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Indian Foreign Policy

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
arun
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 10 Oct 2016 12:24

X Posted from the “India-Russia: News & Analysis” thread.

arun wrote:Video of CNN-News 18 interview of Alexander M Kadakin, Russia’s Ambassador to India.

All in all pretty supportive of India.

Note:
A.His stressing that the Uri attack came from the Islamic Republic of Pakistan.
B.Call on the Islamic Republic to cease cross border terror
C.Support for India’s surgical strike
D.Use of term "Pakistan-Occupied Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir"
E.Falling in line with India and terming terrorism as the greatest human right violation just as India has done at the UN
F.Comment that the Uniformed Jihadis of Pakistani army “use itself for terror attacks against India”:

Youtube - Clicky

Text of the accompanying article put out by CNN-News 18 follows:

New Delhi: Backing India’s surgical strikes against terror camps in Pakistan-Occupied Kashmir (PoK) the Russian ambassador to India, Alexander M Kadakin, said that Russian Federation was the only country to say in plain words that terrorists came from Pakistan.

In an exclusive interview with CNN News18, he called upon Pakistan to stop trans-border terror.

He said that his country had always been with India in fighting cross-border terrorism.

“Greatest Human Rights violations take place when terrorists attack military installations and attack peaceful civilians in India. We welcome the surgical strike. Every country has right to defend itself,” said the Russian Ambassador.

Assuring India that it does not need to worry about Russia-Pakistan joint military exercise, he said the exercises didn't take place in "Pakistan-Occupied Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir".

The usage of the word/term “Pakistan-Occupied Indian State of Jammu and Kashmir” assumes a lot of importance.

“India should not be concerned about military exercises between Russia and Pakistan because the theme of the exercise is anti-terror fighting. That's in India’s interests that we teach Pakistani army not to use itself for terror attacks against India. And the exercise was not held in any sensitive or problematic territories like Pakistan-occupied Indian state of Jammu," said the Russian Ambassador.


Here:

Clicky


Islamic Republic of Pakistan based Newspaper, “The News”, citing “Highly placed diplomatic sources” claims that following protests by the Islamic Republic, Russia had “disapproved the observations of Ambassador Alexander Kadakin” who is Russia’s Ambassador to India and indicated that Kadakin would be “reprimanded” for comments supporting India.

While this is most likely the usual fabrication by the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, I do hope that our Foreign Policy establishment is keeping an eye on things to ensure that this is not a case of Russia playing fast and loose given that holding of a Military exercise with the Islamic Republic was not a very friendly thing to do in the aftermath of Uri notwithstanding holding an exercise with us at the same time.

Meanwhile wait and watch:

Highly placed diplomatic sources told The News here Sunday that Pakistan agitated with Kremlin about the remarks of its ambassador in the Indian capital. Russia while responding to Pakistan has made it absolutely clear that the statement of its ambassador in New Delhi doesn’t commensurate with the Russian position on the subject and it disapproved the observations of Ambassador Alexander Kadakin.

It is understood that the ambassador who is serving in New Delhi since 2009 would be reprimanded on this count. Alexander Kadakin welcomed Indian so-called raids on terrorist launch-pads across the LoC. Kadakin said the military exercise with Pakistan was in fact intended to encourage that country not to target its neighbour.


From “The News”:

Russia frustrates Indian efforts to isolate Pakistan

JE Menon
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby JE Menon » 10 Oct 2016 23:35

http://swarajyamag.com/

India & The GCC States - A Visibly Shifting Paradigm

Philip
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 11 Oct 2016 13:49

Duplicitous Dragon. By this std.,it should keep an open border in "Weegherland"!

http://defencenews.in/article/Indias-de ... erts--8637
India's decision to seal Pak border irrational:Chinese experts
Tuesday, October 11, 2016
By: ET

India's move to completely seal its border with Pakistan was a " very irrational decision" and would further complicate India-China relations considering Beijing's "all-weather" strategic ties with Islamabad, a state media report today quoted leading experts as saying.

"India is making a very irrational decision, since no exhaustive investigation has been conducted after the Uri incident, and no evidence proves Pakistan is behind the attack," the Global Times quoted Hu Zhiyong, a research fellow from the official thinktank Institute of International Relations of the Shanghai Academy, as saying.

Hu was commenting on Home Minister Rajnath Singh's announcement on Friday that the 3,323-km-long border between India and Pakistan would be "completely sealed" by December 2018.

A "completely sealed" border would further hinder the already scarce border trade and talks between the two countries, Hu said.

Wang Dehua, director of the Institute for Southern and Central Asian Studies at the Shanghai Municipal Centre for International Studies, said that a sealed border would only disrupt peace efforts made by the two sides.

"The country's decision reflects its Cold War mentality, and would only cause deeper hatred among residents living in Indian- and Pakistan-controlled Kashmir," Hu added.

Since Pakistan is China's "all-weather" strategic partner, India's decision would make China-Pakistan-India relations more complicated, Hu said.

But he said a peaceful resolution of the Kashmir dispute is in the interest of China's homeland security, especially its western regions.

Their hardline comments come ahead of Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit to India this week to take part in the BRICS Summit in Goa during which he would meet Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

This will be their second meeting in two months. The two met on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Hangzhou last month.

Yesterday, China's Vice Foreign Minister Li Baodong defended China's "technical hold" in the UN on a ban on Masood Azhar, the head of Pakistan-based terrorist group Jaish-e-Muhammad.

"China is opposed to all forms of terrorism. There should be no double standards on counter terrorism. Nor should one pursue own political gains in the name of counter terrorism," he had said indirectly accusing India.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 11 Oct 2016 18:54

As Modi meets Putin in the days ahead, India must maintain a very close relationship with Russia for many reasons. We have to blunt the China-Pakistan axis against us through Russia and should not allow Russia to join that group against *us*. We don't care if they are united in their anti-US activities. India must make this explicit to Russia that India will not tilt towards the US position in the US-Russia matters just as we do not expect it to tilt against us in the China-Pakistan-India matters. We have to keep the Americans off-guard as well. That makes for a good foreign policy. This is what the Americans do to us and we must give them a taste of their own medicine. The Russians still have products and technologies to offer to us and the Americans must know there are other sources too. We do need Russian support in many international fora. We also need to keep under check the growing Russo-Paki relationship. We would not be able to terminate that but we must do everything not to let it blossom.

SSridhar
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 12 Oct 2016 08:34

Military cooperation with 'terror-sponsor' Pakistan will create problems, India tells Russia - PTI
Ahead of their annual bilateral summit, India has conveyed its opposition to Russia over its joint exercise with Pakistan, a nation which "sponsors and practises terrorism as a matter of State policy", saying it will create further problems.

"We have conveyed our views to the Russian side that military cooperation with Pakistan which is a State that sponsors and practises terrorism as a matter of State policy is a wrong approach and it will only create further problems," Indian ambassador to Moscow Pankaj Saran said in an interview to Russian news agency Ria Novosti.

Saran's remarks come ahead of the bilateral meeting in Goa on Saturday+ between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin, who will be arriving in India on October 14. Apart from bilateral Summit, Putin will attend the Brazil-Russia-India-China-South Africa(BRICS) meet on October 16.

India has been communicating its unhappiness to Russia over its joint military exercises with Pakistan. However, these concerns have been played down by the Russins who maintain that they hold similar military drills with other countries of the region as well.

Saran also said, "There are some burning issues before the world today which the BRICS+ countries will certainly address and this includes the question of terrorism and the threat of terrorism faced by all the countries in the BRICS group. So this will be a major item of discussion during the Summit apart from the regional conflicts and the global situation."

On India-Russia ties, the envoy said as far as India's relations with Russia are concerned, the two countries share a special and privileged strategic partnership.

"We see no change in this. On the contrary, this has only strengthened in all areas, including in the field of military-technical cooperation. This partnership is an anchor of peace and stability in the region and the world.

"We have a regular system of military exercises with Russia. We have been holding these exercises for the last few years with Russia and we will continue to do so. The plan for these exercises is drawn up between the relevant agencies of the two sides. This will continue even next year," he said.

Saran also talked about the cooperation in the field of civil nuclear sector, trade and investments.

arun
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 14 Oct 2016 11:51

X Posted from the “India-Russia: News & Analysis” thread.

Full Text of the interview of Russian President Vladimir on Indo-Russian Relations ahead of his visit to India to attend the BRIC’s 2016 Summit in Goa from the Official Kremlin / President of Russia Website.

The Russians seem to have done a good job of not permitting important but embarrassing questions. Thus most regrettably the topical question of Russia’s dalliance with the Mohammadden Terrorists fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan by way of holding Military Exercise Druzhba 2016 immediately after the attack on the Uri camp does not come up at all as was the case with Russian supply of military equipment such as the Klimov RD-93 Turbofan for the JF-17 and MiL 17 Helicopters to the Islamic Republic.

