Indus Water Treaty

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Prem » 20 Aug 2016 10:42

http://asia.nikkei.com/Viewpoints/Viewp ... d-Pakistan
Brahma Chellaney -- Rivers of conflict between India and Pakistan


Any water treaty's comparative benefits and burdens should be such that the advantages for each party outweigh the duties and responsibilities, or else the state that sees itself as the loser may fail to comply with its obligations or withdraw from the pact. If India begins to see itself as the loser, viewing the treaty as an albatross around its neck, nothing can save the pact. No international arbitration can address this risk.
When China trashed the recent tribunal ruling that knocked the bottom out of its expansive claims in the South China Sea, it highlighted a much-ignored fact: Major powers rarely accept international arbitration or comply with tribunal rulings. Indeed, arbitration awards often go in favor of smaller states, as India's own experience shows. For example, an arbitral tribunal in 2014 awarded Bangladesh more than three-quarters of the 25,602 sq. km disputed territory in the Bay of Bengal, even as it left a sizable "gray zone" while delimiting its maritime boundaries with India. Still, India readily accepted the ruling. However, nothing can stop India in the future from emulating the example of, say, China.
To be sure, Pakistan and India face difficult choices on water that demand greater bilateral water cooperation. The Indus treaty was signed in an era when water scarcity was relatively unknown in much of the Indian subcontinent. But today water stress is increasingly haunting the region. In the years ahead, climate change could exacerbate the regional water situation, although currently the glaciers in the western Himalayas -- the source of the Indus rivers -- are stable and could indeed be growing, in contrast to the accelerated glacial thaw in the eastern Himalayas.A balance between rights and obligations is at the heart of how to achieve harmonious, rules-based cooperation between co-riparian states. In the Indus basin, however, there is little harmony or collaboration: Pakistan wages a constant propaganda campaign against India's water hegemony and seeks to "internationalize" every dispute. Yet, in New Delhi's view, Pakistan wants rights without responsibilities by expecting eternal Indian water munificence, even as its military generals export terrorists to India.This rancor holds a broader lesson: Festering territorial and other political disputes make meaningful intercountry cooperation on a shared river system difficult, even when a robust treaty is in place.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Peregrine » 31 Aug 2016 03:01

PMD warns India’s water release may cause flooding]

ISLAMABAD: The Pakistan Meteorological Department on Monday issued an alert informing about the chances of riverine flood in Pakistan because India is likely to release rainwater from its main rivers after September 1.

Also, Pakistan has received 25% above average rain since the onset of the monsoon season, according to the PMD.

105 villages inundated due to River Chenab flood

PMD Director-General Dr Ghulam Rasul told The Express Tribune normal to heavy showers are expected in the catchment areas near India from August 31 to September 1.

“Currently, all water reservoirs in India have reached the maximum conservation level and it is expected that the showers that are expected on Wednesday and Thursday would prompt India to release extra water in the rivers which would likely generate riverine flood in Pakistan,” he said.

He added that though India, before releasing water, issues alerts to Pakistan, still to be on a safe side it is the responsibility of the Pakistan Meteorological Department to inform the authorities concerned ahead of time.

“The PMD issues alerts as a precautionary measure; however, it does not mean that things would happen as predicted,” he said.

“However, till date all rivers are flowing normally, and at a few places there are low-level floods. The situation is fully under control and there are no threats of riverine floods till now,” he said.

“This year Pakistan has experienced only urban flooding so far — not riverine flooding till date,” he said.

According to the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), monsoon rains have claimed 138 lives across the country this year. Of them, 52 were children, 63 men and 23 were women.

The highest number of deaths was reported from Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa where 52 people were killed followed by Fata with 27 deaths. Next comes Punjab with 22 deaths, Sindh (21), Balochistan (10), AJK (5) and Islamabad (1).

However, 63 people were reportedly injured across the country since the onset of the monsoon season this year and six are still missing in Chitral, according to the NDMA.

Ghulam said that during the monsoon season lives of people and property near catchment areas are at major risk. “It is necessary to take extra precautionary measures in order to decrease human and property loss as much as possible,” he said.

