Indian Foreign Policy

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NRao
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby NRao » 17 Feb 2020 10:48

In addition to this fiasco:

NRao wrote:For the record, here is the more complete Jaishankat-LG interaction.



Here is a very good picture of current Indian thinking.



1) It is very blunt (IMHO) (with LG sitting on the same stage), and
2) This, new, thinking re-writes a lot of things, including the papers published by the think tanks thus far

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby ArjunPandit » 17 Feb 2020 18:22

Philip wrote:The huge shake-up in the MEA with a massive reorganisation, extra Addl.Secs. inducted to head vital divisions,etc. i
what changes sir..

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pankajs » 17 Feb 2020 18:24

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=7348&p=2414443#p2414438

GOI has started to wield the danda and that is a welcome change.

Now that the danda has been applied to UK only US senators still remain immune till date. France, Germany and Japan leaders tend to mostly keep to themselves. With the action on UK MP they too are bound to face the similar action should they meddle in out internal affairs. Rest don't matter.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Manish_Sharma » 18 Feb 2020 01:13

TWITTER

GAURAV C SAWANT
@gauravcsawant:

Did British MP
@Debbie_abrahams
have a valid visa to enter India? Sources tell me her e-visa was not valid. Her application was processed and `rejected' and in writing she was advised to apply for a regular visa by the authorities.

So the Hon'ble MP
@Debbie_abrahams
had written communication about not having a valid visa before she boarded the flight to India & was in writing told to apply for an appropriate regular visa? Yet she chose to come on an earlier e-visa (which Govt sources say was cancelled)?

https://twitter.com/gauravcsawant/statu ... 12768?s=20

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Vayutuvan » 18 Feb 2020 05:26

wikipedia biopage on Debbie Abrahams wrote:Personal life
Abrahams married John Abrahams, a former captain of Lancashire County cricket team, in the late 1980s. They have two daughters, both of whom were sent to private schools, despite Abrahams being opposed to selective education


She seems to have taken "the Hypocrite's oath"

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Vikas » 18 Feb 2020 10:18

When watching S. Jaishankar, He comes across very erudite without being preachy with appropriate dash of humor.
Reminds me of Jassu bhai but doesn't complicate his narrative.
He seems to be turning out to be one of the best EAM we had in many years,

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pankajs » 29 Feb 2020 22:07

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTWmUqfkwkQ
S Jaishankar Exclusive Interview To India Today; Opens Up About Trump's Visit, Pakistan & More


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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pankajs » 29 Feb 2020 22:09

https://www.mea.gov.in/Speeches-Stateme ... s_Conclave
Address by External Affairs Minister at the 6th India Ideas Conclave -- February 28, 2020

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Vips » 07 Mar 2020 03:20

India joins Indian Ocean Commission as observer bolstering Indo-Pacific vision.

NEW DELHI: India has joined as an observer of the Indian Ocean Commission — the inter-governmental organisation that coordinates maritime governance in the southwestern Indian Ocean — a move that will bolster Delhi’s Indo-Pacific vision.

This move has strategic importance as the Commission is an important regional institution in the Western Indian Ocean. It facilitates collective engagement with the islands in Western Indian Ocean that are becoming strategically significant. It boosts cooperation with France that has strong presence in the Western Indian Ocean and lends depth to India's SAGAR policy of PM Narendra Modi 2015.

The move also strengthens western flank of the Indo-Pacific and is a stepping stone to security cooperation with East Africa.

The Western Indian Ocean (WIO) is a strategic sub-theatre of the Indian Ocean linking the Southeastern coast of Africa to the wider Indian Ocean and beyond. It is home to one of the key chokepoints in the Indian Ocean- the Mozambique Channel.

While Comoros sits at the northern mouth of the Mozambique Channel, Madagascar borders the channel to its west. While the channel lost its significance post the opening of the Suez Canal, the recent hostilities near the Strait of Hormuz brought the channel back into focus as the original route for bigger commercial vessels (especially for oil tankers).

Additionally, the growing importance of Africa in Indo-Pacific engagements combined with potential natural gas reserves in the Mozambique Channel will only continue to raise the significance of this region in wider maritime security. Keeping in mind the importance of geography for maritime power projection and naval dominance, there is little doubt about the rising significance of the islands in a new geo-political environment in the Indian Ocean.

