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Indian Foreign Policy

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
Trikaal
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Trikaal » 01 Jan 2018 20:09

I will keep that in mind.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby disha » 02 Jan 2018 02:56

SSridhar wrote:If Indian policy is an amalgam of various thoughts, then S-e-S was also all right, because our self-implication in Balochistan, which was what MMS' action finally amounted to, was not taken in his personal capacity.


Right. If you say so.

However, even the most rabid critic of the current GOI on their vote against US in UN has not equated it with S-e-S, irrespective of indian policy amalgamation or not.

Added: Using "same logic or indian policy amalgamation" argument to sanitize S-e-S does not fly.

If Indian stance will not change even after this slap across our face, then this NDA government will learn yet another lesson from Palestine after learning lessons from Pakistan recently.


Ergo - current NDA govt. is so naive that it is learning lessons from the palestinians on foreign policy.

===

The 15-min. news cycle on this has moved on. The latest is about the Trump's rantings on Bakistan. I guess we have yet to learn how Bakistan is teaching yet another lesson to US after NoKo thought them lessons recently.
Last edited by disha on 02 Jan 2018 10:20, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Viv S » 02 Jan 2018 05:01

There seems to be an odd sort of dichotomy in many of the arguments here - unanimity over the idea that India's ME policy ought to be shaped by national self-interest being used to justify a course of action that would support Israel's interests while, at best, being only neutral to India's interest.

I don't understand where this supposed obligation to Israel comes from. Yes they've supplied us with high-end military equipment & technology. But we've given them defence business worth billions. They've shared intelligence and provided technical assistance against Pakistan. But then Pakistan as a matter of state policy doesn't recognize Israel's right to exist, so its not exactly a hard decision on their part.

Where it would have cost them i.e. China, the Israelis haven't drawn back one bit. India sat out the Belt and Road Forum last May because a project passing through PoK infringed upon our sovereignty and was therefore unacceptable to us. Meanwhile, the Israelis had a ministerial-level delegation in attendance at Beijing. And they've strongly supported the OBOR at a regional as well as international level.

---------------------------------------------------
There is an extraordinary capacity for China to assume its rightful place, as it’s doing, on the world stage. We are your perfect junior partner for that effort. [We] will sign a series of agreements on how we can pursue this cooperation, how we can help China with its plans and how China of course can enable us to participate in its great projects. But I believe this is a marriage made in heaven. - Benjamin Netanyahu
---------------------------------------------------

We didn't protest or even raise eyebrows because we understand and accept that in Indo-China matters, Israel will maintain a policy of neutrality. China is a major economic partner for them and business is business. It might have been the same on the defence front too if not for the US factor. The only reason the PLAAF doesn't operate Phalcons today, is that the Pentagon cried bloody murder when it learned of the sale.

Similarly, India's ME policy is based on its national interest. Our ties with Israel are important but so is maintaining good relations with the Arab states as well as Iran. 9 million Indian nationals live and work in the Gulf remitting over $40 billion annually, with the GCC also emerging as a major FDI source for the country. Iran is a critical node on the INSTC and our gateway to Central Asia (and Afghanistan).

The Israelis did not protest or raise eyebrows at that because they understand and accept that in Arab-Israeli matters, India will maintain a policy of neutrality. And that means going with the flow when 128 countries vote in favour of a resolution (including the likes of China, Russia, UK, France, Germany, Japan & Brazil).

And this isn't just the GoI babus or MEA mandarins at work here, its the careful considered policy of the incumbent govt as well. Modi was the first PM to visit Israel but he was also the first PM to visit UAE in 35 years. And he was no doubt instrumental in getting the crown prince of Abu Dhabi to be chief guest at the last Republic Day parade. The Emirati prince, welcomed by the PM with a (now customary) hug at the airport, brought with him, among other things, a pledge for a $75 billion India-UAE investment fund.
Last edited by Viv S on 02 Jan 2018 18:12, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby disha » 02 Jan 2018 06:19

^Viv S'ji, thanks for laying it out as above. It helped me understand my pain points vis-a-vis what some posters have mentioned their points on this thread.

My umbrage comes from the sense some forum members have that is best described as "India's ME policy *must* be shaped justifying a course of action that *must* support Israel's interests".

IMVHO, Israel should take care of its own ME Policy and as it is India has given quiet a leeway to them. Israel can very well understand India's compunctions and circumscribe themselves appropriately knowing fully well that they need Indian friendship as much as we need them.

Viv S wrote:I don't understand where this supposed obligation to Israel comes from. Yes they've supplied us with high-end military equipment & technology. But we've given them defence business worth billions. They've shared intelligence and provided technical assistance against Pakistan. But then Pakistan as a state doesn't recognize Israel's right to exist, so its not exactly a hard decision on their part.


Exactly. I myself am at a loss when posters come up here and say that India has a supposed obligation to Israel! If at all anybody has any obligation to Israel, it is the europeans. The Italians, norwegians, germans, polish etc. Not us.

Where it would have cost them i.e. China, the Israelis have drawn back one bit. India sat out the Belt and Road Forum in May because a project passing through PoK was unacceptable to us. The Israelis had a ministerial delegation there.


Thanks for pointing out the above and particularly this:

Our ties with Israel are important but so is maintaining good ties with the Arab states & Iran. 9 million Indian nationals live and work in the Gulf remitting over $40 billion annually, with the GCC also emerging as a major FDI source for the country.


However, the dhimmi we are, it appears that we have taken the "theka" (or contract) of taking care of Israel's interests and hence we must apologize for our vote against US in UN to Israelis and expect that they will partner with China over OBOR since "we are not tried and trusted friends onleee".
Last edited by disha on 02 Jan 2018 10:22, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 02 Jan 2018 07:32

Polls in neighbourhood pose fresh challenges for India - Indrani Bagchi, ToI
Even as S Jaishankar makes way for Vijay Gokhale to take over as foreign secretary, India is bracing for a fresh set of challenges as every country in India's neighbourhood goes in for elections over the next 16 months with some incumbents looking shaky. Nepal was first off the block with its elections in the closing weeks of 2017. If India counted the removal of K P Oli as a success, anti-incumbency and poor political choices by the Deuba government have brought Oli back to power in Kathmandu.