Gujjar Nullah cleanup: Almost 700 houses, shops dislodged

He revealed that though the Met Office had predicted 10-20% above average rain during monsoon, after the recent spell of rains the average has reached 25%. “Pakistan has received a good amount of rain during the last week of August which helped the country to have above average rainfall as forecast earlier,” he said.
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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby svenkat » 22 Sep 2016 20:04

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Muppalla » 23 Sep 2016 17:00

I am still confused. The dams we talk are on Chenab and Jhelum. Is there any way to divert water from Indus. What are dams on Indus in India?

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby chetak » 23 Sep 2016 17:03

Muppalla wrote:I am still confused. The dams we talk are on Chenab and Jhelum. Is there any way to divert water from Indus. What are dams on Indus in India?


You will have to interlink rivers, a massive project by itself

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SSridhar » 23 Sep 2016 17:04

Muppalla wrote: Is there any way to divert water from Indus. What are dams on Indus in India?

Simple answer, NO. there are no dams on the Indus per se.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby pankajs » 23 Sep 2016 17:17

Indus, Jhelum and Chenab are all part of the Indus basin where Jhelum and Chenab ultimately flow into the Indus.

Dams per say does not mean diversion but just storage. You need canals/tunnels to divert water. Diversions/transfers within the Indus basin between the 3 rivers and its tributaries is only going to impact the flow for the individual river/stream but the water is ultimately going to flow to Bakis.

To deprive Bakis of the water you have to move/divert/transfer it OUT of the Indus basin and for that you will need canals/tunnels. Also check the topography surrounding the Indus basin specifically these 3 rivers path.
Last edited by pankajs on 23 Sep 2016 17:23, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby manjgu » 23 Sep 2016 17:22

SSridhar..not sure abt dams on Indus but surely of tributaries of Indus..dams in Ladhak...are definetly on indus tributaries. i dont think u can divert water OUT of the indus basin using canals given the mountain ranges... can regulate is surely..espicially during periods of lean rainfall and during winters..can affect the wheat crop in pakistan.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Lilo » 23 Sep 2016 17:37

SSridhar wrote:
Muppalla wrote: Is there any way to divert water from Indus. What are dams on Indus in India?

Simple answer, NO. there are no dams on the Indus per se.

Chenab's waters can be linked to the ravi-beas-sutlej system already in place.
Chenab btw has the largest cross border flow of all the rivers in Indus system.

One scheme outlined below on how it can be done
Image

^
From
Hydrology and Water Resources of India
By Sharad K. Jain, Pushpendra K. Agarwal, Vijay P. Singh

https://books.google.co.in/books?id=ZKs ... =PA490&dq=

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby manjgu » 23 Sep 2016 17:59

why the F ..has it not been done...

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SSridhar » 23 Sep 2016 18:03

Guys, the simple fact is there is nothing on hand today. Our small hydroelectric projects on one or two Indus tributaries do not have storage capacity. Almost all of them are under construction. They are not storage dams. Besides, inter-linking of rivers is a long-term project.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby pankajs » 23 Sep 2016 18:05

Till the IWT is in force this is how it will be i.e no water will be diverted OUT.

BTW, linking tunnel in this case does not seem to exist because the text talk of *possiblity*.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby g.sarkar » 23 Sep 2016 18:54

