Indus Water Treaty

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Postby sum » 30 May 2007 09:20

An engineer who accompanied Shah to the Uri project said the Pakistani commissioner was visibly dissatisfied with the explanation of the steps taken by the Jammu and Kashmir government to check water pollution.

Shah had also been quoted as saying that the water level in the rivers is low, particularly during the winters when only filth flows to Pakistan.


finally i openely declare my admiration for the genius of pakis...............
Have to admire the number of innovative ways the pakis try to stop any indian project in the valley!!!!! :roll: :roll:

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Postby Vivek_A » 02 Jun 2007 04:06

Pakistan protests ‘unilateral’ construction of Uri-II project

* Asks for construction to be halted till full engineering update is provided

By Iftikhar Gilani

NEW DELHI: Pakistan formally lodged a protest on Friday against the “unilateralâ€

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Postby SSridhar » 02 Jun 2007 12:21

. . . asked for discontinuation of construction till the issue is resolved. Pakistan’s concerns were mainly on the height and gates of the dam as well as the poundage level and free board.

Some people never learn. Sound like very familiar terms.
Indian Water Commissioner Thareja presented satellite-generated data to argue that Pakistan will get enough water to sustain its agriculture.
That should have been a sledge-hammer blow. Not being used to remote-sensing technologies, TSP expected to run away with a lie perhaps.

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Postby SSridhar » 05 Jun 2007 16:38

TSP says IWT has not hampered agriculture or hydro-power in J&K
[quote]Pakistan rejected the argument that the Indus Water Treaty (IWT) has hampered development and impeded growth in agriculture and hydro-electric potential in Jammu and Kashmir. At the end of the four-day bi-annual Joint Indus Commission meeting here on Monday, Pakistan Water Commissioner Syed Jamait Ali Shah said much of the water set aside for the state is left unused even 40 years after the two countries signed the Treaty. Last week, Chief Minister of Jammu and Kashmir Ghulam Nabi Azad demanded compensation for losses that had accrued to his state due to the IWT. Consequently, he said, his state had been able to produce only 10 percent of a potential 20,000 MWs of electricity. The Pakistan Water Commissioner said the treaty had provided 1.3 million acre feet (MAF) of water for irrigation in Jammu and Kashmir but they had been using just 0.9 MAF for irrigation. When the treaty was signed in 1960, the state used to consume 0.8 MAF of water for agriculture purposes, which had now increased to just 0.9 MAF. He said 1.3 MAF water was enough to not only irrigate but also inundate most of the state and there were no limitations on usage for generating electricity. [b]“The designs only need to be in consonance with the treaty,â€

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Postby Vivek_A » 18 Jun 2007 09:34

Neelum-Jhelum hydropower project in doldrums



By Engr Hussain Ahmad Siddiqui


In his budget speech, the Minister of State for Finance Mr Omar Ayub Khan said: "Today, I hereby announce the construction of Neelum-Jhelum Project, which will cost Rs84.50 billion.â€

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Postby SSridhar » 18 Jun 2007 18:08

As per provisions of the Indus Waters Treaty, if Pakistan manages to complete the Neelum-Jhelum project first, India would not have the right to divert the river flow, as it plans to do at present. Likewise, if India completes its project on the Kishanganga first, it would have priority rights on the use of Neelum/Kishanganga waters.

The learned Engineer is quite wrong. Annexure {E},Paragraph 10 therein talks about "existing" TSP usage at the time India designs the project. India has already designed the project and started construction. TSP has nothing on the ground and so there is no question of TSP staking any claim. Even then, the IWT expects some effect on TSP and disallows only adverse effects.

10. Notwithstanding the provisions of Paragraph 7, any Storage Work to be constructed on a Tributary of The Jhelum on which Pakistan has any Agricultural Use or hydro-electric use shall be so designed and operated as not to adversely affect the then existing Agricultural Use or hydroelectric use on that Tributary.

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Postby SSridhar » 25 Jun 2007 15:19

TSP paper claims that the Tulbul Navigation lock talks are postponed
According to the official, the stalemate in the Indo-Pak peace talks has also led to the postponement of secretary-level talks between Pakistan and India on Wuller Barrage, another contentious issue on the composite dialogue agenda.
Earlier, the talks on Wullar Barrage were scheduled to be held on June 26 and 27 but now they would be held in August this year subject political stability in Pakistan.

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Postby Vivek_A » 01 Jul 2007 07:06

India plans 4 power projects on Chenab in Held Kashmir

By Iftikhar Gilani(closet paki,..glass closet, that is)..

NEW DELHI: With disputes over the Baglihar and Kishangaga power projects still raging on with Pakistan, India has decided to move on four other major hydropower projects on the river Chenab in Jammu and Kashmir, at Kiru, Rattle, Kawar and Shamnot in Dadu district.

Officials in Srinagar told Daily Times that they have asked the National Hydro-Electric Power Corporation (NHPC), a central agency, to prepare detailed project reports and investigate the feasibility of these four projects with a total installed capacity of 1,180 MW.

The state cabinet was slated to discuss execution and financing of these projects last week, but they were dropped from the agenda at last moment as ministers were reportedly divided on the government approach to enter into a joint venture with the NHPC.

