Indus Water Treaty

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23758
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SSridhar » 09 Apr 2014 06:04

Peregrine wrote:With over $100 billion cubic metres of fresh water coursing through the surface water channels of the country . . .[/img]

Peregrine ji, I was intrigued by the underlined portion expressing quantity in dollar terms !

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8185
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Indus Water Treaty

Postby Peregrine » 09 Apr 2014 15:10

SSridhar wrote:
Peregrine wrote:With over $100 billion cubic metres of fresh water coursing through the surface water channels of the country . . .[/img]

Peregrine ji, I was intrigued by the underlined portion expressing quantity in dollar terms !


SSridhar :

Having had the benefit of the BR-F Education from esteemed Members one understood that the $ sign is part of the Psyche of the Faithful from the Land of the Pure and Home of the Terrorists.

What realy intrigues me is that INDIA IS NOT BEING BLAMED AT ALL!

What gives?

Cheers Image

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3727
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Vipul » 11 May 2014 14:49

Indus water treaty -India stealing pakistani water.

India is now usurping pakistani ground water by Djinn technology. India giving 1200 Crores every year to to its Indian agents in Pakistan (Bureaucrats and Ministers to prevent Kala bagh dam from being built. Shah, Memon, Durrani all Indian agents!!! All conspiracies onlee which leads to Pakistan letting 60 Billion worth of water flow into sea.
Look at how the so called experts froth in the mouth claiming conspiracies and smile expectantly at the mention of a decisive war with India for water!!! Thank God we were partitioned in 1947 otherwise these morons would have been part of India.

chetak
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20569
Joined: 16 May 2008 12:00

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby chetak » 11 May 2014 18:20

Peregrine wrote:SSridhar Ji :

This is the first Article from a Pakistani writer not blaming India for Pakistan’s Water Shortages – What gives?

From water scarcity to surplus

The issue of increasing water scarcity in the country is being raised frequently. With deficit irrigation in agriculture, urban water shortages and inadequate access to safe drinking water in rural areas, the challenges seem daunting and complex. These issues, however, are largely solvable. Many countries around the globe, such as Australia, Singapore and South Africa, have far less per capita freshwater availability than Pakistan. Yet, they have shown that water needs can be addressed through progressive policies, sound management and modern technologies.

In Pakistan, the water sector — once the proud custodian of engineering marvels of large dams and canals — needs an injection of new spirit and a sense of purpose. Currently, crop yields have stagnated, electricity production is inadequate and the Indus basin ecosystem and environment is stressed due to reduced water flows, overuse of nitrogenous fertilisers and toxic chemicals from industrial and urban waste.

The Indus river system should be viewed not simply as a lifeline in this largely arid country, but as a ladder for inclusive socioeconomic growth. Currently, water is a vastly underexploited and over-abused resource in the country — its full economic potential is largely untapped while it is stressed with pollution and unsustainable over-abstraction. A federal policy must lay out an enforceable and equitable legal framework. The 1991 interprovincial water accord must now be refined, including the possibility of interprovincial trading. This may allow for greater equity. For instance, Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan (that are often unable to use their allocated water share due to lack of infrastructure) may benefit by selling their unused shares to the other provinces.

At the provincial level, authorities should boldly explore new possibilities that break free from historical legacies and harness their unique local geography and hydrology. Punjab, with its flat, fertile plains, has a natural advantage for establishing a large-scale, modern, efficient agricultural enterprise that feeds the nation and supplies industries with critical raw materials for manufacturing high-value exports.

Sindh — generously endowed with the Indus delta — hosts a large, untapped potential for fisheries and related processing industries. It can embark on an agenda to save water in its low-performing agriculture sector through efficient irrigation technologies and use the water savings from agriculture to supply and reinvigorate the dying delta. New life to the Indus delta, that creates productive estuarine fisheries, can transform the conditions of the local poor and impoverished.

Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa and Gilgit-Baltistan — with high altitude topographies that make canal-based irrigation infeasible — are naturally endowed with forests (now severely threatened by uncontrolled logging). The authorities could consider using hydropower (and potentially interprovincial water trading) earnings to rejuvenate the forest lands and develop a well-managed timber industry and controlled eco-tourism in the alpine slopes.

