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PostPosted: 22 Nov 2011 16:58 
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Singha wrote:
I would rather Akash become our std, agile and world - class missile in the 5km - 35km range and make life very difficult for any intruder rather than be sluggish and big in the s300 sense. the MK2 idea looks right - not much increase if any in airframe size but systems to change.

the ground based radars can continue to change and improve.

at some point the Barak8(IAF/IA), Spyder and Akash control systems should be integrated and hence Akash radars will provide the cues to Spyder well before targets enter the Spyder range...and likewise Barak8 for Akash.


Very valid point instead user must decide and command to kill only system will decide which missile to use, Barak or Aakash or Spyder.


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PostPosted: 24 Nov 2011 12:01 
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Raghuraj wrote:
Singha wrote:
I would rather Akash become our std, agile and world - class missile in the 5km - 35km range and make life very difficult for any intruder rather than be sluggish and big in the s300 sense. the MK2 idea looks right - not much increase if any in airframe size but systems to change.

the ground based radars can continue to change and improve.

at some point the Barak8(IAF/IA), Spyder and Akash control systems should be integrated and hence Akash radars will provide the cues to Spyder well before targets enter the Spyder range...and likewise Barak8 for Akash.


Very valid point instead user must decide and command to kill only system will decide which missile to use, Barak or Aakash or Spyder.


Akash is not a SAM its a area defense system. But if we could put our ground defense with awacs then indian aerospace would become impreganable.
I don't know about the MR-SAM, i haven't see its specifications.
My understanding of the Area defense is that it's a highly networked with multiple targets being engaged with multiple batteries
My two paisa


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PostPosted: 24 Nov 2011 12:15 
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Akash philosophy was simple and cheap missile, with complex ground based C3 system. we must resist the temptation to slap in a active radar seeker , instead seek better airframe, nimbleness, warhead and propellant solns to make it sleeker (each TELAR to carry 6 rather than 3)..while continuing to refine the costly ground based elements of this.

a good seamless merger or handoff between MRSAM->Akash->Spyder C3 network is a must as each will engage the 'leakers' from its next layer and get additional data and warmup time to orient themselves and plan engagements on multiple bogies.


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PostPosted: 24 Nov 2011 12:52 
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singha sir i have doubt
1.How is the active seeker better than sophisticated a radio proximity switch(The one with signal processing acting as Anti Radiation detector)?My understanding is that active seeker would be prone to chaffs(aluminium chaffs)?
2.How is TrackViaMissile(TVM) is different from the Akash guidance system?

Move it to newbie if it basic.

I still see barak as SAM system .I haven't heard about networking and sensor fusion.


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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011 07:05 
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All fired-up on the missile front.

In May 1989, the Agni technology demonstrator was successfully launched with around 1,000 km range. In two decades, the technology demonstrator has transformed into a large programme, which has seen the successful development and launch of four versions of the missile — Agni I to the latest Agni-IV.

This ambitious journey — begun by India's missile man, A. P. J. Abdul Kalam and led now by ‘missile woman', Tessy Thomas (Agni-IV) now — is marked by indigenous technology effort. In the face of stiff technology denials, the country's missile scientists have made some significant contributions in technology, establishing new materials and spurring the domestic industry to play a greater role.

There have been a fair share of failures and delays in this multi-million dollar Agni programme, which is targeted to give India the capability to launch Inter Continental Ballistic Missiles (ICBM) and provide a strong deterrence. After 23 years, Agni-I (700 km), Agni-II (1500 km) have been inducted into the armed forces, while Agni-III (2500 km) is in an advanced stage and Agni-IV (3500 km), has been successfully test fired on November 15.

The Agni-IV is not just India's longest range missile, but is lighter, manoeuvrable, robust and capable of high acceleration. It has established a wide range of indigenous technologies, and given the perfect platform for launching Agni-V, in early 2012. The success of the ICBM would put India in the exclusive club of nations which can launch them — US, Russia, China and France.

INDIGENOUS ELEMENTS
Perhaps, the most important and visible indigenous contribution to the Agni missile are the composite materials that are used in its fabrication. Composites are lightweight, non-corrosive, tough materials. Composites are used in most of the Agni-IV missile — beginning with the critical nose tip of the missile (which is crucial as the missile re-enters the earth's atmosphere at around 3000 degrees C) to nearly 60 per cent of the 20 metre tall, 17 tonne heavy structure.

