Bharat Rakshak

Consortium of Indian Defence Websites
It is currently 29 Jul 2014 01:17

All times are UTC + 5:30 hours




Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 4612 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108 ... 116  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: 11 Dec 2012 19:45 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 27 Jun 1999 11:31
Posts: 902
Location: The planet Earth
Makes me feel a little better about our Raa and eye-bee

Quote:
The CIA Agent Who Found Bin Laden Is Having Trouble at Work

By Adam Clark Estes | The Atlantic Wire

If you're not already aware of the bull-headed CIA agent whose persist pressure to track Al Qaeda couriers helped lead the way to bin Laden's compound, you're about to be. The main character of Zero Dark Thirty, the soon-to-be released Oscar bait that portrays the story of the Bin Laden raid, is based on said agent, "is based on a real person" whose identity remains classified as she's still working for the CIA. Things at Langley haven't been going so well for said secret, soon-to-be an anonymous celebrity spy, though. In fact, according to a new Washington Post report, things sound like they're going pretty poorly. She's been passed over for a promotion, pissed off all her coworkers and sounds generally unpopular.

RELATED: New York Times Reporter Ran a Maureen Dowd Column by the CIA

The scenario sounds like a plot line from Homeland. (Actually, it sounds like the plot line from Homeland, but that's another blog post for another day.) The anonymous agent, a woman in her mid-30s, got her start as a "targeter," someone who recruits spies or identifies targets for drone strikes. She's known for being uniquely dedicated to her work, the type that stands up for an idea before anyone else is even giving it consideration. Such was the idea to hawk Bin Laden's couriers, and one of her follow officers told The Post that she "was one of the people from very early on pushing this." If you watch the trailer for Zero Dark Thirty, you'll catch a mention of this point. A Navy SEAL asks his teammate why he believes the story behind their next mission, a mission to kill Osama bin Laden, and the teammate answers, "Her confidence," pointing to the character based on this CIA agent.

RELATED: On His Way Out, Arthur Brisbane Rebukes The New York Times Again

It shouldn't be too much of a surprise that this agent's stubbornness and imminent fame is a sensitive issue with her colleagues. After the successful raid, this agent and a few others were awarded the CIA's highest honor for non-combat officers, the Distinguished Intelligence Medal. Instead of congratulating her coworkers, she hit reply-all on an email to the recipients and said that only she deserved the award, since everybody else tried to get in her way when she knew she was right. (Homeland fans, just imagine every scene with Carrie and her bosses, ever.) Around the same time and for unknown reasons, the agent was passed over for a promotion that could've brought her an extra $16,000 a year in income, though she did receive a cash reward of an undisclosed amount for her work on the bin Laden case.

RELATED: A Guide to the 'Zero Dark Thirty' Torture Debate

In a way, this sort of internal drama is just how things work at Langley, says one former CIA officer. "Do you know how many CIA officers are jerks?" the former officer told The Post. "If that was a disqualifier, the whole National Clandestine Service would be gone." He added, "The agency is a funny place, very insular. It's like middle schoolers with clearances."



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Dec 2012 02:05 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 26 Mar 2002 12:31
Posts: 3806
Location: searching for the next al-qaida #3
Outgoing IB director Sandhu appointed Deputy NSA

Quote:
NEW DELHI: Outgoing Intelligence Bureau Director Nehchal Sandhu was today appointed as Officer on Special Duty (OSD) in National Security Council Secretariat, a government body to assist in internal security related matters.
...
...
"His (Sandhu) appointment would be on re-employment on contract, initially as Officer on Special Duty until the expiry of the term of the current incumbent, Vijaya Latha Reddy, IFS (1975) on March 20, 2013 and as Deputy National Security Adviser and Secretary, National Security Council Secretariat, thereafter," an official release said today.