At the municipal level, water shortages in piped networks should no longer be acceptable.
With over $100 billion cubic metres of fresh water coursing through the surface water channels of the country, urban residents should not be resigned to a fate of daily water scarcity. A new future of water security will take shape with courageous leadership, rule of law and in concert with policies of social welfare, economic development and scientific progress. With political commitment, efficient management and new technologies, Pakistan’s water balance can tilt from scarcity to surplus.

Cheers Image


Its an isolated case, just one voice taking a contrary view to the very popular perception that India is responsible for all the evil that has befallen them.

Just wait for the other shoe to drop.

jash_p
BRFite
Posts: 266
Joined: 03 Feb 2008 05:56

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby jash_p » 11 May 2014 18:40

chetak
Its an isolated case, just one voice taking a contrary view to the very popular perception that India is responsible for all the evil that has befallen them.

Just wait for the other shoe to drop.



Just wait for the other Quadri emerge for writer !!

chaanakya
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9513
Joined: 09 Jan 2010 13:30

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby chaanakya » 03 Jun 2014 22:06

From the latest imagery available on Google earth ( dated 25/9/2013) Pakistan has been able to drain Hunza up to Shishkat. Water has receded upto 8 Km from Shishkat. The Dam mouth seems well formed and stable. It is able to drain water easily without any obstacle. Large boulders seems to have been removed. As of now dam shows no sign of breach. May be it is waiting for either earthquake of another big landslide.The water body still looks formidable and fearsome, a testimony to nature's power.

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8185
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Indus Water Treaty

Postby Peregrine » 02 Jul 2014 15:28

Pakistan will ask India to inform before releasing dam water

ISLAMABAD: The government will seek prior information from India on releases of dam water to prepare itself for staving off the sudden gush which plays havoc in Pakistan.

Chairman National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) Major Gen Muhammad Saeed Aleem told reporters at the conclusion of a two-day national conference held to review monsoon preparedness: “We have asked Pakistan Commission for Indus Water to take up the matter with India”.

He said that in the past the country had suffered huge loss because of the release of dam water by India without any warning. However, the upper state (India) is bound under the Indus Water Treaty to provide information before making such a move.

Some 50 districts across the country have been identified as prone to monsoon rains and flash floods. The NDMA chief said it was difficult to predict which places would face most.

The Meteorological Department has forecast somewhat below-normal monsoon rainfall in July-September which will gradually increase in northern parts during August. Pre­cipitation will remain normal in August and Sep­tember but northern parts may receive slightly above normal and southern parts below normal rainfall.

Met office will keep issuing monthly and weekly updates because forecast at this stage cannot be 100 per cent accurate due to technological weaknesses involving radar coverage and modern gadgetry, he said.

In reply to a question, the NDMA chief said that unusual weather phenomenon was not something surprising because a situation can develop suddenly.

Though drought in Balochistan could not be ruled out but its chances were slim because of sufficient rainfall the province had already received. However, some areas of Sindh may face drought.

Gen Aleem said all five rivers experienced high flooding last year but the loss was less than in 2012 because of an effective coordination mechanism and timely evacuation of vulnerable communities.

Repair work on most of the flood protection structures have completed and the job is nearing completion.

The national flood protection plan – a key component of the national disaster management plan – will be ready this year which would further reduce flood losses, he added.

Tree plantation, he said, helped in controlling soil erosion but measures to curb deforestation were not being taken, resulting in a decrease in the number of trees. He said the ministry concerned and provincial forest departments needed to address the issue.

Cheers Image

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23758
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SSridhar » 02 Jul 2014 17:53

Peregrine wrote:Pakistan will ask India to inform before releasing dam water
He said that in the past the country had suffered huge loss because of the release of dam water by India without any warning. However, the upper state (India) is bound under the Indus Water Treaty to provide information before making such a move.

That guy is lying to cover up the inadequacies of Pakistan in water management. India has been scrupulously following the IWT provisions, in fact it has been generous to a fault.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23758
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SSridhar » 03 Jul 2014 13:21

9 Interesting facts about Kishenganga Hydropower Project - Economic Times

A slide presentation with good photos (Slide 5 has a problem)

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8185
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Peregrine » 04 Jul 2014 17:47

Peregrine wrote:Pakistan will ask India to inform before releasing dam water
He said that in the past the country had suffered huge loss because of the release of dam water by India without any warning. However, the upper state (India) is bound under the Indus Water Treaty to provide information before making such a move.

