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PostPosted: 04 Oct 2012 14:24 
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Location: Dera Mahab Ali धरा महाबलिस्याः درا مهاب الي
The radio system have two tuners. One is the digital network and the other is the legacy analog tuner that is normally kept tuned to guard. Herculese moved that to 235.8SSB to monitor, while leaving the digital tuner at NATO BC. The receiver monitors both channels. The pilot keys the microphone to select the tranamitting channel, which also include the PA system.

Tide forgot to set his analog tuner properly, and it failed to hear the guard. After being called up for that, he did turn it on, but being self righteous, he didn't want to let the SDREs know that. He 'white lied' that the guard is unserviceable. Later, he couldn't transmit on guard, so he asked to use 235.8SSB.

(All these purely fictional. I haven't even looked at a picture of a radio :lol: )


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PostPosted: 08 Oct 2012 10:57 
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Location: Dera Mahab Ali धरा महाबलिस्याः درا مهاب الي
Chapter 57

The F-16C of the Royal Oman Air Force had escorted the C-130J till it left the lower ARTC of Socotra, before turning around back to Salalah. This gesture had saved a lot of trouble for the Indian C-130J. Their new flight path, after all the detours near the Oman coast, had made them to pass through not only the upper ARTC, but also through the lower ARTC and the local radar of Socotra. It would have been tough to explain to all of them, but the Omani pilot had taken care of that. He had joined in formation with the Hercules, and passed through the airspace using his own identification. With a final ‘ma'asalama’ the representative of the friendly force wished good luck and left the Indians on their vector to Mogadishu.


Ramanathan had come back from the cockpit into the hold with a poker face, and promptly gone back to his work. He and sergeant Ram Naik was conducting a final inspection of the kits and the parachutes of the team. In missions like this, you don’t get a second chance, and everything must work perfectly on the first go. If any of the parachutes fail, the poor commando hooked to that one would have to use the reserve to land in the ocean somewhere in the middle of nowhere, and brave the seas for several hours before any hope of rescue. In fact, Ramanathan had coolly lied to them, looking directly into the eyes, that a rescue was in fact impossible, and unless they can swim to the Somali cost, and brave the pirates after landfall, they would find their resting place at the bottom of the Arabian sea.

He noted one of the garuds come as close as a smirk, and liked that.

Ramanathan had of course knowledge of the entire plan, which included detailed attention to the insertion, extraction, evacuation and rescue modes. It would take up to three hours, but there will be choppers flying in from Kenya, Oman or from one of the patrol ships in the ocean to do the rescue.

It was Sgt Naik who did the final check of the parachute packs for his team. Ramanathan claimed that he was not familiar with the Murugappa made chutes. He had his Autoflug system already strapped on. There was lots of stuff in his kit that was not familiar to the garuds. Some of the boys really wanted to take a look at all the toys, but they hesitated. The commander did not appear to be a friendly beast at all to hazard any ventures.

The inflatable boat and its storage palette were from their own stores, but Ramanathan had added some of his own stuff into that kit. It was neatly stacked, with the carbon fiber collapsible box that housed the Kevlar reinforced polymer hull, the inflation charge, oars and the power pack on the bottom. The power pack had lithium battery and the disk shaped, integrated propulsion unit that combined a brushless DC motor, its controller and a shrouded propeller. It could run the boat, fully loaded and in nominally calm seas, up to three hours. Rations packed in waterproof FRP boxes were stacked on top of the boat, followed by some unknown stuff brought in by the commander. Everything was strapped down with the standard issue nylon straps found in the hercules.

Ramanathan asked the team to remove all the straps of the palette. He then opened his ‘magic box’ on top and produced a set of thin, translucent, braided straps. He went on to meticulously run those straps through the slots in the palette, making sure that everything is held firmly in place. Finally, he tightened them off using a small locking device that did not click like a ratchet. Ram Naik felt that the new straps should have saved at least a couple of kilograms from the weight of the package. He also carefully noted how the commander stood behind the palette and created the links to his own parachute harness. The harness is linked to the straps using four quick-release links that were tested under tension, and finally secured using adhesive tape that resembled duct tape.