For India, engagements with this region will become critical as the Navy begins to strengthen its presence under its mission based deployments. Engagements with the region, especially with the islands- given their geo-strategic location- could become key in supporting Indian naval presence as well as furthering Delhi’s Indian Ocean engagement.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 14 Apr 2020 08:17

In the light of Chinese perfidy over the CV pandemic,refusing to share info on the origins of it etc., the GOI must prepare its policy towards China anew post- crisis.Even before there was a $70B annual deficit that has destroyed our MSMEs. The textile industry in now threatened by it as we have yet to restart ours, and over- dependence on it for bulk drug material has forced us to keep quiet.Had the Vizag SEZ for bulk drug manufature been on stream we wouldn't need China.This project must be built at hyper- speed
to make us self-sufficient in health ,as well as our successes in agri and dairy."A healthy nation is a wealthy nation",old saying.
Back to China.It must face a reckoning.A total ban on Chin goods,de-recognition until it pays up at least a $ trillion to us,plus recognition of Taiwan. Nothing less will suffice.

PS: As mentioned in the earlier abovd post,the maritime sphere is going to be v.heavily contested by China.It regards the IOR as its sphere of influence.It is building sev.units of large amphib vessels which can accommodate at least 30 helos.One has happily caught fire ( put out) during outfitting yesterday, but its intentions are v.clear.The IN must be given a major share of the def. budget.
The 4 planned amphibs are nowhere on the horizon,subs are aged,require immediate acquisitions perhaps through leasing of more Ru N-subs,etc. , and the lack of a supersonic maritime strike aircraft that can hit PLAN assets in the Indo-China Sea ( ICS) is an essential acquisition. The GOI despite the CV crisis on hand shouldn't slacken its modernisation and expansion of the IN.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 14 Apr 2020 19:50

Philip, awesome! Yes, don't pull punches with China. Throw out as many, if not all Chinese companies, reduce massively if not eliminate Chinese goods, recognise Taiwan, counter China in the Indian ocean, and upscale relations with Vietnam, Thailand, Philippines and Cambodia.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 16 Apr 2020 08:45

Cheers to that! If only our MEA will roar,nor mew....

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby amar_p » 09 May 2020 00:33

Get involved in internal political processs in Afghanistan, US urges India
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/arti ... aign=cppst


Something that was to be expected. US/Trump administration has no time or interest in Afghan now, given the Covid disaster at home, elections in Nov and a massive recession if not a depression looming ahead.

It will be interesting to see what India will make out of this situation/opportunity. A new chapter in our foreign policy might be in the making.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby nvishal » 10 May 2020 16:38

^afg has no future

The only way they can get out of the mess is if the shias get absolute power over afganistan, which allows them access to the Arabian sea through Iran.

The pashtuns are too dumb to see 5 years ahead.

India would only be wasting money and resources over a hopeless situation.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Aditya_V » 10 May 2020 16:55

nvishal wrote:^afg has no future

The only way they can get out of the mess is if the shias get absolute power over afganistan, which allows them access to the Arabian sea through Iran.

The pashtuns are too dumb to see 5 years ahead.

India would only be wasting money and resources over a hopeless situation.


or the International community agrees to act as per the Natural aspiration and makes Baluchistan which should never been a part of Pakistan as independant.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby syam » 11 May 2020 14:03

Any more investment in afgan will be waste of resources. we already did what we can given our religious background and people-people connections. Indian is ill equipped to do any thing big anyway. home land muslims themselves rejected hindu nationalist bjp government. what can it do in some foreign muslim nation?

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Raghunathgb » 11 May 2020 14:47

Afghanistan can help India in two ways.

1) Afghanistans Kabul river provides around 17% to Indus river of Pakistan. India's help in building dam for Kabul river now reduces water flow to Pakistan. So any help in utilizing Kabul river will keep relations between Pakistan and Afghanistan tight. Already Pakistan is struggling with water shortage and tightening of water flows from India and Afghanistan will put Pakistan in tight squeeze .
2) Pasthuns have increasingly getting agitated with Punjabis. Afghanistan can help India increase the scale of protest and keep unrest in Pakistan.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Manish_Sharma » 28 May 2020 14:03

https://bharatmimamsa.com/savarkar-on-f ... y-affairs/

Savarkar on Foreign and Security Affairs
by Sandesh Samant | May 28, 2020 |

Veer Savarkar is often discussed as one of the extremist leaders of Indian freedom struggle and the movement of nationalism in India. Much of the discussion revolves around his contribution in freedom struggle and the hardships that he faced in the British Indian Empire.  As the writer Vikram Sampath states that, “Revolutionary as a terminology is generally coupled with the Communists. But, Veer Savarkar was a revolutionary and he wasn’t a Communist.”