SSridhar wrote:That guy is lying to cover up the inadequacies of Pakistan in water management. India has been scrupulously following the IWT provisions, in fact it has been generous to a fault.


SSridhar Ji :

Whilst agreeing with you unequivocally it is a wonder how he WKK imbeciles still want an uninterrupted and uninterruptible dialogue with the foaming at the mouth mullahs (leaderships of all the Ilk) of the Land of the Pure and Home of the Terrorists.

Articles of this type are a constant reminder to the Indian People in General and the Indian Leadership in Particular that India can never have Peace with the Terrorists on her Western Border.

Cheers Image

muraliravi
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2819
Joined: 07 May 2009 16:49

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby muraliravi » 04 Jul 2014 21:24

Sridhar Sir,

I am going to ask you a jingo question.

Is it possible for India to walk out of the indus water treaty and refuse to share any water with pakistan?
If so under what circumstances can we do so (war or severe drought in India)

If we have a successful national river linking project completed and the authority projects a dip in the grid for say next year, can we use that as an excuse to tell the world that, sorry guys we are parched ourselves and we cannot provide water to pakistan.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23758
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SSridhar » 05 Jul 2014 04:06

muraliravi,

No, we cannot walk out of the IWT for two reasons. One, there is no provision in the IWT for unilateral abrogation by any one party. Secondly, how can we stop all the water technically? "Sorry, we are ourselves parched and so we cannot let any water to you" is a weak argument that some Indian states may use in refusing water to its neighbours but internationally, it is impossible to use such an argument in trans-border water bodies and get away with it without repercussions. The 'a priori use' is a validly recognized water-sharing principle.

muraliravi
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2819
Joined: 07 May 2009 16:49

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby muraliravi » 06 Jul 2014 07:10

SSridhar wrote:muraliravi,

No, we cannot walk out of the IWT for two reasons. One, there is no provision in the IWT for unilateral abrogation by any one party. Secondly, how can we stop all the water technically? "Sorry, we are ourselves parched and so we cannot let any water to you" is a weak argument that some Indian states may use in refusing water to its neighbours but internationally, it is impossible to use such an argument in trans-border water bodies and get away with it without repercussions. The 'a priori use' is a validly recognized water-sharing principle.


Sridhar Sir,

Thanks for the reply. What if we prove that Pakistan is at war with India through covert jihadi activity or say that they are occupying gilgit-baltistan which is our territory? Can that be a convincing argument to get out of the treaty without repercussions.

I am just asking this, because when people talk about the cards india has against pakis, I see this as one of the potent cards. But would like to know if we can use it and get away with it.

Anujan
Forum Moderator
Posts: 6944
Joined: 27 May 2007 03:55

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Anujan » 06 Jul 2014 09:33

Many issues vis-a-vis Indus waters.

First as a country, we cant be lawless like our neighbours. The ability to adhere to international treaties in the face of provocation is the very basis on which relationships & businesses are conducted. So we abrogate IWT today. What if we abrogate some other treaty with some other country tomorrow? Which country will be incentivized to stick to their end of the bargain in future treaties?

Secondly we arent fully utilizing the waters of the Indus system we are entitled to. Basically all of the Paki squealing can be classified into two categories

1. They arent going to get the water that they used to get for free and werent entitled to, as we build out our irrigation/power generation abilities
2. They do not want India to get the theoretical capability to shut down the water. This is a subtle point. India cant shut the water even if we wanted to, there are not enough dams/reservoirs/gates for that.

Therefore Pakis object to every project on the Indus. even if we are allowed the project, they force us to adopt designs which limit the lifetime of the dams/reservoirs so it is not economical for us. This is the chief thing that should be addressed.