Interview to Rossiya Segodnya International News Agency and IANS News Agency

Ahead of his visit to India, Vladimir Putin gave an interview to Rossiya Segodnya International News Agency and IANS News Agency.

October 13, 2016 09:40

Question: Russian-Indian relations can be qualified as privileged strategic partnership. As to the economy, a perfect example of this point is cooperation in atomic energy, I particular, the construction of the Kudankulam NPP. What other areas of Russian-Indian cooperation can speak to a similar success?

President of Russia Vladimir Putin: India is Russia's especially privileged strategic partner. Cooperation between our countries is making good headway in all areas on the basis of strong traditions of friendship, trust and mutual respect.

Russia and India are allies in ensuring strategic security and stability, and building an equitable world order. We work closely within the leading multilateral organisations such as BRICS, the G20, and the UN.

This October marks 16 years of the signing of the key instrument for Russian-Indian relations, the Declaration on Strategic Partnership. We have done much to further the entire mechanism of bilateral ties during this period.

The two countries maintain active political dialogue, with summits taking place every year. The Intergovernmental Commission on Trade, Economic, Scientific, Technical and Cultural Cooperation is also working efficiently. Our foreign ministers, heads of staff of security councils and line ministries keep in touch on a regular basis. There is a gradual increase in inter-parliamentary, interregional, business and humanitarian exchanges. We have developed a strong legal framework featuring over 250 agreements.

India has been and remains Russia's major foreign trade partner. Even though in 2015 trade between the countries dropped by 7.8 percent, together with our Indian partners, we are resolved to overcome the negative trend, which, in our opinion, is largely associated with volatility on the global markets and in exchange rates. Especially since our commercial exchanges are mutually beneficial and their structure shows the complementarity of the two economies. Chemicals and engineering products account for a considerable share of Russia’s exports and the exports from your country.

The energy sector plays an important role in trade and economic cooperation between Russia and India. Construction of the Kudankulam NPP is the largest long-term project. In August 2016, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and I took part in a ceremony dedicated to the handover of the first unit of the Kudankulam NPP to the Republic of India. The second unit will be put into operation in the near future. Operation of the first and second units at their rated capacity will significantly increase the energy supply in India and strengthen its energy security.

Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation and the Nuclear Power Corporation of India began preparations for the construction of units 3 and 4. Works are being carried out according to the agreed schedule. The project is implemented with funding from the Russian Federation: the government loan stands at $3.4 billion, or 85 percent of the total value of contracts concluded with the Russian organisations. We are now working on the localisation of component manufacturing in India. We began assessing the construction of nuclear power plants at other sites in India. Technological cooperation in the field of uranium enrichment is being established.

We are strengthening bilateral cooperation in the conventional energy sector. During the St Petersburg International Economic Forum held in June 2016, Rosneft and an Indian consortium signed a contract for the sale of 23.9 percent of shares in Vankorneft, which owns the Vankor field in the Krasnoyarsk Region. Besides, Rosneft sold a stake of shares in the Taas-Yuryakh Neftegazodobycha, a company developing a field in East Siberia, to Indian companies.

Improving the structure of goods turnover by increasing the deliveries of high technology products and developing industrial cooperation is a topical issue. Well-known Russian companies, such as Silovye Mashiny, Gazprom, Stroytransgaz, Novolipetsk Steel (NLMK), Uralmashzavod, SIBUR Holding, Mechel, KAMAZ and many others, are operating in the Indian market.

Implementation of large promising projects is underway in engineering, chemical and mining industries, aircraft engineering, pharmaceuticals, medicine, nano- and biotechnology. Cooperation in finance and banking, which involves, among others, the VTB Bank and Sberbank of Russia, is advancing. It is obvious that the Russian companies see real prospects and high attractiveness of the Indian market.

Our countries actively collaborate in the military technical field. Russia remains in the lead in terms of both direct supplies of most advanced weapons and military equipment and conducting joint researches with India, as well as producing goods for military purposes. The construction of the BrahMos supersonic cruise missile and the development of a new, fifth generation fighter aircraft are among the successful joint projects.

Let me add that many of the Russian projects in India not only have commercial importance but also play a significant social and economic role for the economies of the two countries. They harmoniously fit in the new Indian industrialisation programme proposed by Mr Modi.

Question: The level of investment cooperation is one of the criteria of reliable bilateral relations and trust between countries. In this regard, what steps are planned to be taken in view of the upcoming Russian-Indian Summit? Will the plans to privatise Russian companies influence the development of the investment partnership between Russia and India?

Vladimir Putin: Naturally, during our visit to India we hope to give fresh momentum to the bilateral trade and economic ties, given that companies of both countries are interested in implementing new mutually beneficial projects. Russia's cumulative investments in India amount to about $4 billion, while Indian businesses have invested in the Russian economy twice as much – about $8 billion.

I am convinced that Russia and India can considerably boost bilateral investments. To stimulate mutual investments, we plan to discuss with our Indian partners the possibility of updating the bilateral Agreement for the Promotion and Mutual Protection of Investments. We encourage the development institutes – the Russian Direct Investment Fund and Vnesheconombank – to be more active in providing financial support for investment activities of the Russian companies.

A Working Group on Priority Investment Projects has been established and is now successfully operating within the framework of the Intergovernmental Commission. Line agencies of the two countries, jointly with the India–Russia Forum on Trade and Investment, are engaged in a rigorous selection of promising business initiatives and work on identifying and removing barriers to the free flow of goods, capital and services.

To date, 20 priority projects have been selected – 10 Russian projects and 10 Indian ones – in such spheres as transport engineering, chemical industry, aircraft industry and pharmaceuticals. They include the construction by the SIBUR Holding of a butyl rubber facility with an operating capacity of 100,000 tonnes per year in the city of Jamnagar, and production by Russia’s Lighting Technologies Company of lighting equipment for general and specific purposes in the city of Jigani, Karnataka state. The Sistema Financial Corporation is developing a ”smart city“ model in India. Dauria Aerospace is working on the deployment of the NextStar telecommunication satellite constellations in the geostationary Earth orbit. The two countries’ governments will assist in the implementation of these projects.

Question: BRICS summits have been already included on the global agenda, and are held regularly. Yet, the final declarations only slightly differ from summit to summit. What do you think is essential in order to make BRICS cooperation more substantial, effective and concrete?

Vladimir Putin: BRICS is one of the key elements of the emerging multipolar world. The five countries have consistently reaffirmed their commitment to the fundamental principles of international law and promote the central role of the United Nations. Our countries reject the policy of coercive pressure and infringement upon the sovereignty of other states. We take similar stances on urgent international issues, including the Syrian crisis and the Middle East settlement.

This is why the summits’ final declarations, and the Goa Summit will be no exception to this rule, reaffirm our shared commitment to the fundamental principles of inter-state communication, particularly, to the observance of international law with the central coordinating role of the UN. With some Western countries attempting to promote their unilateral approaches, this position becomes even more relevant.

Traditionally, the declarations of BRICS leaders outline fundamental consensus-based stances on a wide range of issues and identify short-term development goals for the five nations that would serve as a target for follow-up steps aimed at strengthening strategic partnerships among our countries in various spheres.

As for rendering practical interaction among the five countries more substantive, I would like to stress that today, there exist more than 30 formats for inter-agency cooperation in the political, economic, humanitarian, security and law enforcement areas.

The establishment of the New Development Bank (NDB) and the BRICS Contingent Reserve Arrangement with the total capital of $200 billion is a concrete example of this cooperation. I am convinced that, as the bank gets stronger, its output will only increase, including by means of projects that promote integration among the BRICS countries. The NDB started its work in 2016, having approved the first projects in all five countries. The priority at the current stage is renewable energy. In Russia, this implies the construction of small 50 MW hydropower plants in Karelia worth $100 million.

Our countries actively cooperate within the Group of 20, including under the current Chinese chairmanship. Thus, the BRICS countries have undertaken a commitment to implement the Action Plan on Base Erosion and Profit Shifting. We seek to systematically converge our stances in the WTO with a view to improving the rules and spurring up multilateral negotiations within the organisation.

This is why I think the cooperation within BRICS has already begun to yield practical results. It is essential to continue work on consolidating these results and on identifying areas of common interest.

The participants in the BRICS Summit in Goa will look at the initial results of implementing the Strategy for BRICS Economic Partnership adopted in Ufa and finalise the draft of BRICS Roadmap for Trade, Economic and Investment Cooperation until 2020. We intend to establish new formats and mechanisms to cooperate with our partners, in which concerted measures aimed at developing our ties in various fields will be elaborated. At the same time we intend to focus on addressing issues related to strengthening international security and stability, enhancing the competitiveness of our economies and the promotion of international development.

We also support the initiatives put forward by the Indian chairmanship in such fields as BRICS collaboration in agriculture, railway transport, sports, tourism and building people-to-people contacts.