However, one of least discussed aspects of Savarkar’s life is his views on India’s foreign relations and security policies.  He was a pragmatist and his views of foreign policy were driven by his knowledge of the two World Wars and the world order during his time.  Savarkar had spent a good amount of time in the United Kingdom and had observed the political developments in Europe very closely. Although he was imprisoned at the Andaman during the course of the First World War, he was updated about the developments about it. Having studied various ideologies and behaviours of societies and civilisation, he was ahead of his time to analyse the course of future political processes.

Foreign policies are generally driven by ideologies of policy makers. Savarkar, however, did not believe in one particular ideology. His ideas were shaped by the experience of colonisation of India by the British. According to him India’s weaknesses were exploited by the British to colonise the county. Hence, he believed in the masculine superiority of state. He was definitely a staunch realist; but, he refused to believe in any one ‘ism’ to form the country’s foreign policy.  He stated, “We should never hate or love Fascists, Bolshevists or Democrats simply on the ground of any theoretical or bookish reasons. There was no reason to suppose that Hitler was a human monster because he passed as Nazi and Churchill was a demi-God because he called himself a democrat.”

In the contemporary world order and considering the formation of the United Nations and its impacts on the world affairs, Savarkar’s ideas stand the testimony of time.  It was also the reason he advised the policymakers to focus on heavy militarisation. He was strong proponent of India’s nuclear programme. Contrary to common belief, Savarkar wasn’t particularly against the idea of a ‘non-violent’ state; but, he was of the opinion that non-violence shouldn’t make the state weak which may invite crisis. He was influenced by the principles of Mahabharata and Ramayana where Krishna convinced Arjuna to render justice through violence and Ram too resorted to a war.

He’d anticipated the demand of Pakistan and also believed that a neighbouring state like Pakistan which stands on the pillars of religious fundamentalism, shall always pose danger to the security of India. Savarkar was accused of causing paranoia amongst Indians. However, he was proven correct immediately after the formation of Paksistan when it launched an attack on Kashmir and India was engulfed in a war after independence. In last seven decades India had to fight four major wars and innumerable proxy wars against Pakistan.

Savarkar opposed the idea of ‘self-determination’ on religious ground when Sindh was separated from Bombay presidency. He opined that the trend in future would result in the partition of land. Similarly, he insisted the migration of outsiders in the land must be controlled with strict measures. Today, when India is facing the crisis in its Eastern states due to illegal Bangladeshis, Savarkar is proven right yet again.

Similarly, he was a staunch supporter of the Jewish State of Israel. When Israel was established in 1948, India had refused to support the partition of Palestinian soil. Pt. Nehru was of the opinion that, “I confess that while I have a very great deal of sympathy for the Jews, I feel sympathy for the Arabs also…After all these remarkable achievements, why have they [the Jews] failed to gain the goodwill of the Arabs?” India didn’t establish formal relationship with Israel until 1992.  In 1956, in Hindu Mahasabha’s annual session at Jodhpur Savarkar said “…that tomorrow if there breaks out a war between Pakistan and Bharat, almost all the Muslim [states] will be arrayed on the side of Pakistan in opposition to us and their enemy Israel will be our only friend. Therefore, I say that Bharat should give an unequivocal recognition to Israel.” He viewed India-Israel ‘friendship’ from religious relations rather than geo-strategic cooperation. In the war of 1962 against China and in 1999 Kargil conflict – on both occasions, Israel stood by India and helped with decisive military equipment. Today, Israel happens to be one of the most important partners of India in anti-terrorism struggle.

Along with Pakistan and Israel, Savarkar was always vocal about his perspectives on China.  In 1950s, when India’s policy makers were celebrating ‘Hindi Chini Bhai Bhai’, Savarkar had criticised it. (Another important leader to criticise this policy was Dr. B. R. Ambedkar).  Savarkar had raised doubts about the intentions of China.  He expressed his fear that if China could annex Tibet in 1950; it was a matter of time that China would stake claim on Ladakh and Arunachal Pradesh (then NEFA). His views were unconvincing and he was once again accused of causing panic in India. However, 1958 onwards, the relationship between India and China deteriorated and the rest is history.

