan Quest, hosted by Mongolia. Both countries also share technical partnerships, which include civilian training programmes, establishment of training centres in areas like energy and information and technology.


Quote:
In fact, Mongolia has often looked upon India as its “spiritual neighbour”, given its deep-rooted cultural links with all forms of Buddhism, even the Tibetan school, which Mongolians have adopted.


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PostPosted: 13 May 2015 18:06 
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Wow! I had no idea of the implications of UttaraNaMoYatra. :eek: This is going to B-O the PeeAllSea no end.


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PostPosted: 13 May 2015 20:50 
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UB, Many Mongolian names are Indic sounding due to Buddhism.


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PostPosted: 16 May 2015 03:16 
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From photo archives - Here is a road in Ulan Bator -

From google maps : Mahatma Gandhi Street

..

Image


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PostPosted: 16 May 2015 18:41 
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How to win friends and influence people :)

http://scroll.in/article/727210/the-mon ... h-mongolia

Quote:
In one of those inspired decisions made occasionally by the government, India sent out a political appointee, a former Member of Parliament as Ambassador to Ulaanbaatar. The former MP Kushak Bakula also happened to be the Head Lama of Ladakh and was recognised as one of the greatest scholars of Tibetan language and Buddhist studies.

In the late 1980s, this had little import for the Communist regime in Ulaanbaatar. The Communists had wiped out Buddhism from Mongolia, burning scriptures, destroying monasteries and driving out monks. Before this obliteration, Mongolia had more than 300 monasteries and about a third of its male population were monks. By 1990 there was just one monastery, Gandan, and a handful of government-appointed monks left. The knowledge of Buddhist thought and practices was lost.

This changed once Mongolia developed into a multi-party democracy after a peaceful revolution in 1990. The revolution was Mongolian style: the main square in Ulaanbaatar was packed with pro-democracy protestors and, as the situation grew more fraught, late night meetings were held and the Politburo was persuaded to resign. At first the economic adjustment to market reforms was difficult but then a strong nationalistic pride developed.

In the wake of the revolution, along with freedom of religion came restoration of old symbols and icons as well as a revival of interest in Buddhism. The Mongolians follow the same Mahayana school of Buddhism as the people of Ladakh, and this is where Kushak Bakula came in.

He is credited with reviving Buddhism in Mongolia. He took Buddhist scriptures to Mongolia and set up a school for Buddhist learning in Ulaanbaatar. He sent newly ordained monks to India to study Buddhism at Sarnath and Dharamshala, and invited Buddhist teachers to visit Mongolia. He travelled through the vast country, giving lectures and discourses. Old-timers were said to prostrate themselves before him and young Mongolians sought autographs and blessings – usually a red thread tied around the wrist. During the pro-democracy protests in Ulaanbaatar, he is believed to have advised the demonstrators to remain non-violent.

In 1993, on his personal urging, the Indian government allowed the holy relics of the Buddha (housed in the National Museum in New Delhi) to be displayed outside India for the first time. Mongolians, from the president to herders from remote places, queued up for a darshan. Even after he completed his six-year diplomatic assignment, Kushak Bakula retained strong ties with Mongolia till he died at the age of 87 on November 6, 2003.


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PostPosted: 16 May 2015 19:55 
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UlanBatori wrote:
Wow! I had no idea of the implications of UttaraNaMoYatra. :eek: This is going to B-O the PeeAllSea no end.

It is Dharma Vijaya redux onlee.

From the scroll.in article:

Quote:
His first engagement in Ulaanbaatar will be a visit to the Gandan Monastery, where a sapling of the Bodhi tree will be presented to the Chief Abbot.


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PostPosted: 17 May 2015 01:28 
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Forget Uranium. Real reason behind PM Modi’s Mongolia visit is China

Quote:
Forget uranium folks! India has enough foreign resources now to get this precious metal. The real reason behind PM Modi’s Mongolia visit is China.

Quote:
In many ways, Mongolia offers a newer opportunity and strategic leverage for India in dealing with China – Vietnam, Philippines and Myanmar being the old ones.

We are living in the times when China is ubiquitous and the elephant in the room whenever two other nations engage with each other. On 17 May when PM Modi will be holding official talks with his Mongolian interlocutors in Ulan Bator, the dynamics will be a bit different for a change.

This time China will be keeping its fingers crossed when Modi lands in Mongolia.


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