Bharat Rakshak

Consortium of Indian Defence Websites
It is currently 19 Dec 2014 03:07

All times are UTC + 5:30 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 512 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 13  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Solar energy in India
PostPosted: 22 Jan 2011 22:51 
Offline
BRFite -Trainee

Joined: 28 May 2010 14:54
Posts: 14
Location: HOlland, delft city
namaskar,

I still do not understand it what is going on in India. There is so much sunshine in India, but there is no massive program for Solar energy, funded by the government. With the CSP technology it is possible to produce enough solar energy for the whole of India. I think that only ten percent of all deserts in India need to be used to produce CSP energy.

We must organise a solar energy movement in INDia to develop a green economy. Anyone interested can mail me. I have published one text on my site about solar energy but it is in Dutch.

Is there a solar energy program in India? Does anyone has information? Please post it here.

Dewanand
Holland.
Critical Podium Dewanand


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 23 Jan 2011 00:13 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 30 Apr 2009 02:02
Posts: 1636
Location: Standing at the edge of the cliff
Sir,
you might wanna check out the following thread..
http://forums.bharat-rakshak.com/viewtopic.php?f=24&t=5782


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 08 Feb 2011 15:54 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 23 Jan 2007 19:35
Posts: 363
Location: Hyderabad
dewanand wrote:
namaskar,

I still do not understand it what is going on in India. There is so much sunshine in India, but there is no massive program for Solar energy, funded by the government. With the CSP technology it is possible to produce enough solar energy for the whole of India. I think that only ten percent of all deserts in India need to be used to produce CSP energy.

We must organise a solar energy movement in INDia to develop a green economy. Anyone interested can mail me. I have published one text on my site about solar energy but it is in Dutch.

Is there a solar energy program in India? Does anyone has information? Please post it here.

Dewanand
Holland.
Critical Podium Dewanand


Who is real beneficiary of solar energy? Nation? Society? It may look as free power but ..

Solar energy ( I mean electricity ) is so costly that someone ( taxpayer ) has to pay for it in someway because govt gives subsidy for solar power products.

Governments all over the world subsidize it. But they should subsidize only most efficient systems and not blanket subsidy on total volume brought out by all manufacturers. Only then there will be efforts by suppliers to produce 'energy efficient' systems.

http://sssalvi.blogspot.com/2011/02/quo ... .html#more


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 08 Feb 2011 16:00 
Offline
BRFite -Trainee

Joined: 28 May 2010 14:54
Posts: 14
Location: HOlland, delft city
yes you could be right. But solar energy is renewable and it is clean. Maybe you don't know that one tiny company in America invented a new revolutionary solar panel and they are boosting up the production of it.

Especially for CSP plants in India it will be cheap to produce solar energy. India is a tropical country with a lot of sunshine. I think in future this will be developed at a large scale.

We need some time.

dewanand


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 08 Feb 2011 18:08 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 13 Dec 2009 19:41
Posts: 143
Location: Toronto & Mumbai
http://mnre.gov.in/

Ministry of New & Renewable Energy, Government of India

You may want to take a look at JNNSM section

JAWAHARLAL NEHRU NATIONAL SOLAR MISSION (JNNSM)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2011 15:36 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 23 Jan 2007 19:35
Posts: 363
Location: Hyderabad
@ dewanand

Yes I am aware of a few new technologies that are being projected as low cost and high efficiency as the materials convert both visible and IR components of solar spectrum.

All I meant to say was there should be encouragement for RESEARCH rather than subsidizing the production.

If one gets subsidy for production and marketing of his existing products he will never indulge in developing better technologies.

The link given by Shankas talks of subsidies, duty exemptions and concessions and similar things for production and marketing of off-grid, mini-grid and standalone systems ... nowhere it talks of incentives for better efficiency.

That was my point .. There is no encouragement for research.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2011 16:33 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 09 Nov 2006 03:27
Posts: 1516
India Solar Rules Burn U.S.
Commerce Secretary Locke Says New Delhi's Bar on Foreign-Made Panels Is 'the Wrong Way to Go'

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142 ... 51704.html

On the one hand Indian government is subsidising the solar investment in India. Thus encouraging the solar related production within India.

On the other hand Indian government wanted to produce enormous amount of electricity using solar plants in India within a few years.

Then there is also a trade restrictions to import solar related technology into India. While I see the interest in encouraging people to produce within Indian context the solar technology, there needs to be provision for bringing in some technology from outside for immediate set up of a few solar plants. A complete ban on any import is not going to help though I understand the need to encourage local investment in terms of production industries here and also subsidiaries that govt is providing for the solar investments. Indian government should allow at least a few companies to invest in a limited number of places for solar related technology being imported into India. This can run parallel to the production units until they become ready in India.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2011 20:08 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 09 Jan 2010 13:30
Posts: 7367
GOI is grappling with the point made by sssalvi. Cost is very important factor and power input that goes into making silicon ingots and wafers , primary ingredient for SPV. First phase of Solar mission would decide its success. Subsidy given by GOI is their decision to whom it should pass onto and not for locke to preach us. China produces cheapest SPV due to dubious practices, sub standard quality, disregard for pollution control and cheap power from various river valley projects. yet India has not allowed Chinese SPV into this field where subsidy is provided by GOI. If individuals want to set up on their own, who stops them from buying from china or USA.Govt has not banned import. If solar mission succeeds then we should see more investment in hardcore tech industry and aim is to get silicon ingots and wafers produced in the country ( with attendant issues) so as not to depend on imports . Dr Farookh Abdullah and Deepak Gupta has chosen right way to go about it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2011 20:27 
Offline
BRFite -Trainee

