Indian Foreign Policy

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pankajs
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pankajs » 30 Jun 2018 14:50

The guy who advocates "strategic patience" has a given a verdict based on "6 months" performance even if one agrees with his whole premise ?!! :shock: Where is the "patience" to let the "strategy" flower? :rotfl:

When I had written about "strategic patience" in India vs China context I was thinking of 2050 i.e. over about 30+ years. Even if Mr. Modi was the most brilliant "strategic" thinker we wouldn't see the needle move in less than 5 years let alone in 6 months.

Even Mian Musharraf took more than 6 months to plan and execute his "tactical" brilliance in Kargil. If this is the level of our "public intellectuals" God save India ONLY God CAN save India.

I don't know how many Indians feel that India is "punching above" its weight. I certainly don't. Mr. Faker Coupta needs to do a lot more introspection before he again ventures to write such crap.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 01 Jul 2018 08:28

Please read Sekhar Gupta's " Losing one country at a time...", a scathing indictment of the foreign policy techniques of the current dispensation who have got the bull by the horns and the cow by the proverbial "udder end".

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Rahul M » 01 Jul 2018 09:14

more like coupta can't tell one end of the proverbial cow from another. that's the most childish foreign policy analysis I have read, even MK Bhadrakumar makes more sense.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 01 Jul 2018 09:23

Coupta's points about the US once more jumping into the Paki charpoy on Afghanistan are hard facts.Anyone on BRF could've told our MEA mandarins never to trust the US "punishing" Pak.The intel agencies of both countries are too closely bound by the dirty tricks they've collaborated on for over half a century.Unfortunately the Modi regime have invested too much in the "tilt" towards the US in expectation of great results.The speed, within 24 hours of the canning of the "2+2" dialogue , by the DAC clearing the S-400 deal shows that finally we are learning thd bitter truth of a few years of failed diplomacy.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Pulikeshi » 01 Jul 2018 11:52

^^^Indian Foriegn Policy challenges and opportunities are immense. You opinion above is merely just an singular dimensional pursuit of your camp. :roll:
Kudos for being consistently parochial, but try not to push it as what’s in India’s interest.
India has and needs to be her own vamp! She pays good money for the services rendered by other soup powers! :P

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Vips » 01 Jul 2018 17:46

Philip wrote:Please read Sekhar Gupta's " Losing one country at a time...", a scathing indictment of the foreign policy techniques of the current dispensation who have got the bull by the horns and the cow by the proverbial "udder end".


Ha Ha relying on someone's column who once speculated and insinuated then Indian Army chief V K Singh of planning a coup against the Congress government in 2012. Who came out in his support post that news report? Congress Spokesperson Manish Tewari. Now connect the dots......

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pratik » 01 Jul 2018 17:58

Not sure if this is the correct thread. But why Indian Navy is missing in action when our neighbor Thailand is in real need of help.

I strongly believe that it is a good collaboration and learning opportunity to win Thailand and Thai people for our future super power ambition.

What happened?
Local football team of 11-14 years old with their coach is in cave for last 8-days and the entrance is flooded due to rain. It is 8-days and rescue is continuing. US, Australia, England all are working collaboratively with thai navy seals. India should be there as well.

More info:
https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general/1495194/seal-divers-push-deeper-into-cave?utm_source=bangkopost.com&utm_medium=article_news&utm_campaign=most_recent_bottom_box

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby dinesha » 03 Jul 2018 18:25

Why Shekhar Gupta is wrong on Modi’s foreign policy
https://theprint.in/opinion/why-shekhar ... icy/77858/

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby dinesha » 06 Jul 2018 21:46

Why white papers matter
They allow a state to craft its signals carefully. India should take a leaf from China’s book.
https://indianexpress.com/article/opini ... inas-book/

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Trikaal » 07 Jul 2018 06:40

dinesha wrote:Why Shekhar Gupta is wrong on Modi’s foreign policy
https://theprint.in/opinion/why-shekhar ... icy/77858/

Scathing, point by point rebuttal. It's good that people like Shekhar Gupta are being openly called out on their b*****t.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby JohnTitor » 09 Jul 2018 09:51

I'm not sure this is the right thread but I couldn't find anywhere more appropriate.

https://www.firstpost.com/india/rabinde ... 1.html/amp

Looks like he got what he deserved. Died a broke and homeless man, excellent news. I hope the MEA and RAW in particular drill this story into the heads of their staff.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Austin » 10 Jul 2018 11:15

India must resist diktats from US on Iran, Russia
What is wrong with the United States? Why is it issuing “sanction threats” to all and sundry? Why is it pressuring India against buying crude oil from Iran and the S-400 missile defence system from Russia? Such crude “gunboat diplomacy” by this superpower is saddening. Indeed, it is time for India to stand up and tell the US to keep away from meddling in the affairs of sovereign India, which is neither a part of the Western bloc nor a colony of any foreign power. India must tell the US that it comprises 1.3 billion heads, and is not an island state of 60,000 or even six million that can be easily bullied. India reserves the right to purchase its crude oil from wherever it gets the best price in the open market, and has every right to take care of its economic and security system in accordance with its needs.

These threats by Washington only shows the acute sense of insecurity that it seems to be suffering from. Does it feel threatened by those who may not be in tune with its diktats? If that happens to be the case, then New Delhi must advise Washington to not become a victim of an avoidable, self-created and self-inflicted state of tension, that could easily lead to costly mistakes. Indeed, India should take its cue from Bruce Riedel, a former senior adviser to four US Presidents on the Middle East and South Asia, and show that Washington should take note of India’s concerns and not aimlessly fire in the air. It’s time to prove the US wrong to establish a favourable counter-point of diplomacy vis-a-vis the US attempts to thwart India’s sovereign state power.

Bruce Riedel wrote in his book Avoiding Armageddon (2013): “In 1991, Robert Gates, US deputy national security adviser, was meeting Indian Army chief Gen. S.F. Rodrigues, during his visit to Washington... Gates urged India to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)... Rodrigues interrupted Gates almost immediately, asking: ‘Why are you reading me these talking points?... You speak about the importance of the NPT and want us to give up the nuclear option. America is the only country ever to use the bomb on an enemy, and you have built thousands of them. Yet you tell us not to do what you have done! And you give Pakistan F-16s to deliver its nuclear attack on our cities’.”

