Indian Foreign Policy

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pankajs
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pankajs » 30 Jun 2018 14:50

The guy who advocates "strategic patience" has a given a verdict based on "6 months" performance even if one agrees with his whole premise ?!! :shock: Where is the "patience" to let the "strategy" flower? :rotfl:

When I had written about "strategic patience" in India vs China context I was thinking of 2050 i.e. over about 30+ years. Even if Mr. Modi was the most brilliant "strategic" thinker we wouldn't see the needle move in less than 5 years let alone in 6 months.

Even Mian Musharraf took more than 6 months to plan and execute his "tactical" brilliance in Kargil. If this is the level of our "public intellectuals" God save India ONLY God CAN save India.

I don't know how many Indians feel that India is "punching above" its weight. I certainly don't. Mr. Faker Coupta needs to do a lot more introspection before he again ventures to write such crap.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 01 Jul 2018 08:28

Please read Sekhar Gupta's " Losing one country at a time...", a scathing indictment of the foreign policy techniques of the current dispensation who have got the bull by the horns and the cow by the proverbial "udder end".

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Rahul M » 01 Jul 2018 09:14

more like coupta can't tell one end of the proverbial cow from another. that's the most childish foreign policy analysis I have read, even MK Bhadrakumar makes more sense.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 01 Jul 2018 09:23

Coupta's points about the US once more jumping into the Paki charpoy on Afghanistan are hard facts.Anyone on BRF could've told our MEA mandarins never to trust the US "punishing" Pak.The intel agencies of both countries are too closely bound by the dirty tricks they've collaborated on for over half a century.Unfortunately the Modi regime have invested too much in the "tilt" towards the US in expectation of great results.The speed, within 24 hours of the canning of the "2+2" dialogue , by the DAC clearing the S-400 deal shows that finally we are learning thd bitter truth of a few years of failed diplomacy.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Pulikeshi » 01 Jul 2018 11:52

^^^Indian Foriegn Policy challenges and opportunities are immense. You opinion above is merely just an singular dimensional pursuit of your camp. :roll:
Kudos for being consistently parochial, but try not to push it as what’s in India’s interest.
India has and needs to be her own vamp! She pays good money for the services rendered by other soup powers! :P

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Vips » 01 Jul 2018 17:46

Philip wrote:Please read Sekhar Gupta's " Losing one country at a time...", a scathing indictment of the foreign policy techniques of the current dispensation who have got the bull by the horns and the cow by the proverbial "udder end".


Ha Ha relying on someone's column who once speculated and insinuated then Indian Army chief V K Singh of planning a coup against the Congress government in 2012. Who came out in his support post that news report? Congress Spokesperson Manish Tewari. Now connect the dots......

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pratik » 01 Jul 2018 17:58

Not sure if this is the correct thread. But why Indian Navy is missing in action when our neighbor Thailand is in real need of help.

I strongly believe that it is a good collaboration and learning opportunity to win Thailand and Thai people for our future super power ambition.

What happened?
Local football team of 11-14 years old with their coach is in cave for last 8-days and the entrance is flooded due to rain. It is 8-days and rescue is continuing. US, Australia, England all are working collaboratively with thai navy seals. India should be there as well.

More info:
https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general/1495194/seal-divers-push-deeper-into-cave?utm_source=bangkopost.com&utm_medium=article_news&utm_campaign=most_recent_bottom_box

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby dinesha » 03 Jul 2018 18:25

Why Shekhar Gupta is wrong on Modi’s foreign policy
https://theprint.in/opinion/why-shekhar ... icy/77858/

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby dinesha » 06 Jul 2018 21:46

Why white papers matter
They allow a state to craft its signals carefully. India should take a leaf from China’s book.
https://indianexpress.com/article/opini ... inas-book/

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Trikaal » 07 Jul 2018 06:40

dinesha wrote:Why Shekhar Gupta is wrong on Modi’s foreign policy
https://theprint.in/opinion/why-shekhar ... icy/77858/

Scathing, point by point rebuttal. It's good that people like Shekhar Gupta are being openly called out on their b*****t.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby JohnTitor » 09 Jul 2018 09:51

I'm not sure this is the right thread but I couldn't find anywhere more appropriate.

https://www.firstpost.com/india/rabinde ... 1.html/amp

Looks like he got what he deserved. Died a broke and homeless man, excellent news. I hope the MEA and RAW in particular drill this story into the heads of their staff.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Austin » 10 Jul 2018 11:15

India must resist diktats from US on Iran, Russia
What is wrong with the United States? Why is it issuing “sanction threats” to all and sundry? Why is it pressuring India against buying crude oil from Iran and the S-400 missile defence system from Russia? Such crude “gunboat diplomacy” by this superpower is saddening. Indeed, it is time for India to stand up and tell the US to keep away from meddling in the affairs of sovereign India, which is neither a part of the Western bloc nor a colony of any foreign power. India must tell the US that it comprises 1.3 billion heads, and is not an island state of 60,000 or even six million that can be easily bullied. India reserves the right to purchase its crude oil from wherever it gets the best price in the open market, and has every right to take care of its economic and security system in accordance with its needs.

