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PostPosted: 03 Nov 2011 02:01 
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From Livefist: http://livefist.blogspot.com/2011/11/co ... arcos.html
Image

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The photo above is of two Marine Commandos just off their inflatable at Rutland Island, Andaman. Lots more coming up. Stay tuned!


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PostPosted: 03 Nov 2011 03:17 
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^^^^

Should not these commandos be wearing goggles for protection from water


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PostPosted: 03 Nov 2011 03:22 
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^^
One can also say that they should be wearing their whole diving gear but the point is that you cannot tell what they are doing from one still pic. We don't know whether they need to swim or not. Their balaclava looks totally dry to me.


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PostPosted: 03 Nov 2011 06:45 
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Location: Martyr Bhagat Singh Nagar District, Doaba, Punjab, Bharat :)
Army Honour for Close Combat Warfare Expert
The Indian Express
Quote:
Army Honour for Close Combat Warfare Expert
Manu Pubby

Posted : Wed Nov 02 2011
New Delhi


Team India captain M S Dhoni and ace shooter Abhinav Bindra, who were conferred honorary ranks of Lt Colonel by the Army Chief on Tuesday, stole the limelight at the official function in the Capital but the real hero was a third person — Deepak Rao, India’s leading expert on close combat warfare.
Rao, made an honorary Major in the Para regiment, is a doctor who has been training elite special forces of the country for 18 years. Rao, with his wife Seema, has trained over 15,000 troops from elite forces like the Marine Commandos, NSG and Garudas (Air Force) in a new form of Close Quarter Battle that has the sole aim to kill — using daggers, bayonets, small arms and even with bare hands.

While Bindra has been made an honorary Lt Col of the Sikh Regiment, Dhoni and Rao will join the ranks of the elite Parachute Regiment, the highly trained special forces of the Army. Dhoni’s choice for the Para regiment was simple, “I did not want to be restricted to the Kumaon or Garhwal regiment. I wanted to be a part of something that was not restricted (by geographic boundary). I also wanted to be a part of the best”.

For Rao, however, joining the ranks of the Para regiment was like ‘coming home’. He and his wife (also a doctor) train the soldiers in Unarmed Combat Tactical System, which employs principles from Sun Tzu’s Art of War, Bruce Lee’s Jeet Kune Do and Close Quarter Battle tactics as well as modern techniques of close range shooting.


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PostPosted: 03 Nov 2011 08:17 
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Now I have seen it all

Indias close combat expert

The dogs have truly come in to the Army :P


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PostPosted: 03 Nov 2011 09:24 
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i thought marcos are equiped with Tavors not INSAS


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PostPosted: 05 Nov 2011 00:33 
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^^
Tavors are have only started getting inducted very recently. Before that, they mostly used AKMs in operations. Even so, INSAS was always part of their inventory.


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PostPosted: 05 Nov 2011 06:00 
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There were MARCOS with Tavors there as well.

The video should show some of the Tavor equipped MARCOS.


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PostPosted: 06 Nov 2011 17:22 
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India's Defence Security Corps to grow by 30 percent.

In order to boost security of its defence office and strategic installations across the country, India will increase the manpower of a specialist force by 30 percent before 2015.

In a major expansion, the Defence Security Corps (DSC), which performs exclusively the role of securing defence offices and critical strategic installations, will grow to about 42,000 men in the next four years from its present strength of 31,000 men, government officials told IANS.

The proposed accretion to the force was approved this year and the effort to recruit 9,900 more men before 2015 commenced on Aug 1, they said.

With the new recruits, the DSC plans to raise additional 330 platoons of around 30 men each in the next four years.

Usually, the DSC recruits army personnel who retire at a very young age, to provide them an opportunity at re-employment.

"Raising of additional 330 platoons for the DSC has been approved by the government and it has commenced from Aug. 1. The process will be completed in four years from now," one official said.

The DSC, previously known as Defence Department Constabulary Centre, was raised in April 1947 at Mathura in Uttar Pradesh to ensure the protection and security of designated defence installations against sabotage and pilferage.

The DSC performs this duty in addition to the Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) at India's nuclear laboratories and Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) establishments.

While, the CISF is purely a civilian central government security force under the home ministry, the DSC is a force under the defence ministry and comprises mainly superannuated soldiers, who are re-employed for a few years.