Environmentalists and locals have already voiced concern at the 370-MW Shamnot project. Experts say it is technically challenging and economically unviable; environmentalists believe the project will submerge a huge stretch of the national highway connecting Jammu and Srinagar and some important towns resulting in dislocation of a huge population.

The NHPC has already drafted a detailed project report for the 430MW Kiru project. Officials say a survey for the other two projects is also at an advanced stage. “Right now, we are under intense pressure from the NHPC to decide as to how the state wants to implement the Kiru project,â€

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Postby SSridhar » 01 Jul 2007 08:33

Further, they complain that the NHPC is sharing just 12 percent of the power from the Salal, Uri-I and Dul Hasti projects with the state government. These projects owned by the NHPC produce 1,560MW of electricity, but most of it is transported to the northern grid to be supplied to Delhi, Punjab, Haryana and Rajasthan.

This is another tactic to sow dissension. No federally funded project will let a single state government enjoy all the benefits accruing from that project. This is true whether the project is implemented by NHPC or NTPC or NPCIL etc. There are guidelines on how much should be shared etc. Obviously, in this case, the rest of the share should go to some other nearby Northern states. Most State electricity boards are incompetent and corrupt. J&K Power Development Corp. is unable to meet the challenge in electrification works. The Dr. C. Rangarajan Committee that was set up by the Prime Minister recognized power as the 'most critical infrastructure bottleneck' in J&K and recommended the transfer of the 390 MW Dulhasti power project to J&K after compensating NHPC Rs 4900 crores. The Kiru, Ralte, Kawar and Shamnot projects were recommended to be expedited. Producing power is just one aspect of the story. Evacuating it and distributing it to remote corners of this state are equally important too (Transmission & Distribution, T&D)

This said, J&K Government has recently recognized the need to have a healthy mix of hydro and thermal power projects. They have decided to go for 'sell in summer' and 'buy in winter' policies. The peak demand in winter also coincides with poor generation from the predominantly hydro based projects.

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Postby SureshP » 03 Jul 2007 06:42

An emerging threat

THE news that India is considering the construction of four more hydropower stations on River Chenab in Held Kashmir should serve as a strong reminder to the powers that be in Islamabad that they should always be on the lookout for New Delhi’s moves to undermine Pakistan’s interests. They should have learnt a lesson from the Baglihar controversy. Pakistan should take stock of the situation to see whether India is in violation of the Indus Waters Treaty and act accordingly.
On the other hand, the government needs to quicken up its plans to construct big reservoirs, which have long been lying in abeyance not for lack of technical feasibility or financial adequacy but for its failure to create consensus among dissenting provinces. It is obvious that it has only tried, by fits and starts, to bring them round to accepting the absolute necessity of Kalabagh, which incidentally promises to remain silt-free almost forever and thus would be of momentous benefit to the country as a whole. Besides, there should be no delay in executing other big dams, which have been identified. The current chaotic situation resulting from the wide gap between power generation capacity and consumption needs threatens to get worse as Mangla and Tarbela, the two existing big power generating and irrigation reservoirs, like most other dams in the world, get silted up. The pity is that New Delhi is working hard to make things more difficult for us. It should not be allowed to happen.

No Nation

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Postby Theo_Fidel » 03 Jul 2007 09:57

SSridhar wrote:
Further, they complain that the NHPC is sharing just 12 percent of the power from the Salal, Uri-I and Dul Hasti projects with the state government.


Note that the 12% supplied is Royalty Power. Supplied totally free of cost.

Further shares of power must be purchased at cost plus rates as other states are doing.

It is not accurate to say that just 12% is allocated to state. The Salal project was entirely financed by the beneficiary states and central loans were paid by them.

Admittedly J&K is smart enough to pay for Baglihar using federal loans, hence 100% of the power will belong to them.

The closet Paki should be added to the Chenab at high flow to go where he belongs.

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Postby SSridhar » 14 Aug 2007 07:24

Talks on Tulbul Navigation project from Aug 30
[quote]Secretaries from both sides will meet for the first time since India allowed Pakistan Indus Commissioner Syed Jammat Ali Shah to inspect the project’s site and progress on downstream power projects like URI-II. Pakistan opposes the Wullar Barrage construction on grounds that it would disrupt the flow of Jhelum river. It has also opposed the Kishanganga and Uri-II projects.

Pakistan has rejected an Indian offer of examining the design and wants the project’s total scrapping. According to Pakistani officials, the project violates the Indus Water Treaty (IWT).

According to India, the Wullar barrage is a navigation project allowed by the IWT. However, Pakistan maintains that the project envisages storing 0.324 million acre feet (MAF) of water - 32 times more than permitted in the treaty. The treaty allows India to store 0.1 MAF of water on three western rivers.

India says that it’s not making any storage facility as Wullar is a natural lake and that it is only making navigation locks to maintain a constant water level between October and February. Pakistan denies the Indian claim that an understanding had been reached between the two sides in 1994.