Joined: 28 May 2010 14:54
Posts: 14
Location: HOlland, delft city
I do not understand the neo colonial politics of the Indian government. The people of India must unite and fight to change this. The aim must be to make India independant from the white Western World and to do research. Also there must be a massive inflow of high tech and mass production must be organised, with exports.

What is going on in India? Neo colonialism is now backed by Indian people themself and they keep the indian people stupid and poor.

with massive investments in CSP solar technology plants it is possible to produce 90 percent of the energy in India and to become independant from oil and gas imports. There is enough space and sunshine. Look at some deserts in India and fill them with huge CSP plants, and whole India can get cheap solar energy forever.

I do not understand Indian politics. I have planned to move away and go to INdia to change this country. But Indian people must learn to fight for their rights; anyhow India is a democratic country. God bless India.

dewanand


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2011 21:00 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 23 Jan 2007 19:35
Posts: 363
Location: Hyderabad
@ Chaanakya

Chaanakya Bandhu,

Sorry for my ignorance. From the posts in other thread you seem to be related with solar energy management. Is there any effort in cell development in any Indian fabrication facility?
Chinese quality is well known so any quality conscious supplier who wants to seriously establish himself would not venture for it.

What I meant by research that was even with existing panels efficiency can be increased by concentrating reflectors/tracking etc. Simple but effective solutions exist in web-space for these purposes. If someone brings in that efficiency, the development efforts will surely pay off in sales volumes if it is properly projected.
The buyers can be convinced of specific advantages of such systems. They can be told of features which have to be included in tender document so that low efficiency suppliers can be weeded out even if they are cheap. Anyone ( I mean any, including a govt official ) would like to have a better system.
Any link or reference for Farookh Abdulla and Deepak gupta in solar energy space?

@ dewanand

There is a mis-conception about colonialism in the mind of those who don't stay in India. No such thing exists in current time.
Anyway 90% etc are dream figures . There are several small and rich countries in tropical regions who would surely have gone for solar electricity/power if that was possible.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2011 21:10 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 09 Jan 2010 13:30
Posts: 7367
CSP is a relatively new technology. GOI has gone into this a pilot phase. IIT Mumbai has one such plant sanctioned and will be commissioned in due course. Gujrat is setting up tidal power plant on commercial scale, probably a first for the country.

It is not correct for a country to invest in one technology to produce 90 % of energy which in any case difficult for India to do so given the massive requirement and demand.Diversification is good. And there is no need to call for Indian people a stupid and insult here.

You're most welcome to come and work or help. I keep meeting many good intentioned people from abroad and they do their bit in a polite and helpful way. But remember India is massive country by any measure unlike tiny countries which strut around in international arena cocksure of themselves unmindful of how tiny they look to Indians. India is a blessed country and so it has survived for 5000 yrs despite ups and downs. It has welcomed all and you are also welcome.

Vashudhaiva Kutumbakam


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2011 21:10 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 11 Apr 2007 09:22
Posts: 11811
I think all renewable energies could be discussed in one thread. There used to be one. Proliferation of dhaagas in this areas is encouraging and good sign but one dhaaga will be nice. Where is the IB4TL crowd?

Added:
Mods: Here is that dhaaga, I searched it out for you guys {praise to me} viewtopic.php?p=677989#p677989


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Feb 2011 22:18 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 09 Jan 2010 13:30
Posts: 7367
SSSalvi wrote:
@ Chaanakya

Chaanakya Bandhu,

Sorry for my ignorance. From the posts in other thread you seem to be related with solar energy management. Is there any effort in cell development in any Indian fabrication facility?
Chinese quality is well known so any quality conscious supplier who wants to seriously establish himself would not venture for it.

What I meant by research that was even with existing panels efficiency can be increased by concentrating reflectors/tracking etc. Simple but effective solutions exist in web-space for these purposes. If someone brings in that efficiency, the development efforts will surely pay off in sales volumes if it is properly projected.
The buyers can be convinced of specific advantages of such systems. They can be told of features which have to be included in tender document so that low efficiency suppliers can be weeded out even if they are cheap. Anyone ( I mean any, including a govt official ) would like to have a better system.
Any link or reference for Farookh Abdulla and Deepak gupta in solar energy space?



I think it is a misspelling of Dr Farooq Abdullah F/o Omar Abdullah
Currently Cabinet minister for Ministry of new and Renewable Energy Sources. From all the speeches I heard from him, I get the impression that he is prime mover for Solar Mission. Deepak Gupta is Secretary of that Ministry and quite capable officer.