Thirdly and lastly, if we are quite straightforward and transparent about IWT, the greatest injustice vis-a-vis the Indus system will come to the forefront and be solved. Which is the fact that Pakjab takes all the water and does not give any to Sind and other provinces. Everytime some dispute breaks out between Pakistani provinces about water sharing, you have the likes of Hafiz Saeed (Of Pakjabi paramilitary) yelling "India stealing water!!!".

chaanakya
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9513
Joined: 09 Jan 2010 13:30

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby chaanakya » 06 Jul 2014 10:58

Land and border disputes are kept out of IWT by consensus. hence That position can not be taken, now. It is in out interest to adhere to IWT in spirit as well as Letter.Till date we have done so and there is wisdom in that.

manjgu
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2120
Joined: 11 Aug 2006 10:33

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby manjgu » 06 Jul 2014 12:47

Ssridahr is right abt international treaties..but if ur danda is big enough and u have the will then u can abrogate/ignore any treaty !! the fact of the matter is that india is a weak state with a non existent danda and so we get pushed / shoved around..

manjgu
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2120
Joined: 11 Aug 2006 10:33

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby manjgu » 06 Jul 2014 12:49

is not china flouting international treaties on transfer of N tech?? to both pakis , NK ? but their danda is big ....

Anujan
Forum Moderator
Posts: 6944
Joined: 27 May 2007 03:55

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Anujan » 06 Jul 2014 13:24

Multilateral agreements about good behavior is inherently different from bilateral resource sharing treaties.

More accurate comparison to what China is doing would be India's refusal to sign certain kinds of intellectual property agreements about generic pharmaceuticals for example.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23758
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SSridhar » 06 Jul 2014 16:50

muraliravi wrote:I am just asking this, because when people talk about the cards india has against pakis, I see this as one of the potent cards. But would like to know if we can use it and get away with it.

No, we cannot and we won't either.

But, we should learn lessons from the IWT and when we enter into agreements with West Punjab, Nepal, Tibet, BD & Bhutan we must put these into practice.

manjgu
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2120
Joined: 11 Aug 2006 10:33

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby manjgu » 06 Jul 2014 21:32

what abt simla pact?? what abt other agreements between india/pakistan?

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23758
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SSridhar » 25 Aug 2014 12:09

India Accused of violating Indus Water Treaty - DAWN


LAHORE: Pakistan expressed serious concerns on Sunday over construction of Kishanganga Dam and termed it a clear violation by India of the Indus Water Treaty (IWT). :eek: :shock:

It also said that four other proposed dams on the Chenab would be in violation of the treaty.

According to officials, the objections were raised by the Pakistani IWT commissioner during the first round of a meeting with his Indian counterpart who had arrived here to discuss disputes between the two countries.

Pakistani authorities raised objections to the diversion of Chenab water by India by constructing hydropower projects, including the 690MW Ratli Dam, 1,000MW Pikkal Dam, 1,190MW Karthai Dam and 600MW Kero Dam and said this was a violation of the treaty, the officials said.

“Pakistan has also raised objections over design of the Kishanganga Dam that may reduce the required water discharges to Pakistan. And it will be a clear violation of the IWT,” an official said.

He said the authorities had urged Indian IWT officials to change the dam’s design.
The officials from the two countries would discuss all issues in detail during the next round in order to resolve them amicably, he said.

Published in Dawn, August 25th, 2014

Gagan
BRF Oldie
Posts: 11195
Joined: 16 Apr 2008 22:25

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Gagan » 25 Aug 2014 19:46

This probably explains the Khujli that prompted that article:
The Kishanganga tunnels are complete

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dJdLVy0zig

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23758
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SSridhar » 26 Aug 2014 12:41

I first thought that DAWN was re-publishing by mistake a 10-year old story. I checked & re-checked the date before posting.

anupmisra
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8279
Joined: 12 Nov 2006 04:16
Location: New York

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby anupmisra » 26 Aug 2014 16:09

SSridhar wrote:That guy is lying to cover up the inadequacies of Pakistan in water management. India has been scrupulously following the IWT provisions, in fact it has been generous to a fault.


How much heads up time does the paki need? He is rambling from both sides of his mouth. While he admits "inadequacy of gadgetry and radar", he seems to think that a long term advance notice should do the trick and help the pakis to prepare for the floods. Perhaps, as a quid pro quo, TSPA at the LOC should give BSF a three-day heads up as well when they intend to push terrorists through.

Hain?

saip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3636
Joined: 17 Jan 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby saip » 26 Aug 2014 19:59

Pak-India Indus water talks fail

Pakistan will now take its case to the International Court of Justice (ICJ).