Another important perspective that he had offered was about Nepal. Recongnising the importance of buffer states on India’s borders, Savarkar had special affection for Nepal.  He strongly believed that Nepal maintaining its official ‘Hindu’ identity will always be in India’s interest. Hence, he would often write letters to the King of Nepal over various issues.  In 2008, following the massacre in Royal Family, Nepal ceased to be a Hindu state followed by the Maoists forces overtaking Nepal’s politics. Thereafter, the relations between Nepal and India have faced a major setback. Currently, the Maoist influence on Nepal’s politics has resulted in Nepal altering its political map.

There are numerous issues – ranging from Goa to Kashmir and Andaman to Nagaland where Veer Savarkar had expressed his thoughts that were rejected by his contemporary. However, over a period of time, Savarkar’s views remain undefeated. It is the cycle of time that has proven him true in various issues again and again.  It is the need of our times to embrace Savarkar that transcends the clichés in our usual discourse.


Views expressed are of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official position of Mimamsa – An Indic Inquiry 

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby m_saini » 29 May 2020 04:20

I love Savarkar but honestly we shouldn't embrace him. I 100% agree with all his ideas and the ideology but the truth is despite all that foresight and knowledge he had, it didn't help him or India. What good is a person who knows all and is right but never acts on it or can't convince others to act on his behalf. The reality is despite him knowing all that about Israel, pakis and china, all those things he was worried about still happened. All this talk of embracing Savarkar does is it gives us a false sense of pride about our freedom warriors and give us the tag of Hindu nationalists without providing any benefits.
People like Nehru were able to impose their ill-wills by hook or crook and those are the kind of people we should be embracing. There are no points for being good or right if your nation doesn't benefit from it.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby ramana » 29 May 2020 04:46

On the contrary, he has taken a life of his own.

And the current nationalistic resurgence since 1998 is due to him only.

Nehru is hardly a person to embrace unless you want STD.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arshyam » 29 May 2020 06:58

m_saini-ji, Patel also predicted that China would occupy Tibet and cause problems. He also was against going to the UN about Kashmir. In neither of these, did he get Nehru's support, nor was he able to influence the outcome of events.

WRT Pakistan, Ambedkar predicted problems down the road unless a full population exchange was carried out. He also opposed having the words socialist and secular in the constitution. In neither of these was he able to influence the outcome of events (though he was partly successful in the second point as it was IG who later added these words to the constitution).

But we have two examples of nationalist leaders who didn't achieve what they recommended, and I am sure one can find a lot more such examples. So shall we avoid these gentlemen as well?

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby m_saini » 29 May 2020 07:19

no ji for me haha, i'm just a college junior who got to know BRF about 2 years ago from places like reddit. I also apologize if i'm being disrespectful to our freedom fighters.

I really love Savarkar. It's just really painful to see that our great leaders like Savarkar, Patel etc were sidelined and instead we got Nehrus and now gandhis. And then we have people like Churchill and the slave-owning f-fathers who were utter trash but they won and are now heralded almost as legends. There's something really admirable about their particular qualities that made them able to do so. Our history is full of leaders who had it all figured out but could never turn those beliefs and ideas into realities. Just wish we could also nurture those particular qualities in our future leaders.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arshyam » 29 May 2020 07:24

^^ That's exactly why we shouldn't forget the others who weren't successful. Or we'll end up repeating mistakes.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby NRao » 13 Jun 2020 02:18

Confident of winning UNSC seat, no takers for Pakistan’s propaganda: India’s Envoy to UN

June 12, 2020

HIGHLIGHTS
* Election to the UNSC will be held on June 17
* EAM Dr Jaishankar has already launched our set of priorities for our stint in the UNSC: Ambassador TS Tirumurti
* "COVID-19 has made us rethink how we can use multilaterism and international cooperation to make this a better world," Ambassador TS Tirumurti told India Today


In his first interview after taking over as India's Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York, Ambassador TS Tirumurti emphasised the key agenda and priorities of India at the world body. He will serve as the Indian envoy at a crucial time when India is set to become a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) after over a decade.