Sandhu will have a fixed tenure of three years.
...
...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Dec 2012 03:30 
Offline
Forum Moderator

Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Posts: 37947
^^^ That means the govt expects Int Sec to be the most challenging area to appoint the outgoing IB director still on contract.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 04 Jan 2013 05:37 
Offline
Forum Moderator

Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Posts: 37947
Interview with Former IB director Arun Bhagat


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 04 Jan 2013 13:42 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 18 Jun 2000 11:31
Posts: 1709
No churning on China
Quote:
:
:
But first let’s set the context. In 2009, the defence minister issued an operational directive to the three services headquarters stating, reasonably, that China was the country’s main security threat. The directive thus issued required the military to now wheel their big guns, ships and aircraft China-ward. Three years on this hasn’t happened. The Army and the Air Force continue to concentrate their effort on the Western border; the Navy likewise, but less conspicuously, justifies its “North Arabian Sea” tilt, except it now touts piracy as an operational consideration. In effect, the Indian military’s effort and capabilities are majorly tuned to dealing with the inconvenience posed by Pakistan, which in reality is more a nuisance than a genuine military threat. (True, a militarily inferior adversary can effectively utilise terrorism, but to squash a pestiferous fly an elephant gun may be inappropriate, given the potential collateral damage, when a rolled-up newspaper — targeted intelligence operations — may serve the purpose better.)
It means that the military is willfully ignoring a straightforward order from the government perhaps because it finds it hard to tear away from the rationale that the Pakistan threat provides for the plains warfare-heavy weapons profile — in particular, vast armoured and mechanised formations and an inventory full of short-legged and medium-range aircraft — of the services. But also because when the armed forces look around, they see a government that, far from walking the talk, seeks desperately to placate Beijing, striving at every turn to remove from the official Chinese mind even smidgeons of doubt about New Delhi’s “peaceful” intentions. Zhongnanhai (the complex of building in central Beijing housing the Chinese policy establishment) has only to raise its eyebrow for the Indian government to fall to its knees, ready to kowtow to China. But reality has to be faced and, much as everybody would like to keep bashing the Pakistanis, there’s China to be reckoned with. Rapidly enlarging itself, its political role, its military capabilities, its presence in the extended areas far from its home shores, China now demands attention.
The question is not whether or not to appease China because its record in the last few years is damning enough. zlmost all of the free seas off the southern Chinese coast, a pitch for a maritime lebensraum no less, cannot be missed. The best spin one can put on New Delhi’s China policy is that the Congress Party is too scared to spell out India’s strategic stakes, and too blinded by its desire to buy time with an authoritarian-state capitalist system in Beijing to consider the costs of doing so.
:
:
:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 04 Jan 2013 14:29 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Posts: 2057
Location: NullPointerException
VinodTK wrote:
No churning on China
Quote:
:
:
But first let’s set the context. In 2009, the defence minister issued an operational directive to the three services headquarters stating, reasonably, that China was the country’s main security threat. The directive thus issued required the military to now wheel their big guns, ships and aircraft China-ward. Three years on this hasn’t happened. The Army and the Air Force continue to concentrate their effort on the Western border; the Navy likewise, but less conspicuously, justifies its “North Arabian Sea” tilt, except it now touts piracy as an operational consideration. In effect, the Indian military’s effort and capabilities are majorly tuned to dealing with the inconvenience posed by Pakistan, which in reality is more a nuisance than a genuine military threat. (True, a militarily inferior adversary can effectively utilise terrorism, but to squash a pestiferous fly an elephant gun may be inappropriate, given the potential collateral damage, when a rolled-up newspaper — targeted intelligence operations — may serve the purpose better.)
It means that the military is willfully ignoring a straightforward order from the government perhaps because it finds it hard to tear away from the rationale that the Pakistan threat provides for the plains warfare-heavy weapons profile — in particular, vast armoured and mechanised formations and an inventory full of short-legged and medium-range aircraft — of the services. But also because when the armed forces look around, they see a government that, far from walking the talk, seeks desperately to placate Beijing, striving at every turn to remove from the official Chinese mind even smidgeons of doubt about New Delhi’s “peaceful” intentions. Zhongnanhai (the complex of building in central Beijing housing the Chinese policy establishment) has only to raise its eyebrow for the Indian government to fall to its knees, ready to kowtow to China. But reality has to be faced and, much as everybody would like to keep bashing the Pakistanis, there’s China to be reckoned with. Rapidly enlarging itself, its political role, its military capabilities, its presence in the extended areas far from its home shores, China now demands attention.
The question is not whether or not to appease China because its record in the last few years is damning enough. zlmost all of the free seas off the southern Chinese coast, a pitch for a maritime lebensraum no less, cannot be missed. The best spin one can put on New Delhi’s China policy is that the Congress Party is too scared to spell out India’s strategic stakes, and too blinded by its desire to buy time with an authoritarian-state capitalist system in Beijing to consider the costs of doing so.
:
:
:


Now we know one of the reasons why Bikram Singh was made chief - so he can kowtow the UPA line that India-China relations are all fine and dandy.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 04 Jan 2013 15:42 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Posts: 22478
Location: Embarrassed by fresh-off-the-boat Indians
VinodTK wrote:
No churning on China
Quote:
:
The Army and the Air Force continue to concentrate their effort on the Western border; the Navy likewise, but less conspicuously, justifies its “North Arabian Sea” tilt, except it now touts piracy as an operational consideration. In effect, the Indian military’s effort and capabilities are majorly tuned to dealing with the inconvenience posed by Pakistan,


Its not at all clear to me why Karnad is saying this. Every news item I have read in the last three years suggests a turn away from Pakistan and looking at China.

Let me most a list of things that seem to indicate a turn toward China and not Pakistan from news I have read on here
  • Raising of 3 new mountain divisions
  • Su 30s in the east
  • Operationalization of more high altitude bases
  • Improvement in army helicopter strength for high altitude operations
  • Lightweight air transportable artillery M 777
  • Andaman and Nicobar Islands command (that is hardly Arabian sea)
  • Operationalization of Sulur with Su 30s
  • Arakkonam is getting P 8s
It is wrong to claim that Navy is looking at North Arabian sea alone. The Indian Navy has had to have a continuous presence to fight piracy.

So what is this fellow having a big rant about? Anyway he says that China's "megatonne" nukes - will burn up our asses any time. :roll: Why swallow anything that is in print?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 04 Jan 2013 16:08 
Offline
Forum Moderator

Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Posts: 3949
^^ I have to agree.

I'm mystified by BK. Sometimes he comes out with absolute gems of analysis and clarity and insight. Sometimes utter crap. Hard to fathom. Maybe he's just a moody type of guy and got out on the wrong side of the bed today or something. Sometimes it boils down to simple stuff like that.

Or maybe it's his way of pushing for greater focus on China. But even if so, how many takers will be there for this sort of approach by BK?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 04 Jan 2013 16:32 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 May 2007 17:04
Posts: 8409
Location: (IT-vity && DRDO) nagar
Quote:
Let me most a list of things that seem to indicate a turn toward China and not Pakistan from news I have read on here

Raising of 3 new mountain divisions
Su 30s in the east
Operationalization of more high altitude bases
Improvement in army helicopter strength for high altitude operations
Lightweight air transportable artillery M 777
Andaman and Nicobar Islands command (that is hardly Arabian sea)
Operationalization of Sulur with Su 30s
Arakkonam is getting P 8s

Have to add the placing of A-II ( and maybe even A-III) units in NE in the list.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 04 Jan 2013 18:17 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Posts: 2057
Location: NullPointerException
Probably ranting because the MSC is still stuck and won't see the light of day anytime soon. Without that its still a defensive posture WRT China.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 04 Jan 2013 23:47 
Offline
Forum Moderator

Joined: 08 Sep 2005 18:24
Posts: 5873
Location: Sergeant Major-No.1 Training Battalion, BR Rifles
JE Menon wrote:
^^ I have to agree.