Link

Again? This appears to be a never ending thing. May be Modi should scrap the treaty.

Shankk
BRFite
Posts: 242
Joined: 30 Jan 2006 14:16

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Shankk » 26 Aug 2014 23:14

There is a way to deal with this treaty. Just keep following it to the letter which means keep building the dams as much as possible. Pakistan can only scream and take us to the court. The catch here is that this clause of resolution by third party was added by western powers to gain a leverage against India. We can live with it as long as we don't have to give away anything significant. The moment western powers use the leverage against India in anyway, simply announce that this treaty is now connected with Simla agreement. It will be followed in the same way Simla agreement is followed. That will send a proper signal to every party. Pakistan's side is very weak now compared to before. They always counted on the nations world over to get sympathy but given the current geopolitical scenario it is an extremely difficult task to achieve. Moreover we are not cancelling the treaty but just linking to the spirit in which another treaty between same two countries is followed.

anupmisra
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8279
Joined: 12 Nov 2006 04:16
Location: New York

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby anupmisra » 27 Aug 2014 04:24

Shankk wrote:Pakistan can only scream and take us to the court.


The courts by now are probably tired of seeing the pakis.

Hey, its their money and HS&D. We know that the pakis are scraping the bottom of the proverbial barrel for all four. This bravado of taking India to court only keeps their H&D afloat for a few weeks until the inevitable happens (again). Foregte the money and S part. That's long gone. Then its rhona-dhona and finger pointing, and soon its back to business as usual.

anupmisra
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8279
Joined: 12 Nov 2006 04:16
Location: New York

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby anupmisra » 27 Aug 2014 04:27

saip wrote:Pak-India Indus water talks fail

Pakistan will now take its case to the International Court of Justice (ICJ).


Link


Spot the SDRE team:

Image
upload gifs

saip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3636
Joined: 17 Jan 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby saip » 28 Aug 2014 18:53

Only the head line says do not blame India for Pakistani water woes as the author can not suppress his inner pakiness and dose blame India.

Pakistan's water woes should not be blamed on 'bogeyman' India

Pakistan couldn’t find indigenous civil engineering experts to make its case and relied on foreigners and non-engineers.


Link

anupmisra
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8279
Joined: 12 Nov 2006 04:16
Location: New York

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby anupmisra » 29 Aug 2014 03:27

saip wrote:Only the head line says do not blame India for Pakistani water woes as the author can not suppress his inner pakiness and dose blame India.

Pakistan's water woes should not be blamed on 'bogeyman' India

Pakistan couldn’t find indigenous civil engineering experts to make its case and relied on foreigners and non-engineers.


Link


Note the number of Yindoos praise the article in the comments section.

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8185
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Indus Water Treaty

Postby Peregrine » 09 Sep 2014 21:58

Hafiz Saeed blames India for Pakistan floods, calls it ‘water terrorism’

NEW DELHI: Terror mastermind and chief of Lashkar-e-Taiba's front Jamaat-ud-Dawah Hafiz Saeed has blamed India for the floods in Jammu & Kashmir, which has also affected Pakistan-occupied Kashmir and other parts of Pakistan.

On Monday, Saeed on Twitter said: "Occupied Kashmir cannot be looked after by the Modi-led government, what can it do for those in Azad Kashmir? Give them Freedom if you may." Saeed claimed that India was responsible for the floods and had "released waters in rivers without notifying Pakistan". Hafiz then offered his "help" to "Kashmir and all India" saying Modi has "failed to help Kashmiris".

Saeed then termed India's Ladakh dam as a danger for Pakistan and called it "water terrorism". He tweeted: "If India's Ladakh dam project is completed, even Islamabad will become unsafe. Indian water terrorism is more lethal than its LOC violations." The mastermind of the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks then called for India to be taken to the United Nations for "water attack on Pakistan". According to some reports from Islamabad, a wing of Saeed's JuD — Falah e Insaniyat Foundation — has started some rescue and relief operations in Pakistan flood-affected areas.

So far, the floods in the country has claimed the lives of over 200 people.