Having campaigned on a strong anti-India and pro-China platform, Oli's Left Alliance could be the first to serve a full term. Pakistan goes in for general elections in June 2018 although not much is expected in terms of a bilateral breakthrough at present. Maldives is due for presidential elections in September 2018, which is probably the reason why Abdulla Yameen is deeply distrustful of India. Bhutan has its parliamentary elections in the summer of 2018, which might have an effect on how the new government deals with India.

Post Doklam, India's challenges in this country have increased, and the demand to perform better there has also become more acute. Bangladesh is expected to go in for elections in end 2018-early 2019. These will be very important elections — India has invested deeply in Sheikh Hasina and her government, but after two terms, Hasina is facing sharp anti-incumbency. This will be closely watched in India for the implications it might have for bilateral and regional relations.

Afghanistan has parliamentary elections in July 2018 and presidential elections in April 2019. So, apart from Sri Lanka, every country will look very different by the time India herself goes in for elections early 2019. India's task is harder for two reasons — first, its successes of today look like failures of tomorrow, which is a constant diplomatic challenge. And secondly, China is a bigger presence, welcomed by almost all of India's neighbours. India has repeatedly blundered in Nepal with its inconsistencies.

"We lost the hill Nepalis with the blockade, and the Madhesis for lifting the blockade too soon," said a Nepal analyst. Oli has promised to revert the Buri Gandaki hydro project back to China (outgoing PM Deuba had cancelled the contract). Modi is expected in Kathmandu for the BIMSTEC summit, but will Oli make India his first stop? In addition, while India's projects are beset with poor implementation, China's noholds-barred largesse is attractive. For instance, sources said the Pokhara international airport, built by a Chinese government company cost a third more than its estimate, a sign that the deal is not above board.

With Pakistan, the trajectory is only downward. There are no official talks, although two NSAs, Ajit Doval and Nasir Janjua, are believed to be meeting in third countries quietly. However, there are no clarity on these talks. Chinese support and CPEC which India is implacably opposed to make it difficult for the two countries to engage with each other.

Constant infiltration of terrorists into J&K keeps the LoC "hot" and is a terror barrier for bilateral engagement. Despite Maldives President Abdulla Yameen appearing to address the downturn with India, there is no denying that relations between Male and New Delhi are at their lowest ebb. Maldives is reported to have prevented Indian envoy Akhilesh Mishra from meeting people from the opposition, while an FTA with China has added insult to injury. Maldives has denied putting any curbs on diplomats.

Their foreign minister Mohamed Asim took to Twitter to say, "Relations with #India is time-tested and is based on people to people contact & cooperation in several sectors. We remain committed to further enhancing and strengthening existing ties." The issue is not the curbs on Mishra or even a deeper relationship with China.

It is a deep distrust of India. How that is tob eresolved is hard to say, but certainly New Delhi has no interest in propping up either the older Gayoom or Nasheed against Yameen. But that is not a message Yameen is hearing right now. Yameen is clearly sending a strong message to India, which may be partly to do with presidential elections in 2018. As of now, Yameen is virtually the only credible candidate for president, since most of the opposition are either in jail or out of the country.

India can draw comfort from its growing closeness with Bangladesh, Myanmar and Bhutan, all of which looked up in 2017, but only after India had expended a lot of energy and capital. India and Bangladesh have built arguably the most number of connectivity projects, almost unprecedented in south Asia. India has offered $5 billon in development and defence Inprojects only in 2017.

India even undertook a significant course correction on the Rohingya crisis in deference to Sheikh Hasina's sensitivities. Balancing the relationship with Myanmar, India stepped in last week with a modest $25 million socio-economic development plan for Rakhine province to enable some of the Rohingyas to return, if Myanmar allows them back.

India thus is of use to both countries, without getting into mediation. Bhutan played a key role in the Doklam crisis, but it also brought to the fore India's lax handling of issues that are crucial to Bhutan, not to speak of the fact that the younger generation of Bhutanese don't feel as close to India anymore. This will require a lot more work by India, particularly in an election year.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby deejay » 02 Jan 2018 09:02

disha wrote:
SSridhar wrote:If Indian policy is an amalgam of various thoughts, then S-e-S was also all right, because our self-implication in Balochistan, which was what MMS' action finally amounted to, was not taken in his personal capacity.


Right. If you say so.



...


Disha Ji, with reference to your reply to SSridhar ji, your inference of his personal political leanings are uncalled for. Please desist from these personal references.

I request you to kindly delete the reference to his personal leanings. If you are time barred from editing, do reply here and I will do it myself. Else I will delete that part at a later time.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 02 Jan 2018 10:20

PS: Sri Lanka too is heading for long ( deliberately) delayed Pradeshya Sabha elections in Feb.Local Govt. elections.Former anti- India pres.Mahinda Rajapakse is expected to make huge gains with the floating of a new party by SLFP veterans who are in his pocket.
The agreement leading to a coalition govt. comprising of the UNP (Ranil W) and SLFP (Sirisena/Chandrika) expired on Dec.31st. The Feb elections will decide its future.Rajapakse is doing everything to bring it down.
Last edited by Philip on 02 Jan 2018 10:31, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby disha » 02 Jan 2018 10:27

deejay wrote:..... Else I will delete that part at a later time.


DeeJay'ji., mods are humans and so are forum members. I have adhered to your request.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pankajs » 03 Jan 2018 16:41

-- moved --
Last edited by pankajs on 03 Jan 2018 19:18, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 03 Jan 2018 19:12

pankajs, the Ashley Tellis paper discussion above is purely Indo-Pak and should move to Terroristan thread.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 03 Jan 2018 21:17

Former R & AW chief Rajinder Khanna made Dy.NSA.Congrats and happy hunting!