“There was no question of an agreement as the project involved technical and legal issues and unless these issues are not addressed, India cannot start work on the project,â€

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Postby Vivek_A » 28 Aug 2007 05:17

Maybe we can all get together and cry them a river..



Jhelum River source in peril: Wullar Lake drying up fast

By Iftikhar Gilani

NEW DELHI: As India and Pakistan begin talks on the Wullar Barrage/Tulbal navigation lock issue, the last item on the table in the four rounds of composite dialogue, here on Thursday, they are still to find time to actually discuss the health of Wullar Lake, the main source of water to Jhelum River and a lifeline for the Punjab and Sindh plains downstream.

Experts in both Srinagar and New Delhi have constantly warned in the last few years that the lake, which is Asia’s largest freshwater reservoir, is fast drying up. They believe that the lake has already entered the eutrophic stage, the process that stimulates the growth of aquatic plants resulting in the depletion of dissolved oxygen.

Quite recently, while Pakistan had expressed concern at the rising pollution levels in the Jhelum River, it has still to make conservation of Wullar Lake an issue, which is the main source of water for Mangla Dam. Experts say it is time both countries combine their efforts to conserve the crucial reservoir.

Of late, although the Jammu and Kashmir government has decided to constitute a separate development authority for Wullar Lake, India’s official focus still remains the picturesque Dal Lake in Srinagar.

Despite declaring Wullar Lake a ‘Wetland of International Importance’ in the Ramsar Convention in 1990, official agencies still lack proper data concerning the water body. Different figures are doled out about the elliptical lake, which is said to be 16x7.6 kilometres. While the Wetland Directory, published by the Indian government, puts the lake’s area at 189 sq km, Survey of India maps reduce it to 58.7 sq km.

Indian Water Resources Minister Prof Saifuddin Soz, who had led a campaign to save the lake, says it has shrunk from its earlier area of 200 sq km to barely 24 sq km now.

Claiming that they have made calculations on the basis of satellite imagery, a senior functionary in the Jammu and Kashmir Directorate of Environment and Remote Sensing (DEARS) said, “We found out that the lake has shrunk from 202 sq km to 65 sq km, of which an area of 30 sq km has massive vegetation.â€

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Postby alokgupt » 28 Aug 2007 06:15

Well people keep asking how can India retaliate against Pakistan for killing of Indian citizens. Indus Water Treaty provides the answer. Even a minor threat from Indian foreign ministry will get Pakistan ticking.

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Postby Rahul Mehta » 28 Aug 2007 07:34

alokgupt wrote:Well people keep asking how can India retaliate against Pakistan for killing of Indian citizens. Indus Water Treaty provides the answer. Even a minor threat from Indian foreign ministry will get Pakistan ticking.


Alok Gupta,

Admins have this habit for deleting most of the old threads. There had been a loooong discussion some 1 year ago on this issue. I had demonstrated in that thread that no MP, given the Saud money's influence in India politics, will ever agree with using "water as weapon", though over 85% of us commons support "water as weapon" policy.

Now your demand that we should use "water as weapon" is good. I agree with it, and so do over 80% of us commons of India. But not even one MP agrees with it. Now pls tell us how do we enact laws which implement this "water as weapon" policy?

.

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Postby alokgupt » 28 Aug 2007 07:53

Rahul Mehta wrote:
alokgupt wrote:Well people keep asking how can India retaliate against Pakistan for killing of Indian citizens. Indus Water Treaty provides the answer. Even a minor threat from Indian foreign ministry will get Pakistan ticking.


Alok Gupta,

Admins have this habit for deleting most of the old threads. There had been a loooong discussion some 1 year ago on this issue. I had demonstrated in that thread that no MP, given the Saud money's influence in India politics, will ever agree with using "water as weapon", though over 85% of us commons support "water as weapon" policy.

Now your demand that we should use "water as weapon" is good. I agree with it, and so do over 80% of us commons of India. But not even one MP agrees with it. Now pls tell us how do we enact laws which implement this "water as weapon" policy?

.

I know this may be lost as well. I will do best to write emails to BJP, RSS, Kalam, Indian military, MMS (hey at least I know how to send it to him). We should write to defence and strategy institutes within India.

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Postby alokgupt » 28 Aug 2007 08:10

Sent this it to political parties in India.

The has been insufficient focus on internal security in last two decades. While military threats to Pakistan work but there are only so many times those can be made. I think we need new approach for negotiations with Pakistan.

Three words: Indus Water Treaty.

Does India have any water treaty with China? No. Will China ever sign such a treaty? No. Which treaty the only treaty Pakistan wants to respect and enforce with India? IWT. Why is that the case?

The answer is not hard to find. Pakistan is willing to sign IWT with India even for the region of Kashmir granting India rights to build dams in Kashmir. This is quite remarkable given that it will not even stamp passports for Kashmir bus travel.

So I believe this option to peace with Pakistan has been suitable used. We need to immediate suspend operation of IWT only for areas for which there is a conflict till the conflict is resolved. So suspend it in Kashmir till Pakistan accepts LOC as border. Also IWT anyway does not address the rights of Kashmiris. So we just suspend it till negotiations are completed. There are multiple examples of countries withdrawing from international treaties using the soverign right. The big example anti ballastic missile shield agreement by USA.