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PostPosted: 06 Nov 2011 17:49 
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^^
DSC is not a special force by any stretch of imagination. I have generally seen them in the role of security guards in places such as AMC FMSDs (Medical Supply Depots) and similar places where the unit doesn't have sufficient strength to man the gates themselves.


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PostPosted: 06 Nov 2011 19:19 
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http://www.commandocombat.com/

not sure what exactly are his connections, but must be strong to get so much play in the army :roll:


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PostPosted: 06 Nov 2011 19:46 
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*Deleted*
Sorry, wrong thread!


Last edited by atreya on 06 Nov 2011 19:54, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 06 Nov 2011 19:47 
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Re the commandocombat link.... The picture "Home Minister Accepts Encyclopaedia..." looks photoshopped to me... Someone more experienced with this sort of thing could offer a more informed comment :)


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PostPosted: 06 Nov 2011 20:04 
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^^
The Encyclopedia looks odd for sure. The colours of the magazine seem to pop out a lot more than the background. On the other hand, the Encyclopedia seems to be a little curved in the lower right corner from where the lady is holding it. That part seems appropriate for a paperback book being held vertically.
So, it is difficult to confirm either way.


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PostPosted: 06 Nov 2011 20:18 
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^^ I've zero understanding in these matters but sunlight is reflecting off PC inside a closed room! The rest of the room is dark, and the sofas seem out of proportion & perspective to each other.


Last edited by tsarkar on 06 Nov 2011 21:01, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 06 Nov 2011 20:43 
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After the Nana Patekar movie Prahaar, his brother-in-law Lt Col Sunil Deshpande started an organization in Nagpur called Prahaar. Initial aim was to provide personality development and physical training for youth http://www.prahaar.org/

It also provides SSB coaching. Col Deshpande's daughter, who had a cameo role in the same movie (one of the girls who were jogging & whistled at), was one of the first girls to join IA (or was it IAF?)

The organization is well regarded by Nagpur youth and their parents. The defense establishment in Nagpur also views the organization in a good light http://mod.nic.in/samachar/july1-06/h7.htm

Nagpur is also famous for late Captain Chafekar, who imparted soft skills useful for both services and other job interviews. As a laid back town in the hinterland, Nagpur youth lacked the finesse and polish of soft skills that Captain Chafekar imparted. But being the distinguished gentleman he was, he mentored from the personality development perspective and not as a tution to get into NDA.

Bhosale Military School has been turning out fine boys since the 1930s, but more recently, has been associated with ex-servicemen associates of Sadhvi Pragya Thakur.

There is no clear demarcation between civil society and military services. In those gray areas exist good & shady elements.


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PostPosted: 06 Nov 2011 22:25 
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Singha wrote:
http://www.commandocombat.com/

not sure what exactly are his connections, but must be strong to get so much play in the army :roll:

Not the Rao couple again. Newbies, please note that not everyone buys their claims.


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PostPosted: 08 Nov 2011 05:38 
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ArmenT wrote:
Not the Rao couple again. Newbies, please note that not everyone buys their claims.

That Rao fellow was made an honorary Major by the IA recently. No idea why.


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PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011 13:48 
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<del>


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PostPosted: 15 Nov 2011 13:56 
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^^ Why is this in SF dhaaga? Didnt see a mention of the "Garud" anywhere!


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PostPosted: 18 Nov 2011 00:59 
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Toothless Black Cats

National Security Guards

Quote:
The National Security Guards' (NSG) portly and bespectacled Director General RK Medhekar is the antithesis of the image of his commando force, the Black Cats. So you have to take his vision statements with a pinch of salt. At its 26th raising day last month, the affable Mr Medekar declared two new ultra-modern NSG commando force of 1600 commandos each would be ready in five years. The government would spend nearly Rs 1 crore on equipping each commando. (Mr Medhekar, of course, would be in blissful retirement by then).

Medhekar's statements are a tacit admission that the NSG - the home ministry's primary counter-terrorism and anti-hijack response force - is yet to receive any of the sophisticated equipment it had listed after the November 26, 2008 terror attacks in Mumbai. The lack of modern walkie talkies, lightweight bulletproof jackets and holographic sights on rifles was painfully evident during the prolonged 26/11 seige in Mumbai. The NSG's long shopping list continues to be stuck in red tape. What has happened since 26/11 is that the NSG has bloated into what could easily be the world's largest anti-terrorist force. Over 12,000 strong with a mish-mash of police, paramilitary and army personnel strung out in little isolated outposts in Hyderabad, Kolkata, Chennai and Mumbai. A black-dungaree clad paramilitary force that will only add to the chaos of, God forbid, yet another 26/11-style terror attack.