Ram Naik had no clue how it all going to work out. He could figure by the length of the straps that Ramanathan wanted to strap the parachute to his own harness, and allow the pallete to hang below him during the descent. This would be dangerous if you are landing on solid ground, but it would be fine for water. The palette will splash down first, and the man would land on the palette. This was all new things even for the sergeant who considered himself to be an ace in these matters.

Ramanathan produced a bunch of dangling gizmos that looked like fish baits. On one end was a small carabiner connected to a few inches of nylon string. At the other end of the string was a plastic molded oblong of around two inches length, which was surrounded by some plastic fluff resembling the fly fishing baits. He took one out and pulled on the rope, and the oblong began flashing an amber coloured LED in the morse code pattern CQ. Ram Naik looked at him quizzically. Ramanathan turned to the backpack of a commando and hooked the carabiner into the inner end eyelet of the drogue line, right at the point where it entered the pack.

“Brilliant!” thought Ram Naik. Rather than flying their parachutes in the dark based on GPS, they could now see the others in the dark and properly cue their descent. The tracker would be pulled out when the drogue chute deploys in the air, and will stick to the middle of the opened main chute. It appears that the jerk at deployment would turn the tracker on, and since it is above the chute, no one down below would see it. Ram Naik gave a thumbs up to Ramanathan, which was promptly ignored. “what kind of a man is this one?” thought the sergeant.

Another tracker, which was similar to the earlier ones, but flashed the code PQ in green was produced. Ramanathan then walked towards Ram Naik, signed him to turn around, and hooked it onto his chute. He looked at the commander raising an eyebrow in question.

“You are going first.” Ramanathan said without hesitation. “That is why you got the green tracker. The team will follow and fly after you.”

“And you will come last, sir?’ Naik asked carefully. The fact that the commander was going to take the next to impossible task of flying down the heavy palette was really troubling the soldier. Being the leader of the pack, he felt that it was his job to do that, but to tell the truth, he had no idea how to manage that task. This guy should be either super crazy, or super capable. Based on the experience till the moment, Sgt Ram Naik tended to believe the latter.

“I don’t want to crash into you with this 250 kilo package.” Ramanathan said with a smile. “After you all are deployed, we will make an arc to port, and I will deploy myself at around a klik away. I will join you from north, and splash down slightly away. That way no one breaks their necks.”

If there was any trace of doubt in the Makar team’s collective minds, it was removed. This guy knows his business, and they should be gladly following him. In this case, they would be going ahead of him, waiting for him in the waves below.

Each of the garud commando had a wet suite on. On top of it was his kit containing the basic necessities securely strapped on. Over that came the life vest. This one was worn more like a body armour than a life vest. The Kevlar reinforced polymer vest had several cells placed at strategic locations, interconnected by narrow channels. A pair of gas generators was integrated on either hip. The activation was by a pair of cords that would deploy either by a tug by the wearer, or by the water pressure when the wearer goes under. The gas generator would fill the cells, and the wearer would be automatically positioned into a face up position, floating comfortably. The inflated cavities also provided insulation from the cold of the water, and protected the wearer from hypothermia.

Jumping into the sea using parachute poses more problems that just floating in water. The parachute is a very large, impervious cloth. It is very easy to get tangled in it. If it falls on top of you, you can very well drown, or suffocate to death. So, the standard procedure in these kind of operations would be to flare out when you reach close to the water, pitch up at the last moment and cut the cords. This would toss you safely into the water, while the chute is blown away backwards by the air. It takes some skill to pull off, and was one of the main drills for the commandos. All these guys should have done it a hundred times. Still, doing it in the night at an unfamiliar territory was a bit nerve racking.