This makes the missile lighter, manoeuvrable, easy to operate and launch. Moreover, the higher the composites the lesser the cost of manufacturing the missile. All this means a cost-effective missile with a longer reach and destructive ability.

Composites are of use in making lightweight boots for the polio-affected, and in tennis racquets and in medical devices. The DRDO also established its own in-house composite production centre.

The composite rocket motor casing, which has been successfully tested in Agni-IV, was developed by the Advanced Systems Laboratory (ASL) a few years ago. It is made of carbon filament-wound composite. Interestingly, a private industry based in Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, has fabricated it for the DRDO.

In the civil and defence sectors, maraging steels are commonly used to make motor casings. The Hyderabad-based, state-owned Midhani Steels produces the special steels to meet the needs of the strategic sector. It is tough but heavier. Since a lighter missile can be transported quickly and can carry higher payloads over longer distances, big players have been looking for composite materials. The ASL is working towards the goal of making a missile completely out of composites.

A major advantage of a composite casing it that it cuts down costs by nearly half compared with the maraging steel version. Since they are not prone to corrosion, the life of a stored missile is longer. EADS, the leading European consortia, the US and Russia are capable of making it now. For the coming generation of long-range missiles, composites would be the key material, says Mr. Avinash Chander, Chief Controller (Strategic Missile Systems).

TECHNOLOGY TIE-UPS
The synergy between the DRDO labs, Indian industry and the user (armed forces) has resulted in the successful march of the missile programme in the last decade. The missile system is homegrown.

The fabrication, airframes, propulsion systems, the fuel, flex nozzle system, the on-board communication and control systems, the software, the mobile launchers and the tracking systems, the integrated safety and security systems have been developed and tested.

The defence scientists also came up with a technology that helps increase the range of missiles as well as satellite launch vehicles by approximately 40 per cent. Giants like L&T to Tatas and Godrej, PSUs like BDL, HAL, BEL, Keltech, ECIL to a number of private industry like Data Patterns, Sameer, Vem Tech, SEC Industries, Astra Microwave, Resins Allied Products, Walchandnagar etc. have played a big role.

In the entire cycle of missile development to production, a couple of areas where domestic expertise is required are in select electronics, sensors and radar systems. There are collaborations with Israel and France in the area of radars. Similarly, some of the private industry players have forged joint ventures and tie-ups to make sophisticated electronic components.

But, with technology denials still not eased on India, it is vital to acquire the technology in these areas for the acceleration and reliability of the missile armoury. It can also help in cutting down the time of design to delivery, which is around 10 years, to a more desirable five or seven years.

The stage is now set for Agni-5. The platform is ready and efforts are geared up to be test-fired in February, 2012. All that is required is to scale up Agni-IV, say confident missile scientists.

With an expected distance of over 5,000 km to be traversed by the three-stage missile, on trial will be the quality and robustness of components and systems fabricated by the industry and critical technologies indigenously developed by the scientists.


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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011 11:20 
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Vipul wrote:
All fired-up on the missile front.
----
The composite rocket motor casing, which has been successfully tested in Agni-IV, was developed by the Advanced Systems Laboratory (ASL) a few years ago. It is made of carbon filament-wound composite. Interestingly, a private industry based in Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, has fabricated it for the DRDO.

In the civil and defence sectors, maraging steels are commonly used to make motor casings. The Hyderabad-based, state-owned Midhani Steels produces the special steels to meet the needs of the strategic sector. It is tough but heavier. Since a lighter missile can be transported quickly and can carry higher payloads over longer distances, big players have been looking for composite materials. The ASL is working towards the goal of making a missile completely out of composites.

A major advantage of a composite casing is that it cuts down costs by nearly half compared with the maraging steel version. Since they are not prone to corrosion, the life of a stored missile is longer. EADS, the leading European consortia, the US and Russia are capable of making it now. For the coming generation of long-range missiles, composites would be the key material, says Mr. Avinash Chander, Chief Controller (Strategic Missile Systems).
----

This is good news. After the Agni-IV composite 2nd stage motor case, it will be the next big leap and probably the biggest leap to come for a while.