I am not in to solar energy management.Sorry for causing mis-perception.(I do read a lot and try to gather information and knowledge as much as possible)

As for cell fabrication and research in the solar energy field (incl csp tech) part of fund earmarked for solar mission is for research and MNRE would be looking at any worthwhile proposal to fund, even fully. They want to tap potential of institutions like IITs and NITs and some guidelines etc have been issued. One cell fabrication facility will be coming up perhaps in Karnataka or TN Currently prefabricated wafers with connectors are brought and converted to SPV. There are plans to encourage setting up of Silicon Ingot production facility in India and Moser Baer and Relinace would be looking at the opportunities.

Most of the front-line researches are happening in USA where some of the organisation have achieved 40% conversion efficiency and claimed more.
http://www.physorg.com/news99904887.html
Quote:
The Spectrolab group experimented with concentrator multijunction solar cells that use high intensities of sunlight, the equivalent of 100s of suns, concentrated by lenses or mirrors. Significantly, the multijunction cells can also use the broad range of wavelengths in sunlight much more efficiently than single-junction cells.

19% is rated industry standard and 14 % usual efficiency.Degradation over time is one issue which affects power output.
Single crystalline/poly Crystalline and thin film technologies are what seems to be doing the rounds. Project developers in solar fields are very much aware of benefits of efficiency factor and they do weigh in cost of capital employed and IRR for the project vis a vis technology employed. Pilot plants are the best ways to check new technologies and that is what MNRE would be doing.

Now coming to your second para
Quote:
What I meant by research that was even with existing panels efficiency can be increased by concentrating reflectors/tracking etc. Simple but effective solutions exist in web-space for these purposes. If someone brings in that efficiency, the development efforts will surely pay off in sales volumes if it is properly projected.
The buyers can be convinced of specific advantages of such systems. They can be told of features which have to be included in tender document so that low efficiency suppliers can be weeded out even if they are cheap. Anyone ( I mean any, including a govt official ) would like to have a better system.


Yes it can be done and is being done and institutions are encourage to/funded to do research in this area.

Tracking would increase efficiency by 15-20% which is huge for 100 MWp capacity power project. Tracking mechanism would consume about 5% of energy produced so net gain is about 10% to 15%.( actuals)But current cost of tracking mechanism is prohibitive and simple mechanism needs to be developed within the country. I saw one such equipment from a foreign firm with long feature list . CSP thing has good potential.Spain is one of the country into this tech and they have 100 MWp plant.

I think if someone like to bring efficiency at small scale ( say 35%) It would have great future in India. Solar Landscape would be changing fast if first phase proves successful. But need is to bring in a stable regulatory environment where facility provider consumer and dicoms would feel safe in investing in this area. That is being done ( at our usual pace) .

Two things are worth noticing
Renewable Energy Certificates to facilitate easy sell and purchase of RE energy. Electricity Regulatory Commissions are fixing renewable purchase obligation for discoms. Under solar mission each discom would have to purchase 1 unit of RE for 4 units pf FE ( fossil energy) Shortfall could be met by RECs. State Load Dispatch Centres would certify and issue RECs. Regulation would come soon.

Second thing is pCDM route ( Programmatic Clean Development Mechanism)to develop Roof top and house hold solar power projects. This , if successful , might change the financing pattern and bring in efficiency of SPV and lower the cost of system.

The target is to bring parity with fossil fuel power generation ( at Rs 1.20 per unit, current prices) by 2032. USA also plans for the same. I think when more systems are installed , cost would certainly come down and investors would look for more and more efficiency of the system

SSSalvi garu, you had an outstanding career and I am sure you can use your expertise to direct research in this field. If you have some ideas in pipeline I would advise you to send your proposals (preferably in collaboration with NIT or IIT or with SNA in your state) to Mr Gupta Your credentials are enough to get his attention.

I hope I have answered you somewhere in rambling paras. :oops:

ps :

Image
Dr Abdullah, Mr Gupta in the frame.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 10 Feb 2011 11:14 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 23 Jan 2007 19:35
Posts: 363
Location: Hyderabad
^^^^
Oh a great information flood ... thanks for the same.


I have no business or monetary interests. Still sending ideas does not cost anything so will attempt it surely.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 10 Feb 2011 18:18 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 09 Jan 2010 13:30
Posts: 7367
SSSalvi wrote:
^^^^
Oh a great information flood ... thanks for the same.


I have no business or monetary interests. Still sending ideas does not cost anything so will attempt it surely.


Thanks, if anything more is required I can give info on that. And I am not talking about business or monetray interests for you, Ideas and interest in directing research or pilot projects for the mission would be a great thing with your calibre and which organisation wouldn't do that. being new field new ideas are certainly required.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 10 Feb 2011 18:30 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 23 Jan 2007 19:35
Posts: 363
Location: Hyderabad
Could not find topic on Wave Power Generator , hence posting here.