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 04 Jan 2018 09:51

X Posted from the Terroristan thread.

Amber G. wrote:Bruce Riedel's piece;

BARKING OR BITING?

Trump’s Tweet About Pakistan as a Terrorist Haven Was Right. But What Will He Do About It?



Pakistan’s generals, who run the policy supporting terrorism, believe Trump is all bluster. And they may be correct, but there is much Washington can do if it is serious.


………………..{Rest Snipped}……………..


The recognition that US President is blustering regards the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan seems to be well setting in among American Foreign policy types :lol: .

To go with the above Bruce Riedel article, an article titled “Pakistan Has All the Leverage Over Trump : The president can tweet all the threats he wants, but Pakistan’s leaders aren’t worried.", by C Christine Fair, Associate Professor at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, points out that as long as the US identifies Shia Iran as the bigger problem, it is the Sunni Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Pakistan that holds all the cards. Thus she concludes that US President Donald Trump can huff and puff all he wants but the US is eventually going to have to tuck its tail between its legs and back off.

I trust our foreign policy establishment learns this lesson (and learns it well) that administering the stick on the US backside is an entirely feasible option with containable downside and proceeds to do so whenever the US infringes on our national interests starting with providing military aid to the Islamic Republic. No more free pass for the US paying out large sums as Jaziya to the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan to achieve goals in Afghanistan :


While Trump can tweet whatever he wants about Pakistan or Iran, the professionals on his staff know the truth: U.S. policy in Afghanistan requires a port with road or rail access to Afghanistan. This administration — like each one before — has cast its lot with Pakistan. And this administration will confront the same failures as its predecessors. Logistics will beat strategy every time.


From Foreign Policy here:

Pakistan Has All the Leverage Over Trump : The president can tweet all the threats he wants, but Pakistan’s leaders aren’t worried.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 05 Jan 2018 09:24

Op Ed by Barkha Dutt in the Washington Post on the latest spat between Sugar Daddy the United States and two timing girl friend, the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan, titled “Trump’s aid cuts won’t make Pakistan change”.:

Trump’s aid cuts won’t make Pakistan change

By Barkha Dutt

January 4 at 5:21 PM

How seriously should one take President Trump’s tweets? His first tweet of 2018, calling out of the “lies and deceit” of Pakistan, had pretty much all of India whooping in approval. Trump’s remarks on Pakistan’s failure to act against the terrorist groups it has cultivated, and his administration’s subsequent announcement that it would be freezing nearly all of its millions of dollars in security assistance to Pakistan, was a “gotcha” moment for New Delhi.

For years, Pakistan’s deep state (controlled by its all-powerful military and covert agencies) has used terrorism as an instrument of asymmetric warfare both in India and Afghanistan. For Indians, Trump’s tweet and the suspension of funds was a moment of vindication. But the unfortunate reality is that publicly shaming Pakistan, as Trump has done, and even the cuts in security aid have very little real impact on a country whose skin has grown comfortably thick from rhetorical battering. Pakistan survives in the smug belief that after the United States’ grandstanding is done and over, Washington will eventually turn to it for mopping up its half-finished mess in Afghanistan. Holding back the dollars every few years is just a nip and tuck, when what’s really needed is a surgical uprooting of terrorist support systems inside Pakistan. ………………………….

How seriously should one take President Trump’s tweets? His first tweet of 2018, calling out of the “lies and deceit” of Pakistan, had pretty much all of India whooping in approval. Trump’s remarks on Pakistan’s failure to act against the terrorist groups it has cultivated, and his administration’s subsequent announcement that it would be freezing nearly all of its millions of dollars in security assistance to Pakistan, was a “gotcha” moment for New Delhi.

For years, Pakistan’s deep state (controlled by its all-powerful military and covert agencies) has used terrorism as an instrument of asymmetric warfare both in India and Afghanistan. For Indians, Trump’s tweet and the suspension of funds was a moment of vindication. But the unfortunate reality is that publicly shaming Pakistan, as Trump has done, and even the cuts in security aid have very little real impact on a country whose skin has grown comfortably thick from rhetorical battering. Pakistan survives in the smug belief that after the United States’ grandstanding is done and over, Washington will eventually turn to it for mopping up its half-finished mess in Afghanistan. Holding back the dollars every few years is just a nip and tuck, when what’s really needed is a surgical uprooting of terrorist support systems inside Pakistan. …………………

From an Indian perspective, while Trump’s actions score well for Indian diplomacy, no one doubts that U.S. self-interest, not principled concerns about Pakistan’s patronage of terrorist groups in Kashmir, triggered this outburst. In November, American lawmakers dropped a provision that conditionally linked aid to Pakistan to a crackdown on the Lashkar-e-Taiba, the Pakistani terrorist group responsible for a spate of attacks inside India (including the November 2008 attacks in Mumbai). The bill voted into law retained the clause on linking U.S. aid only to Pakistan’s curbing of the Haqqani network in Afghanistan.

This free pass to Pakistan on some terrorist groups, while expecting it to act against others, is part of the schizophrenia that has defined U.S. policy. Trump’s tweet exposes Pakistan’s double standards on terrorism. But the United States needs to examine its own.


From the Washington Post:

Trump’s aid cuts won’t make Pakistan change

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 05 Jan 2018 11:44

X Posted from the Terroristan thread.