These threats by Washington only shows the acute sense of insecurity that it seems to be suffering from. Does it feel threatened by those who may not be in tune with its diktats? If that happens to be the case, then New Delhi must advise Washington to not become a victim of an avoidable, self-created and self-inflicted state of tension, that could easily lead to costly mistakes. Indeed, India should take its cue from Bruce Riedel, a former senior adviser to four US Presidents on the Middle East and South Asia, and show that Washington should take note of India’s concerns and not aimlessly fire in the air. It’s time to prove the US wrong to establish a favourable counter-point of diplomacy vis-a-vis the US attempts to thwart India’s sovereign state power.

Bruce Riedel wrote in his book Avoiding Armageddon (2013): “In 1991, Robert Gates, US deputy national security adviser, was meeting Indian Army chief Gen. S.F. Rodrigues, during his visit to Washington... Gates urged India to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)... Rodrigues interrupted Gates almost immediately, asking: ‘Why are you reading me these talking points?... You speak about the importance of the NPT and want us to give up the nuclear option. America is the only country ever to use the bomb on an enemy, and you have built thousands of them. Yet you tell us not to do what you have done! And you give Pakistan F-16s to deliver its nuclear attack on our cities’.”

Hats off to Gen. Rodrigues! He did what most Indian diplomats couldn’t or wouldn’t do, and had the guts and the gumption to tell the truth and show the US deputy NSA the mirror. Riedel’s final words, however, counter-mirrored the Indian government’s perennially inexplicable “softness” towards the US: “The general was simply more passionate in his denunciation and showed the new world order than the mostly soft-spoken Indian diplomats.”

In 1991, the US message was clear. First, it’s the “new world order” of the monopolistic US player. Second, the general was “passionate” in professing his — and India’s — views. He took his job too seriously as he didn’t realise that the US was the boss and all the others pygmies. And third, the general was not the “competent” person to speak about India-US bilateral relations — for, after all, it is the “mostly soft-spoken Indian diplomats” who are authorised to do the serious business of diplomacy. Whether their softness is effective or not is another matter altogether.

Riedel also clearly demonstrated the reality of the Indian establishment — how India has always acted in a weak-kneed manner before the US, except during the 1970s when then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi showed the Richard Nixon-Henry Kissinger duo their place in matters relating to South Asia in general and India’s looming 1971 East Pakistan-Bangladesh crisis in particular. In reality, the US still gives the impression that it lives by the old adage — “once the boss, always the boss, come what may”. That’s fine in a structured government hierarchy and in the military, but not in international relations and human behaviour. Should every nation follow each and every command coming from the United States? Is it even possible for an independent, sovereign country of 1.3 billion people like India to do so repeatedly?

It’s time for India to firmly question the US and seek answers from it. What does India do if Russia, the sole supplier of almost 70 per cent of our military hardware, threatens or disrupts the India-Russia joint venture and other supply chains, and switches over to a Sino-Pakistani-Iranian axis and takes to Dhaka, Kabul, Kathmandu, Colombo and Male by storm? To snatch them away from the South Asian ambience to that of anti-India hardliners?

It is really surprising that leaders and decision-makers in the United States, that is regarded as the best place to study and understand geopolitics-economics-strategy and international relations owing to its many quality institutions and erudite scholars, speak and act in a childish, unprofessional, undiplomatic and threatening manner. No country should bend to such unethical posturing of a so-called global superpower.

However, the US knows well the soft spots of some ruling class members of developing nations rather too well. Their children love to go to the US for studies, professional work and to settle. The “green card” and long-term visas are magnets for the ruling class of developing nations. For many, the US is still the El Dorado, the promised land! From all this emerges the strength of the superpower and the weakness of other nations. So much so that even China, the second-ranking $11,226-trillion economy (after America’s $18,037-trillion economy) in the world had to submit to Washington when Chinese President Xi Jinping personally rang up US President Donald Trump to save the Hans’ pride ZTE company from extinction, that would lead to a huge loss for China’s nascent economics and engineering.