Speaking to India Today from New York, Ambassador Tirumurti was confident that India will be elected in the group of elite 15 by winning a two-thirds majority. He said that his focus will be to "strengthen the voice of those who are not heard".

At a time when the UNSC has been used against India by Pakistan with help from its all-weather friend China, the Indian envoy said that he will not look at India's presence in the Security Council purely through the "narrow prism of India-Pakistan bilateral issue". Trimurti emphatically said that there were no takers for Pakistan's "false propaganda" and India's fight against "cross-border terrorism" and "terror financing" will continue.

Here are excerpts from the interview:

How has the beginning of your stint been, given that you took office in these difficult times of the Covid-19 pandemic?

TS Tirumurti: Thank you Geeta for having me on your programme. Yes, I have landed in the midst of Covid-19 in New York. It has been a very difficult time for the US, particularly New Yorkers. It has not been an easy time for the UN as well. Everything is going on in virtual mode.

So, it has not been an easy time for the UN and certainly very difficult for the US but I must say that I have been very fortunate. I have been able to communicate with many of my colleagues in spite of COVID and the lockdown.

What would your key priorities be as India's envoy to the UN, especially in the context of the forthcoming elections to the UNSC where India is a candidate?

TS Tirumurti: The immediate priority is naturally to get India elected in the forthcoming elections for the non-permanent seat on the UN Security Council. This will be in a few days on the 17th of this month.

In fact, this will be the first activity inside the UN premises since it was closed down in mid-March.

External Affairs Minister Dr Jaishankar has already launched our set of priorities for our stint in the UN Security Council. We have set ourselves five overarching priorities under the acronym NORMS, which stands for New Orientation for a Reformed Multilateral System. The five priorities include:

* is 'New Opportunities for Progress'. We have always been known for working closely with our partners, particularly in the context of development and developing partnerships, to ensure sustainable peace. The repercussions of Covid-19 have impacted all of us like never before. Even in the COVID situation, we have assisted more than 120 countries. Consequently, to be in the Security Council in the post-COVID period gives us an opportunity to put forward our development and peace agenda.

*Secondly, we will focus on an 'Effective Response to International Terrorism'. India has been a victim of cross-border terrorism and you are aware of our strong interest in fighting terrorism in all its forms and manifestations. Our presence in the Security Council will help pursue concrete and result-oriented action.

* Our third priority would be 'Reform of Multilateral Systems'. Prime Minister has already put forth his vision of "reformed multilateralism". Even as we remain committed to multilateralism, we are equally conscious that it does not reflect contemporary realities. We need to do so to make the multilateral system credible and effective. An important step in this direction will be the reform of the Security Council where India has a strong claim.

* The fourth priority is to have a 'Comprehensive Approach to Peace and Security'. Armed conflicts around the world are getting increasingly complex. Traditional and non-traditional security challenges continue to grow. We need to give greater direction to the mandates of UN peacekeeping operations. You are aware that Indian peacekeepers have played a historic and pioneering role in the UN peacekeeping even while they are protecting lives across the world. We need to protect the protectors.

* Our fifth priority will be 'Technology with a Human Touch'. India has made tremendous progress to bring technology to the people. We would like to take our example to the world and promote technology as a force for good and enhance ease of living.
Overall, during our tenure, we will seek to reflect our ethos of 'Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam' - the World is One Family.

The most important development that we will see in coming days is India joining the UNSC as an elected member? How confident are you of securing the seat even though India stands unopposed? It comes after a decade when last we had Hardeep Puri sit in that room.

TS Tirumurti: We have received tremendous support. Countries see our presence in the Security Council as not just strengthening the Council but also strengthening the voice of those who are not heard. Of course, I am also reaching out to the various countries to ensure that our message and our priorities for the Security Council are understood and appreciated.

They see that India will add value to the UNSC. I have pretty big shoes to fill after minister Hardeep Puri's stint.

Afghanistan gave up its turn for India. How important was it for India to be in that room? The UNSC recently has been used against India by Pakistan through their all-weather friend China?

TS Tirumurti: I don't want to see our presence in the Security Council purely through the narrow prism of India-Pakistan bilateral issues. India has a global role, more so in the context of COVID. COVID-19 has made us rethink how we can use multilaterism and international cooperation to make this a better world. We have the ability to work closely with partners and overcome old and new fault lines.