I'm mystified by BK. Sometimes he comes out with absolute gems of analysis and clarity and insight. Sometimes utter crap. Hard to fathom. Maybe he's just a moody type of guy and got out on the wrong side of the bed today or something. Sometimes it boils down to simple stuff like that.

Or maybe it's his way of pushing for greater focus on China. But even if so, how many takers will be there for this sort of approach by BK?


Absolutely correct.

What does BK expect the Services to do? Move formations lock, stock and barrel just because MOD issued dome directive? Does this directive from MOD reduce the threat from Pakistan? What is still more funny is that he uses his pet peeves to somehow justify his assertions - the armored/mechanized formations, 'weak' PA and all that. Was it not him who was asking India to scale down its Strike Corps and openly convert Prithvi Missile Regiments into theater ballistic missiles as a matter of CBM for Pakistan? Sure, PA is an irritant...an irritant armed to teeth by the only 'super power' in town.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 05 Jan 2013 01:51 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 07 Feb 2007 16:58
Posts: 1970
rohitvats wrote:
Sure, PA is an irritant...an irritant armed to teeth by the only 'super power' in town.


China? :mrgreen:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 05 Jan 2013 07:15 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 09 Feb 1999 12:31
Posts: 13143
JE Menon wrote:
^^ I have to agree.

I'm mystified by BK. Sometimes he comes out with absolute gems of analysis and clarity and insight. Sometimes utter crap. Hard to fathom. Maybe he's just a moody type of guy and got out on the wrong side of the bed today or something. Sometimes it boils down to simple stuff like that.

Or maybe it's his way of pushing for greater focus on China. But even if so, how many takers will be there for this sort of approach by BK?

It is for the external audience from the East


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 05 Jan 2013 18:59 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 Aug 2006 18:43
Posts: 6693
shiv wrote:
Its not at all clear to me why Karnad is saying this. Every news item I have read in the last three years suggests a turn away from Pakistan and looking at China.

Let me most a list of things that seem to indicate a turn toward China and not Pakistan from news I have read on here
  • Raising of 3 new mountain divisions
  • Su 30s in the east
  • Operationalization of more high altitude bases
  • Improvement in army helicopter strength for high altitude operations
  • Lightweight air transportable artillery M 777
  • Andaman and Nicobar Islands command (that is hardly Arabian sea)
  • Operationalization of Sulur with Su 30s
  • Arakkonam is getting P 8s
It is wrong to claim that Navy is looking at North Arabian sea alone. The Indian Navy has had to have a continuous presence to fight piracy.

So what is this fellow having a big rant about? Anyway he says that China's "megatonne" nukes - will burn up our asses any time. :roll: Why swallow anything that is in print?

Add that to additional bases in the tip of the A&N islands overlooking malacca. Construction of a major naval base in the east. There will be more ships based in the east than in the west. Also, tanks will be deployed in the NE (which is what BK had been asking for a long time). Purchase of Mi 17V for transport in the NE, New airstrips in the NE. Brahmos deployment to take out silo's in Tibet and much more

BK talks nonsense sometimes. There are lots of people out to attack the govt.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 05 Jan 2013 19:29 
Offline
Forum Moderator

Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
Posts: 32542
Location: Col of the regiment, ORR JTF unit
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home ... 901984.cms

hope the MEA nehruvians do not scuttle this move as a CBM with china!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 07 Jan 2013 05:51 
Offline
Forum Moderator

Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Posts: 37947
Shyamd, Read his article and not the comments here. He is saying something for young people like you to understand.

OK what is his core message?
Who is his message addressed to?
Does his message confirm or go against any train of thought?
Look at it from these questions.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 08 Jan 2013 03:52 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 18 Jun 2000 11:31
Posts: 1709
For an India-led security architecture in South Asia


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 08 Jan 2013 05:10 
Offline
Forum Moderator

Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Posts: 37947
VinodTK wrote:



Isn't this a underwhelming objective?

India is the largest power in Indian Sub-continent And why use kafir formulations for Indian sub-continent?