If the United States, that has military forces deployed in at least 65 designated destinations across the globe, ceaselessly resorts to such threats, it shows serious faultlines of decay and disenchantment within. That is not good news for anyone, neither its friends nor foes.

India needs to stand up and be counted; and not look weak, vacillating, compromising and benevolent in a narrow sense like that of Delhi Sultan Firoze Tughlaq (1351-1388), who signalled “after me, the deluge”

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pankajs » 10 Jul 2018 13:36

https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-ne ... rxiEK.html
India will adopt a three-pronged strategy to check China influence
One ambassador, according to the third official, laid out the border context and emphasised that Beijing had given up its defensive posture and was aiming for a ‘Pax Sinica’, indicating its ambitions of hegemony. “India has to recognise this and make a choice accordingly,” the official said.

After listening to all the presentations, Swaraj said - according to both the first and second official - that Delhi’s focus must not be on competing with China on resources.
If this wasn't about India, I would be rolling on the floor.

Jeff M. Smith @Cold_Peace_

India will adopt a three-pronged approach to counter China’s growing role in South Asia/Indian Ocean: "track Beijing’s activities carefully; pursue its own projects and commitments; educate and advise neighbors on the consequences of engaging with China."
Ananth Krishnan @ananthkrishnan

But none of these three prongs is new in any way, and I've heard officials speak about this for years (even pre-OBOR). Educating neighbours hasn't been very effective so far--as they often have no alternative-- and the condescension that "we know better" seems to be resented.https://twitter.com/Cold_Peace_/status/ ... 5072168960

Experience is the best teacher. Nothing else brings it home like experience.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby ArjunPandit » 10 Jul 2018 15:25

^^^lure of $$ makes one forget even the past experience, especially when one is corrupt

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 10 Jul 2018 18:45

India readies its prospectors as hunt begins for lithium and cobalt mines abroad - Rakhi Majumdar, Economic Times
India is scrambling to acquire lithium and cobalt mines abroad, along with other resources, to ensure that it has access to such strategic minerals, with China having already taken a substantial lead in the race, much in the manner that it has done so in oil and gas.

Lithium and cobalt are critical elements in batteries that power mobile phones, laptops and electric vehicles, the centerpiece of future transport solutions. The global race for these minerals is intensifying in the wake of the growing use of such vehicles.

The Indian government has directed three state-owned mineral companies to team up for the task, said Anil Kumar Nayak, joint secretary in the mines ministry.

“The joint venture partners are National Aluminium Company (Nalco), Hindustan Copper (HCL) and Mineral Exploration Corp. Ltd (MECL),” he said. “It can also invite private sector companies who are interested to participate in it.” Nalco is the lead partner. The proposal is currently with the Niti Ayog, which will conduct due diligence before it can be formalised.

“There are a few approvals needed before the joint venture can be operationalised,” he said. “However, once this is done, India can access raw material abroad.”

The venture’s main mandate will be to look for and acquire strategic mineral assets abroad, particularly those in which India is deficient.

The move — likely to be formalised along the lines of ONGC Videsh, which buys oil and gas assets abroad — will help the country build a strategic reserve of key minerals.

India has no known sources of lithium and cobalt and access to them is critical to the success of its plan to convert most of its vehicles to electric power in about a decade or so.

With China well ahead in the pursuit of such minerals, especially in Africa, the public sector units have been tasked to actively scout for and acquire assets on a war footing.

“The modalities of the venture will be worked out later, but the joint venture could partner Indian mining companies or join hands with local mining entities abroad,” Nayak said.

A similar model was tried out a few years back in the bid for acquiring iron ore assets in Hajigak, Afghanistan, through a consortium of state and private players. However, the project failed to materialise due to security concerns in that region.

Possible sources of lithium include the Congo in Africa and Latin American countries such as Argentina, Bolivia and Chile — the latter is referred to as the lithium triangle. The Congo is the leading producer of cobalt. “India has now taken the initiative and we want to take it forward,” Nayak said.

HCL chairman Santosh Sharma said, “We are part of the initiative that is being taken by the government to build up assets in strategic minerals like lithium and cobalt.”

The search will include rare earth elements that are much in demand for applications in defence and space technology but are not found in India.

“Given India’s large population and stage of economic development with respect to its need for renewable energy and efficient automotive transportation, it is time for us to develop an appropriate strategy to find and access these minerals which are critical for our development,” said Anjani Agrawal, global leader, steel, E&Y. “A similar model for coal did not yield much of a result. This time hopefully this model may work."