We have advocated dialogue and fairness to solve global issues. We have a great opportunity to shape the post-COVID scenario. Therefore, our election to the UN Security Council will be very timely.

Recently, the UN envoys of OIC nations met and Pakistan tried to raise the alleged persecution of minorities in India. But, it seems like there are no takers for Pakistan's propaganda anymore?

TS Tirumurti: There are no takers for such false propaganda. Pakistan has tried to couch its anti-India disinformation campaign in religious terms and raise this in OIC in New York but found no takers. You are already aware that on the 50th anniversary of OIC, India was invited for the first time as the chief guest on the first of March last year at their Foreign Ministers' meeting where the late Hon'ble Sushma Swaraj had participated.

We also have excellent bilateral relations with OIC countries, especially in the last few years, including in the Gulf and Africa and others where our relations are at an all-time high. The OIC countries share, acknowledge, appreciate and value our pluralistic and democratic ethos.

Terrorism has been spelt out as one of the key agendas by EAM Dr Jaishankar. How would you take up the issue of terrorism, especially cross border terrorism at the world body?

TS Tirumurti: As I mentioned, terrorism is definitely one of the priorities for our Security Council agenda. It is an enduring threat to international peace and security having linkages across the border and regions in recruitment and operations. The UN itself has recognised the grave threat posed by terrorism and has set up the UN Office of Counter-Terrorism in 2016 to bring the issue to the fore to involve the wider UN membership to join efforts to put an end to the scourge.

We will take it up strongly and address both its sponsors as well as the various dimensions like the abuse of ICT by terrorists, stop the flow of terror finance and ensure greater coordination to fight terror. It will be a comprehensive way, looking at all dimensions of terrorism.

Finally, with the changing global order in the wake of the pandemic, could there be a serious relook in the rising demand for UN reforms and expansion of the UNSC that would reflect the right representation of a changed world order?

TS Tirumurti: Reform of the Security Council is going to be a very important part of our agenda. There is definitely a need to look seriously into the reform of the Security Council. As I mentioned, Prime Minister has made a clarion call for reformed multilateralism. The status quo of the multilateral system is what some countries would like to revert to and reinforce. This does not reflect current realities.

It is also not in the interest of developing countries, which have started playing a major role within the United Nations and outside, but whose voices have not found traction in these multilateral bodies. Consequently, there is a need to go beyond the 1940s multilateral architecture and provide for greater representation, starting with the UN Security Council. In other words, the multilateral architecture needs to get contemporary and reflect reality to be relevant.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby amar_p » 13 Jun 2020 02:27

Good to see EAM thinking ahead !

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby NRao » 13 Jun 2020 02:53

Will India be an 'activist' in UNSC?

India is set to enter the UN Security Council as an 'elected' member for a two-year term. Victory is assured in next week's election because India is running unopposed for the Asia-Pacific seat, the only question being the margin of victory.

India's UNSC term runs January 2021to December 2022, a time sure to be marked by profound change, great power competition and possible realignment. But it's also a time to push, generate valuable discussion and prove India's 'vishwa guru' credentials. It will be India's eighth innings in UNSC and, perhaps, the most challenging. It needs 129 votes of the 193 votes to win in the UN General Assembly. Whether it improves last time's record of 187 votes remains to be seen.

First, it's important to use the term 'elected' instead of 'non-permanent' to describe India's entry, because 'while elected members are chosen by a democratic ballot with twothirds majority, none of the existing five non-elected members have undergone such a democratic scrutiny so far since 1945,' Asoke Mukherji, India's former UN permanent representative, told me. It was during his tenure that the path to India's uncontested nomination became clear.

Mukherji's point is pertinent. It segues nicely into India's aim to reform UNSC and make it more representative. When, or whether, UNSC will expand to include a democratic nation of 1.3 billion people is anyone's guess. But it's important to keep pushing.

Given Prime Minister Narendra Modi's love of acronyms, this time the goal comes riding on a vehicle called NORMS, or New Orientation for a Reformed Multilateral System. Interesting, especially since there is trouble with 'INCH Towards Miles,' or India-China Towards a Millennium of Exceptional Synergy, given the border situation. Hopefully, the Chinese incursions will have been sorted out by the time India's envoy sits in the same room as China's ambassador.