Excerpt from Background Briefing with Senior US State Department Officials on Security Assistance to Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan or more correctly its scaling back,dealing with India specific Mohammadden Terrorist groups and individuals namely Lashkar e Tayyiba (LeT), Jaish e Mohammad (JeM) and Hafiz Mohammad Saeed operating in the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan:

The bottom line is that we can’t continue to have a relationship that has business as usual with Pakistan. This conversation is not new to this administration. There have been concerns about Pakistan’s – and I focused on the issue of sanctuaries for the Haqqani Network and the Taliban, but we have concerns about their nuclear program; we have concerns about the ability of anti-India groups like Lashkar-e Tayyiba and Jaish-e Mohammed to fundraise and operate; and Hafiz Saeed, the head of Lashkar-e Tayyiba, who was recently released from house arrest. All of these issues have been a feature of our relationship or a feature of our conversation with Pakistan for many years, and this administration felt that we needed to take additional steps to underscore that we’re not going to be able to continue the relationship on autopilot; we can’t continue a status quo relationship; we need to be able to move beyond these challenges and put our relationship on more solid footing.


Also excerpt dealing with supply of military equipment and aid. Here it may be noted the US has left a two barn doors open for resuming the payment of Jaziya to Major Non NATO Ally the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan. The first is where "required by law" and the second where "critical to national security interests".

The weasel words:

The United States will not deliver military equipment or transfer security-related funds to Pakistan unless required by law. Exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis if they are determined to be critical to national security interests.


From the US State Department Website:

Briefing with Senior State Department Officials on Security Assistance to Pakistan

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Vips » 05 Jan 2018 21:42

Losing a Billion plus $ is no small matter. Porkis will now put up a dog and pony show to show its sincerity (i know thats a Oxymoron) and hand over a couple of Haqqani piglets to get the aid.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 07 Jan 2018 16:03

Palestine State reinstates its Pakistani ambassador !!

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 07 Jan 2018 18:06

^^^ Weblink for the above.

A Maulana by name of Tahir Ashrafi who is identified as the Chairman of the Mohammadden Group the Pakistan Ulema Council (PUC), says Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has reinstated Palestines so called “Ambassador” to the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan,one Walid Abu Ali. Said Walid Abu Ali was reportedly recalled after India protested for his sharing dais with UN Designated Terrorist and 26/11 Mumbai Mohammadden Terrorist attack, Hafiz Mohammad Saeed.

Given that citizens of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic. are inveterate liars but bowing to the need of sensible caution when dealing with the Mohammadden doctrine of Taqiyyah which has also infected Palestine, I wait for confirmation from other sources :

Palestine reinstates ambassador to Pakistan: Tahir Ashrafi

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 07 Jan 2018 18:16

Per ANI, citing Palestine “Foreign Ministry” this is not a demonstration of Taqiyyah by Palestine but a case of a citizen of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan being the inveterate liars they are:

Palestine denies report that envoy who shared stage with Hafiz Saeed was reinstated

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Trikaal » 07 Jan 2018 18:53

Porkis feel insulted that the ambassador was removed for attending a rally they held in solidarity of palestine. Now, they are making up lies to preserve any semblance of self respect. Not that it is doing them any good.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 09 Jan 2018 14:05

Dark clouds across Asia - M.K.Narayanan, The Hindu
What awaits the Asia-Pacific in 2018? Prospects appear, if anything, bleaker than was the case in 2017. More disorder, coming with increasing signs of a breakdown in inter and intra-state relations, is perhaps on the horizon. The Asian region is nowhere near achieving the kind of equilibrium that the Concert of Europe brought to 19th century Europe.

Between the two giants

The region is today an area of intense geostrategic and geo-economic competition. China is the rising economic and military power in Asia today — the second most important economic power after the U.S. and having the second or third most powerful military. In seeking dominance over Asia, however, it not only has to contend with a strong military and economic U.S. presence in the region, but it also cannot afford to ignore the competition from Japan and India. In mid-2017 in Doklam, India had demonstrated that it was more than capable of standing up to China’s bullying tactics.

Much of the speculation about the extent of China’s rise is based on the common presumption that the U.S. under President Donald Trump had surrendered its global leadership role. The reluctance of the U.S. to embark on ‘new wars’, especially in Asia, does not, however, undermine its geopolitical, geostrategic and geo-economic pre-eminence. It is not China’s rise, but the breakdown of the institution of the state, as is evident in Afghanistan and Syria, that poses far more pressing problems for Asia.

Undoubtedly, East Asia will remain a troubled region for much of 2018, with the leadership of North Korea intent on playing increasingly dangerous games and engaging in nuclear sabre-rattling. It is unpredictable at this point whether this would lead to a major destabilisation of the region, with far-reaching consequences for Asia and the world.

The future of the rest of the Asia in 2018 is again dependent on how the strategic triangle of state relations between China, Pakistan and India plays out, as also the extent to which events in West Asia deteriorate. The situation has become more complicated as China and Pakistan have further strengthened their axis, which is inimically disposed towards India. Fragmentation of already difficult relationships does not hold out much hope for any improvement in 2018.

As it is, options for an improvement in relations in 2018 between China and India appear limited. The 19th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party (October 2017) essentially highlighted China’s quest for global leadership and the means to achieve it, including making China’s military ‘world class’, one capable of ‘winning wars’. It contained few hints that signified a possible thaw in India-China relations.

Shots across India’s bow

In 2017, India-China relations had steadily deteriorated. China is clearly peeved that India refuses to participate in its Belt and Road Initiative that straddles Asia and Europe. The stand-off at Doklam in mid-2017 was possibly intended by China to be a ‘shot across India’s bow’, to send a message to India. More such situations will, in all likelihood, be repeated in 2018.

China can also be expected in 2018 to resort to other pressure tactics against India. Backing Pakistani intransigence in ‘needling’ India is certain to be one. Additionally, China can be expected to intensify its moves to displace India as the major partner in relations with many of India’s neighbours — 2017 had already seen China moving in this direction vis-à-vis Nepal, the Maldives, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Myanmar. As it is, China has succeeded to some extent in denting India’s long-standing relationship with Russia, having established a strategic congruence with that country.

India would again need to be on its guard in 2018 as China consolidates its takeover of Gwadar (Pakistan) and Hambantota (Sri Lanka) ports. Together with China’s establishment of a base in Djibouti (on the Horn of Africa), India could find itself at the receiving end of China’s ‘Wei-Qi tactics’.