Shows no need to read the article.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 16 Jan 2013 15:36 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 Aug 2006 18:43
Posts: 6693
India, Chinese and US are competing against each other for listening posts in Maldives, Oman and Madagascar to monitor Arabian sea, Afpak and Yemen.

We already have posts in at least 2 of the 3 and an agreement with the 3rd (which involves surveillance flights).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 25 Jan 2013 05:09 
Offline
Forum Moderator

Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Posts: 37947
Will x-post to ref thread...

First RN Kao Memorial lecture by Shashi Tharoor:

First Lecture
No text?
Second Memorial Lecture
Kumarmangalam Birla?

Third Memorial Lecture?

Fourth memorial lecture
Vice President Hamid Ansari

Intelligence for world of Tomorrow Hamid Ansari


Fifth lecture By Satish Lamba
‘Securing India's Future Through Its Neighbourhood’

Full text?


Sixth lecture in 2012

India's Security challenges in Next Decade: Role of Intelligence

Naresh Chandra

Seventh lecture in 2013 by APJ Kalam

Text not yet available.
-

Goal is to collect the full text and analyse the world view expressed in this lecture series.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 25 Jan 2013 08:12 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 May 2007 17:04
Posts: 8409
Location: (IT-vity && DRDO) nagar
X-post:
Vipul wrote:
Narasimha Rao had asked Kalam to be ready for nuclear test.

Just two days before announcement of results of the 1996 general election, then prime minister P V Narasimha Rao had directed A P J Abdul Kalam, scientific adviser to the defence minister at the time, to keep his team ready for a nuclear test.

However, with the poll outcome throwing up a change in government, Rao ensured his impending successor Atal Behari Vajpaee was briefed in his presence on the nuke test plans and so enabled a smooth takeover of the nuclear programme.

This was revealed by Kalam himself while delivering the 7th R N Kao Memorial Lecture, organized by the Research and Analyses wing of the Cabinet Secretariat, here on Thursday. "I still remember a scene during May 1996. It was 9 'o' clock. I got a call ....that I should meet Prime Minister P V Narasimha Rao immediately," Kalam said.

According to the father of India's missile programme, who later went on to become the President of India, Rao told him, "Kalam, be ready with the department of atomic energy and your team for the N-test and I am going to Tirupati. You wait for my authorization to go ahead with the test. DRDO-DAE teams must be ready for action".

Recounting Rao's plans were not meant to be as "the election result was quite different from what he anticipated", Kalam said he received yet another call from the then PM asking him to meet him along with Prime Minister-designate Vajpayee. This was "so that the smooth takeover of such a very important programme can take place," he elaborated.

However, the nuke test plans could not be carried out as the Vajpayee government lasted barely 13 days.

Noting that Rao's act of ensuring continuity of the nuclear programme "reveals the maturity and professional excellence of a patriotic statesman who believed that the nation is bigger than the political system," Kalam revealed that the first task he was assigned after Vajpayee embarked on his second stint as the PM in 1998 was to conduct the nuclear test at the earliest.

The Pokhran tests were finally carried out in May, 1998.

Placing the focus of his lecture on cyber terrorism and counter measures, Kalam on Thursday suggested an empowered coordinating agency be set up to receive information about all cyber attacks. Apart from calling for continuous upgrade of technical capabilities by the intelligence agencies, the former President insisted that hacking skills be imparted by scientists, computer software and hardware experts, on the lines of China where virus writing is taught in its military schools.

Kalam suggested human intelligence and electronic intelligence be used as a tool to penetrate terrorist groups, besides building offensive and defensive cyber capabilities on the lines of nuclear capabilities. "Technology-driven covert operations are becoming the order of the day and inflicting collateral damages through critical information infrastructure is threatening to change the conventional wisdom in warfare," he said and sought crippling of the ability of terrorists to use technology for communication.

Kalam also recommended creation of an intelligence cadre, like the Indian Intelligence Service, by recruiting specifically for intelligence agencies. All these recruits, he said, must be made to pass a strict personality test based on evolved and dynamic physiological and psychological aptitude tests.