Quote:
Using a small tank of water in a Colorado laboratory, Air Force researchers have captured 99 percent of the energy of a model ocean wave, proving it’s possible to use aeronautical principles to harness the power of the oceans.
The researchers used a cycloidal turbine, a lift-based energy converter, to grab the energy of a simulated deep-ocean wave. It can change direction almost instantly, and its structure is similar to that of a Voith Schneider propeller, which is used to power tugboats.
It involves a main power shaft and a few hydrofoils whose angle of attack can be adjusted to meet the wave. The main shaft is aligned parallel with the wave crests, according to a paper describing the system presented at an American Society of Mechanical Engineers conference.
The entire concept is not unlike a helicopter propulsion system, which involves shifting the angle of attack of the main rotor blades to move the helicopter sideways or to pitch forward and back. That explains why Air Force aeronautics researchers are involved — some of the people working on this project have studied fluid dynamics for military aircraft and NASA spacecraft, according to an Air Force news release.


The aerodynamic gurus of BR could throw some light on principles used.

Intermediate Ocean Wave Termination Using a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter
http://scitation.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=ASMECP002010049118000293000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes&ref=no

Using Aeronautical Principles, Air Force Researchers Capture Wave Energy With 99 Percent Efficiency
http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2011-02/using-aeronautical-principles-air-force-researchers-capture-wave-energy-99-percent-efficiency


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 10 Mar 2011 22:14 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 09 Nov 2006 03:27
Posts: 1516
India eyes wind, solar project expansion
http://www.constructionweekonline.com/a ... expansion/

IFC, Gujarat Energy body in pact for solar power project
http://www.moneycontrol.com/news/busine ... 28774.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 11 Mar 2011 09:04 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 01 Feb 2009 21:07
Posts: 4041
can't solar energy be used to heat water and generate steam? by the means of concave or plain mirrors.. much more efficient than photovoltaic cells, no?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 11 Mar 2011 10:54 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 13 Apr 2005 01:55
Posts: 373
^^^ Yes, IIRC it is cheaper than photovoltaic solar power generation. There is a desert in California that has such a thermal solar power plant. I think it's in Mojave.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 11 Mar 2011 12:56 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 30 Dec 2005 18:28
Posts: 10161
Location: Kali blessing station No 5, Mleccha Defence Tower No 34, Harshavardhan Line - Western Sector
CSP = concentrated solar power - the mirrors concentrate sunlight into a tiny core which reaches extremely high temperatures, which is then used to heat water
there is one in spain also


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 14 Mar 2011 02:42 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 09 Nov 2006 03:27
Posts: 1516
Solar energy growing in India
http://www.biofuelswatch.com/solar-ener ... -in-india/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 21 Mar 2011 13:33 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 16 Mar 2006 15:40
Posts: 788
Location: Out on other planet
Delayed Solar-Power Plants Face Fines as India's Gujarat Sets Precedent
Link

Quote:
By Natalie Obiko Pearson - Mar 10, 2011 1:30 PM GMT+1100
inShare.0More

India, which has an average 300 sunny days a year, will impose fines on solar-power plants that delay start-ups in the country’s largest program to harness energy from sunlight, a state government official said.

“There will be some penalty,” S.B. Patil, senior executive of solar and wind at the state-run Gujarat Energy Development Agency, said in an interview. Five of six projects that agreed to start operating by 2011 were delayed, including one by New Jersey-based Zeba Solar Inc., he said.


Gujarat state has led India’s nascent solar industry, awarding licenses for 959 megawatts to developers seeking a foothold in a state-subsidized renewable energy market. The first 48.5 megawatts were required start operating by Dec. 31, according to a list obtained by Bloomberg News from Gujarat Urja Vikas Nigam Ltd., the state-run company that will buy the power.

How Gujarat deals with delayed projects sets a precedent for India’s Solar Mission, a nationwide program that calls for 20,000 megawatts of capacity by 2022, or the equivalent of about 18 new nuclear reactors. The Solar Mission awarded its first 620 megawatts of capacity in December.

“The way these defaulting projects are dealt with would set examples for other projects in the pipeline,” said Bharat Bhushan, a New Delhi-based analyst with Bloomberg New Energy Finance. “If deadlines are not strictly enforced, more project defaults could be expected.”

Rains, Technology Delays
India is seeking to ramp up the sector with estimates showing it may have among the highest solar potential in the world. The nation’s sunny days may provide as much as 5,000 trillion kilowatt-hours per year of solar energy equivalent, far exceeding its total energy consumption of 848 billion kilowatt- hours, according to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy.

Companies agreed to penalties that were laid out in their power purchase agreements, Patil said. “They will be charged accordingly,” he said. The penalties for delays in beginning operations are 10,000 rupees ($222) a day per megawatt for the first 60 days and 15,000 rupees thereafter, according to the state power company that contracted to buy the electricity.

Lanco Infratech Ltd. (LANCI), the Hyderabad-based developer that completed its 5-megawatt allotment on Dec. 20, is the only company that met the deadline. Five projects awarded to Azure Power of New Delhi, Zeba Solar, Germany’s Dreisatz GmbH and MI MySolar24 Ltd. weren’t completed.

Azure, which built a 2-megawatt plant in Punjab, said the first phases of two plants were delayed to the end of March by unseasonably heavy rains. The company was supposed to have completed 3.5 megawatts by now, according to the list.