This announcement can be timed with some major terrorist incident in India. Pakistan is likely to see more reason to fall in line than by military action which they seem to defy by suitable diplomacy and international pressure.

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Postby SSridhar » 28 Aug 2007 09:28

As usual, TSP's 'concern' about Wullar lake is to be taken with a large bucket of salt, as the following history of events proves (excerpts from the Indus Water Treaty that appeared in SRR):
[quote]The 74 Sq. Km. Wullar Lake (original size 202 Sq. Kms.) is the largest freshwater lake in India and is situated on the Jhelum and supplies 40% of J&K’s fish catch. The stretch of 22 Km between Sopore and Baramulla becomes non-navigable during the lean winter season with a water depth of only 2.5 ft. Small streams like the Harbuji, Arrah, Erin, Pohru and Bandipur flow into this lake. The Jhelum becomes shallow and sand banks appear in the river-bed obstructing navigation. It is only in spring that rainfall causes the snow to melt at higher elevations on the surrounding mountains and causes floods. [16] In order to improve navigation, India started constructing in 1985, a barrage 439 feet long and with a lock, at the mouth of the lake to raise the flow of water in winter to 4000 cusecs with a depth of 4 ft with an added storage of 0.3 MAF. Pakistan objected to this project and construction was halted in 1987. Pakistan’s objection [17,18] stems from two issues, one India needs to get concurrence of the design from Pakistan and two, it cannot store waters as per IWT on the Jhelum Main anything in excess of 0.01 MAF as “incidental storage workâ€

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Postby SSridhar » 29 Aug 2007 07:46

RAPE Sethi's advice . .
[quote]As India and Pakistan take their time resolving their dispute over the Wullar Barrage/Tulbul Navigation project in Indian-administered Jammu & Kashmir, the lake in question is drying up, thus introducing a third factor in the dispute that the two countries have refused to recognise so far. That third factor is the environment which threatens the SAARC states with closure to all disputes they have refused to resolve.

In the heat of bilateral blame-game, no one had pointed out that Wullar Lake feeding the Jhelum River and filling Pakistan’s Mangla Dam was Asia’s largest freshwater reservoir. As the two countries quarrel over whether the barrage on the lake is illegal storage or not, the lake has shrunk from 202 square kilometres to 30 square kilometres, and whatever is left over is full of sewage that human settlements dump into it. Pakistan should rethink its plan to raise the Mangla Dam for more capacity and talk to India about “joint actionâ€

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Postby Rahul Mehta » 29 Aug 2007 09:14

alokgupt wrote:I know this may be lost as well. I will do best to write emails to BJP, RSS, Kalam, Indian military, MMS (hey at least I know how to send it to him). We should write to defence and strategy institutes within India. ... Sent this it to political parties in India. ....


Corrupt Indian MPs already know that water can be used powerful weapons. So do mediamen. It has been an open secret since 1947. As open as "sun rises in East".

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Postby SSridhar » 30 Aug 2007 06:16

TSP delegation in Delhi for talks
Qureshi said his side was ready to accept any project coming up on the rivers in the Jammu and Kashmir provided India complies with the provisions of the Indus Water Treaty.

Stating that the project coming up at the western end of Wullar lake is against the treaty, Qureshi demanded total scrapping of the project, aimed at locking and control waters of Wullar lake from flowing into river Jhelum constantly.

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Postby Vivek_A » 31 Aug 2007 08:44

http://www.dawn.com/2007/08/31/top12.htm

Delhi urged to abandon Wullar project


NEW DELHI, Aug 30: Pakistan has asked India to abandon the Wullar Barrage project because it is not consistent with the Indus Basin Treaty reached between the two countries in 1960.

Talking to APP after the first day of talks between Pakistan and India on the barrage under the composite dialogue here on Thursday, Mohammad Ismail Qureshi, Secretary of the Ministry of Water and Power, said that during the talks both sides presented their positions on the issue.

Pakistan argued that it was a natural lake and man-made storage could not be built on it as it would interfere with the flow of Jhelum river which was allocated to Pakistan under the treaty. “India should abandon this project because it violates the treaty.â€

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Postby SSridhar » 03 Sep 2007 19:39

Tulbul project does not violate IWT - Saifuddin Soz
Maintaining that Tulbul navigation project in Jammu and Kashmir does not violate the Indus Water Treaty with Pakistan, India on Monday made clear its determination to pursue it because of its crucial importance for movement of boats in Kashmir valley. :D

Water Resources Minister Saifuddin Soz emphasised that river Jhelum, on which the project is proposed to be built, is a "symbol of our civilisation" and we cannot lose the right of navigation on it.

"I made it clear to them (Pakistan) ...We want navigation in river Jhelum," Soz told reporters while referring to his meeting with Pakistan's Water Resources Secretary Ismail Qureshi here last week.

"I think they (Pakistan) have got the cue (that India will not budge on its position)," the minister said.

"We have accepted the (1960) Indus Water Treaty. We are not going to violate it," Soz said, adding Tulbul project also did not involve violation of the agreement.

