Indus Water Treaty

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
harbans
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4883
Joined: 29 Sep 2007 05:01
Location: Dehradun

Postby harbans » 10 Nov 2007 14:23

Wonder why should Paki's who are wanna be TFTA Arab types mind at all if the wetlands of Punjab are converted to sand dunes. Same same Arab TFTA and same same geography for our Paki brethren.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 10 Nov 2007 14:30

harbans wrote:Wonder why should Paki's who are wanna be TFTA Arab types mind at all if the wetlands of Punjab are converted to sand dunes. Same same Arab TFTA and same same geography for our Paki brethren.


And, as per the desert theory floated by vsudhir, at least Islam will grow more , if not wheat and rice.

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21182
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Postby Prem » 10 Nov 2007 22:38

derkonig wrote:
SSridhar wrote:menon, that's a good question. countries Balochistan and Sindudesh. This is all going to be very complicated.


just being chankian here..
you see sewage from the NCR & adjoining areas goes into the yamuna & besides, the yamuna is pretty much dry now. so the chankian idea goes like: how hard would it be to channel all of that sewage into the indus river system just before they enter the TSP. i guess the topography is pretty much flat, so simple canals/pipelines can do. saves yamuna & ganga in the east from the sewage, also ya dont need to "treat" any of the sewage, just pump it in neat, we save dollahs, TSP gets to stew in it all they want. :twisted:

5 yrs on whatever little farmland TSP or its successor states have, shall produce only $h*t. :twisted:

also whenever TSPians/successor state abduls wanna go jihadding against us, just add more cities to the canal/pipeline network like say c'garh, towns in punjab, n.raj, haryana.


Well TSP will remain TSP = Totally Shitty Pakistan. TSP can claim the islamic leadership of being the best Shit ever cropped by Allah. Dont underestimate their ability to manufacture a Hadith about this blessing.

On serious note, Azad is making right noises at right time to weaken Pakjabi will. Couple of more blows and they will run for Wagha.

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3727
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Postby Vipul » 11 Nov 2007 22:36

Something suggested for an apt name i had given to TSP: Shitistan.

Vivek_A
BRFite
Posts: 593
Joined: 17 Nov 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Postby Vivek_A » 30 Nov 2007 10:36

ADB report outlines Pakistan’s water woes



By Khaleeq Kiani


ISLAMABAD, Nov 29: Pakistan has reached the water scarcity threshold of 1,000 cubic metres per person a year and has been ranked among the worst performers in Asia in terms of water use, capacity and quality although water has been on President Musharraf’s priority agenda for eight years.

“In terms of water resource availability, the per capita total actual renewable water resources value reduced from 2,961 cubic metre a year in 2000 to 1,420 cubic metre in 2005… and just a little over 1,000 cubic metre per year in 2006-07, fractionally over the scarcity threshold,â€

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 18 Dec 2007 08:58

TSP, as usual, objects to power projects in J&K

Even if the projects would comply with IWT, TSP can only be expected to raise objections for the following reasons, among others:
  1. Delay the projects as much as possible depriving economic benefits to India
  2. Try to paint a bad image for India (remember that the TSP psyche is all about images onleee)
  3. Increase the cost for India
  4. Whip up hysteria among its people about evil kafir India
  5. Divert attention from very pressing domestic issues
  6. Continue to create an image that J&K is a disputed area and TSP is a legitimate claimant
  7. Blame India conveniently for all its failures of managing water resources

[quote]There could be trouble ahead for power projects in Jammu and Kashmir as the Pakistan government had objected to construction of some hydro power projects proposed in the State, official sources said here.

The sources said the projects were, however, in compliance with the Indus Water Treaty 1960.

Under the treaty, India was required to furnish information on new run-of-river projects and storage projects on the Jhelum, Chenab and Indus. Such information had been sent.

However, Pakistan had objected to the projects.

The Union Ministry was of the view that the designs were in compliance with the provisions of the treaty.