Question: What proposals are you going to make at the forthcoming BRICS Summit and what do you expect from this meeting? What do you think the participants in the association could claim as their achievements after this meeting? What other projects beside the New Development Bank, could serve as a proof that this cooperation format is valuable?

Vladimir Putin: First and foremost, I would like to express gratitude to Indian leadership who has, invariably throughout its chairmanship in BRICS, focused on strengthening and consolidating the strategic partnership within our association. I am convinced that the Summit in Goa that will be held under the slogan of continuity and innovation, will be very fruitful.

For our five countries’ leaders this meeting will be a good opportunity to harmonise our positions on key issues on the international agenda. We are determined to cooperate in the fight against terrorism, drug trafficking and corruption. We will also contribute to settling conflicts and ensuring international information security. All of us remain concerned over continued lack of stability in the global economy. Together with our partners we will reflect on what can be done to further unite our efforts in order to address these challenges.

We also expect that the BRICS Summit in Goa will open new opportunities for economic and humanitarian cooperation.

We will certainly discuss the issues of project funding through the New Development Bank and of a full-fledged launch of the BRICS Contingent Currency Reserve Pool. This implies an exchange of views on the ongoing work involving high representatives on security issues, relevant ministerial meetings, expert interaction formats, the BRICS Network University, and the Business Council. For instance, preparations have now been completed for the signing of memoranda of cooperation among the customs services and the diplomatic academies of our states, as well as of creating a platform for BRICS agricultural research.

We are grateful to our Indian partners for ensuring the continuity of the BRICS agenda following the Ufa Summit held in Russia in July 2015. The implementation of the adopted Ufa Declaration and Action Plan has started. The Indian partners have also proposed a number of initiatives that we plan to consider at the Summit.

As for the specific Russian proposals for the Goa Summit, let me remind you that, during our presidency, the Strategy for Economic Partnership was adopted, which covers the promising areas of cooperation among the five countries. An action plan for its implementation is currently being prepared. The Russian side has proposed more than 60 projects, a kind of a road map, which could be implemented in cooperation with its BRICS partners (with a single partner or with all of them). I believe that if we manage to jointly determine partners for the implementation of these projects, it will be an important step towards the modernisation of our countries’ economies.

Russia also supports enhanced cooperation in electronic commerce (including analysis of key barriers between the countries in this sphere, development of the best regulatory practices, etc.), in trade facilitation (with involvement of the Eurasian Economic Commission), supporting small and medium-sized businesses (launching a web portal for BRICS small and medium-sized businesses), and protection of intellectual property.

Question: You often mention the necessity to interlink integration processes, particularly those of the EAEU and the Silk Road Economic Belt. How could the current BRICS format be used to implement such initiatives?

Vladimir Putin: The global economic and financial situation remains difficult, with the consequences of the global financial crisis still persisting. It is therefore regrettable that certain countries seek to solve the problems that have built up by introducing protectionist measures and trying to engage in restricted non-transparent projects, such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership or the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. Russia, just like all its BRICS partners, remains committed to shaping open non-discriminatory economic areas based on the WTO principles.

Let me remind you that on July 9, 2015, Ufa hosted an outreach meeting with participation of heads of state of the Eurasian Economic Union, the SCO, as well as the SCO observer states. Among other things, the participants discussed the issue of major regional and transregional infrastructure projects.

In this context, we also proposed that work on establishing the Eurasian Economic Union should be integrated with that on the Silk Road Economic Belt. This process could eventually provide a basis for the Big Eurasian Partnership that would involve a wide range of states of the Eurasian Economic Union, the SCO, and ASEAN. We expect that such partnership will be open for accession by all countries concerned and will build on the principles of transparency and mutual respect. The BRICS cooperation potential may also be used to implement this initiative. We look forward to the support from India, which is earnestly interested in this proposal.

We are sure that this topic will be further discussed at the BRICS and BIMSTEC heads of state meeting in Goa.

Question: When you think of the territory from India to the Russian border you realise that the situation there is rather complicated, with numerous problems and contradictions. What challenges and issues, in your opinion, will be the most important and acute for the countries of the region in the next ten years?

Vladimir Putin: The situation on the territory between India and Russia remains tense. In particular, the developments in Afghanistan still raise concern. Decisive actions are required to help that country in dealing with such challenges and threats as terrorism, extremism, and illicit drug trafficking. Russia and India share the need to support national reconciliation efforts under the international law and are interested in deepening constructive multilateral cooperation for the purposes of assisting Afghanistan in solving the issues of national security, building counter-narcotics capacity, ensuring social and economic development, and enhancing interconnectivity.

In more general terms, our country is willing to develop such formats of interaction in the above-mentioned region that would allow responding swiftly to emerging security challenges, jointly seeking for ways to address potential threats. In our opinion, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation is to play the major role in it; it is constantly expanding its geography – for example, India and Pakistan are now joining the Organisation. The SCO is stepping up its efforts aimed at building trust, strengthening genuinely collective efforts in the area of crisis response, and developing multifaceted cooperation.

The fact that Russia, with support of its partners, is actively promoting the above-mentioned projects to create a common economic space in Eurasia also contributes to resolving the differences. Such ‘integration of integrations’ based on the principles of transparency and taking into account the interests of all national economies will allow integrating the region into common development, and will strengthen its stability.


From here:

Interview to Rossiya Segodnya International News Agency and IANS News Agency

Prem
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Prem » 20 Oct 2016 09:34


Prem
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Prem » 20 Oct 2016 09:35


Philip
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 02 Nov 2016 10:17

Grand c*ckup by Indian MEA yet again.Hambantotat sold to the Chinese. The myopia of Indian diplomats is yet again on miserable display despite our leverage with SL. Frankly speaking,India has to put its money where its mouth is. Remember,that the development of the port was first offered to India. Heads must roll in the MEA.We could've easily extended financial support to SL and got a lease for 99 yrs. whatever at Htota,Trinco,wherever!

http://defencenews.in/article/Indias-Su ... sion-29028
India's Super-Sensitive Spaceport faces a Chinese privacy invasion
Wednesday, November 02, 2016
By: Asia Times

The decision by the Sri Lankan government to sell the deep sea port in Hambantota to a Chinese state-owned company should not have come as surprise to India. Since April at least, the topic was under discussion as a measure to reduce the country’s debt burden.

Yet, the surprise lies in India’s failure to forestall the deal. Some fundamental questions arise regarding the regional policies under Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government.


A full-fledged, permanent Chinese “presence” in Hambantota cannot but affect the geopolitics of Indian Ocean region.

At its most obvious level, Hambantota becomes a hub of China’s proposed Maritime Silk Road in Indian Ocean. By the way, Colombo also proposes to hand over 6100 hecatres of land near Hambantota Port on long lease to a Chinese company as an exclusive “investment zone.”

Hambantota is located only 10 knots away from the Europe-Far East Line, one of the busiest international sea lanes.

Only 1300 kilometers separate Hambantota from each of India’s two strategic naval bases in the Bay of Bengal – Visakhapatanam and Andaman & Nicobar Islands – from where Indian Navy sets out occasionally to make its presence felt in the South China Sea.

Also, Hambantota is just 500 kms to the south of Sriharikota, India’s super-sensitive spaceport from where it launches military satellites and conducts missile tests.

In a nutshell, Chinese presence in Hambantota will end the “privacy” that India enjoyed in the Bay of Bengal as strategic backyard.

Indian diplomacy has suffered a massive setback. Coming on top of cascading tensions with Pakistan and downhill slide in relations with China, India’s security environment gets very cloudy.

The Hindu nationalist Rashtriya Sevak Sangh (RSS), which mentors Modi government, has choreographed India’s policies toward Sri Lanka and owes an explanation.

The RSS estimated that Sri Lanka could be sucked into the Indian orbit by putting rings of engagement around its elites.

RSS prompted Modi government to abandon the traditional leverage of Sri Lankan Tamil problem to exert influence on Colombo and instead deploy “soft power,” overlooking that the Sinhala narrative pits Hindu nationalism as existential threat.

Indeed, Delhi was in triumphalist mood when the “regime change” was accomplished in Colombo in January 2015. Delhi elites celebrated that the new “pro-Indian” government in Colombo would exorcise Chinese influence.

However, twenty months down the lane, the opposite happened. The RSS’s blind faith in Sri Lankan elites to act as India’s proxies proved to be naive and delusional. This tragic miscalculation – not Pakistan, not Kashmir, not Taliban – turns out to be Modi’s most disastrous foreign-policy legacy.

Yet, Colombo cannot be faulted. Sri Lanka stares at a debt trap. The debt-to-GDP ratio stands at 75% and over 95 percent of government revenue goes toward debt repayment.

On the other hand, Chinese diplomacy has outclassed India’s. China has the financial muscle to back up a robust diplomacy, whereas, India punched above its weight.