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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011 15:10 
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Comment which caught my eye in broadsword blog:
Quote:
1. Firstly you are saying 'But the Agni-2 Prime is the successor to the Agni-3'. That looks like a smokescreen.

The 2000 km Agni 2 was the base model for 700 km Agni 1 its trimmed down version and its slightly fatter & enhanced version is Agni 2 Prime, which has been renamed Agni 4 to confuse everyone.

Agreed the use of latest tech makes it a new missile but change in nomenclature doesnt make much difference as all of them carry payloads +- 1 ton.

2. Agni 3 on the other hand is a shorter and much fatter missile with 3000 km range and payload of +-2 tons. I say Agni 3 is the base model for Agni 5 because both are 1st cousins by weight and may probably by height also.

The only reason DRDO went for Agni 4 before Agni 5 (which was delayed by 1 year as Agni 2 Prime test in 2010 failed) was to validate one important thing. While Agni 2 and 3 have welded scaffoldings, Agni 2 Prime or Agni 4 looks seamlessly attached between stages.

Validating this was important for Agni 5 is supposed to be a road mobile canistered missile. There is big possibility that welded scaffolding of a missile in sealed container will get ruptured during the high pressure gas powered launch.

3 I dont see the point why will we need 2 missiles with same range. The answer is simple, there is no need.

As Agni 3 will be base model for Agni 5, once Agni 5 is tested Agni 3 will be of no use of Agni 3. Its evident from the fact by Dr Avinash Chander's statement that 5 test flights are enough for induction of the missile into armed forces. If that is so why then after all 5 test were done by 2010 it has still not been inducted. It wont be inducted.

4. In all probability Agni 4 will be the base model for Agni 3SL/KX/K4. India will go for MIRV warheads once Agni 5 is tested. Once MIRVs are prepared they will eventually find there way to Agni 5/3SL or the KX/K4 missiles.

5. Missile man APJ Abdul Kalam in a interview in 1989 (if i remember correctly) had said all Indian missiles will be dog missiles and their range can be extended whenever needed. So ultimately its the CEP that will matter for gauging a missiles effectiveness and not the payload.

Hope to get your views on this

Thanks

Joydeep Ghosh

Interesting points, IMHO....


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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011 15:24 
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the lighter composite casing of a 1st stage might permit making it smaller to get the same effect. even a 1m shorter 1st stage is a good +ve from compactness POV esp for SLBM application.


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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011 16:11 
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prabhug wrote:
I still see barak as SAM system .I haven't heard about networking and sensor fusion.

Barak 8's spec says that it is a ‘network-centric air defense’. It also says that it includes superior missile interceptors, the latest technology phased array radars, state-of-the-art command, control and communications, integrated with missionized land-based and airborne command and control, coupled with unmanned aerial sensors.


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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011 16:32 
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sum wrote:
Comment which caught my eye in broadsword blog:
Quote:
1. Firstly you are saying 'But the Agni-2 Prime is the successor to the Agni-3'. That looks like a smokescreen.
.......................

Hope to get your views on this

Thanks

Joydeep Ghosh

Interesting points, IMHO....


Soon after Agni -2 Prime Launch, I made these observations. India graduates to tailor made missiles


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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2011 06:03 
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Vipul wrote:
All fired-up on the missile front.

........................

There have been a fair share of failures and delays in this multi-million dollar Agni programme, which is targeted to give India the capability to launch Inter Continental Ballistic Missiles (ICBM) and provide a strong deterrence. After 23 years, Agni-I (700 km), Agni-II (1500 km) have been inducted into the armed forces, while Agni-III (2500 km) is in an advanced stage and Agni-IV (3500 km), has been successfully test fired on November 15.

The Agni-IV is not just India's longest range missile, but is lighter, manoeuvrable, robust and capable of high acceleration. It has established a wide range of indigenous technologies, and given the perfect platform for launching Agni-V, in early 2012. The success of the ICBM would put India in the exclusive club of nations which can launch them — US, Russia, China and France.