Cheers Image

member_28705
BRFite
Posts: 189
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby member_28705 » 13 Sep 2014 19:18

Why the Indus Water Treaty needs revision.

http://indianexpress.com/article/opinio ... am-way/99/

The floods in J&K — the worst in the last 50 years — also inundated a large part of the Kashmir Valley, which was hitherto thought to be safe from them. Common people as well as water policy experts are in shock. No amount of short-term relief will bring back what each household has lost. A gaping hole in the state’s flood management has been exposed.

After the shortage of essential supplies and threat of disease have been dealt with, the focus should shift to revamping the state’s flood management policy and widening it to include strategies that other parts of the world have successfully employed. There is no doubt that 15 inches of precipitation in a week will always be dangerous. Yet, its destructive capacity can be tempered. Right now, the state’s irrigation and flood control department has limited options. The dredging of rivers carried out in the last decade has not helped the situation. In fact, it has made it worse in certain cases — for example, the Doodhganga and Rambiyaar tributaries of the Jhelum. As the floodwaters carried a high sediment load, the sheer force swept away the bridges and roads that embank these turbulent streams.

To prevent flooding, low-lying areas should be used to strategically divert water in order to avoid the inundation of cities and towns. But in Kashmir, such areas, especially the ones around Srinagar, have either been converted into residential neighbourhoods or used for infrastructure projects. But even if these areas were available, the volume of water that causes major floods would far surpass their capacity. Apart from dredging the Jhelum, which would increase its carrying capacity, the state’s flood control policy has little to offer.

The state has a specific objective to generate electricity from run-of-the-river projects and has no dams. The construction of large dams is not permitted under the Indus Waters Treaty. As Kashmir is yet to fully exploit its run-of-the-river power generation potential, this was not seen as a limitation. But the state is vulnerable during intense precipitation, the incidence of which is likely to increase if global climate change patterns replicate themselves in the Himalayan region and intensify extreme weather conditions.

Strategically placed, dams could hold large quantities of water from the Jhelum’s tributaries. The confluence of the Veshav, Lidder and Rambiyaar into the Jhelum within a few kilometres of each other in south Kashmir could prove dangerous for Anantnag town and adjacent areas. This is a good example of where a dam could be employed to good effect. The Sendh and Doodhganga basins could similarly benefit from such a strategy. Wular lake near Sopore also presents a natural water-storage option. Its capacity to hold a large quantity of water could be enhanced, as envisaged by the Wular navigation project, to provide security against the threat of inundation in north Kashmir. But the projects would have to be accommodated by the Indus Waters Treaty first.

There are benefits for both sides — this year’s floods have killed people on each side of the Line of Control, a grim reminder of the 2010 floods in Pakistan. Despite its large dams and huge storage capacity, Pakistan was unable to prevent the devastation. Dams upstream on the Jhelum, Chenab and Indus, however, could have helped keep water levels low and prevent breaches. Policymakers in Pakistan must understand this well. However, the threat of dams being used as strategic weapons is something that has prevented the political leadership in Pakistan from recognising their larger benefit. The stalling of the Wular project on the Jhelum is a clear example of this mindset. The question is: how can the lack of trust be overcome?

The answer lies in the participation of J&K in future negotiations over the Indus waters. The state could wield greater control over the river waters, which should be distributed by the terms of the Indus Waters Treaty to provide Pakistan a guarantee against strategic wartime usage. Through collective monitoring and the exchange of real-time water discharge data, trust could be further built between water management authorities on each side. And given the fact that dams would be essential to control floods, holding back water would also be detrimental. For India, this would be a win-win situation. Industry and growing metropolises could use the hydropower generated in Kashmir. Power is central to India’s growing economy and hydropower provides an easy option for the country to decrease its reliance on coal.

Cooperation over water is not a new feature of India-Pakistan relations. In fact, it is the sole area where diplomacy between the two countries has been largely successful. Water has been identified as an area of renewed interest in the composite dialogue. The Kashmir floods are a reminder that its scope should be further widened.


kish
BRFite
Posts: 960
Joined: 07 Jun 2010 23:53

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby kish » 17 Sep 2014 01:32

:rotfl: NYT editorial (partially)blames IWT for floods in J&K. More dams in rivers would have helped better manage Floods.

