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PostPosted: 13 Oct 2008 10:46 
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Okay we have it all wrong Chandrayaan-I is a European orbiter

Chandrayaan-1, Europe's Next Lunar Orbiter


http://news.softpedia.com/news/Chandray ... 6205.shtml

:P


Last edited by sanjaykumar on 13 Oct 2008 11:20, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 13 Oct 2008 10:59 
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http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/inde ... entry68871


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PostPosted: 13 Oct 2008 16:14 
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Quote:
Chandrayaan-I preparation reaches final stages

Sriharikota, Oct 13 (UNI) As preparations reached the final stages for the launch of Chandrayaan-I, India's first unmanned lunar mission, there is real excitement at the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) SHAR from where it will be blasted off on October 22.

The mood at the SHAR is really upbeat for the final countdown of India's leap into the outer space.

''We are all really excited. The world itself is excited,'' SHAR Director M C Dathan told visiting journalists from Thiruvananthapuram.

''Till now we had only gone up to 36,000 km. Now we are moving from 36,000 km to about 3.8 lakh km. From the geo-synchronous orbit, we are now moving to the lunar orbit, which is a great milestone for the country,'' he said.

''Every one here is engaged completely in the mission and the mood is upbeat,'' Mr Dathan said.

VSSC director K Radhakrishnan, PSLV Project Director George Koshi and Mission Director Annadurai were all seen to be in an upbeat mood while explaining about the mission.

''This is going to be an important mission in the history of India. For the fist time, we are going to circle the moon, which is a real excitement,'' Mr Radhakrisnan said.

Talking about the greatest challenge faced in the mission, he said the mission itself was a challenge. ''The challenge is to place the Chandrayaan in a 100 km orbit around the moon. We are confident of reaching this orbit,'' he said.

Mr Koshi said the PSLV-C11 is all ready and waiting for the satellite to be installed and integrated to the vehicle tomorrow.

''For the last so many months, we were all with the satellite and the vehicle. We are so excited to see it leaping into the sky,'' he said.

The Chandrayaan-I will blast off into the sky at 0620 hrs on October 22 from here. Its main objetive is to look into the distribution of various minerals and chemical elements and high-resolution three-dimensional mapping of the entire lunar surface.


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PostPosted: 13 Oct 2008 16:54 
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arun can you remove the image from the quote?? :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: 13 Oct 2008 17:48 
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sanjaykumar wrote:
Okay we have it all wrong Chandrayaan-I is a European orbiter

Chandrayaan-1, Europe's Next Lunar Orbiter


http://news.softpedia.com/news/Chandray ... 6205.shtml

:P


Oops, You made them ashamed. They changed the title.

The question is, can ISRO and GOI make it clear to these pompous nut-case ignoramuses and international watchers that these instruments are getting a free launch like deer ticks getting bloody free ride.

Western propaganda and their disgusting, barking shameful rope tricks... :roll:


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PostPosted: 13 Oct 2008 18:54 
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manoba wrote:
Western propaganda and their disgusting, barking shameful rope tricks... :roll:

1 person who wrote the article got his info wrong. not right to blame the entire "western media".


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PostPosted: 13 Oct 2008 19:10 
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Avinash R wrote:
manoba wrote:
Western propaganda and their disgusting, barking shameful rope tricks... :roll:

1 person who wrote the article got his info wrong. not right to blame the entire "western media".


Not just one article... I have seen more than 10-15 articles which includes other languages too.
BeeBeeC wrote it first and every others following the same.


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PostPosted: 13 Oct 2008 20:56 
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manoba wrote:
Avinash R wrote:
manoba wrote:
Western propaganda and their disgusting, barking shameful rope tricks... :roll:

1 person who wrote the article got his info wrong. not right to blame the entire "western media".


Not just one article... I have seen more than 10-15 articles which includes other languages too.
BeeBeeC wrote it first and every others following the same.

still trying to call all this western propaganda is imho a exagerration. there are many who dont like india and will continue writing negative articles or a giving negative spin to every piece of news about india. focusing on their articles is wasting our time. nothing fruitful will come out of that. it will only motivate them to write more such trash if they feel that their articles are having the desired effect of provoking an reaction in india. just my opinion.