A senior official said: “We are in touch with the concerned authorities through correspondence and meetings of the Permanent Indus Commission within the purview of the treaty and also through Secretary-level talks. We are hopeful that the whole thing would be resolved through constant dialogue between the two sides.â€

Baljeet
BRFite
Posts: 410
Joined: 29 May 2007 04:16

Postby Baljeet » 18 Dec 2007 10:11

[quote="SSridhar"]TSP, as usual, objects to power projects in J&K

Even if the projects would comply with IWT, TSP can only be expected to raise objections for the following reasons, among others:
  1. Delay the projects as much as possible depriving economic benefits to India
  2. Try to paint a bad image for India (remember that the TSP psyche is all about images onleee)
  3. Increase the cost for India
  4. Whip up hysteria among its people about evil kafir India
  5. Divert attention from very pressing domestic issues
  6. Continue to create an image that J&K is a disputed area and TSP is a legitimate claimant
  7. Blame India conveniently for all its failures of managing water resources

[quote]There could be trouble ahead for power projects in Jammu and Kashmir as the Pakistan government had objected to construction of some hydro power projects proposed in the State, official sources said here.

The sources said the projects were, however, in compliance with the Indus Water Treaty 1960.

Under the treaty, India was required to furnish information on new run-of-river projects and storage projects on the Jhelum, Chenab and Indus. Such information had been sent.

However, Pakistan had objected to the projects.

The Union Ministry was of the view that the designs were in compliance with the provisions of the treaty.

A senior official said: “We are in touch with the concerned authorities through correspondence and meetings of the Permanent Indus Commission within the purview of the treaty and also through Secretary-level talks. We are hopeful that the whole thing would be resolved through constant dialogue between the two sides.â€

Vivek_A
BRFite
Posts: 593
Joined: 17 Nov 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Postby Vivek_A » 25 Dec 2007 04:35

Controversial IHK dam to be operational next year

* Indian-held Kashmir CM says pace of work slowed because of objections
* Kashmir has potential to generate 20,000 MW, utilises less than 10 percent

SRINAGAR: Indian-held Kashmir’s controversial Baglihar hydroelectric project will start partial operations by next June, supplying much needed power, the troubled region’s chief minister said.

Pakistan has said it fears the $1 billion project could deprive Punjab of vital irrigation water. It says the dam violates a decades-old water sharing treaty brokered by the World Bank. But India says the Baglihar hydroelectric project on the Chenab River does not violate the pact and could go a long way to ending routine 12-hour blackouts plaguing the Himalayan state.

“The first phase of the 450-megawatt Baglihar hydroelectric power project will become operational by June, 2008,â€

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 25 Dec 2007 08:06

Vivek_A wrote:Controversial IHK dam to be operational next year

SRINAGAR: Indian-held Kashmir’s controversial Baglihar hydroelectric project will start partial operations by next June, supplying much needed power, the troubled region’s chief minister said.

Pakistan has said it fears the $1 billion project could deprive Punjab of vital irrigation water. It says the dam violates a decades-old water sharing treaty brokered by the World Bank. But India says the Baglihar hydroelectric project on the Chenab River does not violate the pact and could go a long way to ending routine 12-hour blackouts plaguing the Himalayan state.


I really can't see how the Baglihar Hydroelectric Project can continue to be termed as a 'controversial' one. TSP objected to the project and took it to the Neutral Expert as per provisions of the IWT. The NE was not somebody who was forced down the throat of TSP or India. Either of the parties could have objected to his name and asked for another candidate or even proposed another one. Obviously, neither one of them doubted his technical abilities. Since the award, neither party has also dubbed him 'biased' in his judgement. This simply means that TSP has accepted the award as much as India. His decision was binding on both the parties, as per IWT provisions. He gave his award which significantly coincided with the Indian technical design and exposed the calumny of TSP. Some minor modifications were suggested by the NE in the Indian design which have been complied with. After all this, it is ridiculous to call it a controversial project.

Vivek_A
BRFite
Posts: 593
Joined: 17 Nov 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Postby Vivek_A » 25 Dec 2007 08:33

Yup. nothing controversial about it.