Preventable Disasters in Kashmir

Pakistan has also been hit hard by the flooding. A 1960 water-sharing agreement that guarantees a free flow of water to Pakistan is partly to blame :mrgreen: . Both countries have been wary of building dams that could be used to manage river flows lest they be seen as tampering with water rights to the region’s rivers. Record monsoon rains have unleashed the worst flooding in Pakistan’s history. The United Nations estimates that four million people are affected. Foreign countries, including the United States, and the United Nations are participating in the relief effort in Pakistan.

vishvak
BR Mainsite Crew
Posts: 5557
Joined: 12 Aug 2011 21:19

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby vishvak » 17 Sep 2014 02:00

Is this serious? Can't stop spreading rumour at the time of floods it seems. Indians must be blamed even for upholding IWT when all that pakis complain about is more water. However NYT did hide wild allegations of stealing electric current from under water.

Vikas
BRF Oldie
Posts: 6297
Joined: 03 Dec 2005 02:40
Location: Where DST doesn't bother me
Contact:

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Vikas » 17 Sep 2014 11:12

So if India lets all the flood water flow into Pakistan during rainy season, are we then exempt from releasing water during lean season since net result would be same.
I mean is the flow monitored on daily basis or weekly or annual basis ?

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23758
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SSridhar » 17 Sep 2014 12:58

VikasRaina, there is no question of quantum of water involved and therefore we cannot make a statement like an upper riprian conveniently makes while letting the flood waters go downstream but storing all the water during lean period, not letting anything go and somehow claiming that it was the total quantum that mattered.

No, here all the eastern rivers belong to us and all the western rivers belong to them, save some small storage on them which we have so far not built up. Flood or dry, that's it. This avoids a lot of headache that we see between states in India. Those who negotiated the deal felt that since there was not much scope for India building storage reservoirs and/or no possibility of diverting the waters (at that time), provision for run-of-the-river hydroelectric dams was good enough on the western rivers while all the waters on the eastern rivers secured our legitimate needs and it was a clean deal without day-to-day hassles.

manjgu
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2120
Joined: 11 Aug 2006 10:33

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby manjgu » 17 Sep 2014 18:14

also there is concept of minimum flow in the rivers ( even if u construct run of river projects).... so as per the provisions of the treaty even on the 3 rivers given to pakis, min flow has to be maintained.

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21089
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Prem » 21 Sep 2014 01:43

Paki Aqal Kyon Naa Ayye Koi Janne Naa

Pakistan's water commissioner arrives in India, to inspect 140mw Miyar Powerhouse

LAHORE –
Pakistan Indus Basin Commissioner Mirza Asif Baig left for India on Saturday as New Delhi agreed to site inspection of the 140 megawatt Miyar Powerhouse at river Chenab in Jammu Kashmir.According to the Ministry of Water and Power, the delegates from Pakistan will at first reach New Delhi and later proceed to Kashmir. Changing the route of the Miyar Valley associated with river Chenab, the site inspection of the 140 megawatt powerhouse would continue from September 21 to September 24.Officials stated that head of the delegation Mirza Assif Beg will demand the data related to water flow from river Chenab at Salal and Baglihar during the floods from his Indian counterpart Shri K Vohra. Pakistan has been insisting on Miyar Powerhouse's inspection from the past two years.Earlier, the Pakistan Indus Basin commissioner had cancelled the scheduled visit over India's refusal to let Pakistan inspect the disputed proposed powerhouse at river Chenab in Indian-held Jammu Kashmir. India had reportedly finalised plans to build four powerhouses consisting 2110 megawatt at part of river Chenab that falls in Indian-held Jammu Kashmir.Pakistan had objected to all four projects as per bilateral Indus Basin Treaty and according to a mutual agreement in September last year, India had promised to let Pakistani commissioner inspect the site and the project.India Indus Basin Commissioner Shri K Vohra was supposed to send his Pakistani counterpart the inspection
schedule between March 2 and 4 this year but the inspection plan for the said 120 megawatt powerhouse was dropped.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10248
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby arun » 02 Oct 2014 09:11

From about a fortnight back. Do not recollect seeing it on BRF so posting:

Nationalism, In Spate : Did India cause the floods and other disasters?


Return to “Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: madhu, MSN [Bot], vinod and 59 guests