As rising global power, China will not be deterred by India’s archaic thesis of Indian Ocean being its “sphere of influence”.

China’s stated preference so far has been to work with India in the larger interests of regional stability – be it in Nepal, Sri Lanka or Bangladesh. China invited India invest in its flagship project known as Colombo Port City.

India could have taken up the intellectual challenge in a spirit of pragmatism with long-term objectives in mind. But given their zero sum mindset, Hindu nationalists insist that India cannot cooperate with China’s Belt and Road Initiative.

China probably expected Modi to see the light of reason at some point. At any rate, it so far chose to sidestep Modi government’s patently uncooperative approach.

In Nepal in July, Beijing didn’t resist the overthrow of “China-friendly” prime minister K. P. Oli, just as in January last year in Sri Lanka, it didn’t get agitated when US-Indian moves drove “pro-China” Sri president Mahinda Rajapaksa out of power.

Why is Indian diplomacy looking so disoriented in its natural habitat? Primarily, India never before descended into such an abyss of intellectual bankruptcy. The contrast with China couldn’t be sharper.

Whereas RSS and Modi count on the sayings of India’s ancient Machiavelli, Chanakya ( 4th century BC), to co-relate the country with the twenty-first century world order, China resorts to the intellectual tools of dialectical materialism.

Fundamentally, the Modi government lacks a sense of proportion. When Modi visited Ulaanbaatar in May last year, with an eye on China, he made a stunning announcement of $1 billion as low-interest credit to Mongolia.

Yet, in a bizarre, ironic turn, US$1 billion is roughly the amount China’s Red Chip company, China Merchants Port Holding Limited, will be spending to buy up strategic assets in Hambantota.

Again, only two weeks ago, India organized a BIMSTEC ‘outreach’ at Goa during the BRICS summit in an act of one-upmanship against Pakistan and China. BIMSTEC is touted as a “sub-regional grouping” bringing together Sri Lanka, Bangaldesh and Myanmar under Indian tutelage.

Now, hardly a fortnight later, Colombo bolts away, selling a vast swathe of land to Chinese companies.

Nonetheless, despite the latest setback, the RSS will not be shaken out of the belief that India is strongly placed to tap into the Sino-American rivalry and make a good living out of it. The RSS strategists believe that this was what China did in the Cold war era, too.

They overlook that if China could exploit the American market, it was largely because it was also willing to reform and globalize its own economy.

Equally, China could take advantage of its vast reserves of human resources, thanks to the social formation created through decades of communist rule. India is a far cry from where China stood in the eighties.

A defining moment is approaching in India-China ties. Beijing warned last week that the move by Delhi to invite the Dalai Lama to visit the disputed region of Arunachal Pradesh – hot on the heels of the US ambassador to India – “will only damage peace and stability of the border areas and bilateral relations.” Beijing “demanded” that Delhi should “adhere to its political commitments on Tibet-related issues.”

Indeed, India’s relations with China and Pakistan have lately become intertwined, bringing into the matrix, inevitably, the whole question of China’s presence in South Asia and the Indian Ocean.

Therefore, the thing to be watched closely is how China proposes to utilize the strategic assets in Hambantota.

India’s Foreign Secretary S. Jaishankar visited Colombo last week within a couple of days of the visit by Sri Lankan Prime Minister Maithripala Sirisena to Goa for the BIMSTEC outreach where he had met Modi.

The Sri Lankan Foreign Minister Mangala Samaraweera is due now to arrive in Delhi in the weekend on an unscheduled visit.

To be sure, alarm bells are ringing in Delhi. India’s hush-hush assets, which it had safely hidden away in its strategic backyard of Bay of Bengal, face the startling prospect of privacy invasion.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby MohdKav » 02 Nov 2016 13:03

Who wrote this tripe ? Deng's grandson? Modi should see the light of day? So if only India bows down in servitude to USA, Pakistan, China and Russia, will these idiots be satisfied ?

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby sum » 02 Nov 2016 13:40

The Hindu nationalist Rashtriya Sevak Sangh (RSS), which mentors Modi government, has choreographed India’s policies toward Sri Lanka and owes an explanation.

The RSS estimated that Sri Lanka could be sucked into the Indian orbit by putting rings of engagement around its elites.

RSS prompted Modi government to abandon the traditional leverage of Sri Lankan Tamil problem to exert influence on Colombo and instead deploy “soft power,” overlooking that the Sinhala narrative pits Hindu nationalism as existential threat.


Stopped reading when above sentences appeared

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pankajs » 02 Nov 2016 17:23

Philip wrote:Grand c*ckup by Indian MEA yet again.Hambantotat sold to the Chinese. The myopia of Indian diplomats is yet again on miserable display despite our leverage with SL. Frankly speaking,India has to put its money where its mouth is. Remember,that the development of the port was first offered to India. Heads must roll in the MEA.We could've easily extended financial support to SL and got a lease for 99 yrs. whatever at Htota,Trinco,wherever!

Saar you need to calm down. India cannot match the cheenis dollar for dollar. Sri Lanka know that, the Cheenis know that and the Indians know that too. We cannot get into an bidding war with the Cheenis and that cannot be our strategy. So there was no *Grand 1uck up* as you put it. It was just the acceptance of ground realities as they exist now both on part of India and Sri Lanka. There is no use getting all worked up.

We must prepare to deal with the situation based on our strength and on this we have much to learn for China. China itself has faced a similar (not same) situation for a while on its eastern seaboard with America backed Taiwan and South Korea. Our basic strength is our nearness to these ports. The second factor is that the Sril Lankans are not mad like our other neighbor and don't have a death wish.

Lets start by dominating the Air and Sea in our vicinity. That would bring all these ports under our control during a crisis. Lets build capability to bottle up these ports at our will.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Bart S » 03 Nov 2016 12:52

pankajs wrote:
Philip wrote:Grand c*ckup by Indian MEA yet again.Hambantotat sold to the Chinese. The myopia of Indian diplomats is yet again on miserable display despite our leverage with SL. Frankly speaking,India has to put its money where its mouth is. Remember,that the development of the port was first offered to India. Heads must roll in the MEA.We could've easily extended financial support to SL and got a lease for 99 yrs. whatever at Htota,Trinco,wherever!

Saar you need to calm down. India cannot match the cheenis dollar for dollar. Sri Lanka know that, the Cheenis know that and the Indians know that too. We cannot get into an bidding war with the Cheenis and that cannot be our strategy. So there was no *Grand 1uck up* as you put it. It was just the acceptance of ground realities as they exist now both on part of India and Sri Lanka. There is no use getting all worked up.

We must prepare to deal with the situation based on our strength and on this we have much to learn for China. China itself has faced a similar (not same) situation for a while on its eastern seaboard with America backed Taiwan and South Korea. Our basic strength is our nearness to these ports. The second factor is that the Sril Lankans are not mad like our other neighbor and don't have a death wish.

Lets start by dominating the Air and Sea in our vicinity. That would bring all these ports under our control during a crisis. Lets build capability to bottle up these ports at our will.



Plus the Cheeni govt is throwing money around and while that sounds impressive initially and there is no denying that they are able to buy significant influence and grow their footprint, but in most cases is actually showing pretty poor return on the investment. The return on Cheeni investment dollar for dollar in their own country is extremely poor by global benchmarks and certainly worse than India, overseas their investments have even worse bang for the buck.

So it makes no sense whatsoever for India to get into a bidding war, though that is not to say that India should not hesitate to bid on selected projects that make sense.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby panduranghari » 04 Nov 2016 11:52

China thinks it can buy influence.

US used to think that too, but they had wherewithal to institute regime change.

Free markets laissez faire capitalism can be subjugated only for so long. These 2 nation-states will find out soon enough.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby abhishek_sharma » 16 Nov 2016 10:27

Sushma Swaraj ‏@SushmaSwaraj 26m26 minutes ago
I am in AIIMS because of kidney failure. Presently, I am on dialysis. I am undergoing tests for a Kidney transplant. Lord Krishna will bless

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 16 Nov 2016 10:38

Bad news if true.One prays and wishes a v.speedy recovery for Sushmaji.The GOI needs as many of its ministers in good shape at this crucial time with demonitisation,Paki perfidy and polls to follow.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby hnair » 16 Nov 2016 11:04

goddamn, that is not the news one wants to hear. Wishing a speedy recovery

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 16 Nov 2016 16:49

X Posted from the “India-Russia: News & Analysis” thread.

Russia apparently has no qualms about selling military equipment to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan if the Islamic Republic was in a position to put down cash for it.

Trust our foreign policy makers are aware of Russian proclivities.

Excerpt from Interview by Turkeys Andolou Agency of Russian President Vladimir Putin's special envoy to Afghanistan, Zamir Kabulov dealing with Russia – Pakistan relations.