http://www.firstpost.com/world/indus-wa ... 17682.html
Indus Water Treaty: No need for abrogation, multiple options to drive sense into Pakistan
ndia must decide whether the Pakistan-backed terrorist assault on the army base in Uri — that killed 18 soldiers and is the biggest attack on Indian army since the 2002 Kaluchak massacre — merits a tough tangible response, or is rhetorical flourish and a pregnant promise enough deterrence against a rogue nation that has fought four full-scale wars against us since its inception and continues to beat us with the terrorism stick as part of an asymmetric, never-ending battle.
The answer to this question is important because between a government trapped within its hardline image and realpolitik compulsions, an angry republic which demands some sort of a denouement vis-à-vis Pakistan, and a liberal commentariat that considers bleeding to death by a thousand terrorist cuts some sort of an attainable moral nirvana, India comes across as a weak nation that cannot act in its self-defence.
......
Also, as strategic thinker and CPR professor Brahma Chellaney asks in an article for Livemint, "Pakistan has consistently backed away from bilateral agreements with India—from the Simla Agreement, to the commitment not to allow its territory to be used for cross-border terrorism. So why should India honour the IWT?"
According to Chellaney, the treaty ranks among "world’s most lopsided and inequitable water pact". He points out that "the main Jammu and Kashmir rivers — the Chenab, Jhelum and Indus—and their tributaries have been reserved for Pakistani use, with India’s sovereignty limited to the three rivers of the Indus basin flowing south of Jammu and Kashmir: the Beas, Ravi and Sutlej. In effect, the IWT kept for India just 19.48% of the total waters of the six-river Indus system."
Yashwant Sinha, former finance minister in the Atal Bihari Vajpayee cabinet, wrote in a recent Indian Express column that: "Treaty terms are observed between friends, not enemies. Pakistan is an enemy state of India. It has said so repeatedly. The attacks on our military bases in Pathankot and Uri were not mere terrorist attacks; they were acts of war against the Indian state, sponsored by Pakistan. India will, therefore, be fully justified in abrogating the Indus Waters Treaty with Pakistan.".....
Gautam

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby SaiK » 23 Sep 2016 19:08

water management in general in India is pathetic.

where is the "Nation First" ?

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby svenkat » 23 Sep 2016 20:00

At the minimum,GOI should commission a technical feasibility study to find out if 40% of total Indus basin flows can be retained in India.That study can also include Environmental impact assessment.That will be a good first step.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 23 Sep 2016 21:28

Several Indian commentators, including very sensible and intelligent ones, are against limiting the flow of water to Pakistan. The reasoning being, it would punish the people, not the military or fundamentalists.

If I were on the show :-), I would say many of those people deserve to be punished, a country's actions against another(like Uri) have consequences for the attacking country, and India has to do something, which is better than nothing. So yes, go ahead and restrict the water, if it's feasible.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Dilbu » 23 Sep 2016 22:29

It punishes people for sure. So it is up to Pakistani people to put pressure on their netas or jernails to be nice towards India. That is the whole point.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby chetak » 24 Sep 2016 00:46

Varoon Shekhar wrote:Several Indian commentators, including very sensible and intelligent ones, are against limiting the flow of water to Pakistan. The reasoning being, it would punish the people, not the military or fundamentalists.

If I were on the show :-), I would say many of those people deserve to be punished, a country's actions against another(like Uri) have consequences for the attacking country, and India has to do something, which is better than nothing. So yes, go ahead and restrict the water, if it's feasible.


It's extremely fallacious to try and separate the paki "people" and the paki "army". They are one and the same. Don't ever forget that.

The people are the army, the likes and dislikes and motivations of the "army" cannot be divorced from those of the "people". What ever drives the "people" drives the "army" and vice versa. The "army" recruits from among their "people" and not from some imagined place like mars.

We cannot go to war with their "army" and keep letting their "people" thru the wagah border because we don't or cannot distinguish between the two. It's national suicide. It's their propaganda that is working and lulling us into a false sense of moral superiority.

They are at war with us and they are totally committed to it. If we cannot see that and also do the same, then we deserve to die.

If they are against us, whether it's their people, army, cats or dogs, all need to feel the pain of opposing us. Unless they do, they will never change.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby rsharma » 24 Sep 2016 03:35

Rudali Rudan has started:
http://www.hindustantimes.com/analysis/ ... -for-india

"Any punitive measure from India such as turning off the Indus tap or tampering with the pact will be fodder for Pakistan to whip up anti-India feelings among people."

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Amoghvarsha » 24 Sep 2016 03:49

rsharma wrote:Rudali Rudan has started:
http://www.hindustantimes.com/analysis/ ... -for-india

"Any punitive measure from India such as turning off the Indus tap or tampering with the pact will be fodder for Pakistan to whip up anti-India feelings among people."