Hats off to Gen. Rodrigues! He did what most Indian diplomats couldn’t or wouldn’t do, and had the guts and the gumption to tell the truth and show the US deputy NSA the mirror. Riedel’s final words, however, counter-mirrored the Indian government’s perennially inexplicable “softness” towards the US: “The general was simply more passionate in his denunciation and showed the new world order than the mostly soft-spoken Indian diplomats.”

In 1991, the US message was clear. First, it’s the “new world order” of the monopolistic US player. Second, the general was “passionate” in professing his — and India’s — views. He took his job too seriously as he didn’t realise that the US was the boss and all the others pygmies. And third, the general was not the “competent” person to speak about India-US bilateral relations — for, after all, it is the “mostly soft-spoken Indian diplomats” who are authorised to do the serious business of diplomacy. Whether their softness is effective or not is another matter altogether.

Riedel also clearly demonstrated the reality of the Indian establishment — how India has always acted in a weak-kneed manner before the US, except during the 1970s when then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi showed the Richard Nixon-Henry Kissinger duo their place in matters relating to South Asia in general and India’s looming 1971 East Pakistan-Bangladesh crisis in particular. In reality, the US still gives the impression that it lives by the old adage — “once the boss, always the boss, come what may”. That’s fine in a structured government hierarchy and in the military, but not in international relations and human behaviour. Should every nation follow each and every command coming from the United States? Is it even possible for an independent, sovereign country of 1.3 billion people like India to do so repeatedly?

It’s time for India to firmly question the US and seek answers from it. What does India do if Russia, the sole supplier of almost 70 per cent of our military hardware, threatens or disrupts the India-Russia joint venture and other supply chains, and switches over to a Sino-Pakistani-Iranian axis and takes to Dhaka, Kabul, Kathmandu, Colombo and Male by storm? To snatch them away from the South Asian ambience to that of anti-India hardliners?

It is really surprising that leaders and decision-makers in the United States, that is regarded as the best place to study and understand geopolitics-economics-strategy and international relations owing to its many quality institutions and erudite scholars, speak and act in a childish, unprofessional, undiplomatic and threatening manner. No country should bend to such unethical posturing of a so-called global superpower.

However, the US knows well the soft spots of some ruling class members of developing nations rather too well. Their children love to go to the US for studies, professional work and to settle. The “green card” and long-term visas are magnets for the ruling class of developing nations. For many, the US is still the El Dorado, the promised land! From all this emerges the strength of the superpower and the weakness of other nations. So much so that even China, the second-ranking $11,226-trillion economy (after America’s $18,037-trillion economy) in the world had to submit to Washington when Chinese President Xi Jinping personally rang up US President Donald Trump to save the Hans’ pride ZTE company from extinction, that would lead to a huge loss for China’s nascent economics and engineering.

If the United States, that has military forces deployed in at least 65 designated destinations across the globe, ceaselessly resorts to such threats, it shows serious faultlines of decay and disenchantment within. That is not good news for anyone, neither its friends nor foes.

India needs to stand up and be counted; and not look weak, vacillating, compromising and benevolent in a narrow sense like that of Delhi Sultan Firoze Tughlaq (1351-1388), who signalled “after me, the deluge”

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pankajs » 10 Jul 2018 13:36

https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-ne ... rxiEK.html
India will adopt a three-pronged strategy to check China influence
One ambassador, according to the third official, laid out the border context and emphasised that Beijing had given up its defensive posture and was aiming for a ‘Pax Sinica’, indicating its ambitions of hegemony. “India has to recognise this and make a choice accordingly,” the official said.

After listening to all the presentations, Swaraj said - according to both the first and second official - that Delhi’s focus must not be on competing with China on resources.
If this wasn't about India, I would be rolling on the floor.

Jeff M. Smith @Cold_Peace_

India will adopt a three-pronged approach to counter China’s growing role in South Asia/Indian Ocean: "track Beijing’s activities carefully; pursue its own projects and commitments; educate and advise neighbors on the consequences of engaging with China."
Ananth Krishnan @ananthkrishnan

But none of these three prongs is new in any way, and I've heard officials speak about this for years (even pre-OBOR). Educating neighbours hasn't been very effective so far--as they often have no alternative-- and the condescension that "we know better" seems to be resented.https://twitter.com/Cold_Peace_/status/ ... 5072168960

Experience is the best teacher. Nothing else brings it home like experience.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby ArjunPandit » 10 Jul 2018 15:25

^^^lure of $$ makes one forget even the past experience, especially when one is corrupt

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 10 Jul 2018 18:45

India readies its prospectors as hunt begins for lithium and cobalt mines abroad - Rakhi Majumdar, Economic Times
India is scrambling to acquire lithium and cobalt mines abroad, along with other resources, to ensure that it has access to such strategic minerals, with China having already taken a substantial lead in the race, much in the manner that it has done so in oil and gas.

Lithium and cobalt are critical elements in batteries that power mobile phones, laptops and electric vehicles, the centerpiece of future transport solutions. The global race for these minerals is intensifying in the wake of the growing use of such vehicles.

The Indian government has directed three state-owned mineral companies to team up for the task, said Anil Kumar Nayak, joint secretary in the mines ministry.

“The joint venture partners are National Aluminium Company (Nalco), Hindustan Copper (HCL) and Mineral Exploration Corp. Ltd (MECL),” he said. “It can also invite private sector companies who are interested to participate in it.” Nalco is the lead partner. The proposal is currently with the Niti Ayog, which will conduct due diligence before it can be formalised.

“There are a few approvals needed before the joint venture can be operationalised,” he said. “However, once this is done, India can access raw material abroad.”

The venture’s main mandate will be to look for and acquire strategic mineral assets abroad, particularly those in which India is deficient.

The move — likely to be formalised along the lines of ONGC Videsh, which buys oil and gas assets abroad — will help the country build a strategic reserve of key minerals.

India has no known sources of lithium and cobalt and access to them is critical to the success of its plan to convert most of its vehicles to electric power in about a decade or so.

With China well ahead in the pursuit of such minerals, especially in Africa, the public sector units have been tasked to actively scout for and acquire assets on a war footing.

“The modalities of the venture will be worked out later, but the joint venture could partner Indian mining companies or join hands with local mining entities abroad,” Nayak said.