I wonder why Mr. Somashekhar decided to reduce the range of the missiles by a 1000 kms. Moreover, when comparing ranges he forgot to include the payload. Agni 3 with a payload of almost 2 tonnes can fly to a range of 3500 kms, with a reduced payload it can fly to > 4500 kms. And Agni 4 can fly 3000 kms with a payload of 1 ton. Yet again incorrect reporting on the part of a defence journalist.


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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2011 06:35 
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Vipul wrote:
All fired-up on the missile front.

........................

There have been a fair share of failures and delays in this multi-million dollar Agni programme, which is targeted to give India the capability to launch Inter Continental Ballistic Missiles (ICBM) and provide a strong deterrence. After 23 years, Agni-I (700 km), Agni-II (1500 km) have been inducted into the armed forces, while Agni-III (2500 km) is in an advanced stage and Agni-IV (3500 km), has been successfully test fired on November 15.

The Agni-IV is not just India's longest range missile, but is lighter, manoeuvrable, robust and capable of high acceleration. It has established a wide range of indigenous technologies, and given the perfect platform for launching Agni-V, in early 2012. The success of the ICBM would put India in the exclusive club of nations which can launch them — US, Russia, China and France.



What does Agni 3 is in an advanced stage mean?

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/article2073999.ece

Quote:
He said that the 3,000-km range Agni-III missile has already been inducted into the armed forces. “Agni-III is already inducted. Its development has been completed and is under production,” he said.


That report says Agni 3 already inducted. The "He" in that report is the DRDO chief V K Saraswat himself. Confusing.


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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2011 06:57 
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Its all payload dependent. The heavier ones don't need proofing. So 2 Tonnes of good wishes for Beijing.


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PostPosted: 27 Nov 2011 12:43 
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sohamn wrote:
Vipul wrote:
All fired-up on the missile front.

........................

There have been a fair share of failures and delays in this multi-million dollar Agni programme, which is targeted to give India the capability to launch Inter Continental Ballistic Missiles (ICBM) and provide a strong deterrence. After 23 years, Agni-I (700 km), Agni-II (1500 km) have been inducted into the armed forces, while Agni-III (2500 km) is in an advanced stage and Agni-IV (3500 km), has been successfully test fired on November 15.

The Agni-IV is not just India's longest range missile, but is lighter, manoeuvrable, robust and capable of high acceleration. It has established a wide range of indigenous technologies, and given the perfect platform for launching Agni-V, in early 2012. The success of the ICBM would put India in the exclusive club of nations which can launch them — US, Russia, China and France.



I wonder why Mr. Somashekhar decided to reduce the range of the missiles by a 1000 kms. Moreover, when comparing ranges he forgot to include the payload. Agni 3 with a payload of almost 2 tonnes can fly to a range of 3500 kms, with a reduced payload it can fly to > 4500 kms. And Agni 4 can fly 3000 kms with a payload of 1 ton. Yet again incorrect reporting on the part of a defence journalist.


Confusion seems deliberate!!!


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PostPosted: 27 Nov 2011 14:32 
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i hope the agni-5 comes with mirv.because that is the key. multiple chinese cities can be taken down by a sigle missile. with such a missile china will never undertake a 1962 type misadventure.


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PostPosted: 27 Nov 2011 15:32 
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The interesting ArunS, (if only it made any sense to me)
http://www.slideshare.net/ramana_56/bgr ... -c-9600008


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PostPosted: 27 Nov 2011 15:50 
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i think benefit of mirv is more about hitting a single large countervalue target with more precision in a grid pattern with smaller warheads than just a single big one - 101% guarantees more damage evenly spread out from multiple epicenters and makes the task of ABM more difficult due to more inbounds and smaller RVs.

ofcourse it can also target a few cities in a path below its flight....iirc places around 200km on either side of flightpath are in range of icbm RVs being dropped by mirv adapter.


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PostPosted: 27 Nov 2011 18:55 
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It depends on the shroud capability too.. how many guided RVs can it house? 3-5 of 250kt maal could cover 3 important cities.. now precision requirement depends on the mission goals.. if the 3 targets are within the city limits, and the mission needs a megaton maal, then 3x250 could bring the same effect, as the CEP < 50mtrs means precision and performance of the mission accomplishment is a guarantee.

while our ITR is engaged in these, it is also important to emphasize that 250kt maal-waal is pucca... and this exactly the one that concludes the mission. the same capability launched from sub surface ensures nfu guarantees.