Putin envoy: There is no quick solution in Afghanistan

Whether you like it or not, Taliban is a real political armed force, says Russian president's special envoy to Afghanistan

15.11.2016

Zamir Kabulov, President Vladimir Putin's special envoy to Afghanistan and the Foreign Ministry's director of the Second Asian Department, spoke to Anadolu Agency in Moscow about the situation in Afghanistan, developments in the region, and Russian foreign policy. ………………………

Russia and Pakistan

Kabulov stated that after a bad spell due to the Soviet Union’s long-ago occupation of Afghanistan, Russian-Pakistani relations have recently improved. "We are currently in a relationship with Pakistan. The level of political relations is quite high. Since we do not have major joint projects in the field of the economy, our commercial-economic volume is not much. Our military technical cooperation continues. We sold some military products to Pakistan. They want to buy more, but we do not work with Pakistan on credit and their economic opportunities are limited.”

He also stressed that they support the Pakistani government and are opposed to any kind of armed group, saying, "The Pakistani Taliban, the true brother of the Afghan Taliban, has only a slightly different goal. I think the Taliban poses a threat to the Pakistani democratic state. We support the Pakistani government and we are against any kind of armed group. The Pakistani Taliban also did not fight Daesh.”

Reporting by Hakan Ceyhan Aydogan ; Writing by Ilker Girit


Putin envoy: There is no quick solution in Afghanistan

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby abhishek_sharma » 29 Nov 2016 07:10

Governor Swaraj ‏@governorswaraj 8m8 minutes ago
I am in AIIMS. Pl see @templetree1 for updates on @sushmaswaraj 's health. @sandeepsaraswat

templetree
‏@templetree1
@sushmaswaraj 's condition has deteriorated. She has acute difficulty in breathing and is on oxygen for the last few days.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Karthik S » 29 Nov 2016 07:14

abhishek_sharma wrote:Governor Swaraj ‏@governorswaraj 8m8 minutes ago
I am in AIIMS. Pl see @templetree1 for updates on @sushmaswaraj 's health. @sandeepsaraswat

templetree
‏@templetree1
@sushmaswaraj 's condition has deteriorated. She has acute difficulty in breathing and is on oxygen for the last few days.


Hope she recovers soon!

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby ramana » 29 Nov 2016 07:23

Sad to see her sinking.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 29 Nov 2016 15:47

X Posted from the “India-Australia News and Discussion” thread.

Australian Green Party Senator Ms. Lee Rhiannon makes an anti-Indian speech regards India’s efforts to restore Law and Order in Jammu & Kashmir in the wake of Mohammadden violence which is gleefully picked up the Mohammadden Terrorist fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan (See: On 22 November, Australian Senator Lee Rhiannon, made a powerful statement in the Parliament regarding Indian atrocities). There seems to be personal animus in this rabid attack targeting India by Ms Lee Rhiannon as this subject is outside her area of responsibilities as a member of the Green Party (Clicky).

Text of Ms. Rhiannon’s anti-Indian speech:

Adjournment Speech: Jammu and Kashmir
Speeches in Parliament
Lee Rhiannon/ 23 Nov 2016/ Foreign Affairs/General/
Tuesday, 22 November 2016

Senator RHIANNON (New South Wales) (20:37): The people of occupied Jammu and Kashmir are facing a humanitarian crisis that requires urgent international attention. The people who live in this region have a right to live in peace, with their fundamental human rights to self-determination recognised and honoured. Kashmir has been subjected to centuries of foreign rule. Today, Jammu and Kashmir are occupied and divided between India, Pakistan and China. This situation is a product of British colonialism. Britain partitioned the subcontinent. Nation states were created by drawing arbitrary lines on maps at the close of the Second World War.

Whilst many of us might associate Kashmir with pleasant holidays, the reality for locals is very grim. Kilometres of barbed wire run across the landscape. There is mounting evidence that war crimes and crimes against humanity are being committed in this region. These crimes should be investigated and steps should be taken to end the human rights abuses. Tragically, the violence in this region is escalating. There are worrying reports of blockades limiting supplies of essential commodities to the people of this region. This is from the website of Amnesty International:

Human rights defenders, journalists and protesters continued to face arbitrary arrests and detentions. Over 3,200 people were being held in January under administrative detention on executive orders without charge or trial. Authorities also continued to use 'anti-terror' laws such as the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act and other state-specific laws which do not meet international human rights standards.

Amnesty International has also released a report called Denied: failures in accountability for human rights violations by security force personnel in Jammu and Kashmir. This report documents the difficulties involved in resolving human rights violations. The report notes, at section 7, the Armed Forces (Jammu and Kashmir) Special Powers Act grants virtual immunity to members of the security forces from prosecution for alleged human rights violations.

So much of the violence in occupied Jammu and Kashmir violates the Geneva Convention of 1949 and the follow-up additional protocols of 1977. The distinction between civilian and non-civilian targets is not recognised. Indiscriminate attacks are not prohibited and state forces violate international guidelines. A Human Rights Watch report has identified mass graves of thousands of Kashmiris, possibly as high as 8,000. The Human Rights Commission inquiry confirmed there are thousands of bullet-ridden bodies buried in unmarked graves in Jammu and Kashmir. I understand the majority are young men.

Amnesty International recently called on the authorities in Kashmir to investigate alleged mass rapes of over 30 women in North Kashmir, in 1991, in the villages of Kunan and Poshpora. The women raped were aged between 13 and 70. Human Rights Watch has reported that between 50 and 100 women were raped by Indian Army forces on the night of 23 February 1991. At the time, Kashmir police stated that the case was untraceable and stopped the investigation in October 1991.

In 2011 India's human rights commission requested that Kashmir authorities launch a fresh investigation. In June 2013 Kashmir's Judicial Magistrate Court ordered the reinvestigation of the case. In August this year Amnesty International India temporarily closed its offices in India. The decision was taken shortly after Amnesty had hosted a function on recent events in Kashmir. There were concerns for the safety of Amnesty staff. Since July, Srinagar, the capital city of Kashmir, has had its mobile phone networks shut down, many newspaper offices have been raided and papers have been seized.

Tragically, civilians are often the target of attacks. In August, staff at a hospital in Srinagar covered their eyes with patches as an act of solidarity with the children and adults hit with pellets. The doctors and nurses are treating the civilians who are bearing the brunt of the war crimes. 'See our blindness' was one of the slogans on the doctors' placards. The action garnered international attention.

Australia has a strong connection with Kashmir. Successive governments have been engaged in finding a solution to the dispute that has been causing so much hardship since 1948, when the former coloniser of this land, Britain, withdrew from the region. In 1950 an Australian officer, Major General Robert Nimmo, was appointed Chief Military Observer. Australia held this position until 1966. In 1951 Australia sent eight military observers to UNMOGIP, the United Nations Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan. These Australian observers served in Kashmir until 1985. By that time, 150 Australians had served under UNMOGIP. I understand the Australian government withdrew, as they thought the dispute had been resolved.

Also in 1950, the United Nations Security Council appointed Sir Owen Dixon, the sixth Chief Justice of Australia, as the UN representative to organise a plebiscite in Jammu and Kashmir, but the plebiscite was never held. This is not a reflection on Sir Owen Dixon. It was a failure of the international community. Australia should renew its work to ensure that a plebiscite is now held.

I believe Australia has a special responsibility—as a candidate for the United Nations Human Rights Council for 2018-20—to advocate for the protection of human rights of the people of Kashmir and Jammu. The two nations associated with Kashmir and Jammu are Pakistan and India. Both these countries are nuclear powers. If the Turnbull government is responsible, it should be working to de-escalate the current extreme situation. Foreign Minister Julie Bishop should be exploring every avenue to resolve the current tensions and assist to promote peace and justice in this region.

Clicky


Meanwhile the Hindu is reporting that Lee Rhiannon’s office is backing away from this rabidly anti Indian attack by saying “Although she gave this speech, she does not hold the relevant portfolio”. The Hindu also points out that Lee Rhiannon had in the past attacked Dharmic Sri Lanka. What they have not pointed out is that she has a track record of attacking Jewish majority Israel and supporting Mohammadden majority Palestine:

Australian Senator distances herself from Kashmir speech

Our Political and Foreign Policy top brass must demand the Australian Government inform us as to what action was taken by the ruling Australian Government to challenge this statement on the floor of the Australian Parliament and if not challenged, why that was the case.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 29 Nov 2016 21:01

X Posted from the “India-Russia: News & Analysis”
krishna_krishna wrote:^^^ Meeting did take place :

"But the strangest bit of news would be that earlier this month, Gwadar also received Russia’s Federal Security Services chief Alexander Bogdanov.
It was a hush-hush inspection tour aimed at assessing the efficacy of Russian ships using the port during their long voyages, to assert Moscow’s return to the global stage.
Equally, this is the first visit by a Russian spy chief to Pakistan in over two decades and it took place just as America elected a new president, Donald Trump.
Maybe the timing is coincidental, but more likely, it is not. The Russian diplomacy invariably moves in lockstep.
Bogdanov’s visit was scheduled just a few weeks before the planned trilateral strategic dialogue between Russia, China and Pakistan, ostensibly regarding the Afghan situation, in Moscow next month.
Bogdanov reportedly sought a formal Russian-Pakistani collaborative tie-up over the CPEC."