Why the hell do we care if Pakis are againist us or not?Are these people nuts?

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby jash_p » 24 Sep 2016 05:36

Re: Indus Water Treaty

rsharma wrote:
Rudali Rudan has started:
http://www.hindustantimes.com/analysis/ ... -for-india

"Any punitive measure from India such as turning off the Indus tap or tampering with the pact will be fodder for Pakistan to whip up anti-India feelings among people."


I don't get it. Pakis brains are all ready saturated with anti India feeling. Is author more worried about pakis will become sane and wise people as a side effect if we douse and over saturate paki brain with anti India feeling !!!!!

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby manjgu » 24 Sep 2016 07:02

no need to abrogate..the pakis also didnt abrogate simla accord... i mean we can reduce water flow and ask Pakis for evidence??

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby habal » 24 Sep 2016 10:06

best way to drain water is through tunelling.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Prem » 24 Sep 2016 10:08

habal wrote:best way to drain water is through tunelling.


What about pipelines, crisscrossing whole India ?

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby la.khan » 24 Sep 2016 12:35

After terrorist attack in Uri, IWT has gained a larger profile in the media. It ***may*** have been a good treaty in 1960s for both parties. But, 2016 is not 1960.

Measured by any metric, our water needs are much more today. We have a much bigger population today, have a larger land mass, more arable land area, an economy growing fastest since Independence, and most importantly, people of today's India simply don't have the goodwill towards Pakis anymore. So, we need a bigger share than allocated to us.

Also, use IWT to drive a wedge between Pakis & KMs :twisted: I hope MAD seriously consider renegotiate IWT to set right follies of 1960s.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby pankajs » 24 Sep 2016 12:40

^
I think your suggestion is good. Just as Bakis keep offering to talk to us we should *start* offering to re-negotiate IWT at every opportunity.

Bakis know that they will NEVER get as good deal as the last treaty and keep shooting such a proposal down. We should specifically use the Kishmiris objection to the treaty for our basis for wanting to re-negotiation. The bakis will get the message as will the world without us having to spell it out. Diplomatic niceties you know. If Abrogation is a signal this is an equally strong signal. Anyway we do not have the capacity to divert water out of the Indus system.

It will pile pressure on them as nothing else but it will also reinforce their *dusman* narrative.

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Indus Water Treaty

Postby Peregrine » 24 Sep 2016 16:26

How Pakistanis see India & Indians - Buddhists, Christians, Hindus, Jains, Jews, Sikhs and Zoroastrians - ONLY HATRED

Pew Research CenterGlobal Attitudes & Trends : 14th July 2014
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The poll shows Asians with quite disparate opinions about each other. Half or more in seven of 10 Asian countries surveyed express a favorable view of Japan, while majorities in six of 10 say this about China. Opinions about India vary considerably, ranging from 70% positive in Bangladesh to 13% in Pakistan. Fellow Asians take a fairly critical perspective on Pakistan – there is no country other than Indonesia in which a clear plurality gives Pakistan a positive rating. This includes China, where only 30% have a favorable opinion of Islamabad, a major Beijing ally. Meanwhile, Pakistan is the only Asian nation polled in which less than half see the United States favourably.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby la.khan » 24 Sep 2016 19:46

pankajs wrote:^
Just as Bakis keep offering to talk to us we should *start* offering to re-negotiate IWT at every opportunity.

Bakis know that they will NEVER get as good deal as the last treaty and keep shooting such a proposal down. We should specifically use the Kashmiris objection to the treaty for our basis for wanting to re-negotiation.

Oh, yes! India must vociferously raise IWT with pakis. Pakis want to talk about Kashmir, we say "Sure, as soon as we talk about terrorism & IWT". When pakis reject it, go back to KMs on paki reaction to IWT. While at it, get media (for ex. AG on TimesNow) to interview Hurriyat rats and ask them about IWT. These turds must be seen taking sides (Kashmir vs. pakis).