Money is clearly not a problem. The NSG spent Rs 25 lakh for their raising day including a gala dinner and Rs 12 lakh for a mock Delhi metro train for the firing display. Of course, equipment alone does not make a force. But the training which is supposed mould these armymen into specialist urban-intervention commandos also remains frozen in 1980s. Terrorists have grown nimbler and smarter but the NSG's curriculum hasn't changed in a quarter-century.

The NSG had an epiphany recently while training at their Manesar complex with German GSG-9 commandos (on whom they were modeled on in 1984). In just one crucial area - tactical radios - they noted how far their beefy German counterparts had moved on. The GSG-9 commandos had button-sized radio implants in their ears and sported band-aid sized mouth-pieces taped on their chins. The radios had a range of 1 km. The difference between the two forces is far more intrinsic than that. The GSG-9 remains a cutting-edge commando force that demands and gets nothing but the best mission-critical equipment. The NSG has been reduced to a paramilitary force whose chiefs make boastful claims at public events.


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PostPosted: 13 Dec 2011 16:41 
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There was a counter terrorism drill in office today involving NSG and IAF. An IAF heli(MI-8?) did few dry runs(touch and go) on top of one of the buildings and then finally dropped some NSG personal. NSG gear was not that great.. the same old heavy BPJ and one guy was carrying a sterling gun also. others had MP5, MP5 SD.


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PostPosted: 13 Dec 2011 17:02 
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the lack of eqpt due to purchasing delays is something I do not understand - surely enough money can be found to equip atleast the SAG elements upto the best std. it is afterall our Netas and mantris in lutyens delhi and elsewhere who would be the first beneficiaries of a better equipped force. perhaps the feeling is "let them take 10 extra casualties, in the end they will get job done, its not my son in the line of fire, he is safely studying in harvard!"

the SPG which guards the dynasty and the PM is however smartly equipped with the latest kit per photos one sees.


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PostPosted: 13 Dec 2011 23:05 
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http://www.mid-day.com/news/2011/dec/13 ... inagar.htm

Let us pray for his well being and safety!
A question: Which is the 'Marol' unit? And do NSG commandos join regular Army regiments when posted in COIN ops?


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PostPosted: 13 Dec 2011 23:47 
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Location: The Original West Coast!!
NSG hub in Mumbai is based at Marol.


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PostPosted: 30 Dec 2011 14:51 
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Image

One pooch on this new US style camo of our MARCOS. How does this "sand coloured" camo help in a marine environment? Isnt this colour more suited for desert type scenario with black/dark blue being better for marine units?


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PostPosted: 30 Dec 2011 15:02 
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^^
This reminded me of another pic I came across today.
Image

Source:
http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/sh ... es/page378


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PostPosted: 30 Dec 2011 15:07 
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sum wrote:
Image

One pooch on this new US style camo of our MARCOS. How does this "sand coloured" camo help in a marine environment? Isnt this colour more suited for desert type scenario with black/dark blue being better for marine units?


Pic may be misleading. This is not exactly brown colored. There is a king of green/brown white/grey etc tint and looks quite convincing.


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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2012 15:21 
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Gaur wrote:
^^
This reminded me of another pic I came across today.
Source:
http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/sh ... es/page378


PS quote on this:
Quote:
To Unknown: They're not MARCOS, but naval infantry personnel who had previously applied for inclusion into MARCOS but could not qualify. It is these personnel that now form the nucleas of the Sagar Prahari Bal and are also deployed at all naval dockyards as quick-reaction teams.


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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2012 15:23 
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On the camo for the MARCOS, a comment by a reader:
Quote:
They are Marcos in desert camouflage, imported from USA on trail basis as told to me by one these guys.
I met they on their way back from a place in Rajasthan to Mumbai. One of them told me that they were practicing deep penetration and sabotage in enemy area. I do not want reveal more as that guy told me many things in good faith.


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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2012 14:29 
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The Tibetans who fought the 1971 war

Image


Quote:
Dapon Ratuk Ngawang was one of the senior leaders of the Voluntary Freedom Fighter Force in Tibet, a Tibetan guerrilla outfit which fought Chinese rule and played a key role in the Dalai Lama's escape to India in March 1959.