He was responding to questions about progress in the talks between the two countries on the issue after Water Resources Secretary-level talks here on August 30-31.


Excellent. I think we will now re-start the stalled work. Way to go.

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Postby Vipul » 15 Sep 2007 01:25

Baghlihar ready to start power generation next year.

The Jammu and Kashmir government's flagship Baglihar project is ready to start generating power next year with 90 per cent works complete and its dam height lowered as per the suggestions of a World Bank arbitrator.

"The height of the Baglihar Hydro-Electric Project dam has been reduced by 1.5 metres from 845 to 843.5 metres as per the recommandation of World Bank-appointed neutral expert Raymond Lafittee," Project Chief Engineer S K Raina said.

He said 90 per cent of the works were complete and the project was expected to be commissioned by 2008.

"Three turbines, nine generators, armoured cables, gas- filled circuit breakers and computerised switch boards have been installed in the main power house. It just requires the push of a key to become fully operational," Resident Engineer Boris Lazaric told PTI.

Work on the project was held up due to objections raised by Pakistan. Under the provisions of the Indus Waters Treaty, the World Bank appointed an arbitrator to resolve the issue.

Quality was "not compromised" and the most advanced and sophisticated technology was applied in the 450-mw project during construction works which began in 1999, Raina said.

He said Baglihar ranked fourth among hydel projects in terms of mass concrete used and "the first in the country with plasma-coated turbine blades to enhance its lifespan tenfold".

Lazaric said a nearly 10 km of tunnels and 20 km of roads were constructed in the mountainous belt of Poonch district and top grade steel and technology used to ensure against fissures due to tectonic shifts in the Himalayas.

He said there were some delay in 2005 due to flash floods "yet the project withstood its effects".

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Postby SSridhar » 17 Sep 2007 15:07

TSP should withdraw its objection to the Tulbul Project - Soz
India today asked Pakistan to withdraw its objections to the Tulbul project saying that the proposed navigational locks were not in violation of the Indus Water Treaty.

"Pakistan has complained that we are trying to build a barrage which is a complete misnomer as barrages are meant for diverting the flow of water which is not the case here. We want to build a navigational locks so that water level is maintained at 4.5 feet for navigational purposes," Union Water Resources Minister Saifuddin Soz told reporters here.

The level of water has to be maintained at 4.5 feet during winters to allow navigation on the river, which is not barred by the Indus Water Treaty, he said.

The minister said he had raised the issued with Pakistani officials during a recent meeting and "I think I have convinced them about our viewpoint."

He said, "the fact is that there is no violation of the Indus Water Treaty."

Soz asked the Jammu and Kashmir government to take immediate steps for exploiting the navigational potential of Jhelum river, the only river that flowing through valley.

"The Navigational potential of Jhelum river has been highlighted by expert committees including the Inland Water Transport Committee which has stated around 170 kilometres of Jhelum river had excellent potential for navigation," he said.

He said a Japanese concern was willing to part fund the project and the state government should seek more funds for the purpose from the Centre in the 11th plan.

"The state government should take up the project on priority basis and write to centre about it," Soz said.

The minister said in 1999, Railway India Technical Engineering Services (RITES) conducted a survey and found that the 27-km stretch from Pampore in Pulwama district to Chatabal in Srinagar district were ideal for navigational purposes.

"The RITES concluded that the returns will be ten times the investments into this project," he said.

Soz said the navigational project would be a cheap and pollution free mode of transportation besides a tourist attraction which could help in reviving the culture and moores of the valley.

Asked about the slow pace in Jhelum beautifcation project which was sanctioned several years ago at a cost of Rs 18 crore, the minister "it seems that the work is not going on at the desired pace. We need to look into the reasons."

The minister said efforts were required from all sections of the society including the common masses in preserving the water bodies of kashmir which were moving towards extinction.

Soz said he will come out with a comprehensive report on the status of Dal Lake within next fortnight.

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Postby SSridhar » 19 Sep 2007 16:34

Mangla dam drying up
[quote]The Mangla Dam’s reservoir is slowly ‘dying’ due to sedimentation, posing a serious threat to land and water resources in the Indus plain, one of the largest irrigation systems in the world, it is learnt.

At the same time, the development of infrastructure for the growing population and urbanisation has increased soil erosion in the region, shrinking the catchment area of the dam.

Informed sources told Dawn on Tuesday that the Water and Power Development Authority (Wapda) had approached the federal government to permit it to urgently undertake a water management programme “to save the Mangla Damâ€

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Postby SSridhar » 20 Sep 2007 15:15

India set to revive Tulbul project
[quote]India is set to revive the Wullar project, stalled since 1987 after objections from Pakistan. The slow progress of talks on the matter have led India to revive the project, :D which officials say will now be in total conformity with the Indus Water Treaty (IWT). “The new design envisages purely a navigation project and not a barrage,â€

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Postby SSridhar » 20 Sep 2007 15:18

Declining Indus level threatens dolphin population
[quote]The decreasing flow of water in the River Indus has not only changed the river’s shape but the number of various fish species, especially the rare Blind Indus Dolphin, has declined dramatically, Abdul Karim Gabol, communication officer of World Wildlife Federation (WWF) Sindh told Daily Times on Wednesday.