As India grows closer to the U.S. in 2018, the India-China equation could further worsen. The most recent National Security Strategy of the U.S. refers to China as a ‘rival’, while welcoming India’s emergence as a ‘strategic and defence partner’. This is certain to ratchet up the rivalry between India and China in the Asia-Pacific region, likely to be further compounded by India’s association with the Quadrilateral (of U.S., India, Japan and Australia).


Looking at Pakistan

Again, 2018 holds out little prospect of an improvement in India-Pakistan relations. The last year ended with a serious ceasefire violation along the Line of Control in the Rajouri Sector, in which army men, including a Major, were killed. In 2017 there was an over 200% increase in ceasefire violations, with infiltration touching a four-year high.

This year began with a major terrorist attack by Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM) elements on a Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) camp in Avantipur (Pulwama district) in which five CRPF men were killed. The treatment meted out to the family of Kulbhushan Jadhav (currently incarcerated in a Pakistani prison) and the fake news that followed their visit provides an index of Pakistan’s cold, calculated and consistent hostility towards India. The South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) continues to remain in cold storage. Pakistan has also not refrained from persisting with its proxies like the Lashkar-e-Taiba and the JeM in its war with India.

In its neighbourhood, India must be prepared during 2018 for a further deterioration of the situation in already disturbed Afghanistan. The Afghan state is in real danger of imploding, and this situation could worsen. The latest attack by Mr. Trump on Pakistan’s duplicity in dealing with terrorism could well result in Pakistan adopting a still more perverse and disruptive role here, and providing further encouragement to the Afghan Taliban and the Haqqani network.


The current peace talks may well collapse as a result. Any possibility of exerting greater military pressure by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and allied forces may prove futile.

West Asia in turmoil

The situation in West Asia in 2018 could well turn out to be far grimmer than in 2017. West Asia is at the crossroads today. The entire region is in turmoil. Syria has almost ceased to be a state. The war here entails major powers like the U.S. and Russia, proxies for certain West Asian countries, a medley of non-state actors, apart from terrorist outfits such as the Islamic State (IS) and al-Qaeda.

Intrinsic to the Syrian and West Asian imbroglio is the ongoing war within Islam featuring, at one level, intense rivalry between Sunni Saudi Arabia and Shiite Iran, and at another, the spectre of a split down the line between the Arab and the non-Arab and the Sunni and Shiite worlds.

In addition, there are other forces aggravating an already complicated situation, viz. the war in Yemen, the disruption within the Gulf Cooperation Council, the nascent upheavals in Saudi Arabia and Iran, and the spectre of de-stabilisation that hovers over much of the region. None of these issues is likely to find resolution in 2018, and could suck in more states of the region.

If the U.S. were to follow through with its announcement to recognise Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, it might well ignite new tensions across the entire Arab world. This will further inflame radical Islamist ideas and tendencies across the region, paving the way for a new round of conflict.

This year could also see a resurgence in terrorism. Both the IS and al-Qaeda seem to have acquired a new salience lately. The collapse of the so-called Islamic Caliphate and its territorial demise has hardly weakened the terror potential of the IS. In much the same manner as the Afghan jihad in 1980s and 1990s exacerbated insurgencies across parts of the world, retreating IS members returning to their homeland could provide a new narrative of terrorism in 2018. Existing cells across many parts of the world could well be re-vitalised as a result. The wave of attacks seen recently in Afghanistan can be attributed to this vanguard of retreating IS fighters.

Given such a scenario, it is difficult to be optimistic about a better 2018.

M.K. Narayanan is a former National Security Advisor and a former Governor of West Bengal

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby ramana » 09 Jan 2018 21:41

With such pessimistic outlook he should stop writing.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby sanjaykumar » 09 Jan 2018 22:42

In fact instability in East Asia is not necessarily a bad thing for India. It will keep China preoccupied. Reminiscent of America's Pakistan policy-when the rupture comes it will be ugly. Hillary Clinton referred to snakes being reared in the backyard, that has been true for both Pakistan and the US wrt Pakistan.

I must state that Trump's Asia policy is bang-on. He has served notice on two timing Pakistan-the show of nonchalance notwithstanding, Pakistan has put Hafiz back on its watch list (for what it's worth). Hafiz sahib must read the morning papers for US demands to see if he needs to freshen up his overnight bag.

Trump has put enormous pressure on North Korea-I don't believe that is about North Korea but inevitably it is leverage against its patron saint, China.

India can and should do business with the US for the next 20 to 30 years. Japan was supposed to bury America in the 1980s, chuckle, China will be no different.

There is a convergence of basic goals but more importantly, values, domestic and global, between India and the US.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby manjgu » 10 Jan 2018 11:38

had a chance to interact with a influential indian in US...his take is that USA is really after Paki N weapons..after the Korean episode , Pakistan is in their cross sights.. Pakis dont have delivery mechanism to threaten USA or its allies. Koreans have delivery mechanism but without islamic radicalism. Pakistan has islamic radicalism minus delivery mechanism. The yankess wanna stop another korea in making. Apparently , without boots on ground the Yankees cant hope to control Afghanistan in any meaningful way..the Afghan national army is really nothing and cant be built up over next 5 to 10 years. they cant resolve Afghanistan to their satisfaction. CPEC is also one of the reasons but its scope is limited. The Yankees have not prevented the other chinki bases in africa in any meaningful way.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby chetak » 10 Jan 2018 12:05

ramana wrote:With such pessimistic outlook he should stop writing.


a faithfool family retainer.

put out to pasture some time ago by his owners and now, occasionally seen chewing the bitter cud.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby chetak » 10 Jan 2018 12:47

manjgu wrote:had a chance to interact with a influential indian in US...his take is that USA is really after Paki N weapons..after the Korean episode , Pakistan is in their cross sights.. Pakis dont have delivery mechanism to threaten USA or its allies. Koreans have delivery mechanism but without islamic radicalism. Pakistan has islamic radicalism minus delivery mechanism. The yankess wanna stop another korea in making. Apparently , without boots on ground the Yankees cant hope to control Afghanistan in any meaningful way..the Afghan national army is really nothing and cant be built up over next 5 to 10 years. they cant resolve Afghanistan to their satisfaction. CPEC is also one of the reasons but its scope is limited. The Yankees have not prevented the other chinki bases in africa in any meaningful way.


the paki strategic depth -- eyeran has now turned hostile to them and will remain so because the pakis have joined the arab NATO against them. There couldn't have been a clearer expression of paki intent.