“We declared force majeure,” said Inderpreet Wadhwa, the company’s chief executive officer, whose investors include Helion Venture Partners, Foundation Capital and the private investment arm of the World Bank. Force majeure is an exemption to contract obligations due to unanticipated or uncontrollable events.

Zeba Solar decided to switch to thin-film technology to build a more efficient plant, pushing its completion date back to August, said President Shahal Khan by telephone.

“We were okay with delaying for a few months and paying penalties to have something we can showcase,” Khan said. “There are many people out there that are just rushing to meet deadlines without really looking at quality control.”


Dreisatz was assessing the situation, said Dirk Detzner, a project manager at the company, declining to comment further.

The owner of MI MySolar24 couldn’t be identified.

To contact the reporter on this story: Natalie Obiko Pearson in Mumbai at npearson7@bloomberg.net.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 21 Mar 2011 16:19 
Offline
BRFite -Trainee

Joined: 28 May 2010 14:54
Posts: 14
Location: HOlland, delft city
Very good that India is ramping up on solar energy.

dewanand


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2011 14:08 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 16 Mar 2006 15:40
Posts: 788
Location: Out on other planet
Tata Power inks deal with Australian firm

Link

Quote:
Country's largest private power producer Tata Power announced its partnership with Australian company Sunengy for executing a solar power project in India this year.

"Australia-based solar power company Sunengy has entered into a partnership with Tata Power that will allow it to build a pilot plant for its low-cost, floating on water, solar technology in India by the end of this year," Tata Power said in a statement on Tuesday.

However, the company did not specify the financial details of the partnership.

Construction of the pilot plant in India will commence in August, 2011.

"This nascent technology will be demonstrated in natural environment, utilises the water surface for mounting and does not compete with land that can be used for other purposes," Tata Power Executive Director Banmali Agrawala said.

The deal was significant for the future use of solar globally, Sunengy Chairman and Executive Director (Business Development) Peter Wakeman said.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2011 22:25 
Offline
BRFite -Trainee

Joined: 28 May 2010 14:54
Posts: 14
Location: HOlland, delft city
yes, I read this on times of india today. Bad thing is that India does not do any research for new solar technology. India is not a Research country.

dewanand


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 22 Mar 2011 22:59 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 10 Apr 2002 11:31
Posts: 256
Quote:
Portable solar device creates potable water
March 22, 2011


Image
Jon Liow

By harnessing the power of the sun, a Monash University graduate has designed a simple, sustainable and affordable water-purification device, which has the potential to help eradicate disease and save lives.

The Solarball, developed as Mr Jonathan Liow’s final year project during his Bachelor of Industrial Design, can produce up to three litres of clean water every day. The spherical unit absorbs sunlight and causes dirty water contained inside to evaporate. As evaporation occurs, contaminants are separated from the water, generating drinkable condensation. The condensation is collected and stored, ready for drinking.

Liow’s design was driven by a need to help the 900 million people around the world who lack access to safe drinking water. Over two million children die annually from preventable causes, triggered largely by contaminated water. It is an increasing problem in developing nations due to rapid urbanisation and population growth.

Image

‘After visiting Cambodia in 2008, and seeing the immense lack of everyday products we take for granted, I was inspired to use my design skills to help others,’ Mr Liow said.


Mr Liow’s simple but effective design is user-friendly and durable, with a weather-resistant construction, making it well suited to people in hot, wet, tropical climates with limited access to resources.

‘The challenge was coming up with a way to make the device more efficient than other products available, without making it too complicated, expensive, or technical,’ Mr Liow said.

Image

Image

Image

Mr Liow, and a working prototype of his Solarball, was featured on ABC1’s ‘The New Inventors’. The product has been named as a finalist in the 2011 Australian Design Awards - James Dyson Award. It will also be exhibited at the Milan International Design Fair (Salone Internazionale del Mobile) in April 2011.

Provided by Monash University


Physorg


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 23 Mar 2011 03:49 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 09 Nov 2006 03:27
Posts: 1516
Tata Power to build India's first floating solar plant
http://www.moneycontrol.com/news/busine ... 31185.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 23 Mar 2011 16:03 
Offline
BRFite -Trainee

Joined: 28 May 2010 14:54
Posts: 14
Location: HOlland, delft city
India is far behind research and innovation. How can this be changed in future?

dewanand


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 25 Mar 2011 09:12 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 03 Oct 2002 11:31
Posts: 3873
Location: Smoking Piskobidis
Quote:
Expert Opinion


Sunlight and Water to Power Homes




With some sunlight and less than two bottles of water, MIT professor and entrepreneur Daniel G Nocera says he can produce enough electricity to power an entire household in the developing world. The technology has attracted the attention of Tata Group chairman Ratan Tata, who has invested $9.5 million in Nocera’s firm — Sun Catalytix — as part of its series B funding round with participation from existing investor, Polaris Venture Partners, as well as other investors. Nocera spoke to Peerzada Abrar of The Economic Times, on the sidelines of a technology conference organised by MIT’s magazine for innovation, ‘Technology Review’.

VISION

Science does a lousy job of addressing problems at the bottomof-the-pyramid and does very little to produce energy for the poor. The Energy sector demands a lot of capex and the belief is that a firm will not get any return on investment if they focus on the poor. This is what we want to change. We are not helping the poor; it is they who are helping us. The poor will teach the world new ways for generating energy.