From Here:
http://www.dawn.com/news/1298977/chines ... nal-policy

Source# 2:
https://sputniknews.com/business/201611 ... adar-port/


Russian Foreign Ministry denies reports appearing in the media of the terrorist fomenting Islaic Republic of Pakistan that Russia will join the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor.

Despite Russian denial, India must convey to Russia India’s implacable opposition to any project by any country that is set up on Indian Territory in Pakistan Occupied Kashmir, CPEC included:

29 November 201611:15

Comment by the Information and Press Department on Pakistani media reports about Russia’s alleged involvement in the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor project

2197-29-11-2016
The Pakistani media reports about “secret negotiations” between Russia and Pakistan on the implementation of projects as part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) are not true to the facts. Moscow is not discussing the possibility of joining this project with Islamabad.

Russia-Pakistan trade and economic cooperation has its own inherent value, and we intend to strengthen it. Russian companies are implementing business projects in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, including the planned construction of the North-South gas pipeline from Karachi to Lahore, on a bilateral basis.

[b]Clicky

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby abhishek_sharma » 29 Nov 2016 23:35

templetree
‏@templetree1
@sushmaswaraj to undergo angiography/angioplasty in AIIMS today.

ramana
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby ramana » 30 Nov 2016 00:47

She went for kidney replacement and now for angioplasty.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 30 Nov 2016 11:50

X posted from the “India-Russia: News & Analysis” thread.

Armenia blocks Pakistan's observer bid in CSTO Parliamentary Assembly

Russia is not only “Primus Inter Pares” but also the “Tail which Wags the Dog” when it comes to the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO). It would thus be highly surprising if the Mohammadden Terrorist fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan’s candidature as observer in the Parliamentary Assembly of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) could have proceeded without the { tacit} approval of Russia. Accordingly our Political and Foreign Policy establishment must make it plain to Russia that the Russian support for the Mohammadden Terrorist fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan as observer in the Parliamentary Assembly of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO), is an unwelcome development. That the Islamic Republic of Pakistan had high hopes of being permitted to enter as observer to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) is clear given the presence of the Mohammadden Terrorist fomenting Islamic Republics of Pakistan’s National Assembly Speaker, Sardar Ayaz Sadiq, at the plenary session of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Collective Security Treaty Organisation (CSTO) in the Russian city of St Petersburg on November 25:

Russian plenary: Peace, security are Pakistan’s top priorities, says Ayaz

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 30 Nov 2016 12:08

Indian foreign policy is completely "effed up" with respect to Pak. With daily killing of officers and jawans in terror attacks the time is long past giving Pak a diplomatic boot in the backside.Ban overflights,cut off all trade,personal,sporting contacts until terror abates.Unfortunately,the eunuchs in the MEA appear to have our political bosses by the items that they haven't! Appeasement of China and Pak are the grand achievements of our MEA whose cadre strut around like the national bird,peacocks,with only peas and not the rest,pardon the pun!

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby yensoy » 30 Nov 2016 12:30

Philip wrote:Ban overflights


This will do little to them and hurt us terribly. Air India's reversal of fortunes comes from its new right-sized planes, carefully picked destinations and excellent connections at Delhi. All that will go for a toss if overflights are banned. We don't have a viable backup hub in Mumbai (a long overdue demand but won't happen till Navi Mumbai airport is up and running). Pak has precious little to lose, only something like seven PIA flights per week or so cross Indian territory and anyway PIA is a mess without our help. In comparison, AI has around 10 flights which overfly per day enroute to Europe/North America not counting several flights on Indian carriers their way to the Gulf from North India.

I always worry that AI will be in serious trouble if Pak bans overflights.

Of course European and Middle East airlines will clap their hands with glee were this to happen.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 01 Dec 2016 07:36

X Posted from the STFUP thread.

Bart S wrote:http://www.radio.gov.pk/30-Nov-2016/pm-sharif-felicitates-donald-trump-over-his-victory

Prime Minister Muhammad Nawaz Sharif telephoned US President-elect Donald Trump and felicitated him on his victory.

During the telephonic conversation, Donald Trump said he is ready to play any role that Pakistan wants him to do to find solutions to the outstanding problems. He said it will be an honour and he will personally do it.

Donald Trump said Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has a very good reputation, and he is doing amazing work, which is visible in every way. He is looking forward to meet the Prime Minister soon. :rotfl:

He said Pakistan is amazing with tremendous opportunities. Pakistanis are one of the most intelligent people. :eek:

On being invited to visit Pakistan by the Prime Minister, the US president-elect said he would love to visit fantastic country, fantastic place of fantastic people.
:lol:



I have a hard time believing that at least some portions are not made up.


Looks like the Donald Trump Presidential term of office is going to see the US ramping up her traditional policy of handing out Jaziya to her Munna aka Major Non NATO Ally, the Mohammadden Terrorism fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan.

Meanwhile another seemingly official website of the Government of Mohammadden Terrorist fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan namely the Press Information Department of the Ministry of Information, Broadcasting and National Heritage, corroborates the story.

Very effusive and fulsome praise for the Mohammadden Terrorism fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan by the US President Elect. Expect in a very short while shipments of F16’s to the Islamic Republic to recommence and a US Presidential visit which Obama refused, to happen:

CLICKY

PR No. 298 PM TELEPHONES PRESIDENT-ELECT USA Islamabad: November 30, 2016

Prime Minister Muhammad Nawaz Sharif called President-elect USA Donald Trump and felicitated him on his victory. President Trump said Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif you have a very good reputation. You are a terrific guy. You are doing amazing work which is visible in every way. I am looking forward to see you soon. As I am talking to you Prime Minister, I feel I am talking to a person I have known for long. Your country is amazing with tremendous opportunities. Pakistanis are one of the most intelligent people. I am ready and willing to play any role that you want me to play to address and find solutions to the outstanding problems. It will be an honor and I will personally do it. Feel free to call me any time even before 20th January that is before I assume my office.

On being invited to visit Pakistan by the Prime Minister, Mr. Trump said that he would love to come to a fantastic country, fantastic place of fantastic people. Please convey to the Pakistani people that they are amazing and all Pakistanis I have known are exceptional people, said Mr. Donald Trump.

*****


Meanwhile reporting from other US MSM:

Pakistan’s surprisingly candid readout of Trump’s phone call with prime minister

Donald Trump Had the Trumpiest Phone Call With Pakistan’s Prime Minister

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 02 Dec 2016 06:09

Terrorism, enhanced connectivity to top agenda of Heart of Asia meet - Nayanima Basu, Business Line
Terrorism emanating from the South Asian region and the political will to fight and eradicate it will be the main agenda of the upcoming sixth Ministerial Conference of the Heart of Asia (HoA), Istanbul Process. The conference will also focus on improving connectivity with Afghanistan.

The conference, which India is hosting for the first time in Amritsar from December 3-4, will see participation from over 30 countries, including China, Pakistan, Iran, Russia and the US.

“Terrorism is something that Afghanistan has suffered the most. And we all know it is Pakistan that continues to support state-sponsored terrorism and turns a blind eye to cross-border terrorism. This will be the main agenda of the talks, undoubtedly,” a senior official told BusinessLine requesting anonymity.

The HoA was launched in an effort to improve the security situation of the war-torn country thereby improving connectivity to the region in an effort to make it a hub for trade and commerce.

According to Afghanistan’s Ambassador to India Shaida M Abdali, terrorism is a “continuous threat” to the country. He urged for collective measures to fight terrorism and its breeding ground.

“We all know, terrorism is a creation of this region and the solution lies within this region only,” Abdali said hinting at Pakistan.


In an effort to contain terrorism and thereby developing the region, the Afghan government held reconciliatory talks with the Taliban under a so-called Quadrilateral Coordination Group (QCG), which includes Afghanistan, Pakistan, US and China.

But the process has not been successful owing to the rapid deterioration of ties between Afghanistan and Pakistan.

“The deteriorating ties between Afghanistan and Pakistan continue to remain a hurdle in the talks. But the Heart of Asia is a process where the US and China also get a platform to discuss issues concerning terrorism, which is most important. Unless there is a radical change in Pakistan’s policies, the situation will not change,” said Kanwal Sibal, former Indian Ambassador to Afghanistan.

Afghanistan is also keen to revive the old financial linkages with India. And in this it is important to understand why Amritsar was chosen as the venue for the meeting.