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2011 16:28 
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http://pib.nic.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=77672

Quote:
BrahMos Supersonic Cruise Missile has been developed initially as Anti-ship version for launch from ship to ship for the Indian Navy and inducted in Service :eek: . Later, land to land version has been developed for the Indian Army and Indian Air Force. This version has been inducted in the Army and is under production for Army and Air Force. Test also has been carried out from ship to land target. Coastal battery from Mobile Complex on land to ship is also available for the Indian Navy. Air-version of the missile is being developed for SU-30 Mk-I for Indian Air Force.

Some parts of the missile components, airframes and air borne launcher are currently being produced in Thiruvananthapuram complex of BrahMos Aerospace. Multiple industries of India are partners to provide components for themissile and ground systems.

This information was given by Defence Minister Shri AK Antony in written reply to Shri Pradeep Majhiand Shri Kishnbhai V. Patelin Lok Sabha today.


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2011 17:31 
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RKumar wrote:
http://pib.nic.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=77672

Quote:
BrahMos Supersonic Cruise Missile has been developed initially as Anti-ship version for launch from ship to ship for the Indian Navy and inducted in Service :eek: . Later, land to land version has been developed for the Indian Army and Indian Air Force. This version has been inducted in the Army and is under production for Army and Air Force. Test also has been carried out from ship to land target. Coastal battery from Mobile Complex on land to ship is also available for the Indian Navy. Air-version of the missile is being developed for SU-30 Mk-I for Indian Air Force.

Some parts of the missile components, airframes and air borne launcher are currently being produced in Thiruvananthapuram complex of BrahMos Aerospace. Multiple industries of India are partners to provide components for themissile and ground systems.

This information was given by Defence Minister Shri AK Antony in written reply to Shri Pradeep Majhiand Shri Kishnbhai V. Patelin Lok Sabha today.


It has been inducted long before, read the next 2 lines, you will see the article is just giving the present status of Bramhos.


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2011 19:34 
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Brahmos achieves Mach 6.5 speed during test - http://ibnlive.in.com/news/brahmos-achi ... 644-3.html
Quote:
Chennai: The latest version of Indo-Russian Brahmos cruise missile has achieved a speed of Mach 6.5 during experiments at Hyderabad and the target is to achieve Mach 7, a top DRDO official said in Chennai on Monday.

"Experiments are being done in Hyderabad. We have completed tests up to Mach 6.5," BrahMos Aerospace Private Limited Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director A Sivathanu Pillai said in Chennai.

Interesting news ... how was the test conducted - are there wind tunnels that can reach those speeds?


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2011 20:04 
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Firing Scramjet under simulated condition on ground , they have done that before.


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2011 20:09 
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When are we going to test these in real life arena? :roll:


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2011 20:14 
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Does this mean that a scramjet was tested on a rig whose specific thrust generated equalled an amount required to propel the object to a speed of mach 6.5? If they hit mach 7 consistently soon, does that mean a missile design freeze is not far away anymore? Any idea about the seeker tech developement? Apart from modifications that allow brahmos 1 seekers to operate at higher speed related with brahmos 2, what other modifications would the brahmos 1 seeker need to go on board the brahmos 2? Would they share any commonality? At this pace, can we guess a first test can be achieved before 2013/2014? I guess first test would be Chandipur as well.


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2011 20:34 
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Singha wrote:
i think benefit of mirv is more about hitting a single large countervalue target with more precision in a grid pattern with smaller warheads than just a single big one - 101% guarantees more damage evenly spread out from multiple epicenters and makes the task of ABM more difficult due to more inbounds and smaller RVs.

ofcourse it can also target a few cities in a path below its flight....iirc places around 200km on either side of flightpath are in range of icbm RVs being dropped by mirv adapter.


Apart from making ABM interception more difficult, MIRVs are used to increase the area of destruction compared to a single MT level strike. The blast intensity reduces proportional to cube of the radius. Hence multiple flowers delivered in a spaced out grid gives you better coverage and also increases chances of survival against ABM.

Of course, the shakinah effect of MT level strikes cannot be matched by the smaller coordinated delivery of flowers, no matter their size.