CHALLENGES

Rising living standards of a growing world population will cause global energy consumption to increase dramatically over the next half century. Within our lifetimes, energy consumption will increase at least two-fold. The additional energy needed is simply not attainable from nuclear, biomass, wind, geothermal and hydroelectric sources.
Sunlight is by far the most abundant global carbon-neutral energy resource. Sunlight has the greatest potential of any power source to solve the world’s energy problems. In one hour, enough sunlight strikes the Earth to provide the entire planet’s energy needs for one year.

TECHNOLOGY

However, the major problem with solar energy is to have a cost-effective means of storing it. We have imitated photosynthesis performed by plants to crack water efficiently into hydrogen and oxygen and store the resulting hydrogen as fuel in a tank and later used to produce electricity. If I take one and a half bottles of water, it would give 2.5 kilowatt-hours in a day, which will run one little house. The stumbling block was developing a catalyst that would not corrode. We have recently overcome this problem by developing self-healing catalysts.

INDIA CONNECTION

Ratan Tata stands as an equal partner in our firm. He was very interested in us from the start. And I didn’t understand it, but now I do. It really is this idea of frugal innovation. Without knowing much about science, he figured out that at some point it is going to be sunlight plus water that will power the world. To do it low-cost is the whole mission of Sun Catalytix.

FUTURE PLANS

We need only one-third the amount of water in a swimming pool to be converted to hydrogen and oxygen per second to solve the world’s energy problems. At the end it has to be a full energy system. You might want many grids and then make a bigger system. We don’t know whether our first product will be for Tata Power. There are lots of options for renewable energy. That is what is being worked out now. I don’t have the answers for that. I am just a scientist.


ET, 25 March 11


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 25 Mar 2011 09:15 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 03 Oct 2002 11:31
Posts: 3873
Location: Smoking Piskobidis
Dewanand, you asked and Ahona Ghos Replies in ET of 25 March '11

Quote:
Making Hay While The Sun Shines Bright

A clutch of emerging companies are piping solar power in to the national grid and building solar lighting devices as investor attention flares across the sector. Ahona Ghosh tracks the emerging sector.

India’s energy shortfall is proving to be the spur for growing entrepreneurial action in the solar power sector.
As the country grapples with nearly 10% less power than it actually requires, renewable sources such as solar are being viewed as a viable solution. This, in turn, is generating business for young companies and gaining investor attention. Investors have backed over a dozen solar companies in the past three years.

The National Solar Mission is expected to provide an investment opportunity of over $50 billion in the Indian market, with its target of generating 20 gw by 2020, according to the latest Cleantech Report by research firm Venture Intelligence.

“Solar sector has low construction and operating risks. Prices of solar panels are reducing every year, making this power source a competitive business sector in coming years,” says Shalabh Tandon, head of Power for Asia, IFC, the investment arm of the World Bank. It has invested in two solar companies in 2010.

In the last three years, a total of $294 million of private equity funding has gone into 13 solar companies. For investors, solar is where the action is, but it will take time for this interest to translate into deals, say industry watchers. The Indian Resource Centre, which tracks the power situation in the country, estimates that the gap between supply and demand for power in India will drop to 6% by 2020, down from 10% in 2009, with solar power viewed as a strong alternative power source.

This trend in India is contradictory to what is happening in developed markets, where investors are moving away from solar investments. In fact, clean tech seems to have lost momentum in the US. According to Siddhartha Das, general partner at VenturEast, the US is shifting its focus to other parts of the solar value chain. “Instead of investing in solar technology, they are focusing more on solar power projects now,” says Das.

Germany, a pioneer in the solar technology market where government policies required utilities to pay above market prices for solar-generated electricity, has now cut back on subsidies post the recession. Globally, solar markets have grown due to feed in tariff subsidies.

In India, however, entrepreneurs are innovating with a mix of business models and consumer financing options to drive this fast-growing market. For instance In India, the government does not give any subsidy to off-grid solar device players who make lanterns and other lighting devices.

So start-ups such as Dlight Design, which makes and markets solar lighting devices are partnering with organisations that have a last-mile reach in remote areas, such as NGOs, micro-finance institutions (MFIs), self help groups and rural retail chains.
The company has reached one million people in rural India with their solar power plug-and-play devices.

Mandeep Singh, managing director, Dlight Design, India and Nepal, says his biggest battle is against subsidy. “Compare the cost of acquiring a kerosene lamp at 150 to the cost of acquiring a decent solar lantern at 1,500, even though the latter investment pays back in 12-18 months and becomes virtually free from then on,” he says.

FUND IN NEED

Therefore the market for Solar in India will kick start only when business models package the financing aspect as seamlessly as a car loan. A case in point is Intelizon, a VenturEast funded company that addresses the power needs of rural homes using solar driven technologies.

Kushant Uppal, CEO of Intelizon, says the company’s sales jumped up 3 to 5 times when he tied up the financing with microfinance institutions, banks and distributors.