This will lead to some all around fun :twisted:

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Indus Water Treaty

Postby Peregrine » 24 Sep 2016 20:37

Shun extreme options, punish Pak by diluting Indus treaty: Experts

NEW DELHI: Amid rethink on the Indus Waters Treaty with Pakistan in the wake of the Uri terror strike+ , experts have argued that short of the "extreme" step of abrogation, India has other options like use of water of western rivers of the Indus system or suspension of the meetings of Indus Water Commission to put pressure on its neighbour.

The experts point out that these available options would be enough to send signal to Pakistan about the leverage India has over the entire river system without actually scrapping the treaty or violating any of its clauses.

"Abrogation of treaty is neither practical nor desirable. India can rather go for the extreme option of suspending the meeting of the Commission. However, the more realistic option would be to use water of the western rivers of the Indus system, which is well within the framework of the treaty," said Uttam Sinha of the Institute of Defence Studies and Analyses (IDSA).

Under the Indus Water Treaty, signed between the two countries in 1960, water of eastern rivers (Ravi, Beas and Sutlej) are allocated to India while the country is under obligation to let flow the water of the western rivers (Indus, Jhelum and Chenab) to Pakistan. India can, however, use the water from the western rivers for its domestic purposes, irrigation and generating hydro-electric power.

"We should use this option legitimately. It is India's right under the treaty. Pakistan cannot challenge this as it knows that India can use water of western rivers under the specified clauses of the treaty. If India exercises this option, it would be enough to put Pakistan under extreme pressure," Sinha told TOI on Friday.

River expert and environmentalist Himanshu Thakkar of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People (SANDRP) agrees with such an option. India has been permitted to construct storage of water on western rivers up to 3.6 million acre feet (MAF) for various purposes, but the country has, so far, not developed any storage facility.

Thakkar said, "We have never exercised our rights under the treaty as we have not created infrastructure on our side to use water of western rivers. We must, therefore, concentrate on building barrages and other storage facilities to use the water."

Thakkar too found the idea of abrogating the treaty impractical. He said, "It will not solve any purpose. It won't help India militarily. It will, instead, damage India's credibility at international forums. We have treaties and water-sharing arrangements with other neighbours like Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and China. Abrogation of treaty will certainly not send the right signal."

The experts also pointed at the third option where India can align itself with Afghanistan by helping it create infrastructure on the Kabil river that flows into Pakistan through the Indus basin. Sinha said, "Though India has been engaged with Afghanistan , there is a need to go for it in a big way in our strategic interest. This option will also exert pressure on Pakistan."

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Lilo » 24 Sep 2016 20:48

^
River expert and environmentalist Himanshu Thakkar of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People (SANDRP) agrees with such an option. India has been permitted to construct storage of water on western rivers up to 3.6 million acre feet (MAF) for various purposes, but the country has, so far, not developed any storage facility.

Thakkar said, "We have never exercised our rights under the treaty as we have not created infrastructure on our side to use water of western rivers. We must, therefore, concentrate on building barrages and other storage facilities to use the water."

Thakkar too found the idea of abrogating the treaty impractical. He said, "It will not solve any purpose. It won't help India militarily. It will, instead, damage India's credibility at international forums. We have treaties and water-sharing arrangements with other neighbours like Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and China. Abrogation of treaty will certainly not send the right signal."


Funny to see a two tongued SANDRP snake, giving sage advice to "first" create western river water storage (when SANDRP is genetically antiDam) ,than to straight away withdraw from IWT .
I guess protection of their Paki Papas comes first to saving the environment for these sikular snakes.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby kancha » 24 Sep 2016 21:43

From Twitter, on the IWT
Twitter Link

#IWT Some thoughts on the hullabaloo surrounding the talk about abrogation of Indus Water Treaty in the aftermath of #UriAttack Here goes

#IWT Firstly, an abrogation of the treaty doesn't mean that the rivers in Pakistan will go dry. Water cannot be held back / stored beyond..

..the capacity already existing/planned. Period. But what CAN happen is partial manipulation of amounts permitted to flow downstream..

in order to play merry hell with crop plantation season inside Pakistan. This brings me to the second point being peddled by our ..