“Amritsar was the original wholesale market for agricultural products of Afghanistan. That traditional wholesale market has to be revived and that is crucial for the revival of the Afghan economy,” said former Ambassador Rakesh Sood
, who has also served in Afghanistan and Nepal.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Bhurishravas » 02 Dec 2016 15:21

Couldnt find India-israel thread. So posting here -

http://www.dailyo.in/politics/india-isr ... 14336.html
Modi deserves credit for ending India's hypocrisy with Israel
It's time Tel Aviv gets the recognition it deserves from New Delhi.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 03 Dec 2016 08:50

Modi, Ghani to discuss terror, defence - Suhasini Haidar, The Hindu
Terrorism, trade and defence assistance will be on the top of the agenda as Prime Minister Narendra Modi meets Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani here this weekend, which will also see a fresh focus on India’s plans to develop the Chabahar port in Iran for trade to Afghanistan.

Mr. Modi and Mr. Ghani are expected to meet and inaugurate the 14-member Heart of Asia conference on Sunday, which will be attended by ministers from Pakistan, Iran, Russia and China, as Foreign Secretary S. Jaishankar chairs a senior officials meet on Saturday.

Sources tell The Hindu that Mr. Modi is likely to build on India’s commitment on military aid to Afghanistan, of which seven helicopters including 3 utility choppers have already been supplied, and work is on on a trilateral framework with Russia on supplying spares and conducting repairs on other aircraft in Afghanistan.

Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, who is stepping in for External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj, will address a joint press conference with Afghanistan Deputy Foreign Minister Hekmat Khalil Karzai on Sunday, an MEA release said.

India and Afghanistan, the co-chairs of this year’s conference, will also seek to corner Pakistan on their common problem of cross-border terrorism during the ministerial conference on Sunday, which Pakistan’s Foreign Affairs Adviser Sartaj Aziz will attend. Condemning the Nagrota attack in which 7 Army men were killed in Jammu and Kashmir this week, Afghanistan’s Ambassador to India Shaida Abdali said, “We are affected as well as India is affected by cross-border terrorism in the same way and therefore we are emphasising more on the question of terrorism in the upcoming Heart of Asia conference to discuss how we can find solution to the problem, which affects us but at the same time affects the people of Pakistan as well.”

Focus on trade routes

But even as India and Afghanistan seek to corner Pakistan on terrorism in the text of the Amritsar declaration, officials say a major focus for the conference will be developing trade routes to Afghanistan, with major competition brewing between India’s plans for the Chabahar port in Iran and China and Pakistan’s development of the Gwadar Port. Iran’s Foreign Minister Javed Zarif is expected to make a presentation on the benefits of Chabahar to Afghanistan, while India now plans a big “reach-out event” to attract more countries to the port project, officials said.

However, diplomats say that work on the Chabahar port has yet to take off, and the trilateral agreement has not been ratified yet {Indian projects are very slow. China was already showing an interest in Chahbahar too and if India does not make progress Iran may offer the project to China.}.

When asked, Pakistan’s High Commissioner to India brushed off concerns over a “Great Game” on ports between India and Pakistan, saying “more trade ultimately benefits the whole region.” “I hope that we [India and Pakistan] have the relationship that will allow transit trade to Afghanistan in the future, but we aren’t there at present,” he told The Hindu ahead of the Amritsar conference.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Austin » 03 Dec 2016 11:47

India, China, Russia consult on Asia Pacific; get Philippines backing

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2016 ... cking.html
India, China and Russia on Thursday held their first round of consultation on Asia-Pacific Affairs which included regional security architecture, coordination within regional and multilateral fora, anti-terrorism and other regional issues, according to PTI as reported by The Statesman.

The consultation was attended by representatives from Ministry of Foreign Affairs of China, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Russia and Ministry of External Affairs of India, an Indian Embassy statement here said on Friday.

The three parties conducted in-depth exchange of views on the situation in the Asia-Pacific region, foreign policy towards Asia, regional security architecture, coordination within regional and multilateral fora, anti-terrorism and other acute, topical regional issues, it said.

The three parties also agreed that as important countries in the region, China, Russia and India have extensive common interests and close views on many aspects of regional agenda.

Trilateral consultations will contribute to strengthening practical coordination on regional and global issues.

The three parties are satisfied with the outcome of the consultation, it said.

The three parties stand ready to hold the next round of consultation next year, it added.


Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has expressed readiness to work with Russia and China on world peace, but ruled out any military alliance with them.

“I am not ready for military alliances because we have a treaty that was signed in the ’50s,” Duterte told a Russian television network (RT), referring to the 1951 Mutual Defense Treaty between the Philippines and the United States.

“But I am ready to cooperate with my new friends, China and Russia, to make this world more peaceful,” he told interviewer Marina Kosareva when asked about the status of defense cooperation between the Philippines and Russia.

Duterte has been forging warmer ties with Russia and China, even as he stepped up his anti-US rhetoric in his rambling speeches.

The President said the country’s plan to purchase guns from the United States was now under review. He, however, said he has a “friend” who has plenty of firearms to offer the government.

He earlier said that Russian President Vladimir Putin, whom he met on the sidelines of an economic summit in Peru, offered to sell firearms to the Philippines at an apparent bargain, or in a buy-one-take-one deal.

In the interview, Duterte said he was befriending Russia to show the world he was not limited to a few countries.

“We have to do business and have diplomatic relations with everybody. And if there is good to it, then I thank God,” he added.

Duterte also told RT that he believed Filipinos would understand his recent moves, including the waning of ties with the United States.

When told that opinion polls show that many Filipinos back an alliance with the United States, he said this was understandable because the country had been under the Americans for 50 years.

But he believed his explanation would get through to his countrymen.

“It should not surprise you. It’s ingrained in the genealogy of the Filipinos. But little by little I’ve been telling them, I made this decision because…I think the Filipinos know the reason in their heart why,” he said.

He said that he had been vocal about his grievances against the United States, which he had openly castigated for threatening to withdraw aid from the Philippines if the country did not do its bidding.

As to whether he could be friends with the United States under President-elect Donald Trump, Duterte alluded to sentiments from retired generals who want the country to renew ties with the United States.


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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Viv S » 04 Dec 2016 02:34

Cross-posting from India-US thread

US Congress to enshrine US-India defence ties in US law

Congress to clear bill next week, Obama will sign into law thereafter

By Ajai Shukla
Business Standard, 3rd Dec 16

With President Barack Obama and the India-friendly Defence Secretary Ashton Carter about to demit office, their unswervingly pro-India defence policy is about to be enshrined into US legislation.

This week, top US lawmakers from both houses of Congress --- the Senate and the House of Republicans --- jointly agreed to an amendment in a major budget bill that will formalize and consolidate India’s status as a major US partner.

The amendment is entitled “Enhancing Defense and Security Cooperation with India” (hereafter “India amendment”). It is a part of the National Defense Authorization Act of 2017 (NDAA), which allocates funding each year to the US military. Like several small, but important, US bills, the India amendment is piggybacking on the NDAA (which must be passed by Congress) to avoid the fate of numerous small bills that are lost forever in Washington’s legislative hubbub.

The classic example of this piggybacking technique was the passage of the innocuously titled “Naval Vessel Transfer Act” in 2008, which has legislatively committed the US to ensuring Israel enjoys a “qualitative military edge” over every potential adversary.

Now, in similar fashion, the US Congress is binding future American presidents, whatever their alliances or foreign policies, to nurturing US-India defence ties.

The India amendment directs the US Department of Defense (the Pentagon) and Department of State to sustain and prioritize defense cooperation with India through a specified series of policies and actions.

These include: recognizing India’s status as “a major defense partner of the United States”, designating an official to ensure the success of the “Framework for the United States-India Defense Relationship”, to “approve and facilitate the transfer of advanced technology”, and the “strengthen the effectiveness of the US-India Defense Trade and Technology Initiative (DTTI) and the durability of the [Pentagon’s] “India Rapid Reaction Cell”.

All these mechanisms were instituted by the Obama administration to galvanize US-India defence relations, but there was no guarantee that subsequent US governments would follow them. The passage of the India amendment makes it obligatory for all US administrations to do so.

According to officials closely involved with negotiating the India amendment, the NDAA is likely to pass the House of Representatives and the Senate next week and be signed into law by President Obama soon thereafter.

The passage of this amendment, which had been cleared by the House of Representatives in May, but scuttled --- only temporarily, it now emerges --- by the Senate in June, underlines the bipartisan Congressional consensus that the US-India relationship is, in the words of their president, “the defining partnership of the 21st century”.

"For the last decade, a consensus has been growing among America’s soldiers, spies, and diplomats that a stronger and more capable Indian military is in America’s national security interest. This legislation demonstrates that this realization has spread to America’s elected representatives as well,” said Ben Schwartz, the US-India Business Council’s defense and aerospace head, who was formerly India head in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

There has been criticism that the India amendment makes no changes to the US Arms Export Control Act, which places India in the category of countries to which arms sales require a 30-day notification to the US Congress; rather than the more favoured countries that require only a 15 day notification.