After the last of the trackers were mounted on the respective backpacks, and tested for function and strength of attachment – you don’t want it to fly off in the air, or fail to flash – Ramanathan went back to his trunk that was strapped down further aft. This piece of luggage would not follow him, and stay on board the Hercules till the mission is over and he could collect it.

Taking the moment to advantage, Raghunandan and Jinendra walked up to him. They wanted to know what is going on in the cockpit. Ramanathan was seen to be talking on the intercom to the cockpit, and later pay a visit there. But to the discomfort of Raghu and utter annoyance of Jinendra, he totally ignored them upon return, and didn’t even show the courtesy to let his peers get an update. They too had work to do, and so did Ramanathan. But now, as the preparations seemed to be over, they could venture to see what is going on.

Jinendra was about to speak, when Raghu touched the back of his elbow, silencing him. “Boss, what is going on up front?” Raghu asked in the pleasantest tone he could muster.

Ramanathan seemed to enjoy the attention. He took a deliberate moment to answer. “There is a US Navy fighter escorting us on our tail.” He said with a grin.

The other two men almost dropped out of their life vests.

“Figher escort? We didn’t know that was arranged.” Jinendra said in a complaining voice.

“Oh, it was not ‘arranged’ your excellency.” Ramanathan said with mock courtesy. “The Americans took it on themselves to make sure that we do not crash into their carrier group down below.”

Ramanathan then told them the story as far as he knew. He had not, of course, witnessed the rest of the drama. Jinendra’s face reddened with rage, but he did not speak.

“Makar Team!” The voice of Sqd Ldr Binoy Thomas came over the speaker. 30 minutes to first drop zone. You are cleared to do Radio check with forward.”

Ramanathan turned back from the other two without any courtesy. He got work to do.


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PostPosted: 08 Oct 2012 14:11 
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Location: Dera Mahab Ali धरा महाबलिस्याः درا مهاب الي
Chapter 58

The Baaz team, consisting of six garud commandos, their leader, and the two outsiders were standing around their cargo, doing the final preparations for their part of the mission. Three palettes, each holding a container that was almost a metre cube, were strapped on the floor of the cargo hold of the C-130J aircraft, ready for the air drop.

The FRP boxes with carbon fiber strength members were extremely strong and light. An empty box weighed just above 10 kilograms, but once closed, bolted and strapped down, it could safely carry almost half a tonne of stuff, and still survive a drop from 100 feet. Each of the corners had an integrated cap made of carbon fiber. A collapsible protector made of expanded polystyrene is strapped on for added protection for drops. The lid of the box was on the side, with neoprene gaskets that made them airtight when closed. Pinch clamps held the lid in place, with security pins to guard against accidental opening.

There was a trough on the top that could house the parachute pack. Slots moulded into the wall allowed Kevlar straps to pass through to go around and hold the box securely to the harness. The parachute system had an altimeter trigger that blew an explosive charge at the set altitude and deployed the chute. The package fell free for most of its descent, opening the chute just in time to break the fall.

The package also contained an infrared beacon, as well as a radio tracker that reported its GPS coordinates to a querying transmitter. The beacon is useful to visually track it during descent using night vision goggles. The radio tracker is for locating it on the ground after landing. The packages will be deployed first, and the commandos of the Baaz team will follow, flying their highly maneuverable chutes to land near to the landing site of the packages. Sergeant John Devapakkiam, the leader of the Baaz team was going to lead the drop, and Raghunandan and Jinendra would bring up the rear. Sgt Devapakkiam was wearing the night vision scope to track the boxes.

They were going to land a couple of kilometers inside the coast of the Republic of Somalia. Even though the country had no government, and no armed forces, it was still a sovereign nation, and breaching its airspace was not entirely legal. Since the tens of thousands of stinger missiles that went missing from Afghanistan were not yet accounted for, any such flight was deemed to be of some risk. Hence, the Hercules will be flying in fast directly from the ocean.