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PostPosted: 14 Oct 2008 01:19 
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Chandrayaan: Payloads tasked

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Chandrayaan: Payloads tasked
DH News Service, Bangalore:
India's maiden lunar mission, Chandrayaan-1 will be carrying eleven payloads when it launches on October 22.


Over the next two years, these payloads or scientific instruments will completely map the moon surface and conduct chemical and mineralogical mapping.

Out of these eleven payloads, five instruments have been developed and designed in India, three are from European Space Agency, two are from United States and one is from Bulgaria. Below is a brief description of each of the instruments.

Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC): A CCD camera, it will map topography in both near and far side of the Moon and prepare a 3-dimensional atlas with high spatial and altitude resolution. This will help in understanding the lunar evolution process as well identify regions for detailed study.

Hyper Spectral Imager (HySI): A CCD camera, it will obtain spectroscopic data for mineralogical mapping of the lunar surface and improve existing data. It will also study the mineralogical composition in deep crater regions of Moon’s interior.

Lunar Laser Ranging Instrument (LLRI): This instrument will provide data for determining the accurate height of lunar surface features. It will also aid in determining the global topographical field of the Moon and also generate an improved model for the lunar gravity field.

High Energy X-ray Spectrometer (HEX): The High-Energy X-ray spectrometer is designed to explore the possibility of exploring polar regions covered with thick water and ice deposits. It is designed to primarily study and identify regions of thorium and uranium deposits.

Moon Impact Probe (MIP): The only probe to actually land on the Moon, it will demonstrate the technologies required to land a probe at a desired location on the moon. It will also qualify technologies required for future soft landing missions and explore moon from a close range.

Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS): The primary goal of the C1XS instrument is to carry out high quality X-ray spectroscopic mapping of the Moon. C1XS will use X-ray fluorescence technique for measuring elemental abundance of Magnesium, Aluminium, Silicon, Calcium, Iron and Titanium distributed over the surface of the Moon.

Smart Near-IR Spectrometer (SIR-2): SIR-2 will analyse the lunar surface in mineral resources, formation of its surface features and survey mineral lunar resources for future landing sites and exploration.

Sub Kev Atom reflecting Analyser (SARA): The aim of this instrument is to study the surface composition of the moon, the way the moon’s surface reacts with the solar wind and magnetic anomalies associated with the surface of the moon.

Radiation Dose Monitor Experiment (RADOM): RADOM will qualitatively and quantitatively characterise the radiation environment in a region of space near the moon. Provide an estimate of the dose map around Moon at different altitudes and latitudes.

Miniature Synthetic Aperture Radar (MiniSAR): This will detect water ice in the permanently shadowed regions on the Lunar poles up to a depth of a few meters. This radar mapper will allow viewing of all permanently shadowed areas on the Moon, regardless of whether sunlight is available or the angle is not satisfactory.

Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3): This spectrometer will assess and map lunar mineral resources at high spatial and spectral resolution to support planning for future, targeted missions. It will also help in characterising and mapping lunar materials in context of moon’s early geological evolution.


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PostPosted: 14 Oct 2008 02:13 
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India should be reaching for the stars

India's preposterous priorities


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PostPosted: 14 Oct 2008 02:16 
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Moon mission rides on basketballer turned rocket scientist


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PostPosted: 14 Oct 2008 04:56 
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Gerard wrote:


"...as the saying goes ‘per ardua ad astra’ – through struggle to the stars."

I like this saying. That's a good motto.


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PostPosted: 14 Oct 2008 07:09 
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Chandrayaan looking to help establish lunar bases

The colours of India to the moon - T. S. Subramanian


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 02:10 
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Chandrayaan-1: Objectives of India's Moon Mission


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 02:11 
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The Moon Impact Probe (MIP), which has pride of place among the 11 instruments on board Chandrayaan-1, is painted with the proud colours of the Indian flag. It is this instrument that will land on the moon’s surface and leave telltale evidence of an Indian instrument having reached the moon.