A similar model was tried out a few years back in the bid for acquiring iron ore assets in Hajigak, Afghanistan, through a consortium of state and private players. However, the project failed to materialise due to security concerns in that region.

Possible sources of lithium include the Congo in Africa and Latin American countries such as Argentina, Bolivia and Chile — the latter is referred to as the lithium triangle. The Congo is the leading producer of cobalt. “India has now taken the initiative and we want to take it forward,” Nayak said.

HCL chairman Santosh Sharma said, “We are part of the initiative that is being taken by the government to build up assets in strategic minerals like lithium and cobalt.”

The search will include rare earth elements that are much in demand for applications in defence and space technology but are not found in India.

“Given India’s large population and stage of economic development with respect to its need for renewable energy and efficient automotive transportation, it is time for us to develop an appropriate strategy to find and access these minerals which are critical for our development,” said Anjani Agrawal, global leader, steel, E&Y. “A similar model for coal did not yield much of a result. This time hopefully this model may work."

A spike in demand for lithium has fuelled interest in mining of the metal in countries such as Bolivia, which has one-fourth of the world’s reserves. It has reached out to nations like India for exploration and extraction of the metal and manufacture of value-added products.

India’s requirement of lithium is expected to be 350,000 tonnes per year according to auto industry estimates, with companies like Suzuki India planning to manufacture lithium-ion batteries in India. A recent Metal Bulletin report said the world’s largest producers of the substance feel a shortage of lithium battery-grade compounds will endure in 2018 and years to come.

Chinese imports of cobalt from the Congo, the world’s biggest producer of the mineral, was around $1.2 billion in the first nine months of 2017, compared with $3.2 million by India, the second-largest importer, according to a recent Wall Street Journal report. The Congo accounts for nearly 54% of the world’s cobalt supplies.

Analysts say few commodities have witnessed such a dramatic rise in demand as cobalt which is essentially a byproduct of copper and nickel mining. Global cobalt production has quadrupled since 2000 to about 123,000 metric tons a year, according to the US Geological Survey.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby souravB » 11 Jul 2018 00:50

Great discussion. Need of the hour.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Rudradev » 12 Jul 2018 02:39

Kanwal Sibal on Modi's Pragmatic Foreign Policy

http://epaper.mailtoday.in/1730117/Mail ... 66667:1320

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby chetak » 12 Jul 2018 07:00

pratik wrote:Not sure if this is the correct thread. But why Indian Navy is missing in action when our neighbor Thailand is in real need of help.

I strongly believe that it is a good collaboration and learning opportunity to win Thailand and Thai people for our future super power ambition.

What happened?
Local football team of 11-14 years old with their coach is in cave for last 8-days and the entrance is flooded due to rain. It is 8-days and rescue is continuing. US, Australia, England all are working collaboratively with thai navy seals. India should be there as well.

More info:
https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general/1495194/seal-divers-push-deeper-into-cave?utm_source=bangkopost.com&utm_medium=article_news&utm_campaign=most_recent_bottom_box


There Was An Indian Connection In Thailand Cave Rescue Operations Which Saved 13 People


'Made In India' Water Pumps Were Used For Clearing Way To Rescue 13 People From Thai Cave

Shweta Sengar July 11,

The daring Thailand cave rescue mission in the treacherous confines of a Thai cave met a successful end yesterday, saving a total of thirteen people, a football team of 12 young boys and their coach.

Experts from a Pune-headquartered firm gave technical support in the operations to rescue the football team trapped inside a cave system in Thailand. Kirloskar Brothers' Limited's ‘dewatering’ pumps were used in the rescue operations upon the recommendation of Indian Embassy to Thai authorities.

The company sent teams from its offices in Indian, Thailand and the United Kingdom to the site.

Kirloskar’s experts were on the site at the cave in Tham Luang since July 5 and offered, "Technical know-how and advice on dewatering and pumps involved in the rescue operation," said a KBL release.

KBL had also offered to provide four specialised high capacity Autoprime dewatering pumps, which were kept ready at Kirloskarvadi plant in Maharashtra to be airlifted to Thailand, said the release

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 12 Jul 2018 14:27

Spiritual dimension of ‘Act East’ policy - G.Parthasarathy, Business Line
India’s eastern neighbourhood unfortunately received relatively little bilateral diplomatic attention in the years immediately following Independence. India had then focussed attention on moves for freedom from British/European colonial rule, with a somewhat exaggerated belief that it played a significant global role in the ‘Cold War’.{We also rejected the request from Lee Kuan Yew to develop a security relationship}

Moreover, with New Delhi choosing to adopt a path of “self-reliance” and “import substitution”, the prospects of playing any meaningful role in foreign investments and trade, were sharply limited. There was a relatively limited Indian contribution, in security and economic development, across its eastern shores.

Things changed significantly in the 1990s after the end of the ‘Cold War’. Prime Minister Narasimha Rao set India on a path of renewing ancient trade and economic links with countries across its eastern shores, with a new “Look East” policy.

This was in close consultation with countries like Singapore, which we had virtually ignored, for decades.

Interestingly, Narasimha Rao was India’s first Prime Minister hailing from an eastern coastal State, who was not, therefore, so exclusively focussed on security threats, from across our land borders.

He realised that our eastern neighbourhood, extending beyond Malacca to Vietnam, Japan, China and South Korea, was becoming the economically fastest growing region globally.

Increasing integration

Over the last three decades, our economy has been increasingly integrated with economies across our entire eastern neighbourhood, including the 10 members of ASEAN, apart from South Korea and Japan. Trade and investment ties and regional connectivity are expanding. Three partners in South Asia — Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh — are an integral part of this process, through the BIMSTEC.

These developments are only natural, as trade with India’s eastern neighbours from Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Thailand to Srivijaya (Indonesia) and beyond, had flourished for centuries, before colonial rule. But, these ties can and should be made enduring, by reinforcing trade and investment, with a spiritual dimension, arising from the huge influence in our eastern neighbourhood, of the teachings and message of Lord Gautama Buddha.

The message of Lord Buddha spread beyond India’s borders, particularly eastwards, through Sri Lanka to Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia and Laos. It followed the abhorrence and renunciation of war, by Emperor Ashoka, after the bloodletting in the Kalinga conflict.