The Baaz team’s mission was no way easier than that of the Makar team. Of course, they don’t get the excitement of jumping down into the ocean in the dark. Instead, they get to jump into the dry and deserted land of Somalia, and stay put till they hear from the command. They had three All Terrain Vehicles to concur the terrain and supplies for five days to survive. Three boxes, each containing an all terrain vehicle, and accessories and supplies including rations, weapons, ammunition, fuel, spare parts, etc, were strapped down on the floor of the Hercules. Their mission, as per the general brief would be to seek out an enemy that is out there somewhere in the coastal villages. The details were not known to the team yet.

Unlike the Makar team, they will be deploying their supplies the normal way, which is to slide them out of the ramp, and follow it using their maneuverable parachutes. The landing zone was already surveyed by a number of satellite passes, and they expected no resistance there. Still, the commandos carried their weapons ready for any surprises.

The top of the boxes was currently being used as a table for briefing. They had satellite images and maps that detail their landing zone and also the whereabouts of a location that might become of interest to them. Wearable GPS receivers were already programmed with the co-ordinates and paths related to all the features of interest.

Almost every satellite pass above the region in the past couple of weeks, be it that of the various government agencies, or that of the private service providers, were acquired by the company, and put to use for planning this mission. Imagery consisting of visible, infrared and radar mapping was obtained. Regular flights of the Albatross were conducted over the ocean, so the location of the ship they were interested in was kept under watch. The air patrol was kept well away from the coast line, so that the pirates wouldn’t get alarmed and did something drastic. The ship was finally seen anchored at around 8 nautical miles from the coast line to the south of the town of El Bakzur, where it lay currently, not knowing that she would soon get visitors.

The analysts also found from the satellite maps that there was an unexplained source of infrared radiation from a small oasis like place that lay between the town and the coast. This area appeared to have water available, as indicated by the growth of trees and bush in abundance. This was quite unremarkable for the general geography of the location, except the fact that against the chilled darkness of the nighttime infrared map, the place glowed hotter than the town of El Baksur itself.

It turned out to be a good catch, as the latest visible imagery showed vehicle tracks going from the orchard – that was the code name given for the place – to the coast. There was indication of a good amount of vehicle and foot traffic to the coast that lay 4 kilometres to the east from the orchard. A less used trail was also leading to the town.

The trail to the coast ended at a beach and a rudimentary jetty that some of the images showed a boat or two tied up. The MV Alor Gajah was anchored not too far from this point. It was decided to keep a flank on land, so that in case the pirate story was a ruse, there was a back up to deal with the situation.

The Baaz team was supposed to land at a location that was almost 2 kilometres south of the ‘orchard’. This place offered an advantage of easy access for the ATVs to reach the town, the ‘orchard’ and the coast. It also offered a reasonable amount of trees and bush for the team to hide and escape the punishing sun of the days. There was also a dry lake bed where a chopper could land if the need arise. They were to stay put among the wilderness, awaiting orders.

Raghunandan Kulkarni watched on, as the Makar team deployed. The Hercules had descended to ten thousand feet, and reduced speed to one twenty five knots. The aft ramp opened, and everyone within the hold began to be shaken up by the buffeting air mass. The Makar team queued up by the side, led by Sgt Naik. They gingerly walked to the dark void, and one by one, jumped off and vanished into the darkness. After all six commandos were off and away, the Hercules made a slow and gentle turn to port, coming almost to 180 degrees. Everyone craned their heads in the direction of the parachutes down below that carried their colleagues. The stream of flashing LEDs were visible, clearly indicating the formation floating down to the darkness of the ocean. Finally, with a nod and a thumbs up, Ramanathan, who was standing behind strapped up to his cargo, deftly pushed it over the castor wheels towards the open ramp. He broke into a run, and floated away through the ramp into the buffeting slipstream and sunk out of sight. The Hercules didn’t wait to see further. As the ramp closed, the mighty plane started another turn starboard, this time heading to the landing zone of the Baaz team beyond the coast line. After that drop if finished, the hercules would immediately climb to FL240 and re-acquire their original air route to Mogadishu. There was an early breakfast and a pair of nice beds waiting for the pilots at Nairobi.