This, once again, makes afghanistan the preferred and only destination for the paki strategic depth scenario. The pakis now need afghanistan like never before. India's goodwill grip on the afghan space is an existential threat to them as well as a threat to the han's CPEC jamboree.

Wheat supplies from India to afghanistan via the chabahar route has also panicked the pakis who see their tenuous hold over afghanistan being rapidly diluted by India, thus reducing and also negating many of their tactical as well as their strategic operational possibilities.

The amrekis turning against them is probably the last straw that may break the paki camel's back. Their precarious loan repayment issues have only brought them to the very edge of the abyss like never before.

The amrekis have struck after careful thought and consideration to maximize the impact of their very real threat and may actually withhold vital CSF funds.

The hans will callously watch and pickoff prized paki assets before they do just enough to stop the pakis from actually tipping over.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Trikaal » 10 Jan 2018 14:11

I don't think the tough posturing will last. Trump administration has been fraught with bizarre policy decisions. They needle Pakis one week and then talk about breaking iranian n-deal the next. Pakis are changing their begging bowls from dollar to yuan. Not to forget, no matter how much USA huffs and puffs, they need the land route to afg. Pakis have proved to be resilient enough for america to fail to install puppets. Unless there's a military coup by a general who is in yankee pockets, i don't see the situation changing much. A military coup is the worst outcome for india coz the said puppet will try to distract the masses from the US by pointing guns towards india. That is what musharraf did.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 13 Jan 2018 09:56

X Posted from the Terroristan thread :wink: on the "lessons" India needs to learn from the US for arm twisting the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan :lol: .

shiv wrote:
arun wrote:Xinhua reports that civilian underling in chief to the Uniformed Jihadi’s of the Punjabi Military Dominated Deep State of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan fronting fictional façade of civilian control over the Uniformed Jihadi’s , namely Defense Minister Khurram Dastgir Khan, has disclosed that the Islamic Republic has suspended defense and intelligence cooperation with the United States amid growing tensions over U.S. suspension of military aid to Pakistan:

Defense, intelligence cooperation with U.S. suspended: Pakistani defense minister

The Voice of America (VOA) on the other hand reports that the US insists its Major Non-NATO Ally has done no such thing :roll: .

:wink: Appears the US may be pretending that her Major Non-NATO Ally, the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan has not stuck a finger up the US backside and wiggled it vigorously by claiming that that no such thing happened so as to not have to act on the tough guy threats they (the US) have made to the Islamic Republic :lol: :

US Denies Pakistani Claims of Suspension of Military or Intel Cooperation


Where are all the rahrah USA smokegetsinyoureyes people who used to come on this thread to say that the US twirls Pakistan around its little finger and that India should learn from the US. Cat got their tongue? Maun vrat?


Indeed where are all the “rahrah USA smokegetsinyoureyes people who used to come on this thread to say that the US twirls Pakistan around its little finger and that India should learn from the US”.

Meanwhile the US adds more lubrication to ensure they do not have to act on the tough guy threats they (the US) have made to the Islamic Republic :lol: . This time via Steven (Steve) Goldstein, their Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, who continues to insist that they, the US, have not been informed by the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan of a cessation in intelligence sharing.

Looks the US continues to lay the groundwork to roll back the scale of their military aid stoppage to the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan as even a week after a formal announcement of a supposed and highly qualified cutback in military aid ie: subject to legal obligations and critical for national security considerations (Clicky BRF). Further Steven (Steve) Goldstein could not name a figure for the actual amount of the alleged military aid cutback:

Special Briefing
I. Steven (Steve) Goldstein
Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs
2. Brian Hook
Director of Policy Planning
Press Briefing Room
Washington, DC
January 11, 2018 ………………………….

QUESTION: Yeah. Another question regarding Pakistan policy. What will be the next step of decision of United State toward Pakistan if Pakistan still keep its old policy toward Afghanistan and United State? Any update?

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: As it relates to the decision that we made?

QUESTION: Yeah.

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: We would hope that Pakistan would come to the table and that they would turn over those terrorists that we have asked be turned over. We’ve indicated very clearly that we are – that we believe that can happen. We’ve only suspended the aid; we have not reallocated the money. So now it is the job of Pakistan to take seriously their commitment to us, and most importantly to the people of Pakistan who would most be hurt by this, by another terrorist – any terrorist activity, and come forward. So our position hasn’t changed. They have not yet come forward, to answer your follow-up question.

QUESTION: One follow-up on this?

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: Yes, sir.

QUESTION: Can you tell us now precisely what is the amount of Foreign Military Financing that the U.S. State Department will suspend pursuant to the President’s decision? You had previously said, I think, or an NSC spokesman said it was about a billion dollars including --

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: Yes.

QUESTION: But it’s a week later, and I wonder if you now have the actual number.

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: I’ll get back to you with the number. You’re correct, though. That is the number that we use – something close to a billion dollars. It’s a series of dollars in different areas that would have to be put together.

QUESTION: Yeah.

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: But again, our hope – and we haven’t reallocated the money. Our hope is that Pakistan will do the right thing for the people of Pakistan because they should want to root out terrorists in their country as much as we want to root out terrorists in their country.

QUESTION: On Pakistan?

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: Yes, sir.

QUESTION: And I brought this up earlier. I don’t know if there’s an answer to it or not. But do you have anything on any kind of recent interaction with the Government of Pakistan on the situation – the case of Dr. Afridi?