In fact, that would be a problem only for countries that have such a high volume of arms purchases from the US that they cannot wait an extra 15 days. India, in contrast, as seen in all recent purchases of US weaponry, actually takes several years to conclude a contract after the “congressional notification”.

US officials also point out that this distinction has absolutely no affect on the level of technology transfer.

The passage of the India amendment has been bumpy, because of infighting over unconnected issues within the bitterly divided US Congress. US legislative procedure required both houses to pass similar versions of the India amendment, after which a joint conference reconciles the wording before it is voted on.

This process encountered a hiccup in summer. After the House of Representatives passed the India amendment in May, entitled “US India Defense Technology and Partnership Act”, the Senate failed to pass the companion bill, entitled “Advancing U.S.-India Defense Cooperation Act”. Now, however, a joint House-Senate “conference”, convened to hammer out the final form of the NDAA, mutually agreed to include the India amendment, which forms Section 1292 of the NDAA.

The US Congress will now be closely monitoring the relationship. The India amendment mandates: “Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act (the NDAA), and annually thereafter, the Secretary of Defense and Secretary of State shall jointly submit to [Congress] a report on how the United States is supporting its defence relations with India in relations to the actions described…”
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Enhancing US-India defence: Features of India amendment

# India recognized as “major defence partner of the United States”

# Designated US defence official to ensure success of US-India Framework Agreement on Defence.

# Support combined US-India military planning for non-combat missions

# Promote US-India weapons interoperability

# Enhance cooperation with India “to advance United States interests in the South Asia and greater Indo-Asia-Pacific regions”

# Strengthen “Defence Trade and Technology Initiative” (DTTI)

# Develop “mutually agreeable mechanisms” to verify security of US-supplied defence equipment and technology

# Annual report to Congress on how the US government is supporting defence ties

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby NRao » 16 Dec 2016 09:25


arun
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 18 Dec 2016 12:22

X Posted from the “Pakistani Role In Global Terrorism” thread.

Bangladesh Home Minister Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal on the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting behaviour of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan. Clearly Bangladesh does not think very highly of the self-proclaimed Sole Islamic Nuclear Weapon Power and Citadel of Islam, Pakistan, despite being a fellow Mohammadden country:

"Pakistan has always harboured and supported terrorists.

We feel those who support terrorism should be discouraged and isolated. We should do everything to discourage and condemn such attacks. Such kind of terror attacks should not be carried out against any country,"


"Both India and Bangladesh have the same stand on the issue of terrorism. We have noticed in recent past, how Pakistan's involvement in various terror attacks has come out in open. This has to stop."


Press Trust of India via News 18:

Pakistan Should be Isolated for Supporting Terror Acts: Bangladesh

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 19 Dec 2016 21:27

X Posted from the “India-Russia: News & Analysis”.



Clarification on comment by Russia’s envoy to Islamabad Alexey Y Dedov on CPEC which was quoted by Radio Pakistan via Press Attache of Russian Embassy in Islamabad, Vyacheslav Sentyurin.

Russia Rejects Reports of Involvement in China Pakistan Economic Corridor

Parikshit Luthra | CNN-News18 ParikshitL
First published: December 19, 2016, 8:16 PM IST | Updated: 36 mins ago

Hours after Russia’s envoy to Islamabad Alexey Y Dedov was quoted by Radio Pakistan as saying that “Russia strongly supports the China Pakistan Economic Corridor” the Russian Embassy in Islamabad has urged the media not to make its own conclusions and treat the report carefully.

Speaking to CNN-News18, the embassy’s press attaché Vyacheslav Sentyurin said, “There is no question of joining or investing in the CPEC corridor. We are not going to be a part of it, but we have our own projects which we could connect to it. These ideas are not new and the media has made its own conclusions. We don’t hide such things from India”.

Sentyurin said the press should refer to the Russian Foreign Ministry’s recent statement which said, “Pakistani media reports about secret negotiations between Russia and Pakistan on the implementation of projects as part of CPEC are not true to facts and that Moscow is not discussing the possibility of joining this project with Islamabad”.

While reports quoted the Russian Envoy as saying that Russia was thinking about merging the Eurasian Economic Corridor with CPEC, the embassy clarified that “in the interview with the ambassador it was the merging of the EAEU with Chinese project of Silk Road Belt that was under discussion. Recognising the importance of CPEC for Pakistan’s economy and regional connectivity, the ambassador made it clear that Russia doesn’t participate in it being engaged in realisation of its own large-scale bilateral project with Pakistan – that of “North-South” gas pipeline from Karachi to Lahore”. …………………………………..

The Indian foreign ministry has refused to comment on Ambassador Dedov’s statements but, sources say government officials are closely following Moscow’s statements on Pakistan.


From here:

News 18

arun
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 22 Dec 2016 14:38

X Posted from the “India-US relations: News and Discussions III” thread.

India might be facing the prospect of having to tackle a Robin Raphael on steroids in the form of Lt. Gen Michael T. Flynn (Retd).

Michael Kugelman points out that Lt. Gen. Michael T Flynn (Retd), the US National Security Adviser Designate in the incoming Trump Administration, fed the Uniformed Jihadi’s of the Military of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan secret intelligence information:

Mike Flynn’s Pakistan Problem ; The incoming national security advisor allegedly shared classified intel with Pakistan’s notoriously compromised security services. What does that mean for Trump's "AfPak" policy?

The citied Washington Post article was titled “Trump’s national security adviser shared secrets without permission, files show” and is datelined December 14. The bitthat deals with the Islamic Republic is as follows:

Former U.S. officials said that Flynn had disclosed sensitive information to Pakistan in late 2009 or early 2010 about secret U.S. intelligence capabilities being used to monitor the Haqqani network, an insurgent group accused of repeated attacks on U.S. forces in Afghanistan.

Flynn exposed the capabilities during meetings with Pakistani officials in Islamabad. The former U.S. intelligence official said a CIA officer who accompanied Flynn reported the disclosures to CIA headquarters, which then relayed the complaint to the Defense Department. Flynn was verbally reprimanded by the Pentagon’s top intelligence official at the time, James R. Clapper Jr.

Clapper subsequently became director of national intelligence and endorsed Flynn to become his successor as director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. In 2014, however, Clapper forced Flynn out of that job over concerns with his temperament and management.

The newly disclosed Army documents state that the 2010 investigation was ordered by the head of U.S. Central Command, which oversees military operations in the Middle East and Afghanistan. Although the records do not say exactly when the case was opened, the commander at the time would have been Marine Gen. James Mattis.

Mattis took charge at Central Command’s headquarters in Tampa, Fla., in August 2010. One month later, Flynn was ordered back to Washington from Afghanistan. He was assigned to a temporary job at the Pentagon as the special assistant to the Army’s chief of intelligence while the investigation unfolded, records show.

Mattis was nominated this month by Trump to serve as secretary of defense. In that role, Mattis will work closely with Flynn; the retired generals are expected to be the most influential voices on national security in the Trump administration.

The Army documents that summarize the investigation into Flynn do not specify which countries he was accused of improperly sharing secrets with.


From here:

Trump’s national security adviser shared secrets without permission, files show

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby panduranghari » 22 Dec 2016 15:14

arun wrote:Clarification on comment by Russia’s envoy to Islamabad Alexey Y Dedov on CPEC which was quoted by Radio Pakistan via Press Attache of Russian Embassy in Islamabad, Vyacheslav Sentyurin.

Russia Rejects Reports of Involvement in China Pakistan Economic Corridor

.



This rejection of a report after a report has been published seems very unlike Putin's Russia. They would keep their mouth shut either way is usual Russian behaviour. There seems to be more to this and perhaps Russia is making overtures towards Pakistan.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 28 Dec 2016 06:55

I wonder what the PRC Spokesperson meant when she said “The UN Security Council has explicit regulations on whether India can develop ballistic missiles capable of carrying nuclear weapons.”?:

Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hua Chunying's Regular Press Conference on December 27, 2016
2016/12/27

Q: Further to India's successful test of a continental ballistic missile yesterday that can reach most part of Asia and Europe, I would like to have your reaction.

A: We have noted reports on India's test fire of Agni-V ballistic missile. The UN Security Council has explicit regulations on whether India can develop ballistic missiles capable of carrying nuclear weapons. China always maintains that preserving the strategic balance and stability in South Asia is conducive to peace and prosperity of regional countries and beyond.

We also notice reports, including some from India and Japan, speculating whether India made this move to counter China. They need to ask the Indian side for their intention behind the move. On the Chinese part, China and India have reached an important consensus that the two countries are not rivals for competition but partners for cooperation as two significant developing countries and emerging economies. China is willing to work alongside regional countries including India to maintain the long-lasting peace, stability and prosperity of the region. We also hope that relevant media can report in an objective and sensible manner and do more things to contribute to the mutual trust between China and India and regional peace and stability.

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