The abiding impact of the message of Lord Buddha is evident from the fact that the estimated population of Buddhists worldwide in 2010 was around 480 million. The present Buddhist population could be estimated at around 540 million. Out of the 480 million Buddhists worldwide in 2010, 244 million were in China, 45.8 million in Japan, 64.4 million in Thailand, 38.4 million in Myanmar, 14.3 million Vietnam, 11.05 million in South Korea and 14.2 million in Sri Lanka. Laos, Mongolia, Malaysia, and the Philippines have Buddhist populations of well over one million, while the US is home to nearly four million Buddhists.

India has never seriously considered how to leverage the abiding spiritual ties it has with the people of neighbouring Buddhist countries. India ignored how imaginatively building tourist facilities in areas of Buddhist pilgrimage would benefit it, boosting tourism revenues, by facilitating the quest of Buddhists worldwide for salvation, in the Land of the Buddha. It also appeared to ignore the fact that such tourism would enable it to develop abiding relationships, across its eastern shores. We also appear to forget that tourists from our East are now considered bigger spenders than their western counterparts.

An unpleasant task

Tourists from Buddhist countries often find visiting India a difficult, if not unpleasant, experience. I was saddened when Sri Lankan ladies spoke to me about the absence of adequate toilet facilities in Bodh Gaya. Foreign visitors to Bodh Gaya and other Buddhist sites face other shortcomings too, such as rip-offs by taxis, absence of expressways to major tourist destinations, absence of suitable hotel accommodation, and harassment by beggars.

Given the wide range of tourists who could visit the pilgrimage centres, all major destinations for potential Buddhist tourism should have a wide variety of hotels/hospitals available. Tourist sites are not well connected by road, rail and air. Bhubaneswar does not have the necessary air connectivity with Sarnath and Bodh Gaya.

Given the immense long term diplomatic and economic benefits of building up viable Buddhist tourism circuits in India, it’s necessary to integrate our domestic efforts with a diplomatic drive to seek the participation, involvement and investment of Buddhist countries in a cooperative effort for building integrated Buddhist circuits for domestic and foreign tourism in India. Most notably, the involvement of China, Japan, South Korea, ASEAN and South Asian neighbours — Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Nepal — is imperative. Governments of States like UP, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Gujarat and Odisha would also have to participate actively in this effort. Any Buddhist tourism circuit would necessarily involve emphasis on a link to Lumbini in Nepal, where Lord Buddha was born.

Moreover, Buddhist countries should be welcomed to make their architectural and aesthetic contributions, including exhibitions, for displaying their own cultural and spiritual heritage, in Buddhist tourism destinations in India.

Strengthening the connect

Having visited, lived in and worked with Buddhist countries one can assert that India is respected there primarily, because it is home of Gautama Buddha and Emperor Ashoka, who spread the Sakya Muni’s message of renunciation and peace across the world. But, for people to connect with the country that gave birth to that message, it is imperative that we not only welcome them for worship, but also make them feel that we are inviting them to join us in showcasing their own contributions to spreading the message of Lord Buddha, which emanated from the soil of India. Exhibitions and exhibits of how Buddhist teachings are observed across these countries, together with their investments for development of the infrastructure for promoting Buddhist tourism, should be welcomed and adorn the landscape of Buddhist centres in India. The message should be that India wishes to welcome more pilgrims from them.

The Department of Tourism has imaginatively drawn up three distinct tourism circuits (“Dharma Yatra” or the “Sacred Circuit”) for visits to Buddhist pilgrimage places. With around 500 million Buddhists living beyond our borders, primarily to our east, it is imperative that, as the focal point of Buddhist heritage and spirituality, our “Act East” interactions with our eastern neighbours, are imaginative and sensitive.

The writer is a former High Commissioner to Pakistan.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby pankajs » 30 Jul 2018 17:54

This is how a good foreign policy is conducted where you look at the long-term self-interest even while facing adverse situations. Ups and downs are part and parcel of diplomacy. It is never black and white but shades of grey depending on many many factors. Too many commentators in India want black and white zones clearly defined.

https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/politics ... old-friend
Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad to be greeted like ‘old friend’ in Beijing despite suspension of major projects
Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad will be welcomed as an “old friend” of China when he visits President Xi Jinping next month, according to Daim Zainuddin, the 93-year-old leader’s special envoy to Beijing.

The two governments have accelerated preparatory work for the highly anticipated meeting. Guo Yezhou, a senior official of the Chinese Communist Party, met Mahathir on Sunday, ahead of a scheduled visit by Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi on Tuesday. Mahathir is due to visit the Chinese capital in August, although the dates of his visit have yet to be finalised.

High-level talks between diplomatic officials from both sides have been underway in Malaysia since Friday, before Wang’s visit en route to a meeting of regional foreign ministers in Singapore.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 03 Sep 2018 08:40

Root out terror: BIMSTEC - PTI
Describing terrorism as a “great threat” to international peace and security, India and six other BIMSTEC nations on Friday called for identifying and holding accountable states and non-state entities that encourage, support or finance terrorism, provide sanctuaries to terrorists and falsely extol their virtues.

The BIMSTEC (Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation) is a regional grouping comprising India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Bhutan and Nepal.

The Kathmandu Declaration issued at the end of the two-day fourth BIMSTEC summit, attended by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, deplored terror attacks in all parts of the world, including in BIMSTEC countries, and stressed that there could be no justification for any act of terrorism.

“Today’s [Friday] proceedings at the BIMSTEC Summit were extremely productive. We built on the ground covered yesterday [Thursday] and reiterated our commitment to further strengthen multilateral cooperation in diverse areas,” Mr. Modi said.


Great threat

“Terrorism and transnational organised crimes continue to pose a great threat to international peace and security including in the BIMSTEC countries,” the declaration said.

The unanimously adopted declaration said the “fight against terrorism should target not only terrorists, terror organisations and networks but also identify and hold accountable states and non-state entities that encourage, support or finance terrorism, provide sanctuaries to terrorists and terror groups and falsely extol their virtues.”

The declaration did not name any specific country, but Pakistan is often accused by its neighbours, including India, of providing safe havens to terrorists.

The declaration underlined the importance of multidimensional connectivity, which promotes synergy among connectivity frameworks in the region, as a key enabler to economic integration for shared prosperity.