A spike in demand for lithium has fuelled interest in mining of the metal in countries such as Bolivia, which has one-fourth of the world’s reserves. It has reached out to nations like India for exploration and extraction of the metal and manufacture of value-added products.

India’s requirement of lithium is expected to be 350,000 tonnes per year according to auto industry estimates, with companies like Suzuki India planning to manufacture lithium-ion batteries in India. A recent Metal Bulletin report said the world’s largest producers of the substance feel a shortage of lithium battery-grade compounds will endure in 2018 and years to come.

Chinese imports of cobalt from the Congo, the world’s biggest producer of the mineral, was around $1.2 billion in the first nine months of 2017, compared with $3.2 million by India, the second-largest importer, according to a recent Wall Street Journal report. The Congo accounts for nearly 54% of the world’s cobalt supplies.

Analysts say few commodities have witnessed such a dramatic rise in demand as cobalt which is essentially a byproduct of copper and nickel mining. Global cobalt production has quadrupled since 2000 to about 123,000 metric tons a year, according to the US Geological Survey.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby souravB » 11 Jul 2018 00:50

Great discussion. Need of the hour.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Rudradev » 12 Jul 2018 02:39

Kanwal Sibal on Modi's Pragmatic Foreign Policy

http://epaper.mailtoday.in/1730117/Mail ... 66667:1320

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby chetak » 12 Jul 2018 07:00

pratik wrote:Not sure if this is the correct thread. But why Indian Navy is missing in action when our neighbor Thailand is in real need of help.

I strongly believe that it is a good collaboration and learning opportunity to win Thailand and Thai people for our future super power ambition.

What happened?
Local football team of 11-14 years old with their coach is in cave for last 8-days and the entrance is flooded due to rain. It is 8-days and rescue is continuing. US, Australia, England all are working collaboratively with thai navy seals. India should be there as well.

More info:
https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general/1495194/seal-divers-push-deeper-into-cave?utm_source=bangkopost.com&utm_medium=article_news&utm_campaign=most_recent_bottom_box


There Was An Indian Connection In Thailand Cave Rescue Operations Which Saved 13 People


'Made In India' Water Pumps Were Used For Clearing Way To Rescue 13 People From Thai Cave

Shweta Sengar July 11,

The daring Thailand cave rescue mission in the treacherous confines of a Thai cave met a successful end yesterday, saving a total of thirteen people, a football team of 12 young boys and their coach.

Experts from a Pune-headquartered firm gave technical support in the operations to rescue the football team trapped inside a cave system in Thailand. Kirloskar Brothers' Limited's ‘dewatering’ pumps were used in the rescue operations upon the recommendation of Indian Embassy to Thai authorities.

The company sent teams from its offices in Indian, Thailand and the United Kingdom to the site.

Kirloskar’s experts were on the site at the cave in Tham Luang since July 5 and offered, "Technical know-how and advice on dewatering and pumps involved in the rescue operation," said a KBL release.

KBL had also offered to provide four specialised high capacity Autoprime dewatering pumps, which were kept ready at Kirloskarvadi plant in Maharashtra to be airlifted to Thailand, said the release

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 12 Jul 2018 14:27

Spiritual dimension of ‘Act East’ policy - G.Parthasarathy, Business Line
India’s eastern neighbourhood unfortunately received relatively little bilateral diplomatic attention in the years immediately following Independence. India had then focussed attention on moves for freedom from British/European colonial rule, with a somewhat exaggerated belief that it played a significant global role in the ‘Cold War’.{We also rejected the request from Lee Kuan Yew to develop a security relationship}

Moreover, with New Delhi choosing to adopt a path of “self-reliance” and “import substitution”, the prospects of playing any meaningful role in foreign investments and trade, were sharply limited. There was a relatively limited Indian contribution, in security and economic development, across its eastern shores.

Things changed significantly in the 1990s after the end of the ‘Cold War’. Prime Minister Narasimha Rao set India on a path of renewing ancient trade and economic links with countries across its eastern shores, with a new “Look East” policy.

This was in close consultation with countries like Singapore, which we had virtually ignored, for decades.

Interestingly, Narasimha Rao was India’s first Prime Minister hailing from an eastern coastal State, who was not, therefore, so exclusively focussed on security threats, from across our land borders.

He realised that our eastern neighbourhood, extending beyond Malacca to Vietnam, Japan, China and South Korea, was becoming the economically fastest growing region globally.