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 03:41 
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Chandrayaan-1 shifted to VAB


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 11:14 
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Space engineer has licence to kill


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 12:52 
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Looking beyond Chandrayaan-I

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The inclusion of a Russian rover in the second mission did cause some heartburn in India, especially among IIT-Kanpur students.

The institute had designed a rover and it was hoping that it would be a part of Chandrayaan-2. But following PM Manmohan Singh’s visit to Russia in November 2007, the decision swung in favour of the Russian rover.


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 13:38 
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Dumb questions:

Why are satellites covered with gold film?
Why is the impactor cube shaped? Is it meant to penetrate the surface? If so, why isnt it more appropriately shaped?


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 19:53 
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Tanaji wrote:
Dumb questions:

Why are satellites covered with gold film?
Why is the impactor cube shaped? Is it meant to penetrate the surface? If so, why isnt it more appropriately shaped?

No dumb questions, only Dumb answers.

Gold film an essential part of the craft's thermal management system. Gold film is an excellent optical reflector in visible and IR band. Given that Gold is most malleable material, its mass penalty can be made very small.

Impactor is as its name says an impactor, not a JDAM penetrator.
BTW at >10Km/sec impact speed the shape is largely inconsequential, for it will vaporise in the first millisecond but will continue penetrating till its shockwave dissipates, but before that it throws up lot of dust just under the moon's fine dust cover, that will allow remote spectroscopic chemical analysis by orbiting Chandrayan's instruments.


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 20:06 
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Tanaji>> How could you forget Gold leaf electroscope to demonstrate the effect of charged particles (high school, first year Physics)? :mrgreen:

Just kidding
Take this seriously "Never take me seriously)


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 20:20 
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http://news.softpedia.com/news/Chandray ... 6205.shtml

Got some more corrections made..though appreciate the corrections made promptly by the site.


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 21:16 
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we need to send instruments as done by AZ univ students for Mars-phoenix. shame on mms to favor russians. the faster we get to h3, and perhaps send a digger, grabber and a transporter back to earth for our future chain reactions.


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PostPosted: 15 Oct 2008 23:13 
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X Post.

The ground segment of the Chandrayaan mission is 400% functional 8) :

Indian Deep Space Network tracks the Koguya and Rosseta space missions


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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2008 06:44 
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Lunar spacecraft positioned on rocket


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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2008 07:41 
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How Chandrayaan-I will be put in moon's sphere of influence

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The enhanced capabilities of the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) and accurate modelling of the forces that act on the Chandrayaan-1 satellite in orbit make India’s mission to Moon possible next week. The PSLV will put the satellite into an elliptical orbit under the influence of earth’s gravity.

The inbuilt rockets of the satellite will then push it to the moon’s sphere of influence.

Final destination

The final destination is a circular Lunar orbit 100 kilometres above the surface of the Moon. The first challenge for the engineers of ISRO will be to put the satellite into the transfer orbit around the earth. The PSLV has been modified to lift the 1,304 tonne {sic} satellite and attain a highly elliptical orbit.

The nearest point (perigee) of this orbit will be about 250 kilometres and the farthest point (apogee) will be about 22,860 km away from earth. The launch vehicle will have to achieve a velocity of about 26,000 km an hour to place the satellite into the transfer orbit. This, it will do in just over 18 minutes, or 1,096 seconds, to be exact. The capacity of the strap-on-booster motors of PSLV has been increased from nine to 12 tonnes of solid propellant to achieve that. (Because of the increased length of the strap-ons, they are referred to with the suffix XL.)

The first stage of the vehicle together with its six strap-on boosters carries 320 tonnes of propellants. The third stage also uses solid propellant while the second and fourth stages use liquid propellants. Once the launch Vehicle puts the satellite into orbit, the inbuilt thrusters are used to move it into an extended transfer orbit.