An MoU was signed on establishment of the BIMSTEC Grid Interconnection. “The MoU provides for optimisation of using energy resources in the region & promotion of efficient & secure operation of power system,” External Affairs Ministry spokesperson Raveesh Kumar tweeted.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 06 Sep 2018 08:41

India backs Mauritius’ claim over UK-ruled Chagos Islands - Indrani Bagchi, ToI
India weighed in on behalf of Mauritius at the International Court of Justice (ICJ), The Hague, saying the Chagos archipelago in the Indian Ocean – which is currently ruled by the UK and operates US’ Diego Garcia military base – “has been and continues to be with Mauritius.”

After the UN General Assembly voted overwhelmingly in favour of a legal opinion to the question of sovereignty of the islands, the ICJ has taken up the case to deliver an advisory opinion, which will not be legally binding. Of the 22 countries which are giving their legal opinion, the UK is supported by the US, Australia and Israel, while Mauritius is being supported by 17 countries, including India.

India’s ambassador, Venu Rajamony, who presented the Indian opinion, said "the historical survey of facts … indicates that the Chagos Archipelago throughout the pre- and post-colonial era has been part of the Mauritian territory. These islands came under the colonial administration of the United Kingdom as part of Mauritian territory.”

While India stayed true to its commitment to its Indian Ocean neighbour Mauritius, as well as its anti-colonial credentials, there is some irony in the fact that after signing the LEMOA with the US in 2016, India can actually access Diego Garcia for some of its uses.
That itself has led to some interest in India’s opinion, particularly as the UK and US have reached out to India for support. The Indian opinion was also made the day before the first high-level dialogue between India and US here [New Delhi] tomorrow {first high level dialogue between India and the US? :) She is referring to 2+2 Dialogue}.

A statement by the Indian government observed, “The Arbitral Tribunal constituted by agreement between Mauritius and UK in its Award dated 18 March 2015, ruled that the undertakings of the United Kingdom with respect to the fishing rights of Mauritius in the waters of Chagos Archipelago; the eventual return of the Archipelago to Mauritius and; the benefit of mineral and oil resources in and near the Archipelago, are legally binding undertakings. Further, by declaring as legally binding the undertaking of the United Kingdom to return the Archipelago to Mauritius, the Award has determined the legal obligation of the United Kingdom to return the Archipelago to Mauritius.”

Once the Chagos was unilaterally annexed by the UK in 1968, the Islanders were evicted in groups from their homes. Many of them ended up in the UK and filed cases against the British government demanding the right to return.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby nvishal » 06 Sep 2018 10:41

The Diego Garcia base is against Indian interests. Without that base, India would have ended the Pakistan nuisance in 1971 itself.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby sum » 06 Sep 2018 12:14

Wasnt the TF 74 which threatened India sent out from Phillipines?

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 08 Sep 2018 07:33

Nepal ends Indian monopoly on transit, with access to Chin ports even though they're thousands of KMs away.A huge snub to India.TOI today.

Not too long ago, I advised a serving high-ranking diplomat of ours to allow Nepal an SEZ attached to a port in India, preferably in Bengal, on long lease.Somewhat similar to what China enjoys in Sri Lanka.This would facilitate Nepalese trade more easily giving them autonomous operations under our overall security.He said it was an excellent idea and would pursue it in the MEA.
However, our MEA operates at a cosmic speed, where the stars seem to be permanently fixed in the firmament and only occasionally seem to move! While our MEA slept- this could've been a handsome gift to PM Oli when he last visited us, the Chins have taken up , or were thinking on similar lines of the idea which I remember posting on BRF last year! No wonder China is racing ahead of us diplomatically in our own backyard.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Trikaal » 08 Sep 2018 07:56

^Let nepalese trade through China. If they love china so much, let's close the border and they can trade using chinese ports. Let's see how long it takes before transportation costs break their backs and brings them running back to us.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Vips » 08 Sep 2018 17:57

Geography has ensured any Nepalese/Chinese attempt to leverage each other vis-a-vis trade to make us do anything against our will and interests is simply not feasible. Again geography suits us or else our Babudom would only do its part in giving advantage to the other side.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby chetak » 08 Sep 2018 20:42

The "educated" nepalese are mostly anti India. Their constant refrain is the "big brother" syndrome which they claim is the root cause of all their troubles.

They are playing us against the cheeni for maximum benefits for themselves without conceding anything at all to India.

We have financial and security limitations that kick in well before the cheeni limitations kick in and so it is a no contest. We should stop trying to piss against the wind and try to keep what we have, ie cultural ties.

We made a major mistake by allowing the communists there to unseat the monarchy and grab power. We will continue to pay heavily for our fatal foolishness for the foreseeable future.

For now, and for our own security, strict border controls have become inescapable. we should implement this quickly.

The nepalese army, polity and their internal security apparatus are riddled with ISI stooges who believe that they are getting their own revenge on India after decades of "Indian exploitation".

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 09 Sep 2018 23:59

BK's latest book.
" Staggering forward".Narendra Modi and India's global ambition.
Review xcpts:
"Candidate Modi roared like a tiger, as PM he has been a purring kitten when dealing with big cats".

Long before Modi arrived, the reviewer says, BK was an adherent to a " muscular India", advocating staring down China, using force against recalcitrant neighbours who didn't come to heel, and argued against India's self-imposed moratorium on nuclear testing.

BK in the book says that we have two blind spots in our foreign policy.The US and China.We have been overly deferential and accommodating with the US and not stern enough with China.In his criticism of the Modi foreign policy however, he is an even harsher critic of his predecessors.

My take: The PM has made a huge outreach worldwide promoting India's interests.His visits to many forgotten important nations by our MEA have generated a very favourable impression of India abroad as a country on the go, looking forward striving to be an economic giant and major military power for peace and stability in the IOR region primarily.

Where this pro-active policy has floundered is in our very own neighbourhood with the exception of Bangladesh.Piddly little Maldives ruled by a despot has the Chins firmly entrenched there when the entire country was calling for Indian intervention.Our Nepalese for. pol. has been an unmitigated disaster. Relations with Pak have further deteriorated and we have not stopped China from its perpetual attempts to ingress into Indian territory.In fact even diplomatically our MEA appears terrified of China by swallowing the insults of stapled visas for Indian citizens visiting China from Ar.Pradesh and Kashmir.