“Though the exact number of the fish could not be collected, according to an estimate of the Sindh Wildlife Department in 1989, the number of Blind Indus Dolphin between the Sukkur barrage and the Arabian Sea was about 3,500. That has gone down to a mere 1,100 in 2006,â€

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Postby Vivek_A » 30 Sep 2007 04:32

Nothing like a paki-whine to bump up a thread..

New fantasy on Jhelum river

The bogey of navigation on the Jhelum river is yet another impish idea floated by India in the name of welfare of the Kashmiris

By Arjimand Hussain Talib

India's Minister for Water Resources Saifuddin Soz -- who happens to be a Kashmiri -- has a dream for Kashmir's Jhelum river: he wants its historical glory to be restored. According to him, this can be done by introducing diesel-driven boats that are "a symbol of our civilisation".

Speaking at a press conference in Srinagar recently, Soz said he felt introduction of diesel-driven boats would help "promote" tourism in the state (the first stated objective of everything that is done in the Held Kashmir) and also introduce a "cheap mode" of transportation between the 170-kilometre long river stretch from Khanabal in South Kashmir to the Wullar lake.

Soz further said the reason he wanted to do all this was that "he wants to do something" for the future generations of Kashmir, which will "never forgive us if we failed in our duty to preserve the water bodies." But the question remains how would we be able to "preserve our water bodies" by introducing water transport?

In the same press conference, Soz urged Pakistan to withdraw its opposition to the Wullar Barrage Project that is being initiated by India in North Kashmir. But what has boat rides on the Jhelum river to do with the Wullar Barrage dispute between New Delhi and Islamabad? The bogey of navigation on the Jhelum river is yet another addition to the long list of impish ideas that are floated by India from time to time in the name of welfare of the Kashmiris, but are actually aimed at achieving something else.

The idea of using the Jhelum river for water transport, with its current water quantity and quality, defies both economic and aesthetic logic. The idea of introducing water transport on the Jhelum river is based on the assumption of dredging its silt out and availability of enough water to facilitate the travel of diesel-driven boats. Firstly, given the geographical location of the Jhelum river, its recurrent siltation is a reality that cannot be whisked away. Secondly, the mean amount of water available in the river throughout the year is insufficient to facilitate the travel of medium-sized boats.

Now if one were to assume that both these problems would be overcome by the use of small boats, many other questions arise. Considering the efficient passenger transport facilities between Khanabal and Srinagar and Srinagar and Sopore, an additional mode of transportation -- which is not only cumbersome but also geographically unfeasible for use by most people in the Held Kashmir -- is hardly required.

Why would people need to ride small boats that would be very slow in comparison with surface transport as well as highly time consuming? Does it make any economic sense to spend millions of rupees on dredging and running a few small boats to carry a few hundred people in a day? Moreover, if within a couple of years the train facility between Qazigund and Baramulla is going to provide a strong alternative to land-based transportation of goods and fruits in the Valley, what purpose would water transport serve?

A cost-benefit analysis of the project, considering that it is aimed at the promotion of tourism, also shows that it is unviable. The idea of joyride on the Jhelum river is fundamentally a flawed one, as the current quality of the river's water is unlikely to attract tourists. For today's tourists, the significance of a joyride on the stinky and polluted waters of the Jhelum river does not make much sense.

Almost the whole sewerage of the Srinagar city, as well as of the other towns situated on its banks throughout the Valley, goes into the Jhelum river. Also, the whole waste generated during the annual Amarnath Yatra goes into this river through the Lidder stream.(And thence to TSP :)) So, why would tourists prefer a boat ride on the Jhelum river when better options are available to them?

Besides all these factors, the geo-political factors underlying this idea would make the condition of the Kashmiris even worse. Since this idea has the question of navigability attached to it, its planners would surely look for ways and means to not only further take up Wullar Barrage work with vigour but also create conditions for building more such barrages in the Valley.

The idea of water transportation on the Jhelum river will create a basis for New Delhi's geo-political strategists to manufacture arguments for improving navigation on the river and thus necessitate creation of more Wullar barrages. This would neither help the people of Kashmir nor the ongoing peace talks between New Delhi and Islamabad.

The bogey of the Wullar Barrage Project and its linking with the question of water transportation in the Valley needs very careful handling by Kashmir's ruling elite. Not only the Kashmiris, but also those who have planned the Wullar Barrage Project know the argument that the project is meant to improve navigation on the Jhelum river during lean season is nothing but a joke. It is now well known among the water resources management experts that the basic idea behind the Wullar Barrage Project is not navigation, but its use as a geo-strategic tool during negotiations with Pakistan.

There are people associated with the project who have also spoken of it being 'useful' in enhancing water intake for the Uri Power projects, which are run and used by the central government without helping Kashmir's economy in any way. To put the things straight, the idea of the water transportation on the Jhelum river in the current form is unfeasible to say the least.