Wasnt the RAS also a sort of Indian Intelligence cadre as suggested by Dr. Kalam, which is now not so useful since the IPS lobby has killed it? Wont the same happen to any newer such formations also?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 25 Jan 2013 10:06 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 05 Apr 2006 16:25
Posts: 6863
People might take this lightly but a UPA-1 or II if there was no NDA would have tested Nukes and would quietly accepted Paki Nuke threats.

The whole peaceful behavior of Pakis etc was benefit from Kargil and Parakram and will now wear off. I don't see the present UPA, 3rd front constuitents have the ability to take necessary decisions against international pressure when Pakis show their Pakistaniyat.

1971 bought 15 years of peace, Kargil and Parakram have bought us 10 years of peace. I really don't see appeasement working


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 31 Jan 2013 18:47 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 Aug 2006 18:43
Posts: 6693
Did Parakram really bring peace? See this database for casualties/incidents in J&K:
http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries ... alties.htm


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 31 Jan 2013 19:43 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 05 Apr 2006 16:25
Posts: 6863
shyamd wrote:
Did Parakram really bring peace? See this database for casualties/incidents in J&K:
http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries ... alties.htm


Boss Pakistan knew it had Nukes, if there was no Parakram if anything our casualties would have been much higher.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 01 Feb 2013 02:03 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 Aug 2006 18:43
Posts: 6693
Yes but the figures point that they are still infiltrating at a high level despite parakram - then AfPak kicked in with jihadis diverted north and peace deal with Mushy who started slowing things down/shutting some camps helped to an extent.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 01 Feb 2013 06:24 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 28 Jun 2007 06:36
Posts: 2917
ShyamD,

Are you reading the same data you posted?

Terrorist fatalities by year from your link in satp

1998-2261
1999-2538
2000-3288
2001-4507
2002-3022
2003-2542
2004-1810

2005-1739
2006-1116

The figures indicate that 2002 was the decisive turn in terrorism figures, which basically means the role of Op parakram was the most important point which reduced terrorism. The graph clearly shows that 2001-2002 was the year when terrorism was decisively reversed.

Notice the peak fall after 2002, the graph cant get any better than that to show the most important milestone in terrorism reduction - op parakram.

That actually shows that Op Parakram was the most resounding success. With that single operation, India has broken through the cycle of terrorist violence in Kashmir.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 01 Feb 2013 06:28 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 28 Jun 2007 06:36
Posts: 2917
shyamd wrote:
Yes but the figures point that they are still infiltrating at a high level despite parakram - then AfPak kicked in with jihadis diverted north and peace deal with Mushy who started slowing things down/shutting some camps helped to an extent.

and all that Mushy had to do because of Op Parakram. Op Parakram showed that India did not had unlimited patience wrt terrorism and will react if it got out of hand. That made the payoff - matrix for Pakistan's support to a continuous high level of terrorism unviable. It made the 1000 cut strategy completely unviable as India said that if even one cut gets too deep, it will not hesitate to put Pakistan on its knees.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 01 Feb 2013 10:26 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 09 Feb 1999 12:31
Posts: 13143
Aditya_V wrote:
shyamd wrote:
Did Parakram really bring peace? See this database for casualties/incidents in J&K:
http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries ... alties.htm


Boss Pakistan knew it had Nukes, if there was no Parakram if anything our casualties would have been much higher.


2002 - Op Prakram

2005 - Earthquake in POK.

2008 - Global Financial crisis and drop in international finance


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 01 Feb 2013 18:32 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 Aug 2006 18:43
Posts: 6693
Virupaksha wrote:
ShyamD,

Are you reading the same data you posted?

Terrorist fatalities by year from your link in satp

1998-2261
1999-2538
2000-3288
2001-4507
2002-3022
2003-2542
2004-1810

2005-1739
2006-1116

The figures indicate that 2002 was the decisive turn in terrorism figures, which basically means the role of Op parakram was the most important point which reduced terrorism. The graph clearly shows that 2001-2002 was the year when terrorism was decisively reversed.