I agree with BK that we've tilted too much towards the US and the signing of LEMOA and COMCASA a great error which we will rue bitterly in years to come.We are not the US's " rent- boy" replacement for Pak in the region, but that appears to be the very ambition that some of our for. policy makers want us to be! Contrast this with our ties with the USSR and Russia over decades.At no time ever did Russia demand such intrusive protocols, threaten sanctions or impose their military personnel to be based in India as the US is demading now for a few items of weaponry, that too meant mainly to be used against China
by inter-meshing our armed forces into the US's mil. machind which will in the future allow them to use us seamlessly like a servile mercenary force .We are compromising hugely in our sovereignty and independent foreign policy by hitching our wagon to the retreating army of Uncle Sam globally and to our detriment.

They say that every action has its equal and opposite reaction.China has said today that in the aftermath of India signing COMCASA with the US, " Pak is our iron brother " always a priority and its " all- weather strategic cooperative partner".As India succumbs to American diktat, it only cements further the military and strategic ties between China and Pak and widens the ties between India and Russia, ties that allowed us to dismember Pak in ' 71 and massively modernise and expand our military muscle during and after the Cold War with its latest weaponry at affordable cost as well as its considerable diplomatic support of Indian interests and over J& K.
It will be very interesting to see the Russian reaction to our latest strategic shift , further into the US's military campsite when Pres. Putin arrives .

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby SSridhar » 11 Sep 2018 07:00

Africa should not become theatre of rivalry: Sushma Swaraj - Kallol Bhattacherjee, The Hindu
Africa should not become a playground for rival world powers, the External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj said here [New Dehi] on Monday. Welcoming an agreement between the Ministry of External Affairs and Telecommunications Consultants India Ltd (TCIL) to launch an e-network project, the minister reiterated that India will intensify diplomatic presence in Africa and work to safeguard the oceans.

“India’s vision of Indian Ocean Security is cooperative and inclusive, rooted in security and growth for all in the region. We must all work together to ensure that Africa does not once again turn into a theatre of rival ambitions, but becomes a nursery for the aspirations of Africa’s youth,” Ms Swaraj said inaugurating the second phase of the pan-Africa e-network.

Monday’s agreement signed will facilitate two schemes – eVidyaBharati and eArogyaBharati – that will benefit African citizens seeking education and health facilities. Ms Swaraj said that the programmes will provide telemedicine and tele-education benefits to African nationals.

The minister described the tele-medicine and tele-education network as the second phase of India-Africa digital partnership. As part of this, the e-VidyaBharati and eArogyaBharati projects will increase ease of access for students, doctors and other beneficiary groups aimed by the projects.

Ms. Swaraj pointed out that the Government has decided to open 18 new diplomatic missions in Africa that will intensify coordination on crucial issues of common interest like security and counter terror and said, “Our government has put Africa at the top of India’s foreign policy priorities. This is reflected in our actions: in the last four years, there have been 26 visits to African countries at the level of President, Vice President and Prime Minister apart from several Ministerial visits.

India has been pushing for deeper diplomatic engagement with Africa and during his recent visit to Uganda, Prime Minister Narendra Modi laid down the renewed vision. Sushma Swaraj emphasised the “Bridge of Brotherhood” that exists between the two sides since the era of anti-colonial struggle and pledged continuation of similar ties.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby dinesh_kimar » 11 Sep 2018 19:48

^
Wow, our rulers are smart.

Instead of aiming for export success and arms sales (automobiles like Renault Duster, Bajaj Pulsar, liquor, medicine , Levis jeans.) and arms like Navy ships, FAL Rifles, ammo, backpacks, uniforms, etc. which will definitely do well in Africa (they know and like these products, lower costs from India wont hurt), Shushma wants to open 18 Missions (with Support staff and baggage) and patrol the oceans.

The first option spells "WORK" while the other keeps the Department and everyone busy, benefits the fat cats of Ext. Affairs ministry and continues to shaft the country.

She has let herself off the hook.

Bajaj Pulsar sales in Africa need deep ToT from Ext. Affairs ministry to negotiate favourable concessions with their African counterparts. (Fat chance this will happen under Sushma. Our largest exports are IT products, where the czars negotiate directly with the client.)

My understanding is China cloned the Pulsar as "Gulsar" and have sold many in Africa.

Sushma is adopting a no risk strategy. No risk equals no mistakes. Perhaps she has Prime Ministerial ambitions. And what about the fate of our country, may I ask ?

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Philip » 12 Sep 2018 11:23

Is this really Chanakian cunning,as the Chins allege or accommodating everyone,by throwing money at their wares? Frankly,COMCASA is a big win for the US.Our buying oil from Iran and weapons from Russia is really no great deal compared to entering our battlespace to influence our mil. strategy.
http://www.defencenews.in/article/India ... dia-570521
India Playing Double Game with China, Russia and US : Chinese Media
Wednesday, September 12, 2018
By: Eurasian Times

The Chinese media have accused India of playing a “Double Game” with China, Russia and the US to get benefits from all the three sides. While the US has adopted stiff sanctions against Iran and Russia which has affected almost everyone, but India has managed to get the best of both the worlds, according to Chinese Media Global Times.

According to Chinese Media, the two plus two dialogue between the US and India took place in New Delhi, during which US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary James Mattis held talks with their Indian counterparts – External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj and Defense Minister Nirmala Sitharaman, over a variety of issues including bilateral defence cooperation, US sanctions against Iran and India’s purchase of Russian S-400 air defence system.

Prior to the dialogue, experts believed that the US demand to halt India’s oil imports from Iran and purchase of Russian S-400 air defence system would thwart US-India defence partnership. Surprisingly, Washington made concessions on both these issues. An important step forward, the US and India signed the Communications Compatibility and Security Agreement (COMCASA), and agreed to hold joint exercises involving the air force, navy and the army off the eastern Indian coast in 2019.

Even though the two plus two dialogue was postponed twice, but it was finally held demonstrates the urgent needs of both the US and India to deepen strategic defence cooperation. The Logistics Support Agreement, COMCASA, and Basic Exchange and Cooperation Agreement for Geo-spatial Cooperation are the three basic agreements that the US signs to form military alliances with other countries. Now only the third has yet to be signed between the US and India.