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2011 20:36 
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Austin wrote:
Firing Scramjet under simulated condition on ground , they have done that before.


But how do you simulate air flowing at Mach 7?


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2011 20:55 
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Pranav wrote:
But how do you simulate air flowing at Mach 7?


Its called Hypersonic Wind Tunnel. I guess they have one in Hyderabad, and IIRC they built it using Israeli Tech, back in the day when DRDO started with the HSTDV wind tunnel testing.


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2011 21:40 
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Aditya_V thanks I was not aware that first version was anti ship .... that's why I was surprised.


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 00:09 
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hypersonic tunnel was planned for Hyd in 2010. article says mach5 tunnel was already there. http://www.hindu.com/2010/11/18/stories ... 050500.htm

again from 2010 - http://knol.google.com/k/vijainder-k-th ... hy2mq/109#

I believe in June 2011 a hypersonic wind tunnel facility was also commisioned in VSSC, trivandrum.
--
this AWST article indicates the HSDTV is precursor and tech development vehicle for what could a new family of hypersonic products starting from brahmos2 but could hop skip and jump to bigger meat like global-quickstrike "avatar" type weapons platforms. 8) http://i953.photobucket.com/albums/ae20 ... def/12.jpg


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 09:45 
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RKumar wrote:
Aditya_V thanks I was not aware that first version was anti ship .... that's why I was surprised.


Brahmos originally was deravative of Russian anti-ship Yakont with an Indian Seeker, once we started using for anti-ship role we realised we could use it for other cruise missile requirements, the full flight Mach 3 speed was especially useful for the Russians against US CBG's since detection interception of such a fast missile was very difficult.


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 10:34 
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good details on a american pgm here of similar nature, incl photo of the engine test.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_X-51

all the scramjet projects I see seem to have the similar shape of a boxy fuselage, wedge shaped nose and a small air scoop below the body. must be some special +ve of this design.


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 11:12 
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what are other benefits of going for mach 7 A2S brahmos [reduced time and hence before an antimissile system detects and launches, the target is destroyed]? I can see a lot of benefits if we can get a mach 7 a2a bvr.


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 11:44 
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SaiK wrote:
what are other benefits of going for mach 7 A2S brahmos [reduced time and hence before an antimissile system detects and launches, the target is destroyed]? I can see a lot of benefits if we can get a mach 7 a2a bvr.


It will probably be too fast for the missile to home in onto the target in the terminal phase. The typical target will be moving fast and in three dimensions.


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 11:54 
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SaiK wrote:
what are other benefits of going for mach 7 A2S brahmos [reduced time and hence before an antimissile system detects and launches, the target is destroyed]? I can see a lot of benefits if we can get a mach 7 a2a bvr.


It would be too heavy(in its todays form) and too costly for fighters to carry.


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 12:21 
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The entire A-IV team pic in THE WEEK. The print edition has the A-IV also shown in the background pretty close up:

Image

Reign of fire

Quote:
Sometime within the next three months, a missile canister on a mammoth truck in the eastern coast of India will be turned towards the clear sky. From a safe distance, scientists of the Defence Research and Development Organisation will punch in the launch code, igniting the base of Agni 5, India's first intercontinental ballistic missile. The ignition will generate 3,50,000kg of force, propelling the missile hundreds of kilometres into the outer atmosphere. The payload will then be separated to splash down at extremely high speed into the Indian Ocean, more than 5,000km away from the launch site. The splash will add one more country to the global ICBM club. Scientists say the entire Asiatic landmass will fall within the range of the first Indian ICBM.