After the 1962 Sino-Indian border war, Ratuk Ngawang commanded the Tibetan secret regiment, known as the Special Frontier Forces, SSF, or Establishment 22, based near Dehra Dun in Uttar Pradesh.

Now 84, Ratuk Ngawag lives in the Tibetan colony of Majnu Ka Tilla in Delhi. He recently published his memoirs (in Tibetan) in which he recounts his early life in Kham province of Eastern Tibet and the escape to India as well as the Tibetan participation in the 1971 operations.

In an exclusive interview, he tells Claude Arpi about the SSF's role during the Bangladesh Liberation War.

In 1971, Ratuk Ngawang was a 'Dapon', often translated as 'Brigadier'; they were also known as 'Political Leaders.'

One of the aspects of the 1971 War which has never been publicised is the participation of Tibetan troops in the operations.

The official history of the war mentions all the victorious battles, but the Tibetan regiment is not mentioned. Today we have no document proving the Tibetan soldiers' participation.

We would be interested to hear from you more about the Tibetan Forces' role in the Bangladesh operations. We are also curious to find out about the directives (if any) from the Central Tibetan Administration (the Dalai Lama's government-in-exile) towards the Tibetan soldiers?

I have covered all these issues in my memoirs (published in Tibetan by the Amnye Machen Institute, Dharamsala). The Tibetan Regiment known as Special Frontier Forces or Establishment 22 has never officially been under the Indian Army.

It was established in 1962, after the Indo-China War. The main objective of the regiment was to fight the Chinese army with the help of the Indian Army.

At the time of the creation of the Force, we thought that the operations could be based at Lhuntse Dzong in Tibet (near the Indian border).

The plan was to engage the Chinese army in a military conflict within 5, 6 months of the Force's creation. But the Indo-China war came to an abrupt end (on November 22), and due to severe international pressure to maintain peace, no further military engagements occurred with China.

Therefore, the services of Establishment 22 regiment were not used as planned.


Tell us more about Establishment 22.

The Chinese took over Tibet in 1959. In 1960, the Government of India established a Force known as the Indo-Tibetan Border Force. Tibetan Establishment 22 was established in November 1962.

Who ordered the SFF to take part in the war?

A senior Indian Army officer, Major General Sujan Singh Uban (The SSF became known as 'Establishment 22' or simply 'Two-twos' because General Uban earlier served as commander of the 22 Mountain Brigade). At that time, he was the commander of the Tibetan Force.

A special army meeting was held in New Delhi; later we heard that General Uban had volunteered to lead the Establishment 22 regiment in the Bangladesh war.

It was S S Uban and my colleague Dapon Jampa Kalden who voluntarily decided to take part in the war.

Later they told me about their plans. First, I refused to join them, because to voluntarily go to war was for me 'illegal.' I told them that only if we got an order from the Government of India or from the Central Tibetan Administration, could we join the operation.

Moreover, I told them that Establishment 22 had not been created to fight 'for India'; rather it was established with the sole aim to fight the Chinese.
In fact, it is the reason why we get less salary as compared to Indian soldiers. We are not part of the regular Indian Army.

When the regiment was established, there was a mutual agreement that we would fight the Chinese. This did not happen.


However, I told General Uban and Dapon Jampa Kalden that if we were to get a formal order from the Indian government then we could join the operations.


Quote:
How many Mukti Bahini were trained at Uttar Pradesh by General Uban?

After Sheikh Mujibur Rahman was imprisoned in West Pakistan, more than 1,000 of his supporters escaped to India. Many of them were stationed near by the SSF camp.

We trained them in military combat. They were known as the Mukti Bahini.

Some of them were related to Mujibur Rahman. They later acted as our guides and contact persons during the war though they did not actually fight with us.

Though it was us who fought the real war and suffered the casualties, all the credit has later been given to the Mukti Bahini (because the Tibetan Force was involved under the guise of the Mukti Bahini).

Were the Mukti Bahini also under the command of General Uban?

Yes. General Uban provided the training to the Mukti Bahini.

When did you and the other two Dapons reach Bangladesh?

It was in November 1971. I was 39 years old at that time.

Did you go to Bangladesh before the beginning of the war or during the war?

We went before the Bangladesh war started. Though we were meant to fight the Chinese in a guerrilla warfare, during the Bangladesh war, our main enemy was the Mizo insurgents.