Then a trajectory to transfer the satellite into the moon’s gravitational sphere is achieved through multiple manoeuvres to extend the apogee beyond 3.8 lakh kilometres.

The calculation of the gravitational and other forces acting on the satellite at this and earlier stages is crucial in guiding the satellite into the right orbits.

The Indian Space Research has prepared models for this, and the calculations have been validated in reference to models used by other space agencies.

The manoeuvre

The manoeuvre to insert the satellite into Lunar orbit will be done when the moon is at its nearest position to earth. The Indian Space Research Organisation is hoping to use a window available early in November.

For this, the launching is to be done between October 22 and 28. Before the moon is in position, a trial will be done by extending the apogee beyond the position where the moon would be at the time of insertion.

When the satellite falls into the Lunar orbit, it will be about 500 km (peri-seline) {sic} from surface of the Moon on an elliptical orbit that will extend to 5000 km (apo-seline). The orbit will then be reduced to 100 km in steps by slowing down the satellite.


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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2008 15:59 
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Six days to go: Know more about Chandrayaan
http://in.news.yahoo.com/photos/slidesh ... ssion.html

India is all set to reach the moon and that too in its own way, literally! The first Moon mission, an unmanned remote-sensing satellite, Chandrayaan-I, is set for launch from Shriharikota.


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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2008 17:10 
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Photo Gallary of Chandrayaan-1 and PSLV-C11 - ISRO


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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2008 19:04 
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Indian spacecraft will try to unravel Moon's origin
Quote:
India's lunar explorer, Chandrayaan-1, will try to unravel the moon's origins as it scouts for minerals and water there, according to project director M. Annadurai.

When Chandrayaan is launched Oct 22 from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre here, about 80 km from Chennai, it will boost international space cooperation by carrying 11 scientific devices, six of them from European and American organisations, to study the earth's nearest celestial neighbour while it orbits 100 km above the moon.

One of the lunar orbiter's key missions will be to map the moon. "During the two-year expedition, the 11 devices will be used to prepare a three-dimensional atlas of both near and far side of the moon," Annadurai told IANS. The maps will have a high resolution of 5 to 10 metres, he added.

Annadurai said the chemical and mineralogical mapping of the entire lunar surface will show where elements such as magnesium, aluminium, silicon, calcium, iron and titanium are to be found.

"Simultaneous photo, geological and chemical mapping will enable indentification of the different geological units, which will test the early evolutionary history of the moon," he said. They will also help determine the nature of the lunar crust, he said.

The lunar probe will also look for water-ice in the permanently dark polar regions of the moon which may be as cold as 50 to 70 degrees Kelvin (about minus 223 to minus 203 degrees Centigrade) , he said.

These are the European Space Agency devices or payloads that will fly on the Chandrayaan:

-- Imaging x-ray spectrometer (C1XS), developed by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Britain with the ISRO satellite centre, will map the lunar surface, using x-ray fluorescence technique for measuring the elements. It will also observe the moon during the rising phase of the solar cycle when x-ray signals are expected to be enhanced.

-- Sub-kiloelectronvolt (keV) atom reflecting analyser (SARA), built jointly by the Swedish Institute of Space Physics and the Space Physics Laboratory of the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VKSC) at Thiruvananthapuram, will study the composition of the moon, the way its surface reacts to solar wind, how its materials change and the magnetic anomalies.

The following are the two US instruments packages:

--The 6.5-kg mini synthetic aperture radar (MiniSAR), developed by the Johns Hopkins University applied physics laboratory and the naval air warfare centre, will detect water-ice in the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar poles by digging a few metres into the surface.

-- Moon mineralogy mapper (M3), an imaging spectrometer built by Brown University and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of NASA, will assess and map lunar mineral resources at high spatial and spectral resolution for future targeted missions.

"The seven kg M3 will also help in characterising and mapping lunar minerals for knowing the moon's early geological evolution," Annadurai said. "Its compositional maps will improve our understanding of the early evolution of a differentiated planetary body and provide a high-resolution assessment of lunar resources."