Notice the peak fall after 2002, the graph cant get any better than that to show the most important milestone in terrorism reduction - op parakram.

That actually shows that Op Parakram was the most resounding success. With that single operation, India has broken through the cycle of terrorist violence in Kashmir.

The jihadi's were fighting in AfPak instead - they can't fight on both fronts easily. From mid 2002 onwards its on record that they were preparing. 2003 afpak began kicking off. By 2005 things were in full motion.

FYI, the numbers you quoted above include Security personell and civilians. It might be useful to add casualties during Op. Parakram to the above too.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 01 Feb 2013 20:15 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 05 Apr 2006 16:25
Posts: 6863
ShyamD we should then have Paki causualties in Operation Parakram also. NO credit for LOC fence ?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 01 Feb 2013 20:59 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 19 Feb 2002 12:31
Posts: 1699
Aditya_V wrote:
ShyamD we should then have Paki causualties in Operation Parakram also. NO credit for LOC fence ?


There is an ongoing debate as to the reason why J&K Insurgency has tapered off in recent years:

a) Because of Pakistan's withdrawal or reduction of official support. Was this change of heart gradual or sudden? But then 26/11 evidence especially Dawood Gilani's confession is overwhelming evidence that the terrorism apparatus remains very much intact.

b) Our security forces have defeated the insurgency successfully using various means (including fence) and reduced it to a level similar to North Eastern states.

c) Developments and US/NATO prescence in AFPAK has meant that the terrorists need to lie low.

d) Combination of above.

This debate has great implication for future. In present context it will effect if Rashtriya Rifles will be dissolved and if AFSPA will be withdrawn. I think answers will not come before 2014-15.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 01 Feb 2013 21:03 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 Aug 2006 18:43
Posts: 6693
LoC fence is good, but still not enough to stop cross border movements. LoC fencing was relatively complete mid 2004. You can see how many are still getting through after this period.

If you are concerned about paki well being then please add their losses too.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 01 Feb 2013 21:11 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 Aug 2006 18:43
Posts: 6693
Aditya G wrote:
There is an ongoing debate as to the reason why J&K Insurgency has tapered off in recent years:

a) Because of Pakistan's withdrawal or reduction of official support. Was this change of heart gradual or sudden? But then 26/11 evidence especially Dawood Gilani's confession is overwhelming evidence that the terrorism apparatus remains very much intact.

Partly this - Mushy closed a few camps here and there but the infrastructure was still very much there. Its just that the focus was elsewhere.

Quote:
b) Our security forces have defeated the insurgency successfully using various means (including fence) and reduced it to a level similar to North Eastern states.

The political answer - the one that makes UPA happy. The truth? Well, partly yes IA/intel community/JKP demolished the remaining guys who were inside J&K. IA tactics post fencing has helped too.

Quote:
c) Developments and US/NATO prescence in AFPAK has meant that the terrorists need to lie low.

DGMI are basing current estimates on this (jihadis diverted north) - we are going for troop increase etc in J&K to reflect the post 2014 situation. Ample evidence to prove that they are deployed in the north, both public accounts and inputs we receive.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 02 Feb 2013 03:07 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 21 Mar 2006 02:18
Posts: 365
Shyamd,

The upcoming NoKo N-test should be watched closely. If they obtain a substantial yield, wont it be time for us to retest a couple of times and validate once and for all our TN capability ?

In any case, better to be sanctioned now, when the economy is a little slow anyway, than to be forced into testing later at a time when the economy is booming.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 02 Feb 2013 07:07 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 Aug 2006 18:43
Posts: 6693
So many factors to take into account. But to meet CMD they have to at some point. Everyone is watching us too. Pre-elections is my expectation. But it's gonna be interesting because of Obama's pledge to eliminate nuc's and they are negotiating with the Russians now again.

See latest PC decision and think about it


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 02 Feb 2013 09:54 
Offline
Forum Moderator

Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Posts: 37947
What PC decison?