Indian diplomats are confident their hard work in Africa and in the Arab world will be remembered on voting day. As for the difficulties created with regard to Article 370 and Kashmir, most countries consider it a matter to be resolved bilaterally between India and Pakistan. Still, Arab ambassadors have been troubled by what's happening to the Muslim community in India

Most countries value New Delhi's perspective because they believe India as a developing country brings a nuanced position and offers solutions they can accept. India has extended $7 billion in lines of credit, $700 million in grants, and $1billion in buyer's credit to African countries in the last 4-5 years, apart from assigning thousands of slots for IT training and scholarships. Add to that India's medical aid during the Covid-19 pandemic, and 35 visits at the level of PM, president and vice-president, apart from ministerial trips, to African countries in recent years.

Foreign Minister S Jaishankar said that an unreformed and under-representative multilateral system can't effectively deal with new or persistent challenges — Covid-19 and terrorism. Incidentally, both have a Chinese flavour, one infused globally, the other regionally. A multilateral system designed last century can't effectively deal with the current disorder.

Change is essential, and it's time to counter countries whose main business is to block and prevent others from playing a bigger role. Also, the US must decide how it wants to play. US disengagement over the last 10 years has only helped China gain influence within the UN and beyond. The US should help UN evolve, even as Washington gets busy creating 'circles of trust' with 'like-minded countries' outside.

That means the US-European alliance must be healthy. But Europe is pulling in a different direction while in awe of Beijing. European nonalignment will be costly, because the US-China Cold War will remain a feature, no matter who wins the White House in November. The western alliance could push for UNSC expansion, instead of paying mere lip service. The only permanent member that doesn't want change is China.

Vips
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Vips » 20 Jun 2020 18:17

Any information on which 8 countries voted against India in the elections to the Non-Permanent seat of the UN security council? India won 184 out of the 192 votes. I searched but am not able to come across this info.

I have six countries so far who might have voted against us China, Pakistan, Nepal Malayisa, Turkey and Azerbaijan.

darshan
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby darshan » 20 Jun 2020 19:33

May be it's a secret ballot. India would have received the vote so I suppose that countries wanting to suck up to chinese XiChee would have done it voluntary.

Procedure for Holding Elections by Secret Ballot Without a Plenary Meeting During the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Pandemic
https://www.un.org/pga/74/2020/06/09/pr ... andemic-3/

NRao
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby NRao » 24 Jun 2020 04:57

Could not find an appropriate thread:

India expels dozens of Pakistan diplomatic staff

India is expelling half the staff at Pakistan's high commission (embassy) in its capital Delhi, accusing diplomats of spying and dealing with terrorists.

India will also reduce staff by the same number at its high commission in the Pakistani capital Islamabad, the external affairs ministry said.

There was no immediate response from the Pakistani authorities.

Relations between the nuclear powers were already tense after India expelled two Pakistani staffers three weeks ago.

They were accused of trying to obtain information about Indian troop movements.

Indian media suggest the latest move was prompted by the alleged mistreatment of two Indian staff members in Islamabad.

Last week, the Indian government accused Pakistan of abducting the two men but Pakistan said they had been detained by police after hitting a pedestrian while driving.

According to the Hindustan Times newspaper, each of the two countries has an agreed strength of 110 staff at their respective high commissions, although the current number is actually about 90.

India's decision means the two commissions will both have to send back 35 staff members within a week.

The Pakistan High Commission in Delhi - high commission is the term used for the embassies of one Commonwealth country in another
"They [the Pakistani staff] have been engaged in acts of espionage and maintained dealings with terrorist organisations," India's external affairs ministry said in a statement.

It summoned Pakistan's Charge d'Affaires, Syed Haider Shah, to make the accusations.

He was also told, the Hindustan Times reports, that Pakistan had "engaged in a sustained campaign to intimidate the officials of the Indian High Commission in Islamabad from carrying on their legitimate diplomatic functions".

What are the allegations about the Indian staffers?
The Indian government's position, according to the Hindustan Times, is that Pakistani security agencies picked up the two men in Islamabad, tortured them and framed them over a road accident and fake currency.

When the two men, Dwimu Brahms and Selvadhas Paul, returned to India on Monday, they are said to have provided "graphic details of the barbaric treatment that they experienced at the hands of Pakistani agencies".

Pakistan police say the two men were detained after running a man over and trying to flee the scene but were later released from custody because of their diplomatic status.

There was no immediate comment on the allegations that the two men had been tortured.


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