The Bulgarian Academy of Sciences' radiation dose monitor (RADOM) will characterise the radiation environment in a region of space near the moon. Its data will be used to evaluate the radiation environment and radiation shielding requirements on future manned moon missions.

The five Indian payloads are:

--The seven-kg terrain mapping camera (TMC) will map moon's topography and prepare the three-dimensional atlas.

--The four-kg hyper spectral imager (HySI) will gather spectroscopic data for mapping minerals.

--The 10-kg lunar laser ranging instrument (LLRI) will provide data for determining the height of lunar surface features and moon's gravity field.

-- The 16-kg high energy x-ray spectrometer (HEX) will explore the moon's polar regions (north-south) that may be covered by thick water-ice deposits.

-- The 29-kg moon impact probe (MIP) that will descend on to the lunar surface in about 20 minutes from an altitude of 100 km on a specific location at a pre-determined time to explore the moon from a close range.


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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2008 22:16 
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http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/index.htm

enjoy


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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2008 23:01 
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The Moon Impact Probe (MIP), which has pride of place among the 11 instruments on board Chandrayaan-1, is painted with the proud colours of the Indian flag. It is this instrument that will land on the moon’s surface and leave telltale evidence of an Indian instrument having reached the moon.

This word keeps repeating but not for China


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PostPosted: 16 Oct 2008 23:14 
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What??


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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2008 05:49 
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As ISRO's lunar date nears, tracking systems are in full gear

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When Chandrayaan-1, the nation’s most ambitious and biggest space adventure to date, takes off on its lunar odyssey at the crack of dawn on October 22, two giant antennae at Bangalore will start tracking it 17 minutes into the launch.

These tracking systems, which are the eyes, ears, brain and guide of the lunar mission, are ready for the long haul, according to Mr S.K. Shivakumar, Director, ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network.

Starting from just after the launch to the next two years of the mission, ISTRAC and its Indian Deep Space Network with the 32-metre and 18-m antennae will play the key role in all manoeuvres, navigation, control, command. This includes catching or sending signals to the spacecraft across nearly 4 lakh km and the release of the Moon Impact Probe, painted in the Tricolour and that will crash land on the lunar surface.

“We did the first full dress rehearsal yesterday [on Tuesday] involving all the nine ground centres and it went off quite well. We will do two more until the 19th,” Mr Shivakumar told Business Line.

The biggest morale-booster, according to him, has been that the two antennae have tracked the Japanese lunar orbiter Selene or Kaguya, in co-operation with the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency. JAXA sent up its orbiter last year.

Selene being similar to Chandrayaan-1, tracking it for practice means “Our antenna pointing is perfect, the ground system works; and we are there when Chandrayaan-1 reaches Moon’s orbit,” he said.

ISRO has set up the Rs 100-crore ISDN which includes the special 32-metre antenna (named DSN32) to track the lunar mission and future planetary forays; the DSN18 stands by at the ISDN site at Byalalu, some 30 km on the outskirts of the city.

ISTRAC’s scientists also track the IRS remote-sensing satellites that orbit at a relatively small distance of 900 km. Over 200 scientists have been specially working round-the-clock with only Moon on their mind and hands. “There is heightened enthusiasm as this is a major mission. Every one has been put on the job, their command tasks assigned and logistics worked out. From now on, we’ll get even more focussed,” Mr Shivakumar said.


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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2008 08:15 
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Quote:
Mass(earth) 5.9x1024kg (moon)7.475x102kg
:shock:

I have never really understood the need for the MIP. Well I read that the suggestion came from APJ Kalam. I guess the Mars exploration programme did something similar..

moon soil/rock samples are available (NASA) and a lot of analysis must have been done already and probably published in journals. So what more info can we get from this experiments? We could probably target some potentially mineral rich region but that is just one impactor and one analysis :?:
If only we had multiple impactors to probe multiple potential areas..
Any experts know better here..would appreciate some gyan on this.
Thanks


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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2008 10:47 
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Yugandhar wrote:
I have never really understood the need for the MIP.