The headline is just the paki rat iftikar gilani's heartburn.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 27 Dec 2007 09:46

TSP still dreaming about the Neelum-Jhelum project

Let's see what comes out of this most recent attempt.
[quote]he government would charge 10 paisa per electricity unit from January 1, 2008 onwards to generate around Rs 6 billion for financing Neelum-Jhelum hydropower project,â€

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 31 Jan 2008 09:25

IWT will not be abrogated: India
Indian Water Resources Minister Professor Saifuddin Soz on Wednesday announced that there was no chance of abrogating the Indus Water Treaty (IWT) with Pakistan.

Addressing a press conference here, Soz announced that India would harness the irrigation and hydroelectric potential of the country’s Western rivers to the fullest. :twisted: Referring to the World Bank’s verdict on the Baglihar Dam project, he said it had been clearly established that India could use its water for irrigation and other development purposes. He said two more projects — at Burser on River Chenab and at Ujjh on a tributary of River Ravi — were also in the pipeline.:twisted:

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 31 Jan 2008 12:50

TSP wants to inspect Baglihar before commissioning
[quote]Pakistan wants to inspect the Baglihar dam to see if India has complied with the World Bank neutral expert’s verdict regarding the design of the power project.

“The Indus Basin Treaty Commissioner for Pakistan is in touch with his Indian counterpart to visit the dam site for inspection before it becomes operational,â€

Vivek_A
BRFite
Posts: 593
Joined: 17 Nov 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Postby Vivek_A » 04 Feb 2008 05:38

Work on Neelum-Jhelum Hydroelectric project kicks off this week

LAHORE: Water and Power Minister Tariq Hamid said on Sunday the groundbreaking of 969 megawatt (MW) Neelum-Jhelum Hydroelectric project would be held this week.

The land for the project has been acquisitioned, Hamid told a meeting at Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA) House. WAPDA Chairman Shakil Durrani and Member (water) Muhammad Mushtaq Chaudhry attended the meting, which also reviewed progress on Diamer-Basha Dam and other hydropower projects. Hamid said the Neelum-Jhelum Hydroelectric project would give Pakistan water rights over the River Neelum, adding that it would also help improve the ratio of hydroelectric power generation in the country. “The development will help produce about 5,150 gigawatt hour electricity annually,â€

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 09 Feb 2008 19:58

AoA

Musharraf launches the Neelum-Jhelum Project
President Pervez Musharraf Friday said there are indications of forward movement towards the resolution of long-standing Kashmir dispute with India and vowed that he would not let down the Kashmiris. Speaking at the launch of 2.16 billion dollars Neelum-Jhelum Hydro- Electric Project in Islamabad Saturday he said Kashmir runs in the veins of every Pakistanis and relations between Pakistan and India could not be normalized unless the dispute is resolved. He said the forward movement on conflict resolution slowed down in the past few months but now there are positive indications in this regard. President Musharraf said now there is greater interaction among the Kashmiris on both sides of the LoC which would help in taking the peace process forward. Neelum-Jhelum Project has strategic importance, President Musharrraf said and expressed gratitude for the Chinese assistance in the project. It is yet another symbol of Sino-Pak friendship, he added.. He said Pakistan has proposed extending oil and gas pipelines and rail network up to Chinese border which would be an eighth wonder. The Chinese Ambassador said Neelum-Jhelum to be completed in eight years is one of the biggest project being undertaken with Chinese collaboration. The project envisages the diversion of Neelum River waters through a tunnel out- falling into Jhelum River. The Power House would be constructed at Chatter Kalas, 22 kms south of Muzaffarabad, the capital of Azad Kashmir.

ChandraS

Postby ChandraS » 09 Feb 2008 21:57

SSridhar wrote:TSP wants to inspect Baglihar before commissioning
Pakistan wants to inspect the Baglihar dam to see if India has complied with the World Bank neutral expert’s verdict regarding the design of the power project.

.....
In 2005, Pakistan had sought intervention of the World Bank which is the third party to the 1960 Indus Water Treaty, alleging that construction of the project violated the accord. The expert had upheld three of the four objections raised by Pakistan. :D Reservations about the spillway had been rejected.