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Postby Vivek_A » 24 Oct 2007 03:28

http://www.thenews.com.pk/top_story_detail.asp?Id=10789

Neelum-Jhelum project hits fresh snags

By Khalid Mustafa

ISLAMABAD: In a new shocking development, the initiation of construction work of strategically very important Neelum-Jhelum Hydropower project, which was earlier scheduled to kick off by end November this year, has been further delayed owing to dispute between Norwegian consultant and National Engineering Services of Pakistan (Nespak) on money issues, a senior government official told The News.

The Neelum-Jhelum Hydropower project has already been delayed for more than eight years. Further delay on the part of Pakistan government would enable India to easily manage to have the water priority rights of Neelum River under the 1960 Indus Water Treaty.


"The Norwegian consultant has quit the project and refused to work with Nespak. Wapda chairman Shakil Durrani intervened, and offered Norwegian consultant to work with Wapda and not with Nespak and the power utility would directly pay for their services."

However, Norwegian consultant refused to work and left the country. The Joint Venture of Norwegian consultant and Nespak was assigned the task of supervising the construction work at a cost of Rs3.15 billion.

Owing to this ugly development, the initiation of the project has been delayed at least by

three months more which Pakistan can ill afford at this point of time, as India is already working on construction of Kishanganga hydropower project on the same Neelum river which originates from held Kashmir in India.

The early completion of Neelum-Jhelum Hydropower project having the capacity to generate 969MW of electricity is imperative to ensure water priority rights of Neelum River that originates from India.

The Neelum River is called Ganga in India where Kishanganga hydropower project is being built. Under the Treaty, the country first completing the hydel project on the Neelum (Ganga) River would automatically gain the priority water rights.


The Neelum-Jhelum hydropower project is proposed on the Neelum River. India is reported to have completed 60-65 per cent construction of Kishanganga hydropower project, but Pakistan's authorities concerned so far have miserably failed to initiate the Neelum-Jhelum hydropower project.

The contract for this vital project has been awarded to a Chinese consortium, comprising China Gezhouba and the CMEC China, at Rs90.90 billion ($1.5 billion) on March 9, 2007. The official said that the letter of acceptance was issued on 7th July of 2007.

To a question the official said that the said Joint Venture of Chinese companies has formally communicated to the government that it stands ready to mobilize machinery and equipment to the site for initiating the construction work, but the project has hit snags prior to initiation because of the decision of Norwegian consultant to quit the project because of

rifts with Nespak on payment issues.

"The Joint Venture of the Chinese companies, however, linked their initiating the construction work with the provision of foolproof security cover for their employees." To a question, the official said that the government needs 2,300 acres for the powerhouse. Out of the required land the process of acquiring 500 acres land has been completed and the government of Azad Jammu Kashmir has been paid Rs336 million for 1,100 acres of land.

To a question the official said that the government has allocated Rs10 billion for the said project during the current fiscal year 200-08. The Neelum-Jhelum Hydroelectric Project Company (NJHPC) has been made to complete and run the project to ensure water priority rights of Neelum River that comes from India. To arrange the financing, the government is set to increase power tariff by 10 paisa per unit in the head of development surcharge.

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Postby SSridhar » 31 Oct 2007 07:56

Continuing with the saga of TSP's Neelum-Jhelum Power Project
A spokesman for the National Engineering Services Pakistan (Pvt) Limited (NESPAK) has clarified about a news item on the Neelum-Jhelum Hydropower Project that appeared in The News, Karachi, on Oct 24.

It was rightly pointed out in the news item that the project should have been initiated about a decade ago, the spokesman said in a press release.

However, some other information provided in the story was contrary to the actual facts, the press release said.

The most recent 'delay' was not caused by the NESPAK, as reported in the news item, the press release said and added the Norwegian consultants, NORCONSULT, did not quit or refuse to work due to payment issues with the NESPAK.

The previous delays in the project were due to construction tendering 'miscarriages' and the consultants had nothing to do with it, the press release said.

In the past, the project was advertised, at least, three times for construction :) through the International Competitive Bidding (ICB), but each time the work could not be awarded due to various problems, mainly being lack of proper response from the bidders, :) the press release said.

This time also the delay had been caused mostly by lengthy contract negotiations between the client and the contractor, the press release added.

It was reiterated that the NESPAK never had any money issue with the Norwegian consultants, the press release said.

If that was the case, the Norwegian consultants would have accepted the offer made to them by Wapda for direct payment of their services, as reported.

Wapda had re-tendered the consultancy contract on a gallop basis :) and it was hoped that by the time the contractors were in place, the consultants would be appointed, the press release said.

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Postby Prem » 06 Nov 2007 04:29

Financing Neelum-Jhelum hydropower project

http://www.brecorder.com/index.php?id=6 ... =&supDate=

As India has already started work on Kishanganga power project, any further delay on our part will irretrievably compromise our vital national interests, particularly when we are already caught up in a tightening energy squeeze. There is, meanwhile, a need to get certain facts straight about the Kishanganga hydropower project.

According to the Water Treaty of 1960, India is entitled to construct the dam only on the run of the river, as it cannot build the dam by diverting river's flow. If India diverts the flow in a bid to generate electricity by building the power project, Pakistan will receive one-third less water due to the construction of the dam. It will therefore constitute a grave violation of the Indus Basin Water Treaty.