The two plus two ministerial dialogue mechanism has long been established between the US and its regional allies such as Japan and Australia. With the establishment of the one between the US and India, it’s anticipated the Japan-India and Australia-India strategic cooperation mechanism will be further upgraded. If so, the formation of a quadrilateral security dialogue comprising the US, Japan, Australia and India is not far away.

One of the main reasons for the formation of the US-India two plus two ministerial dialogue and the inking of the COMCASA is to counterbalance, even contain, China’s rise. The US hopes to form military alliances to confront China and exclude it from the process of globalization as it did with the USSR.

As seen in the interactions between India and the US, there have been more and more convergences between India’s China strategy and the US’ Indo-Pacific strategy. India views China as the principal opponent in the region. It not only aims to counterbalance and contain China with help of US strength but also wants to overtake China. Therefore, enhancing defence cooperation with the US is India’s established strategy.

The past few months have seen a rapprochement in China-India relations and sound interactions between the two. Chinese Defense Minister Wei Fenghe concluded his India visit just several days before the US-India two plus two dialogue. But from the Indian side, this is just a tactical adjustment rather than a strategic one.

After the China-India Doklam standoff, India has been trapped in an awkward situation – relations with China and other neighbouring countries deteriorated; moving closer to the US didn’t exempt it from tariffs imposed by the Trump administration but led to an alienated India-Russia relationship.

The diplomatic predicament unquestionably would negatively affect Indian PM Narendra Modi’s election next year. In such context, Modi recalibrated his diplomatic policy, holding an informal meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Wuhan and Russian President Vladimir Putin in Sochi while keeping a distance with the US at the Shangri-La Dialogue.

This won India diplomatic manoeuvring room and motivated Washington to make concessions over a range of issues in the US-India bilateral relations.


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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Kashi » 12 Sep 2018 12:24

Philip, how do you say COMCASA in Russian?

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Mukesh.Kumar » 12 Sep 2018 12:27

Philip wrote:Is this really Chanakian cunning,as the Chins allege or accommodating everyone,by throwing money at their wares? Frankly,COMCASA is a big win for the US.Our buying oil from Iran and weapons from Russia is really no great deal compared to entering our battlespace to influence our mil. strategy.
http://www.defencenews.in/article/India ... dia-570521
India Playing Double Game with China, Russia and US : Chinese Media
Wednesday, September 12, 2018
By: Eurasian Times

The Chinese media have accused India of playing a “Double Game” with China, Russia and the US to get benefits from all the three sides. While the US has adopted stiff sanctions against Iran and Russia which has affected almost everyone, but India has managed to get the best of both the worlds, according to Chinese Media Global Times.

According to Chinese Media, the two plus two dialogue between the US and India took place in New Delhi, during which US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary James Mattis held talks with their Indian counterparts – External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj and Defense Minister Nirmala Sitharaman, over a variety of issues including bilateral defence cooperation, US sanctions against Iran and India’s purchase of Russian S-400 air defence system.

Prior to the dialogue, experts believed that the US demand to halt India’s oil imports from Iran and purchase of Russian S-400 air defence system would thwart US-India defence partnership. Surprisingly, Washington made concessions on both these issues. An important step forward, the US and India signed the Communications Compatibility and Security Agreement (COMCASA), and agreed to hold joint exercises involving the air force, navy and the army off the eastern Indian coast in 2019.

Even though the two plus two dialogue was postponed twice, but it was finally held demonstrates the urgent needs of both the US and India to deepen strategic defence cooperation. The Logistics Support Agreement, COMCASA, and Basic Exchange and Cooperation Agreement for Geo-spatial Cooperation are the three basic agreements that the US signs to form military alliances with other countries. Now only the third has yet to be signed between the US and India.

The two plus two ministerial dialogue mechanism has long been established between the US and its regional allies such as Japan and Australia. With the establishment of the one between the US and India, it’s anticipated the Japan-India and Australia-India strategic cooperation mechanism will be further upgraded. If so, the formation of a quadrilateral security dialogue comprising the US, Japan, Australia and India is not far away.

One of the main reasons for the formation of the US-India two plus two ministerial dialogue and the inking of the COMCASA is to counterbalance, even contain, China’s rise. The US hopes to form military alliances to confront China and exclude it from the process of globalization as it did with the USSR.

As seen in the interactions between India and the US, there have been more and more convergences between India’s China strategy and the US’ Indo-Pacific strategy. India views China as the principal opponent in the region. It not only aims to counterbalance and contain China with help of US strength but also wants to overtake China. Therefore, enhancing defence cooperation with the US is India’s established strategy.

The past few months have seen a rapprochement in China-India relations and sound interactions between the two. Chinese Defense Minister Wei Fenghe concluded his India visit just several days before the US-India two plus two dialogue. But from the Indian side, this is just a tactical adjustment rather than a strategic one.

After the China-India Doklam standoff, India has been trapped in an awkward situation – relations with China and other neighbouring countries deteriorated; moving closer to the US didn’t exempt it from tariffs imposed by the Trump administration but led to an alienated India-Russia relationship.

The diplomatic predicament unquestionably would negatively affect Indian PM Narendra Modi’s election next year. In such context, Modi recalibrated his diplomatic policy, holding an informal meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Wuhan and Russian President Vladimir Putin in Sochi while keeping a distance with the US at the Shangri-La Dialogue.

This won India diplomatic manoeuvring room and motivated Washington to make concessions over a range of issues in the US-India bilateral relations.



Phillip Sir, we need to look at who is commenting to understand their motivations. Seems more like a case of grapes are sour or trying to disrupt diplomatic initiatives by India or drive us into another paroxysm of "India can do no good." Its the Chinese who have their own interests and trying to further it. Whether Chanakyian or not, we should be satisfied with being able to maintain our diplomatic space.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Vips » 26 Sep 2018 23:33


arun
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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 04 Oct 2018 18:13

X Posted from the Terroristan thread.

Kashi wrote:Pakistan seeks US role for talks with India, gets rejected.

…………………{Rest Snipped}…………………


8) Good to see attempt by the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan aka Terroristan to renege on the 1972 Shimla / Simla Agreement stipulation that there can be no third party mediation in bilateral matters involving India and Terroristan, is peremptorily thwarted by the US who toe India’s line and rebuff Terroristan’s attempt to involve the US as a third party mediator :rotfl: .