The Pakis want to inspect their 300% victory :D

Rohit_K
BRFite
Posts: 593
Joined: 09 Nov 2006 22:53
Location: atop Sukkur Barage

Postby Rohit_K » 10 Feb 2008 00:40




Spotted on SSC TSP -

I think this news article is wrong. People didnt any of you study Pakistan Studies in school! Under Indus Water Treaty, Pakistan gets 3 western rivers and all their tributaries (so that includes Neelem as well). India is allowed to generate electricity from this water but it can not divert any for its use or use any of it for its irrigation needs. So India can not take any water from that river, but it is free to build hydropower plants on it as long as India is not storing too much water for that purpose. Now as long as they are following these rules, I fail to see what Pakistan's objection is, and I have no idea where this talk of priority-rights is coming from. Under Indus Treaty teh division of water was finalized once and for all, and no one is allowed to usurpe other's water rights (acutally they can not because I believe Ravi and Sutlej start on Pakistani side of Kashmir so if India tries to usurpe Indus, jeelhum or Chenab, Pakistan can block of Ravi and Sutlej) Maybe there is more to it than that but I doubt it, its probably just another case of Indo-Pak hysteria over nothing (just like Siachen).

Anujan
Forum Moderator
Posts: 7009
Joined: 27 May 2007 03:55

Postby Anujan » 10 Feb 2008 01:13

SSridhar wrote:AoA

Musharraf launches the Neelum-Jhelum Project
Maybe there is more to it than that but I doubt it, its probably just another case of Indo-Pak hysteria over nothing (just like Siachen).


Evil kuffar yindoos at it again.

Pakistan has rights to the waters of the Indus, Chenab and Jhelum. Jhelum is the largest Indus tributary (also the most western river) and Kishanganga (neelum) is Jhelum's largest tributary. Neelum joins Jhelum near muzzafarbad. Kuffar SDREs want to build a 27km long underground canal through the mountains and divert water from Kishanganga to Wullar and from Wullar to Jhelum. SDREs argue, no water is being held, just water from one river moved to another, in any case they join 80kms downstream anyway. We are innocent onlee.

TFTAs argue, no touching the river.

AFAIK (I could be wrong here), diverting one river to another is allowed under IWT provided it does not disturb pre-existing power/irrigation projects. Kishanganga/Neelum does not have one downstream, so if we finish first, it should be okay. Interesting race to find who finishes construction first.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 27 Feb 2008 17:09

An Act of Treason

Some Rip-van-Winkle wakes up . . .and gives a soul-stirring speech.
It is surprising to note that the Government of Pakistan seems satisfied at the unjust decision of the World Bank's mediator on the question of Baglihar Dam. The fact is that its construction will lead to an irreparable loss of Pakistan's economy, political stability and ideological frontiers. Apart from an unprecedented huge loss of water, its construction will prove to be a death knell for our Defence too. It must be noticed that Baglihar's construction is an illegal act in the light of Indus Water Treaty :lol: signed in September 1960. Through this treaty, it was agreed upon between the two countries that India will have the right on run of the river of Ravi, Sutlej and Beas whereas Pakistan will enjoy complete right of Chenab, Jhelum and Sindh waters.

It should be noted here that it was an unwise step on the part of the government to ask for mediation to an ineffective body which has cunningly provided opportunity to India to play the game as it likes thereby resulting into ratification of her international crime at the behest of the World Bank. This is highly dangerous for Pakistan. We must take into account the Indian nefarious designs. We should have dealt with the situation at the very outset. It is because of our remissness that India, by violating Indus Water Treaty, has already constructed about sixteen small and big size dams under Hydel Power Project on River Chenab.
This is a violation of the Treaty. Not once, but several times, India has been repeatedly committing violations against the Agreement because of Pakistan's negligence. The result of this negligence is the illegal construction of Salal Dam on Chenab by India. Baglihar is so huge that only in one day, it can decrease Pakistan's six to seven thousand cubic ft water. :lol: India has the capacity to store our water in these dams in three months. Such an act can cause unparallel havoc for Pakistan especially its agriculture.