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Postby SSridhar » 06 Nov 2007 07:39

By their own admission, if India has already started the construction, they have already lost the case. Only existing rights to water need to be respected by India and there was no existing power project when India started. QED.

What TSP was touting as 'grave violation of the IWT' were not found to be so as recently as last year. Indeed, they were found to be figments of TSP's feverish imagination. So will Neelum-Jhelum turn out to be.

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Postby SSridhar » 09 Nov 2007 09:08

India plans to tap Chenab waters
[quote]The Jammu-based pro-government Early Times said Chief Minister Ghulam Nabi Azad was contemplating tapping water at Reasi from the river that was assigned to Pakistan by the Indus Water Treaty of 1960.

The idea is to “cope with the scarcity of drinking water in Jammu city and its peripheral areasâ€

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Postby Vivek_A » 10 Nov 2007 02:11

http://www.nation.com.pk/daily/nov-2007/10/bnews1.php

Wheat growers facing severe water shortage

Naqi Akbar
LAHORE - The less-than-expected water availability at the start of Rabi 2007-08 season coupled with the fact that there is discrepancy in the Punjab view about IRSA, the farmers in the key wheat-sowing areas of south Punjab are facing extreme difficulty in the water supply, as there were frequent canal closures in the area.
It may be pointed out here that the south Punjab cotton belt depends upon the Tarbela command area and being at the tail end has a greater risk of being left out in the water supply allocations.
In this context, Hamid Malhi of Punjab Water Council when contacted in this regard said that the farmers from the area were facing difficulty in getting the first watering resources as there was a discrepancy between the Punjab and IRSA forecasts. He argued that this estimation conflict was compromising the actual indent estimates and due to the resultant canal closures the wheat farmers were in the dire straits. He argued that with such a state of affairs the wheat sowing can affect the wheat production estimates for the current season.
Malhi also took exception to the fact that while IRSA was insensitive to the issues of Punjab farmers, the Punjab representative in IRSA was not doing the needful, he noted. He said that such situation could be ill afforded by the south Punjab farmers. Here it is pertinent to note that the much delayed IRSA meeting to decide the Rabi 2007-08 award ended on the note that while Punjab pleaded more than 25 per cent shortage, IRSA stuck on to 22 per cent advising the provinces to design canal operations in accordance with the 22 per cent shortage. The Punjab irrigation experts however pleaded review over which the award would be decided in the third week of the current month.

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Postby Sadler » 10 Nov 2007 08:05

Vivek_A wrote:http://www.nation.com.pk/daily/nov-2007/10/bnews1.php

Wheat growers facing severe water shortage


Well, i suppose they'll have to start eating rice now.

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Postby SSridhar » 10 Nov 2007 08:34

Sadler wrote:
Vivek_A wrote:http://www.nation.com.pk/daily/nov-2007/10/bnews1.php

Wheat growers facing severe water shortage


Well, i suppose they'll have to start eating rice now.


I think rice cultivation needs even more water than wheat and so they cannot grow it. They can import it from neighbouring India, though. What a fall for the tall,fair, mighty meat-and-wheat eating martial races! They are already importing meat from India and now rice also ? These cunning SDRE kafirs :twisted:

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Postby menon » 10 Nov 2007 09:11

Has anyone considered the effect of possible balkanisation of porkistan on the IWT? If porkis cease to exist how can we deny them water?

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Postby SSridhar » 10 Nov 2007 11:20

menon, that's a good question. IWT is an agreement between India & TSP. When TSP ceases to exist, the Treaty will have to be negotiated afresh between India and the next lower riparian state which will be Balawaristan or Pakhtoonistan (for the Indus) depending upon how they separate and the Punjab (for the other rivers). These two countries will have to negotiate treaties, in turn, with other two lower riparian countries Balochistan and Sindudesh. This is all going to be very complicated.

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Postby derkonig » 10 Nov 2007 13:37

SSridhar wrote:menon, that's a good question. IWT is an agreement between India & TSP. When TSP ceases to exist, the Treaty will have to be negotiated afresh between India and the next lower riparian state which will be Balawaristan or Pakhtoonistan (for the Indus) depending upon how they separate and the Punjab (for the other rivers). These two countries will have to negotiate treaties, in turn, with other two lower riparian countries Balochistan and Sindudesh. This is all going to be very complicated.


just being chankian here..
you see sewage from the NCR & adjoining areas goes into the yamuna & besides, the yamuna is pretty much dry now. so the chankian idea goes like: how hard would it be to channel all of that sewage into the indus river system just before they enter the TSP. i guess the topography is pretty much flat, so simple canals/pipelines can do. saves yamuna & ganga in the east from the sewage, also ya dont need to "treat" any of the sewage, just pump it in neat, we save dollahs, TSP gets to stew in it all they want. :twisted:

5 yrs on whatever little farmland TSP or its successor states have, shall produce only $h*t. :twisted:

also whenever TSPians/successor state abduls wanna go jihadding against us, just add more cities to the canal/pipeline network like say c'garh, towns in punjab, n.raj, haryana.


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