.. Fiberals - hurt to the poor, common, innocent Pakistani citizen for sins of the establishment. I say, so be it. If the common ..

.. citizen of the country suffers, will he not ask his establishment why? Will the establishment not be obliged to explain it to him?

And if the establishment doesn't feel the need (most likely scenario), then how does the supposed goodwill of the average Pakistani ..

.. matter, when he exercises no influence over his own govt? Then there are some 'worthies' talking about the Indus originating in ..

.. China. Well, dear geniuses, here's some news for you - so does Sutlej. That makes it a grand total of TWO rivers out of the SIX ..

.. whose waters are distributed / shared amongst Indian and Pakistan by the Indus Water Treaty. And how does the fact that Indus & ..

.. Sutlej originate in Tibet alter Indian narrative? Answer is that this has NO fcuking impact. So much for gleefully dismissing ..

.. dismissing your own govt's stated intention in light of the loss of its soldiers. And guess what? This is exactly the same line ..

.. being peddled by a large percentage of Paki 'intelligentsia'. Let's just call it a coincidence and move on. So far I've talked ..

.. about the manipulation of water flow inside Pakistan after abrogation. Another aspect of the IWT is that due to the conditions ..

.. laid out in the treaty, own projects on the Western rivers are continuously challenged by Pakis. But knowing them, all their ..

.. cases sent for arbitration have fallen flat, with a minor concession or two thrown their way, that they take home with a victory ..

.. dance. Case in point is the recent Baglihar and Kishengangan verdicts. However, this is also because India has stuck to the ..

.. provisions, esp regarding ensuring minimum flow to Pakistan, thereby being forced to execute sub-optimal designs in its projects.

Then there are some who cite the treaty as a model treaty that has withstood the test of times and wars etc. All Bunkum. Fact is that..

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby chetak » 24 Sep 2016 21:45

Brahma Chellaney ‏@Chellaney 7h7 hours ago

India's great water folly in 1960: After gifting 80.52% of Indus waters to Pak, India gave $173.63 million for dam and other projects in Pak

857 retweets 406 likes

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Lilo » 25 Sep 2016 05:38


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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 25 Sep 2016 13:10

^
Also, there is a bit of a moral and political issue here as well. India is not sending terrorists into China to slaughter Chinese citizens or soldiers. How would China justify reducing water to India? India has suffered repeated terrorist attacks from Pakistan. Good that Chellaney pointed out that reducing water to India, would also seriously affect Pakistan. Leaving aside the ethical question, wouldn't that be a Chinese self-goal?

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby pankajs » 25 Sep 2016 15:52

The Chinese are least concerned with moral/political questions. Chinese will invent a reason to do what they want e.g. SCS.

The reason we should not link the two is that the Chinese will do what benefits to them *irrespective* of what we do with Bakistan.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby manjgu » 25 Sep 2016 19:28

looks rethink on IWT is hotting up..Modi ji taking briefing on IWT on Monday. we need more structures to impound more water. We also let lot of water into Pakistan on the 3 rivers allotted to India. Punjab cant let water into Haryana but ok with leaving water for Pakis.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Prem » 25 Sep 2016 23:39

PMO to have meeting tomorrow. IWT under review , whether to suspend , abrogate or demand amendment.

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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby saip » 26 Sep 2016 00:04

I do not follow the logic of this China cutting off 36% of the water. The writer says if we abrogate the treaty we still owe Pakistan 63%? If we lose 36% (out of which we will only get 7.2%) we still will have 64% which is more than the 20% we get now.

sanjaykumar
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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby sanjaykumar » 26 Sep 2016 00:40

Punjab cant let water into Haryana but ok with leaving water for Pakis.

Yep, that's India for you.

Prem
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Re: Indus Water Treaty

Postby Prem » 26 Sep 2016 01:11

sanjaykumar wrote:Punjab cant let water into Haryana but ok with leaving water for Pakis.

Yep, that's India for you.


Anyone knows what will /can be the share of Punjab in this water going to Haryana and Rajasthan?


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