Similarly, in New Kalinga village in Orissa, Dlight tied up with SKS microfinance to sell solar lighting devices. SKS gave loans to the villagers who paid an EMI for their solar lanterns. But now, Singh is looking for alternative ways to ease consumer financing because of the ongoing MFI crisis. Dlight has garnered a total investment of $12 million from a clutch of VC investors such as Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Nexus Venture Partners and Gray Matters Capital.

POWER BOOST

While everyone is talking of large-scale power plants, Hari Kiran Chereddi, managing director of Sujana Energy, believes the future lies in smaller, modular and distributed power plants as each community can then generate their own energy locally. This cuts transmission loss when power is piped in from high-voltage transmission lines over long distances.

Sujana is in talks with PE investors to raise $100 million for scaling up. “The Indian market has a lot of traction and is gearing up for a spurt of growth,” says Chereddi. Till date, they have made an investment of $25 million from their parent company. They are at various stages of developing 400mw of solar power and concentrated photovoltaic power plants by FY 2014 and are also looking to accelerate growth through acquisitions.

Chereddi says a key idea for sustainability is innovation. “Companies with holistic energy strategies and newer business models are poised to succeed.”

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

While the cost of solar power per watt has been coming down dramatically (globally at 18-22 cents/kWh), it is still not at par with conventional sources priced at between 10 and 15 cents/kWh. Inderpreet Wadhwa, CEO of Azure Power, a solar power generation company, says the challenge is to get takers to buy this power at higher cost.

Unlike conventional power prices, which are dependent on the cost of raw materials, there is no raw material cost for solar power. When prices of coal rise, so will conventional energy prices. “The benefit for solar technology is that I can guarantee a fixed price 10, 20, 30 years down the line,” says Wadhwa. The only cost solar power projects have to bear is that of capital required to set up the plant. Price predictability over the life of a plant, usually around 25 years, is the benefit. “The government in India understands this and is playing the role of a buyer of power through its policy framework,” says Wadhwa.

Azure has received funding from Helion Venture Partners, IFC and Foundation Capital. Azure is currently constructing a 17 mw plant. In three years, Wadhwa plans to scale up to 100mw by increasing the existing capacity and adding newer projects.

“Several private companies are investing in solar energy sector and PE firms are likely to benefit by investing early in these companies with reducing input costs,” says Tandon of IFC. Applied Solar Technologies, one of the companies IFC invested in, is an off-grid based hybrid power provider to telecom towers in India. IFC invested $5.5 million in equity and provided $10 million loan to the company.

Despite the support of the ecosystem, there are concerns for entrepreneurs. The bidding process for power purchase agreements goes to the lowest bidder who may not have the necessary technological abilities to set up such a plant. “Today, existing technology from Spain or Germany or US is being applied in India, we need to create our own innovative technologies localised to our needs,” points out Chereddi.

Other challenges include the lack of depth in debt markets and the lack of talent in the sector. Indian banks look for balance sheet funding, because of which a lot of growing companies are unable to attract projectbased funding, driving up the cost of debt. Says Ramesh Venkat, CEO of Reliance Private Equity: “In solar technology, particularly many of the emerging opportunities in India lack scale, though over the years this will change dramatically.”

Apart from scale, solar companies also need a longer gestation period. According to Venkat, it makes them more suitable for VC funding rather than PE. “PE firms require different set of skills to work with. Such companies offer an exit window of 5-7 years,” says Venkat.

Industry watchers point out that the return on investment in solar is pitched between 12-18%. Solar power projects, on a utility scale, would give higher returns and is more a PE play as is the manufacturing sector like the Moser Baer PV cell manufacturing project. For off-grid devices like solar lamps and technology innovation, venture capital is a better option.

Clearly, with both money and government support available, entrepreneurs can quite literally make hay while the sun shines.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 25 Mar 2011 09:18 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 03 Oct 2002 11:31
Posts: 3873
Location: Smoking Piskobidis
Gujarat is pioneer in Solar energy

visit

http://www.geda.org.in/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 25 Mar 2011 14:37 
Offline
BRFite -Trainee

Joined: 28 May 2010 14:54
Posts: 14
Location: HOlland, delft city
this is really great news. I want INDia to become leader in solar technology, but this will not happen overnight.

dewanand


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 13 Apr 2011 04:35 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 09 Nov 2006 03:27
Posts: 1516
PLG Power launches 40MW solar plant
http://www.pv-tech.org/news/plg_power_l ... olar_plant

BHEL in JV with BEL for solar PV plant
http://www.business-standard.com/india/ ... nt/431828/

India can lead solar revolution
http://www.mydigitalfc.com/op-ed/india- ... lution-234


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 13 Apr 2011 12:47 
Offline
BRFite -Trainee

Joined: 28 May 2010 14:54
Posts: 14
Location: HOlland, delft city
The holy and ancient Vedas promote clean energy and that's why Hindus must heavily invest in solar technology and become world leaders. It is our holy duty to do this for the sake of the Hindu Dharm.