Increasing integration

Over the last three decades, our economy has been increasingly integrated with economies across our entire eastern neighbourhood, including the 10 members of ASEAN, apart from South Korea and Japan. Trade and investment ties and regional connectivity are expanding. Three partners in South Asia — Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh — are an integral part of this process, through the BIMSTEC.

These developments are only natural, as trade with India’s eastern neighbours from Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Thailand to Srivijaya (Indonesia) and beyond, had flourished for centuries, before colonial rule. But, these ties can and should be made enduring, by reinforcing trade and investment, with a spiritual dimension, arising from the huge influence in our eastern neighbourhood, of the teachings and message of Lord Gautama Buddha.

The message of Lord Buddha spread beyond India’s borders, particularly eastwards, through Sri Lanka to Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia and Laos. It followed the abhorrence and renunciation of war, by Emperor Ashoka, after the bloodletting in the Kalinga conflict.

The abiding impact of the message of Lord Buddha is evident from the fact that the estimated population of Buddhists worldwide in 2010 was around 480 million. The present Buddhist population could be estimated at around 540 million. Out of the 480 million Buddhists worldwide in 2010, 244 million were in China, 45.8 million in Japan, 64.4 million in Thailand, 38.4 million in Myanmar, 14.3 million Vietnam, 11.05 million in South Korea and 14.2 million in Sri Lanka. Laos, Mongolia, Malaysia, and the Philippines have Buddhist populations of well over one million, while the US is home to nearly four million Buddhists.

India has never seriously considered how to leverage the abiding spiritual ties it has with the people of neighbouring Buddhist countries. India ignored how imaginatively building tourist facilities in areas of Buddhist pilgrimage would benefit it, boosting tourism revenues, by facilitating the quest of Buddhists worldwide for salvation, in the Land of the Buddha. It also appeared to ignore the fact that such tourism would enable it to develop abiding relationships, across its eastern shores. We also appear to forget that tourists from our East are now considered bigger spenders than their western counterparts.

An unpleasant task

Tourists from Buddhist countries often find visiting India a difficult, if not unpleasant, experience. I was saddened when Sri Lankan ladies spoke to me about the absence of adequate toilet facilities in Bodh Gaya. Foreign visitors to Bodh Gaya and other Buddhist sites face other shortcomings too, such as rip-offs by taxis, absence of expressways to major tourist destinations, absence of suitable hotel accommodation, and harassment by beggars.

Given the wide range of tourists who could visit the pilgrimage centres, all major destinations for potential Buddhist tourism should have a wide variety of hotels/hospitals available. Tourist sites are not well connected by road, rail and air. Bhubaneswar does not have the necessary air connectivity with Sarnath and Bodh Gaya.

Given the immense long term diplomatic and economic benefits of building up viable Buddhist tourism circuits in India, it’s necessary to integrate our domestic efforts with a diplomatic drive to seek the participation, involvement and investment of Buddhist countries in a cooperative effort for building integrated Buddhist circuits for domestic and foreign tourism in India. Most notably, the involvement of China, Japan, South Korea, ASEAN and South Asian neighbours — Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Nepal — is imperative. Governments of States like UP, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Gujarat and Odisha would also have to participate actively in this effort. Any Buddhist tourism circuit would necessarily involve emphasis on a link to Lumbini in Nepal, where Lord Buddha was born.

Moreover, Buddhist countries should be welcomed to make their architectural and aesthetic contributions, including exhibitions, for displaying their own cultural and spiritual heritage, in Buddhist tourism destinations in India.

Strengthening the connect

Having visited, lived in and worked with Buddhist countries one can assert that India is respected there primarily, because it is home of Gautama Buddha and Emperor Ashoka, who spread the Sakya Muni’s message of renunciation and peace across the world. But, for people to connect with the country that gave birth to that message, it is imperative that we not only welcome them for worship, but also make them feel that we are inviting them to join us in showcasing their own contributions to spreading the message of Lord Buddha, which emanated from the soil of India. Exhibitions and exhibits of how Buddhist teachings are observed across these countries, together with their investments for development of the infrastructure for promoting Buddhist tourism, should be welcomed and adorn the landscape of Buddhist centres in India. The message should be that India wishes to welcome more pilgrims from them.

The Department of Tourism has imaginatively drawn up three distinct tourism circuits (“Dharma Yatra” or the “Sacred Circuit”) for visits to Buddhist pilgrimage places. With around 500 million Buddhists living beyond our borders, primarily to our east, it is imperative that, as the focal point of Buddhist heritage and spirituality, our “Act East” interactions with our eastern neighbours, are imaginative and sensitive.

The writer is a former High Commissioner to Pakistan.


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