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: I don’t, but I will check on that and I will get back to you later today.

QUESTION: Thank you.

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: Yes, ma’am.

QUESTION: Thanks so much. On Pakistan, we understand that officials have said they will stop sharing intelligence and already have stopped sharing intelligence from sources on the ground on the Afghan border with the U.S. What’s your reaction to that? Have they informed you of that? Are you making efforts to see if that’s correct and take action?

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: No, they have not informed us of that. And I checked on that at a quarter to two Eastern Time, and as of that point, that had not occurred.

QUESTION: Do you anticipate that to happen? Do you anticipate the unilaterally cut off the supply?

UNDER SECRETARY GOLDSTEIN: Because, as Matt noted, I have feeling, I am hopeful that Pakistan will do the right thing and turn over the terrorists and honor their commitment.


From the US State Department website:

On-the-Record-Briefing : January 11, 2018

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 13 Jan 2018 14:52

Ties with India intact, says Israeli Ambassador - The Hindu
Speaking to the media, Ambassador of Israel Daniel Carmon indicated that Israel and India maintained an “all-weather friendship” and that discussion on a bilateral Free Trade Agreement was under way.

“Our relationship is richer and wider in terms of collaboration and complementarity. It [the issue of India’s negative vote at the UN General Assembly] is being talked about through diplomatic channels between our countries. We always want the international community to vote for us. Of course we are not happy when some do not support us,” said Mr. Carmon, reminding that Israel had recently supported India’s candidate for the International Court of Justice, Judge Dalveer Bhandari.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 15 Jan 2018 08:59

One UN vote can't change our relations: Israel PM Netanyahu - PTI
Dubbing India-Israel relationship as a "marriage made in heaven", Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Sunday that even though the Jewish state was "disappointed" by India's vote at the UN against the Jerusalem issue, one negative vote will not affect the ties.

Netanyahu said he hoped that his visit to India will strengthen cooperation between the two countries in various areas like technology, agriculture and other spheres that are changing the world.

"Yes, naturally we were disappointed, but this visit is a testimony that our relationship is moving on so many fronts forward," Netanyahu said when asked to comment on India's vote at UN against the US decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

"I don't think one vote affects a general trend you can see in many other votes and these visits," he told 'India Today' in an interview.

Last month, India joined 127 other countries to vote in the United Nations General Assembly in favour of a resolution opposing the recent decision of US President Donald Trump to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

The resolution was approved with 127-9 at the UN General Assembly.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 15 Jan 2018 14:20

But MKN is only echoing what most of us are saying on BRF.and what the armed forces are warning about.He may have been a stooge of the" familia" , but thd dangers are very real as Doklam showed.Ties with China will not improve.They have a yellow-faced Chin "Fuhrer" in charge with his dreams of establishing a Chin empire over much of the globe- certainly the Asian landmass and subjugation of India.

Ties with Pak bound to further deteriorate as they get more and more frustrated at their failed Kashmir acquisition policy and resistance to their second attempted takeover of Afghanistan through their proxy the Taliban. They are now trying to do so with a JV with the Chinese. Thus the gradual handing over of Pak to China.The Chinese will operate from Paki soil like the US in Okinawa and their Gulf bases.We have already in truth been surrounded esp. in Sri Lanka where a huge full-court press is required to regain the initiative.We must turn the screws upon the SL lilliputs in charge and read the riot act out to them.

Indian foreign policy has been much to benign in the past.Moreover as the saying goes ," one swallow does not mean summer", so too one or two foreign visits to a country by any PM of India does not evolve into a diplomatic victory or gain.The follow up work by the diplomats and sealing of deals within the shortest time are of the essence.See how swiftly Putin leveraged his support to Assad guaranteeing the survival of his regime into securing a long lease for his navy and air force! He may now achieve something similar on the N.African coast.

To my mind in recent times our chief successes have been acquiring Assumption island from the Seychelles as a naval base and Agalega island from Mauritius as a surveillance station. We must be pro- active in the region, to remove the Chin ingress into the IOR littoral and formulate a regional security architecture with India as the centre of it. I've already given a concept to bypass SAARC , SAFE.The " South Asian Forum Economic".

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 16 Jan 2018 07:33

X-posted from the Indo-Israel thread.
Israel raises Palestine issue with India - Business Line
Israel has raised the issue of Palestine with India, less than a month after New Delhi’s UN vote against the US’ decision to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of the Hebrew State.

“The two Prime Ministers discussed the developments pertaining to the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process,” said the joint statement issued by the Ministry of External Affairs after the meeting between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Israeli counterpart Benjamin Netanyahu.

According to Vijay Gokhale, Secretary (External Relations), Ministry of External Affairs, the Israeli side expressed its position and so did India on the contentious issue.

We have cleared our own position both on the status of Jerusalem and on Palestine. What the two sides agreed was that our relationship was much larger than any single issue and that we need to look at it holistically and while we continue to talk to each other, our relationship is not determined by this single issue,” Gokhale said.

At the UN General Assembly last month, India was among the 128 countries that rejected US’ decision to shift its consulate to Jerusalem.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 16 Jan 2018 16:29

X Posted from the Terroristan thread.

Peregrine wrote:US trying to convince us that India is not a threat, says Pakistan defence minister

ISLAMABAD: The US has been trying to convince Pakistan that India was not a threat to it and Islamabad should change its strategic stance towards New Delhi, defence minister Khurram Dastagir Khan has said.

…………………..{Snipped}………………

Reading out a policy statement on the government's foreign policy contours and the security situation in Pakistan in the National Assembly yesterday, he regretted that the US played down India's aggressive posturing along the Line of Control (LoC) and Working Boundary, the Dawn reported on Tuesday.

The minister said the perception of India was one of the foundational divergences between Pakistan and the US.

…………………..{Snipped}……………

Khan said that Washington had been trying to convince Pakistan that India was not a threat and, therefore, Islamabad should change its strategic stance.