I wrote an article in Dutch about a Hindu fundamentalistic view on solar energy and I will translate it to English this year, to spread this information in India.

dewanand


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2011 12:01 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 16 Mar 2006 15:40
Posts: 788
Location: Out on other planet
Lanco sees big potential in solar energy sector

Quote:
Lanco Solar, a subsidiary of Lanco Inbfratech, sees big potential in the solar energy sector in Gujarat and is making large investments in the state to make the most of the opportunity, a senior company official said on Thursday.

Lanco Solar has already setup a 5mw solar power generation plant in Gujarat and plans to scale it up to 35mw by the end of the year. The company is also eyeing Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) projects in solar power sector in the state.

“Our 5mw solar power plant in Patan is already operational. We are setting up two more solar power plants, totalling 30mw, which are going to be commissioned before 2011 end," V Saibaba, CEO, Lanco Solar, told DNA.

Saibaba said that Lanco has already invested Rs140 crore in solar power generation in the state and would invest an additional Rs400 crore in the coming months to increase solar power generation capacity.

“The projects are being funded by a mix of debt and equity," he said.

Asked about difficulties in raising finance for solar power projects, Saibaba said that there were certain challenges and banks had to be convinced for giving funds for solar power projects.

“There is the fear of the unknown. There are certain difficulties because bankers and financial institutions are not aware of solar power technology and the returns. But, their fears are misplaced," he said.

The company CEO said that they were expecting to generate power worth Rs77 crore per year once the full 35mw capacity is commissioned.

In response to a question about choosing Gujarat for the solar power project, Saibaba said, “We chose Gujarat mainly because of two reasons. Firstly, due to excellent solar radiation, and secondly due to progressive policies of the state government."

Lanco is also eyeing EPC contracts for building of solar power projects in the state. “We are in discussions with developers of 30-40mw of solar power projects for EPC contracts. Talks are at advanced stages for two such projects totalling 15mw," he said.

Lanco Solar also plans to setup a plant to manufacture components for solar power plants in Gujarat. Saibaba said that they are considering a couple of locations for the plant.


link


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 25 Apr 2011 09:41 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 31 May 2004 11:31
Posts: 4070
Location: The rings around Uranus.
dewanand wrote:
The holy and ancient Vedas promote clean energy and that's why Hindus must heavily invest in solar technology and become world leaders. It is our holy duty to do this for the sake of the Hindu Dharm.

I wrote an article in Dutch about a Hindu fundamentalistic view on solar energy and I will translate it to English this year, to spread this information in India.

dewanand


Well, the Vedas could have been talking about clean and renewable energy from nuclear fusion, which is after all the power of the sun! :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 25 Apr 2011 13:05 
Offline
BRFite -Trainee

Joined: 28 May 2010 14:54
Posts: 14
Location: HOlland, delft city
yes, this year I must make time to study the Vedas. At this moment I am busy with the translation of a manuscript to Dutch about the Vedas, 300 pages. I learn a lot. Many things are so astounding for me.

I live in Holland and here there is welfare, with high wages. I think that India can do better if they use their brains and invest in cheap and clean solar energy. Maybe in future I will settle in India if I will be fifty years of age.

bye

dewanand


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 27 Apr 2011 11:39 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 31 Mar 2006 02:15
Posts: 6377
Location: Still in transit....
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-1 ... -says.html

Quote:
“If everybody is going to compete at the same time for resources, for contractors, for mechanical fabrication or labor, the cost is bound to go up,” said Subramaniam, who heads the engineering, procurement and construction activities of Moser Baer’s solar unit. “They may not be available for completion in time.”

India, which averages 300 sunny days a year, has awarded licenses to build 1,579 megawatts of capacity under two solar programs that aim to create one of the world’s biggest markets for producing electricity from the sun. Most of that capacity needs to be completed this year or developers risk fines.

Developers need to select contractors by May 31 if they’re to complete their projects on time, he said. Moser Baer is in talks for some of those contracts, he said, declining to elaborate.

The central government awarded licenses in December for 620 megawatts to be built under its national Solar Mission program, which calls for 20,000 megawatts of solar power capacity by 2022. Gujarat, under its own state-level program, has awarded an additional 959 megawatts of capacity.

India’s currently has less than 18 megawatts of grid- connected solar power, according to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 27 Apr 2011 12:41 
Offline
BRFite -Trainee

Joined: 28 May 2010 14:54
Posts: 14
Location: HOlland, delft city
india must invest three percent of its GDP into solar energy.

dewanand


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 28 Apr 2011 03:27 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 31 Mar 2006 02:15
Posts: 6377
Location: Still in transit....
That would be more than our defense expenditure. Nothing quite so drastic is needed.

Right now Solar Thermal costs 10 Crore to 15 Crore per Megawatt capacity installed. PV is 20 Crore per Megawatt or so. The Sivaganga 5 MW facility cost Rs 100 Crore. I think with time these costs will drop dramatically in India, esp. WRT our previous experience with wind turbines.

So say we can install a 1000 MW Solar Thermal facility for Rs 10,000 crore or so. If we want about 5000 MW installed per year, we need Rs 50,000 crore or so annually. Or about $10 Billion. This is about 0.6% of our GDP at present.

This the inside of Moser Baer's PV facility. Pretty clean.
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 512 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 13  Next

All times are UTC + 5:30 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group