The need is probably not for the impact itself or for the collected info per se but for the tech validation--targeted soft landing, collection, examination, transmission etc which will translate to more complex missions later. Nobody is going to give it to us. No matter how simple it seems or how well we understand the theory and mechanics, there is no substitute for actual experience. JMO.


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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2008 12:31 
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Victor wrote:
Yugandhar wrote:
I have never really understood the need for the MIP.

The need is probably not for the impact itself or for the collected info per se but for the tech validation--targeted soft landing, collection, examination, transmission etc which will translate to more complex missions later. Nobody is going to give it to us. No matter how simple it seems or how well we understand the theory and mechanics, there is no substitute for actual experience. JMO.


I dont think they are going for a soft landing this time. From what I understand they are going to crash land the probe on to the surface and study some of the dust that is scattered because of the impact.


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PostPosted: 17 Oct 2008 13:29 
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Sorry if posted earlier.
Pictures of the Chandrayaan and PSLV C-11. For the first time I am seeing the Booster rockets up close.
http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/photos/index.htm


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PostPosted: 18 Oct 2008 05:53 
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Chandrayaan-I may encounter peaking monsoon

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The launch of Indian Space Research Organisation’s (ISRO) Chandrayaan-1 lunar spacecraft scheduled for October 22 may have to deal with a north-east monsoon peaking just around the same time.

The east-west shear zone of monsoon turbulence would have been established over south peninsular India by that time which could provide for some unsettled weather along the southeast coast, said Dr Akhilesh Gupta, Senior Advisor, Department of Science and Technology.

This would be pronounced over the Tamil Nadu and south coastal Andhra Pradesh, ‘Ground Zero’ for purposes of the launch programme. Gusting winds and convective clouds are other likely risks.

WIND GUSTS

Easterlies to northeasterlies are seen picking in speed in tandem with the peaking monsoon. Formation of convective clouds, however, cannot be predicted with any conceivable measure of accuracy until two hours before it actually takes place.

In this context, the Doppler radars at Sriharikota and Chennai would become in handy for the crack team of meteorologists associated with the Chandrayaan project, Dr Gupta said.

Vertical wind shear triggered by the vertical motion in tall convective clouds, lightning and storms are weather hazards such launch programmes have to deal with during this time of the year. But the skies can clear up in between, throwing up possible ‘launch windows’ depending on how long the recess sustains.

NO BIG STORM

These possibilities are largely factored in to the launch schedule, and the actual count-down lends itself to being adjusted in accordance with emerging weather conditions. In any case, no big storms are forecast to develop in the Bay around October 22 save for some activity centred some distance to the east.


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PostPosted: 18 Oct 2008 18:19 
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PSLV-C11 On Launch Pad - ISRO


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PostPosted: 18 Oct 2008 19:17 
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Launch Rehearsal exercise on

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As the countdown for the Chandrayaan-I -- India's ambitious moon mission, is set to begin Monday, ISRO scientists put in motion launch rehearsal exercises at the Sriharikota spaceport as part of preparatory drill for the blast off.

"The fully integrated launch vehicle has been moved out of the vehicle assembly building and anchored into the umbilical tower," ISRO spokesperson S Satish told PTI at Bangalore on Saturday.

A 52-hour countdown for the mission is expected to commence in the early hours of October 20.

There was slight rain in Sriharikota on Saturday but there is no cause for worry. The weather on October 22 is forecast to be fine, he said.

Meanwhile, preparatory activities for the countdown have begun.

"Preparatory activities, including checking of various parameters in payloads, to start countdown are going on," Satish Dhawan Space Centre Associate Director Dr M Y S Prasad told PTI at Chennai from Sriharikota.

Dr Prasad said the spacecraft was moved to the launch pad last evening.

Prasad said all the operations were progressing satisfactorily for the launch of the spacecraft mission on October 22.

"About 42 tonnes of propellant would be filled during the countdown period," he said.


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