Says Avinash Chander, chief controller (missiles and strategic systems) and programme director, Agni: “As of now, most of India's perceived immediate and potential strategic threats are located within 5,500km. Agni 5 will take care of those concerns.”
Agni 5 follows the successful launch of Agni 4 from Wheeler Island, off the coast of Orissa, on November 15. Unlike last year when a similar launch had failed, Tessy Thomas, project director of Agni 4 and in-charge of the mission aspect of Agni 5, dashed to the nearest landline at the facility to inform Defence Minister A.K. Antony about the textbook flight. Antony promptly invited her to brief him at the earliest in Delhi.
“What kept us going despite the setback of last year was the way the seniors kept on motivating us,” says Tessy. “I think that the personal involvement from the Raksha Mantri, [former president] A.P.J. Abdul Kalam and Mr Chander is the biggest thing for us at the Advanced Systems Lab in Hyderabad.”
Tessy's career has soared with the Agni missiles. She joined the Agni team in 1988, a year before Agni Re-Entry Demonstrator project was launched. In the past 23 years, she has handled the mission aspects of Agni 1, 2 and 3, and became leader of the Agni 4 project. “I have nearly 300 people working under me and I make it a point to be available to them at all times,” says she.
Established in 1958, DRDO began with a humble test of an anti-tank missile system on the banks of the Yamuna river. The organisation, says Chander, got a unique culture and sense of community once Kalam joined in 1982. “We became a community of scientists under him and he made us rope in new people and approach new institutions. As a result, currently, we can coordinate with more than 25 institutes across the country on our state-of-the-art missiles,” says Chander.
Tessy was among the second generation scientists who came in, leaving a bright academic career that could have taken her around the world to deal with what she terms “classical scientific challenges”. Under Tessy's guidance, a number of young talents have bloomed. G. Satheesh Reddy, who designed the Ring Laser Gyroscope (RLG) for Agni 4 and 
Agni 5, is one such.
“We are now among the best and have the latest in missile technology,” says Reddy, who is his 30s. According to his colleagues, RLG accelerates the missile and turns it invulnerable to the enemy's anti-ballistic missile system. Cruder gyroscopes are used by ships and aircraft but the ones to be used in high-velocity missiles are special. Scientists at DRDO say that the earlier gyroscopes and the navigation systems in Agni 1, 2 and 3 were of the 1970 generation. “With Agni 4, we have embarked on a new quantum of technology. And with Agni 5, we will perfect the sleeker systems,” says Chander.
Diplomats at the external affairs ministry, too, say the optical gyroscope of Agni 4 has become a “gamechanger” in the global strategic environment. Apart from RLG, what sets apart Agni 4 and Agni 5 are their higher avionics and their ability to do real-time estimation (on-board improvisation of performance of the missile).

Unlike Agni 2 and Agni 3, which were rail-mobile, Agni 4 and Agni 5 are road-mobile, thereby making it possible to launch them from anywhere in India. “The trucks carrying the Agni 4 and Agni 5 missiles will be able to speed up to 60kmph giving the missile system minimum signature,” says Chander.
Brigadier Gurmeet Kanwal, director of Centre for Land Warfare Studies, feels that given India's size, the land-based ICBM will become undetectable to enemy eyes. “Total road length of India is approximately 3.34 million kilometres and the new generation ICBM can be parked anywhere in that road network. This adds a new element in the nuclear triad that India is developing,” says Kanwal.
Over the years, Agni missiles have become ‘fat-less'. “Past Agni missiles needed a large number of auxiliaries,” says Tessy. “Our challenge at hand was to reduce the operational manpower to just one or two officers, whose sole duty will be to launch the missile from a well-placed location once the coded orders were given. We reduced the number of auxiliaries, and as a result, the auxiliaries have become programmes on board the ICBM.”
Thanks to the measures, Agni has become sleeker and more efficient. Agni 3 weighed 40 tonnes and had a range of 3,000km. Agni 4 weighs 20 tonnes and travels 3,500km. The lighter components used in the frames of Agni 4 and Agni 5 make possible a high level of flexibility and reach. Also, given that the Agni series uses solid fuel, they can be launched from the high-altitude Himalayan road network as well. “Flexibility, reach, coverage and speed are a few of the features of the latest Agni missiles India is producing,” says Chander.
Apart from its new features, Agni 5 will be distinguished by the fact that it will be the first indigenous canister-launched missile. Scientists at DRDO are glad that the news of the coming launch of Agni 5 has added to the morale of Indian soldiers. “Our weapons provide cutting edge to the Indian soldier. If soldiers feel confident about our product then that is the biggest reward for us,” says a scientist.
According to DRDO sources, the sleek, powerful Agni missiles, combined with the strength of the armed forces, will translate to a ‘do-not-mess-with-India' message. V.K. Saraswat, scientific adviser to the defence minister, says the new age missiles will help India put its rivals on notice so that its vital assets are not targeted in the future. “Older, big powers of the world were dependent upon energy and military might. India's powerful status comes from its economic might because of its strengths in IT and manufacturing. Future warfare might target IT and other relevant sectors of Indian economy,” says Saraswat.
“In the coming days, DRDO will turn the national cyber security infrastructure and encryption process totally impregnable,” he said. Buoyed with the success of the Agni 4 and the optimism for Agni 5, scientists at DRDO say that they can come up with an ICBM of 10,000km to 12,000km range. “Developing that weapon will depend on the decision of the political leaders. But the country should know that we have the technology for building missiles that can strike beyond 12,000km,” says Chander.
But a cyber virus like Stuxnet, which wrecked the Iranian nuclear programme, is a threat. “We have taken precautions throughout the development process of our first ICBM and have neutralised all cyber threats in the beginning so that the systems like Agni 5 can produce the desired results,” says Saraswat. “We sanitise hardware so that mischief can be avoided. Stuxnet cannot attack our missiles. Software in the missiles is indigenous and therefore cyber attacks cannot take place on strategic assets.”
What marks Agni 5 special is the political decision to test it. Given the reach of the missile, the strategic community believes, a decision has been taken in the highest level that New Delhi should not economise on projecting its strength. :twisted: :twisted: However, with China working on a 3,000km-range super fast missile that can target moving aircraft carriers, a 
new challenge has come up. “We cannot rest on the success of our missiles,” says Saraswat. “Strategic situations are changing fast and we have to be ready for a wide array of challenges.”