Just as the Tibetans were trained by the Indian Army, the Mizo soldiers were trained by Pakistan.

When and how did you go?

We went from the base of Establishment 22 in Uttar Pradesh to Dum Dum airport (Kolkata) by plane. From Dum Dum we went to Demagiri in Mizoram by motor vehicles. It took us three days.

After reaching the Bangladesh border (the Chittagong Hill Tracks), we had a meeting and went straight into the battle.

We left for the war on November 12 and fought for 28 days after which we came out victorious.

Many soldiers from the Pakistani side were killed and many surrendered.

What was General Uban's military objective in the war?

We were thoroughly trained in commando warfare to fight the Chinese; we were requested to use these skills to fight in the Bangladesh war.

The Indian authorities had assured us that the Indian Army would fight with the Tibetans for the cause of Tibet. Their reasoning was that the Tibetan soldiers alone could not defeat the Chinese army.

That's why we decided to join the Bangladesh war. It was in the hope that the Indian Army will help us militarily one day to fight the Chinese.


Quote:
Before going to the war, did General Uban gave you any instructions to capture specific places or specific Pakistani military bases?

We had a map of the area (Chittagong Hills). Each of the three units (battalions) with a little more than 1,000 soldiers each included the Tibetan soldiers and some Mukti Bahini partisans.

Since General Uban was the commander of the Tibetan Special Frontier Forces, he gave us instructions in Hindi (we had Tibetan translators). He told us where to go and later through walkie-talkie we could inform him where we had reached and he would then tell us what we had to do.

The three Tibetan battalions had three Tibetan Dapons and three Indian colonels. The three Dapons and the three colonels always discussed the strategies, but the decisions were taken by General Uban after we had informed him.

Other than Demagiri, in which other places did the Tibetan soldiers fight?

Demagiri was the main military base. About 100 Tibetan soldiers and 100 Mukti Bahini were posted to guard the base.

Apart from senior military officials stationed at Demagiri, the base also had a hospital, where those who got injured in the battle could be treated. Most of the doctors were majors and captains of the Indian Armed Medical Corps.

The preparation for this had been done much before the beginning of the war.

The severely injured soldiers were taken by helicopters to other hospitals, but since the war was going on in the jungle of the Chittagong Hills, it was difficult for the helicopters to land. That is why many of the injured had to be sent by boats through the river.

When the Indian Army came to Demagiri at the beginning of the actual war, were the Indian soldiers able to help the Tibetan soldiers?

No. The Indian soldiers were not able to help us. Similarly, the Tibetan soldiers were also not able to help the Indian soldiers since both have been trained in different types of military warfare.

The Tibetan commandos were trained in guerrilla warfare whereas the Indian soldiers were trained in urban warfare.

Were your military objectives fulfilled?

Within ten days, we captured almost all the enemy bases except for two.

Most of the enemy bases had only 50 soldiers or so and when we attacked them, they were hugely outnumbered and surrendered within an hour of fighting.

On December 16, when news of the Indian Army's conquest of Dhaka became known, most of the remaining smaller units surrendered.

After the victory in the Bangladesh war, did you go to Chittagong for the official victory parade?

General Uban did organise a trip for us to go to Chittagong for the official victory ceremony. But we couldn't go as the Tibetan soldiers had been scattered in many different places.

Therefore, General Uban and R N Kao went to Chittagong to attend the official ceremony and discuss the perks and rewards for the Tibetan soldiers's contribution in the war.

We stayed back and celebrated the victory at our bases.



Quote:


Quote:
Did Gyalo Thondup, the Dalai Lama's elder brother, give the directives to the Tibetan soldiers to join the Bangladesh war or was it someone else?

The directive came from the department of security of the Central Tibetan Administration in Dharamsala.

The department had called us for a meeting. They told us that there was no alternative but to go to war 'for India.'

Moreover, they told us that the Indian government was in a very critical situation at that time and our participation in the war could help save a lot of Indian lives.

Did you have any contact with R N Kao who was responsible for external intelligence in the Cabinet secretariat?

Yes. R N Kao was a high level officer of the Indian government and Indira Gandhi's close associate. But our commander was General S S Uban. He had visited New Delhi and also informed the Central Tibetan Administration about his plans to lead the SFF in the Bangladesh war.