End of Part 2


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PostPosted: 08 Oct 2012 14:17 
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Joined: 04 Apr 2005 08:17
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Location: Dera Mahab Ali धरा महाबलिस्याः درا مهاب الي
There goes folks!! Another break!!

The original intention was to fit the story in 60 chapters, but couldn't resist the mid-air encounter. The downside of that one is, the creative forces were spent on it. Need a bit of a breather to figure the concluding/climax. Right now, creativity is pretty low and the buffer is empty. It should be possible to start posting again in a fortnight.

Meanwhile, I could use some review on the mid-air encounter. It is done entirely based on imagination, and I could use some reality check. Comments on all other aspects are also most welcome.

See y'all back in two weeks.


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PostPosted: 08 Oct 2012 14:50 
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Gripping stuff as usual. I had stopped reading after your first break as I wanted to read all of story in one go rather than waiting for each new post. The pace was faster in first one but the 2nd one seemed a little slow, lost in details. But it looks like it was just the buildup. Hope you finish writing the rest quickly


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PostPosted: 19 Nov 2012 15:44 
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Joined: 04 Apr 2005 08:17
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Location: Dera Mahab Ali धरा महाबलिस्याः درا مهاب الي
I see no chance of re-starting it in the regular form. So, here is a summarized ending

Summary Ending

Kerim Obijuo was the leader of nine men. He was a small time pirate who worked on the fishing craft and small freighters that plied the troubled waters of Somalia. A few months ago, his life was changed drastically. He and his men where hired by what he thought was a group of mercenaries. They had settled down in a lightly wooded area near his village. They were foreigners, who looked different than his own people or the Arabs from the north. In his country that had no government, firepower was power, and Kerim was hired, with a good salary that could easily dwarf the pittance he used to earn by plying the waters. Still, he was a bit resentful about the military like ways of the group.

One late evening, while he was sitting lazily in his hut that served as a command post that controlled the outer perimeter, Kerim’s team were subjected to a sudden, surprise attack. Though he was constantly being asked to be wary of such an attack by his bosses, Kerim used to laugh it off inside. Given the geography of the place, it was incredible how the attack came. A small group of fighters appeared from nowhere, mounted on a few small, four wheeled vehicles. They moved with deadly precision, and knew where exactly the highly camouflaged sentry posts were. After seeing two of the sentry posts explode in a fireball after the familiar woosh of the RPG, Kerim decided that it is neither worth nor sensible to fight the intruders. He yelled the code to abandon the fight into his radio, and dove to the nearest hiding place. He preferred to fight another day.

The fight did not last too much. Even though the campers, along with another local team similar to Kerim’s who foolhardily decided to stay on, had put up a good fight, they were no match to the highly efficient intruders. As he watched from his hiding place, Kerim noted the shooting move further in, and die off eventually. The fight was apparently over. It was time to make himself scarce, and take stock of what is left of his team. Kerim crawled out from the bunch of firewood, but before he could turn around the corner, he felt the cold of a barrel on his neck. No words were exchanged, but the guns speak their own languages. Kerim Obijuo was taken prisoner, without any resistance or noise.

Kerim spoke passable English. This aided the intruders to find a lot of information about their quarry. Kerim sang true like a canary. He held no loyalty to his (former) employers. He was deemed to be a useful implement, and the garuds decided to keep him in that capacity.

Kerim didn’t know much about the men who ran the camp. He gladly recounted what he know. He was approached by the local shop owner, and he was led to meet someone by name Isow. He was a suave and well built man in his fifties. A deal was soon struck for Kerim and his men to serve the new comers. The official line was that they were prospecting for minerals in the area, but Kerim was no fool to swallow that. But it was not really his business to meddle, as long as he was paid his due. Till date, that end was met satisfactorily.