Meanwhile NDTV’s take on the same story put out by Economic Times:

For Talks With India, Pakistan Seeks US Help. Gets Rejected Again

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 05 Oct 2018 19:50

X Posted from the India Russia thread.

How times have changed when it comes to being supported against Mohammadden Terrorism emanating from the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan targeting India.Russia cannot bring herself to name the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan and provides India faint support by pussyfooting around without naming the Islamic Republic and makes no mention of Pakistan sponsored terrorist attacks at Mumbai, Pathankot and Uri. On the other hand the US has no such inhibitions in naming and shaming the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan besides explicitly mentioning Pakistan sponsored terrorist attacks at Mumbai, Pathankot and Uri.

Indo Russia Statement dealing with Terrorism:

India-Russia Joint Statement during visit of President of Russia to India (October 05, 2018)
October 05, 2018

India-Russia: an Enduring Partnership in a Changing World …………..

The Sides declared their support to Afghan government’s efforts towards the realization of an Afghan-led, and Afghan-owned national peace reconciliation process. Concerned with the unabated violence and severely undermined security situation in Afghanistan and its adverse effect on the region, the Sides resolved to work through the Moscow Format, SCO Contact Group on Afghanistan, and all other recognized formats for an early resolution to the long-term conflict in Afghanistan, end to terroristviolence, external safe havens and sanctuaries for terrorists and the worsening drug problem in the country. Both Sides called upon the international community to join efforts to thwart any external interference in Afghanistan, to restore its economy, contribute to sustaining peace and security, economic and political development of a stable, secure, united, prosperous and independent Afghanistan. The two Sides will direct their activity to launchjoint development and capacity building projects in Afghanistan. ………………………..

The Sides denounced terrorism in all its forms and manifestations and reiterated the need to combat international terrorism with decisive and collective response without any double standards. The Sides agreed to converge their efforts to eradicate terrorist networks, their sources of financing, arms and fighters supply channels, to counter terrorist ideology, propaganda and recruitment. The Sides condemned all kinds of state support to terrorists including cross border terrorism and providing safe havens to terrorists and their network. Recognizing the importance of adopting the Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism, pending in the United Nations, to become part of the international law, both Sides called upon the international community to make sincere efforts towards its early conclusion. То address the threats of chemical and biological terrorism, the Sides supported and emphasized the need for launching multilateral negotiations at the Conference on Disarmament on an international convention for the suppression of acts of chemical and biological terrorism.

Clicky



For contrast the US Statement that goes hammer and tongs at the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan and names and shames them:

Joint Statement on the Inaugural India-U.S 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue
September 06, 2018 ………………………….

Welcoming the expansion of bilateral counter-terrorism cooperation, the Ministers announced their intent to increase information-sharing efforts on known or suspected terrorists and to implement UN Security Council Resolution 2396 on returning foreign terrorist fighters. They committed to enhance their ongoing cooperation in multilateral fora such as the UN and FATF. They reaffirmed their support for a UN Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism that will advance and strengthen the framework for global cooperation and reinforce the message that no cause or grievance justifies terrorism. The Ministers denounced any use of terrorist proxies in the region, and in this context, they called on Pakistan to ensure that the territory under its control is not used to launch terrorist attacks on other countries. On the eve of the 10-year anniversary of the 26/11 Mumbai attack, they called on Pakistan to bring to justice expeditiously the perpetrators of the Mumbai, Pathankot, Uri, and other cross-border terrorist attacks. The Ministers welcomed the launch of a bilateral dialogue on designation of terrorists in 2017, which is strengthening cooperation and action against terrorist groups, including Al-Qa’ida, ISIS, Lashkar-e-Tayyiba, Jaish-e-Mohammad, Hizb-ul Mujahideen, the Haqqani Network, Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan, D-Company, and their affiliates. The two sides further reaffirmed their commitment to ongoing and future cooperation to ensure a stable cyberspace environment and to prevent cyber-attacks.

Clicky

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby souravB » 05 Oct 2018 20:31

arun wrote:X Posted from the India Russia thread.

How times have changed when it comes to being supported against Mohammadden Terrorism emanating from the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan targeting India.Russia cannot bring herself to name the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan and provides India faint support by pussyfooting around without naming the Islamic Republic and makes no mention of Pakistan sponsored terrorist attacks at Mumbai, Pathankot and Uri. On the other hand the US has no such inhibitions in naming and shaming the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan besides explicitly mentioning Pakistan sponsored terrorist attacks at Mumbai, Pathankot and Uri.
--------snip--_---

Arunji, Russia is still to experience the treacherous vermins called Pakis. Putin would have invaded them for half the things they did with Unkil. Since their interests are being aligned in Afghanistan at the moment, we have plenty of time left to see Putin gifting S-400 to Afghanistan for placing at their eastern borders.
We just need to make sure that we have the Popcorn ready when the time comes.

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby arun » 06 Oct 2018 12:30

X Posted from the India-US Relations thread.

Below is what is purportedly the press statement issued by the US Embassy in New Delhi regards the Indo-Russian S400 deal and CAATSA.

Caveat; It has been extracted from the twitter feed of one Rishikesh Kumar, who identifies himself as a correspondent for Russian media outfit Sputnik (Clicky Twitter):

Image

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Re: Indian Foreign Policy

Postby Malayappan » 08 Oct 2018 10:46

How the Rafale deal was struck

The article by KP Nayar deals more with FP issues. Despite the title it is not about Ambani, Offsets or such matters!
Modi had done his homework. He quoted from cipher telegrams sent by Ranjan Mathai — who was ambassador in Paris — in 2007 after Dassault Aviation placed its bid for 126 medium multi-role combat aircraft in August of that year.

Mishra, who loved good things in life, shared several of those tales with those he trusted on many spirited evenings. Therefore, we know that in the initial days of the Kargil war in 1999, when Pakistanis had a worrying advantage on the heights, the French executed on an emergency footing the adaptation of IAF Mirages to equip them with Israeli laser-guided bombs, which were secretly delivered in Srinagar.

President Jacques Chirac took him on a long walk on the grounds of the Elysee Palace. Chirac said France would stand by India, but advised Mishra that in order to end India’s nuclear winter, he would have to work on the Americans. The rest, as they say, is history


Suggestion: Read it all!


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