The cut in RM budget?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 02 Feb 2013 14:07 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 Aug 2006 18:43
Posts: 6693
Cutting budget (by 8% - $20b)in election year 'to meet deficit' and upsetting rest of the cabinet. If you were smart, you would have probably cut budget last year and then let loose (spent more) this year in time for elections. One of the first orders ABV gave on nuc file was to prepare economy for sanctions.

But again I could be wrong. But all I know is they have to test at some point and they can't meet CMD unless they do. This topic is worth writing an essay because so many things need to be taken into account.

US needs a good global economy so can't rock the boat too much either.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 03 Feb 2013 16:43 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 08 Aug 2006 18:43
Posts: 6693
shyamd wrote:
Image
Image

EXCLUSIVE: Welcome to what could be India's newest listening post. On the northern eastern tip of Oman lies Ras Al Hadd. European intel services have been speculating the purpose of a listening post set up 2 years ago. Located on a rocky plataeu, the site is well protected by several police checkpoints. The European intel services also drew up a list of US listening posts in the country - and found that this facility wasn't on it. So, the europeans said if it ain't ours or it ain't the US's either then who's is it? The conclusion appears to be that this is likely to be an Indian post - India and Oman have had active security relations incl. the defence pact in 2008 and the facility is located directly opposite Pakistan. The building had been under construction since 2009 and has been operational since 2010.

India till date has had interception posts in North of Madagascar since 2007 and is planning to build others in the Maldives, Seychelles and Mauritius.

The US has had a monopoly in the region with a comprehensive set of listening posts in the region which has been used in Iraq and Afghanistan. In Oman - the NSA has facilties in Aboot, Masirah island and 2 posts in the Musandam peninsula. Further it has listening posts in Masira island, Bahrain, Sir Abu Nuair an island off Abu Dhabi, a 2nd faciltiy in Masirah island as well as Diego Garcia

What has china been upto in the region? China has been trailing behind on listening on the arabian sea and has been working on building permanent facilities.. It has deployed specialists to support the ISI and iranian intel services but these only have limited capacities to intercept. In an effort to boost its presence the PLA is working with Djibouti and Kenya - however this hasnt produced any results to date. In the meantime, China routinely despatches "oceanographic observation" vessels crammed with interception gear to the arabian sea. These ships frequently cross paths with the french naval intel ship - the Dupy de lome and spends much of its times in the same area..


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 04 Feb 2013 03:31 
Offline
BRF Oldie

Joined: 09 Feb 1999 12:31
Posts: 13143
ramana wrote:
VinodTK wrote:



Isn't this a underwhelming objective?

India is the largest power in Indian Sub-continent And why use kafir formulations for Indian sub-continent?

Shows no need to read the article.

Until the Indian economy reaches 5T + and dominant in external trade non of these security framewor will work.
India will achive all the alliace only after strong trade relations with these neighbors


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 04 Feb 2013 19:20 
Offline
BRFite

Joined: 19 Feb 2002 12:31
Posts: 1699
Aditya G wrote:
There is an ongoing debate as to the reason why J&K Insurgency has tapered off in recent years


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 327568.cms

Quote:
Q: About violence coming down. Partly this is due to domestic management and partly due to external situations outside India's control. So can this calm prove illusionary?

A: I don't think the situation can alter dramatically. That will take monumental failures on the line of control. Our entire counter-insurgency grid will have to fail. Our fence will have to fail. There are those who are suggesting that the withdrawal of US forces in Afghanistan, there will be a spillover effect in Jammu and Kashmir. I am not convinced. I believe it is something we need to keep an eye on but I am not convinced you will see a massive spurt in infiltration and violence. A large part of the credit for less violence goes to the way in which security forces have harmonized operations.

The local population is fed up with insurgency, allowing us to generate pin-point intelligence for operations. The capacity of state police has increased, no operation takes place without the active support and participation of J&K police.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 4612 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108 ... 116  Next

All times are UTC + 5:30 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group