After he came back to our base (in Uttar Pradesh), he sent Jampa Kalden and me to meet officials of the Central Tibetan Administration in Dharamsala.

We told the administration about our initial reluctance to join the war. But since the Central Tibetan Administration had already decided about sending Establishment 22 to the war, we would go for it.

Was R N Kao involved in the decision?

R N Kao was a high level official and not a military man. So he was not directly involved in the operations. But he instructed us and advised us to prepare ourselves and fight well.

Was Mr Kao giving orders to General Uban?

General Uban was a military officer. R N Kao was a high ranking official, therefore he had greater authority.

When we captured Chittagong, R N Kao came to visit Establishment 22 and gave awards and speeches in praise of the Tibetan unit's heroic battles. R N Kao was a very patriotic person.

After the decision to participate in the operations was taken, Dapon Dhondup Gyatotsang (who lost his life during the 1971 operations), Dapon Pekar Thinley and myself divided the regiment into three units.

We decided that each one of us would lead one unit in the war.

Due to his age and despite his military experience, Dapon Jampa Kalden couldn't take part in the war. He remained the administrative link between the Indian government and Establishment 22.

Gyalo Thondup was the chief strategist of Dehra Dun's SFF, but he was not involved in the decision to send Tibetan soldiers to the Bangladesh war.

When the Tibetan refugees first came to India, the Indian government had categorically urged the Tibetans not to participate in any political activities.

Much before the Bangladesh war, Gyalo Thondup and Andrug Gonpo Tashi (the founder of the Tibetan Volunteer Force in Tibet) had already resigned from their military posts.


Quote:
Claude Arpi notes: It is said General S S Uban's plan was to use the Tibetan Force to capture Chittagong, but the SFF did not have the artillery and the airlift support to conduct such a type of mission.

However, they conducted smaller missions in the Chittagong Hill Tracks including the operation at the Kalurghat radio station, attacks on bridges and on the Kaptai Dam on the Karnaphuli River, 65 km upstream from Chittagong in Rangamati district.

They managed to stop the Pakistani 97 Independent Brigade and the 2nd Commando Battalion from retreating into Burma by cutting off their rear defences.

Establishment 22 lost 56 men and 190 were wounded in the 1971 operations.

The Indian government gave cash awards to 580 soldiers for their valourous conduct, but no bravery awards as the Tibetan soldiers were only 'The Phantoms of Chittagong', fighting a war which was not theirs under the guise of the Mukti Bahini.

I am indebted to Jamphel Shunu and Tenzin Lekshay for the translation of the interview.


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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2012 17:34 
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^^^A slight correction: Major General Uban had commanded 22 Mountain Regiment and hence, Establishment 22.


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PostPosted: 20 Jan 2012 19:50 
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Dont know if this has been posted before

Indian Polish SF ex (most likely mizoram)

http://www.network54.com/Forum/211833/t ... s+training


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PostPosted: 24 Jan 2012 20:30 
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Got this pic of NSG kammandu at Raj Path from Indian Army Fans page on FB

Image


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PostPosted: 24 Jan 2012 23:52 
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BRF Oldie

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^^I was under the impression only MARCOS were allowed to keep beards.


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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2012 00:04 
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Nice picture , what is that rifle with a nice big scope MP-5 ?


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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2012 00:16 
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Yes, what rifle is that? Doesn't look like an MP-5 to me. Is it a Sig SG 551?


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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2012 00:21 
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BRFite

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nachiket wrote:
^^I was under the impression only MARCOS were allowed to keep beards.


Everyone in the Navy can sport a beard with the Commanding Officer's permission. But I don't think any Navy personnel are deputed to the NSG, I always thought it was Army & Para Military units. Could this guy be an ex-Marcos personnel currently made to serve in NSG before going back to becoming a normal Navy sailor?

Read: http://indiannavy.nic.in/beard.htm for more information and a funny anecdote :)


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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2012 00:29 
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Austin wrote:
Nice picture , what is that rifle with a nice big scope MP-5 ?

SIG SG-551. Another pic
Image

We saw a few pics of NSG using it during 26/11 as well.


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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2012 10:27 
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Joined: 16 Feb 2009 19:11
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Dmurphy wrote:
Got this pic of NSG kammandu at Raj Path from Indian Army Fans page on FB

Image


Arent these Marcos? See the (in)famous scooter helmet in the hands of the guy following?

Would explain the beard?

Unless, of course, he is a sardar


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