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 12:35 
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SaiK ji, the kinetic energy of the Brahmos-2 at Mach 7 would be 6.25 times greater than the kinetic energy of Brahmos at Mach 2.8, assuming the two missiles have the same mass. This will probably not be the case though. IF one were to speculate, even if Brahmos-2 is half as heavy as air-launched Brahmos (2,500 kg) then the Brahmos-2 would still have 3.25 times the kinetic energy of air-launched Brahmos.

This is interesting:

New BrahMos can cover 290 km in two minutes
Quote:
We have completed tests up to Mach 6.5,” BrahMos Aerospace Private Limited chief executive officer and managing director A. Sivathanu Pillai said in Chennai. The target is to achieve Mach 7, he added. However, for BrahMos to achieve hypersonic speeds in real field trials scientists need to make certain changes to its components. A new engine has to be designed, which can withstand such high speeds and high temperature. Moreover, there will be a lot of vibration and the components need to withstand it.


So what has been tested so far might be the engine structure, both the exterior shape and the interior cavities, with heavier materials which can be machined to get the desired shape. This design is to be tweaked for the attempt at Mach 7. These materials might not last the flight duration due to the intense heat though, so coming up with ones that do would be the next task.


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 13:31 
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at mach7 can a radar in the nosecone work? I thought the pershing2 had a radar....

my vision is a strategic AAM that can be unleashed from far away to predicted position of high value assets like tankers, awacs, C3I big a/c and hunt them with active radar in a mach7 dive from the edge of space...


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 14:23 
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With Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), I believe it boils down to this - if we can build a compact radar to track objects moving at Mach 7, then we can also build a compact radar that moves at Mach 7 to track slower objects.


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 14:40 
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RKumar wrote:
Quote:
BrahMos Supersonic Cruise Missile has been developed initially as Anti-ship version for launch from ship to ship for the Indian Navy and inducted in Service. Later, land to land version has been developed for the Indian Army and Indian Air Force. This version has been inducted in the Army and is under production for Army and Air Force. Test also has been carried out from ship to land target. Coastal battery from Mobile Complex on land to ship is also available for the Indian Navy. Air-version of the missile is being developed for SU-30 Mk-I for Indian Air Force.
I find the bolded part to be a new development. this would help the navy pack a big punch particularly in protecting high value assets from a maritime assault. Imagine the welcome PLAN ships would receive if they try any mischief in say the ANC or our future LHDs disembarking couple of Brahmos TELs during an Amphibous assault on Pig-land.


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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2011 14:56 
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singha sir!!
any idea by when hyper-brhamos will get inducted into service??


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