Isow was the commander, and it was him who dealt with Kerim and the other locals. The locals were never allowed beyond the inner perimeter manned by the camp’s own soldiers, but Kerim knew that there are at least fifty men, all mercenary like, who camped inside. Often, the local hires were ordered to move to their rooms, while some important activities were carried out. Once again, he decided that it won’t be in his interest to be too curious.

The residents of the camp had suffered major casualties. Unlike Kerim and his men, the other team of locals fought valiantly, but unfortunately, they were outsmarted and out gunned by the intruders. The fight was going down really bad, almost to the last man and last bullet. But the bullets ran out before men, and the commandos could take the survivors, including the leaders, into their custody. They were appraised to expect the campers to go the suicide route. The ingenious use of certain chemical cocktail that would induce sleep had helped to avoid the situation.

Jinendra Renaweera walked in following Raghunandan. Two garuds accompanied a step behind, with their weapons at ready, and eyes constantly scanning for danger. It took them a moment to recognize the tall man in full combat gear. Ramanathan had categorically refused to take Raghu and Jinendra for the shooting match. Even though they had parted only hours ago, they could not really recognize the man with all the dirt, soot and filth. With a cocky smile and an overdose of courtesy, Ramanathan opened the door to the inner chamber and waved his guests in.

Inside, there were three chairs, with three men sitting, with their hands and feet securely tied. Armed commandos stood, with their weapons trained at the men. The men were sitting in utter defiance, and they only glanced to the door when the new comers entered. A deliberate hiss of disgust welcomed Raghu, which gave way to a gasp when the face of Jinendra came to light.

Ramanathan took a step forward with a dramatic effect. “Your Excellency,” he addressed Jinendra trying hard to avoid any tone of sarcasm. “Pleasure to introduce Isow Divianathan.” He said, waving to the man sitting to the right.

Jinendra stood speechless, but he was not looking at Isow, better known as Divia in his records. Isow Divianathan was the brains behind the separatist organization. He was responsible to mobilize the world wide support machinery for the organization, and serve as the de facto foreign minister and spokesman. He lived abroad, and visited the island nation only occasionally. When things went really bad for the ‘leader’, Divia vanished from the public eye, and also from the tracks of the intelligence organizations of the countries involved. The government of Dharmendra Renaweera did whatever possible to get hold of him to no avail. Finally, they had to cook up a story of his demise to satisfy the curious. The appearance of a live Divia would leave a lot of trouble for the president.

But the trusted deputy of the president was not thinking about that right now. His eyes were stuck at the shorter stubbier man sitting in the middle with a visible smirk.

Isow Divianathan sensed the trouble. He tried to speak, but had to clear his throat multiple times before he could. “Your Excellency..” He finally managed to say with some clarity. “Allow me to introduce you to our National Leader. I take it that you would grant him all the courtesies his stature demands”

Raghu felt that a lightning hit the inhabitants of the room. Jinendra tried hard to stay focused. His eyes were frantically scanning the round, multi chinned, smirking face for clues of being fake.

The evil that everybody thought to be dead was sitting there, very much alive.

Ramanathan moved forward, completely ignoring the drama and the predicament of his coilleagues. He moved to the third chair, and poked the face of the young man sitting there to life it up to the light.

“Is this your man?” He asked a bewildered Raghu, with total irreverence. The pomp of the two other men deflated instantly. Raghu took a step forward and took a good look at the young man.

“Yes.” He said with a chuckle. “Here is Angu Thevar, aka Sebastian, aka Simon Mariadas. Fugitive for the government of India.”

Seeing the change in atmosphere, Isow jumped in. He boldly claimed that the camp was his sovereign territory, and the intruders have no right to incarcerate them. Simon was the son of the leader, and hence heir apparent. He can not be arrested, claimed Isow.

“As far as I am concerned” Ramanathan said with an evil smile “You are just a bunch of pirates. I don’t care if you are real, fake or even a ghost. It would help you to consider that I am as lawless and as a pirate as anyone, and I wouldn’t care much to shoot you or give you off to the best bidder.” He watched the visible shudder on the face of the much feared leader. Ramanathan barked a command to his commandos to watch the prisoners well, and deny them any food or water. He then turned on his heel, facing a surprised and speechless Raghu and Jinendra. The three men walked out of the cabin. Once outside, the evil pirate in Ramanathan had mysteriously evaporated, and they started planning the next move.