"But the truism remains true. Both India's capacity and intents are today hostile towards Pakistan," he alleged.

…………………..{Snipped}……………

Khan alleged that "India has amassed men, material and garrisons along the border with Pakistan" and said that 2017 was the deadliest year in terms of LoC violations by India and the killings of civilians.

"India today is a highly militarised and an increasingly belligerent neighbour," he claimed, adding that the unrelentingly hostile and anti-Pakistan stance taken by the current Indian government has reduced drastically the space for any advocacy of peace.

………….{Rest Snipped}………..


As the above article shows, the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic is very clear that India is the enemy.

Given the above and US Acting Assistant Secretary of State Alice Wells reportedly having said to journalist Hamid Mir per the below article that the United States considers the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic Pakistan’s enemy as its own enemy; is the US now saying that India is their (i.e. the US’) Enemy :?:

Pakistan’s enemy is our enemy, says US State Dept official

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 16 Jan 2018 18:37

The US will never learn, just like the British who from century to century come back for more,to get their backsides rogered by the Afghans! The US must every few years like a sado-masochistic pervert also get its its vitals set afire by the ungodly species of Pakis.Unless it experiences the ritual of pain then a small dose of soothing balm pain again then more balm repeated ad nsuseum Paki style, the Americans ,like good junkies must get their regular " fix" to war perpetual in the region.

As for the hope of stopping or eliminating Park's WMDs ,the Yanquis can dream on! If they can't deal with the Taliban fat chance they will have with the Pakis.However, it's worth a try. An air and naval blockade of Pak might yet produce some spectacular results.A few Tomahawks down 'Pindi-way to scorch the uniforms of the ungodly may work wonders.No harm in trying though! Go for it Donald!

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Trikaal » 16 Jan 2018 22:38

Philip wrote:The US will never learn, just like the British who from century to century come back for more,to get their backsides rogered by the Afghans! The US must every few years like a sado-masochistic pervert also get its its vitals set afire by the ungodly species of Pakis.Unless it experiences the ritual of pain then a small dose of soothing balm pain again then more balm repeated ad nsuseum Paki style, the Americans ,like good junkies must get their regular " fix" to war perpetual in the region.

As for the hope of stopping or eliminating Park's WMDs ,the Yanquis can dream on! If they can't deal with the Taliban fat chance they will have with the Pakis.However, it's worth a try. An air and naval blockade of Pak might yet produce some spectacular results.A few Tomahawks down 'Pindi-way to scorch the uniforms of the ungodly may work wonders.No harm in trying though! Go for it Donald!


If the yanks are going to, quote"scorch the uniforms" then the time to do so is now. Pakis are aggressively pursuing ICBM tech and once it gets that, US is going to slink away like a drenched cat. Yanks are cowards and even the barest threat of nukes dropping home will have them running for negotiation tables. We all know how Pakis negotiate with Yanks.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Raveen » 17 Jan 2018 02:10

Trikaal wrote:
Philip wrote:The US will never learn, just like the British who from century to century come back for more,to get their backsides rogered by the Afghans! The US must every few years like a sado-masochistic pervert also get its its vitals set afire by the ungodly species of Pakis.Unless it experiences the ritual of pain then a small dose of soothing balm pain again then more balm repeated ad nsuseum Paki style, the Americans ,like good junkies must get their regular " fix" to war perpetual in the region.

As for the hope of stopping or eliminating Park's WMDs ,the Yanquis can dream on! If they can't deal with the Taliban fat chance they will have with the Pakis.However, it's worth a try. An air and naval blockade of Pak might yet produce some spectacular results.A few Tomahawks down 'Pindi-way to scorch the uniforms of the ungodly may work wonders.No harm in trying though! Go for it Donald!


If the yanks are going to, quote"scorch the uniforms" then the time to do so is now. Pakis are aggressively pursuing ICBM tech and once it gets that, US is going to slink away like a drenched cat. Yanks are cowards and even the barest threat of nukes dropping home will have them running for negotiation tables. We all know how Pakis negotiate with Yanks.


Delusional, plain delusional

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 18 Jan 2018 15:07

This is the second important articulation of foreign policy appearing on the same day, the other being Subramanyam Swamy's talks in China, posted in the China thread.

‘India needs to focus eastward’ - The Hindu
India has “realised” that its future lies in Asia, said BJP general secretary Ram Madhav, making a distinction from the “American way” of conducting foreign policy, in comments seen as a rare departure from the government’s traditionally close ties with the U.S. and Western allies.

“The so-called ‘American Way’ will no longer be at work in the region. It is the play of the civilisations that will be at work. India has to make cultural and civilisational linkages an important part of its diplomacy,” said Mr. Madhav, seen as a key player and track-two negotiator in the NDA government’s foreign policy making structure.


Strategic shift

“[India] has to completely reorient its strategic mindset. Strategic shift is needed from Westward Ho to Eastward Thinking; from Land-based thinking to Ocean-centric thinking,” he added.

Mr. Madhav outlined “twelve realisations” about the Indo-Pacific region at the Ministry of External Affairs’ annual conference, the “Raisina Dialogue”, on Wednesday. He was participating in a high-powered panel that included U.S. Deputy Assistant for National Security to President Donald Trump Nadia Schadlow, and Ministers from Australia and Singapore, Christopher Pyne and Maliki Osman respectively.

Mr. Madhav said the “global power axis” had now moved from the Pacific-Atlantic to the Indo-Pacific with almost half of the world’s population, half the container traffic, 40% of off-shore oil reserves, and most of the world’s defence spending coming from the Asian region.

The BJP leader also called for support for India’s “proactive role in the region”, saying New Delhi would not be a “spectator” as China pushed its Belt and Road initiative forward. He called the project a “Neo-Marshall plan” in a veiled reference to the carving up of post-war Europe as akin to Chinese infrastructure projects in Asia and Africa.


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