Jinendra was adamant that this ‘leader’ was an impostor. Probably one of the body doubles that the real leader used to employ. He claimed that he himself had been at the death scene of the real leader, and there was no question in his mind that it was the real man. This was a really tricky situation, that needed very careful handling. After multiple sessions of consultations and conferences, it was decided to take the prisoners out to the sea, and record the arrest of Simon, and take him back to face the legal proceedings of his latest crime. The other men will be held till the identities and back stories could be verified. INS Mysore promptly sailed out, and the men were transferred on board. Later that day, a helicopter took Simon to Mogadishu, to board a chartered flight to face his fate. The prisoners continued on board, and eventually landed at some unknown naval port to be transported to some unknown detention facility.

DNA tests were conducted, with still confusing results. Simon’s DNA did not match either the ‘live leader’ or the ‘dead leader’. Upon Raghu’s insistence, it was matched to the DNA of Samuel NAnbunayakam, and it matched. Simon was, after all, the son of Samuel. This information was never revealed to anyone.

Jessica and Jennifer were brought in, and allowed to see the ‘leader’ from behind a one way mirror. Jessica turned to a stony silence, while Jennifer frantically ran forward, calling for her father. It took some effort to calm her, and prevent her from breaking the glass. She was promised a chance to meet her father, and a meeting was arranged. Though the little girl went all emotional on seeing her ‘father’, the response from the ‘leader’ left a lot to be desired. Jennifer herself was very depressed after the meeting, even though she adamantly insisted that it was indeed her father, and her leader.

The DNA, however, didn’t match. It did not match the stored profile of the ‘dead leader’ either. Jessica never went back from her claim that Jennifer was indeed the daughter of the leader. It reached a stage where there was no further use for the women. They refused to go back to the island, so they were taken to the only facility that is assured to be secure. The one inside the tiger reserve.

Despite so much of effort by the nations involved, a clear identification on who was the real leader could not arrive at. Dharmendra demanded that Isow and the fake leader be extradited to his country. But the other nations summarily objected to the idea. Finally, it was decided to move them to a secure facility while investigations continue. No one heard about them thereafter.

The only thing the public came to know was about the valiant efforts by the Indian Navy to apprehend the escaped criminal. He was subjected to a fair trial, and everyone let a satisfied sigh when the capital punishment was vested upon him. But he is expected to spend a long, boring time in the prison, going through the appeals process.

The vessel M V Alor Gajah was abandoned. It was reclaimed by the coast guard, and auctioned off. The poor fishermen who lost their lives got nothing. However, a crackdown in the coastal areas of the state netted a number of ‘undocumented aliens’ who were subjected to the due process of law.

Anish Kurup made a full recovery and went back to his business. The trusty Passat was written off, and he bough an exactly similar car. His habits are hardly changed.

The End.


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PostPosted: 19 Nov 2012 17:36 
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Dileep wrote:
I see no chance of re-starting it in the regular form. So, here is a summarized ending

Summary Ending
...
...
The End.

:((
Not done - just not done!! We were ready to wait ... :((


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PostPosted: 19 Nov 2012 18:49 
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klpd comes to mind!


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PostPosted: 19 Nov 2012 23:04 
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Seriously Kejirwal Lok Dal Party moment.


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PostPosted: 20 Nov 2012 14:29 
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Dileep wrote:
I see no chance of re-starting it in the regular form. So, here is a summarized ending

സാറേയ്.. ഇത് ഒരു മാതിരി വിളിച്ചുണർത്തി ഊണില്ല എന്നു പറഞ്ഞ പോലെ ആയല്ലോ :(( :((


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PostPosted: 20 Nov 2012 20:10 
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Joined: 05 Feb 2010 21:13
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