Now let us have a look at the Defence of Pakistan. It may be noted that Marala Headworks on the river Chenab has significant importance. Its water is thrown in Ravi which is further distributed to different border area canals. In this context Marla Headworks can work until the run of the river Chenab is not intruded. If the flow decreases it will adversely affect the whole Punjab Canal System. The point is that in case the water of Chenab is blocked it will not only damage the irrigation system but at the same time it will paralyse the Defence Line too. In such a state of affairs, one is constrained to learn as to why such a trivial question remained unnoticed by the people at the helm of affairs. It is unfortunate that we are not taking the question seriously that Chenab's water is the only source of all products being grown in our country. India is storing every drop of our water in Kashmir and according to Mr Chakrawarti, irrigation Minister of India, who had already threatened Pakistan in 2002 that India will withdraw itself from World Bank Agreement and make Pakistan barren.
It may also be noted that India had tried to construct Wuller Barage on river Jhelum but thanks to the mujahideen who blew it up otherwise it would have become a problem for Pakistan by now. :lol: It may also be added here that some other projects are also being materialised on Kishan Ganga and efforts are being made to stop Sindh's water. :lol:

The question is as to why the people at the top are silent since 1999 when a calculated attack was launched on our Defence System. It was necessary for them to put an end to it immediately. What was the sense in it to take the matter to the World Bank when 80% of its construction work had been completed. The World Bank simply put some technical restrictions and gave walk over to India to carry on. During the same period, India remained busy erecting fences on our border. We kept mum. And, still the irony is that we claim our criminal negligence to be our success. It is a fact that India has turned its deserts of Rajisthan into a fertile green land on one hand and on the other, she is bent upon turning our fertile areas into a desert. When the right of run of the river has been accepted, who will stop India's further aggressions?
Is it such a simple question that we should wait and see the Indian attitude without uttering a word of caution? It is a question of our life and death. Silence from our side will mean turning Pakistan into a desert thereby dissolving Pakistan's Defence giving opportunity to India to materialise its plans of Akhand Bharat. In this context we shall have to ponder over the matter carefully and find the ways to protect our country from the Indian adventure.

First of all we must accept our fault that we went to the World Bank without taking into account that the matter was purely a political one and not a technical problem. The fact is that the matter lost its significance the moment India made open violation of the Treaty by constructing the Dam. India began its construction by force and plans to thrust its hegemony.
It is only apolitical crisis deeply linked to our Defence. Therefore, the matter can only be solved through a political dialogue and in case, India does not respond actively, then we must gird up our loins {Isn't that a kafir act ?} and be ready for war. Immediate solution to this problem is that we should take up the question boldly asking for the whole of Kashmir and should bring it back to point one.

It is important to note that before India withdraws itself from the Agreement, we should declare with courage that since India is utilising Indus Water Treaty for its benefit thereby causing damage to Pakistan :lol: , therefore, in such a situation we are no more a party to it. We wish that India should stop any further aggression and should remove all its installations and constructions on our rivers. In case it does not respond, all future talks with India should be discontinued. And last of all, make it clear that Pakistan will not hesitate to go for a war to get its rights back.

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21182
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Postby Prem » 27 Feb 2008 22:34

Nothing more beautiful in South Asia :wink: than the spectacle of Baki proving his namardi, bewakoofi and haramiat pakistaniat in public.
India is helping them to resemble their land to desert like the Holy Land of Saudi Arabia thus bringing more Islam into Pakistan and these ungrateful ( BC) Valentine night product of Paki brother and sister is whinning like an old Lawhorian.

alokgupt
BRFite
Posts: 186
Joined: 22 Aug 2007 04:42

Postby alokgupt » 02 Mar 2008 07:32

Indus Water Treaty divests India of Chenab when technically it is feasible to utilize that water

India's immediate response would be to block the flow of the Chenab. Pakistan would be deprived of a major tributary for the Indus. Chenab is the most vulnerable among the western rivers given to Pakistan considering that it flows hardly 50 km away from Ravi River in the Indian plains. It is technically feasible to divert the Chenab through the Marhu tunnel and join with the Ravi, thus retaining Chenab for India's sole use.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 15 Mar 2008 19:22

Unyielding Stance
YET again, the water dispute between the nuclear rivals, India and Pakistan, has bubbled up as preparations by the former to build a number of dams in the occupied territory of Jammu and Kashmir are well under way. Despite Pakistan's repeated requests, India has chosen to turn a blind eye to the gravity of the situation and instead has continued to maintain its uncompromising stance on the issue. It must be noted that almost all of the dams India is currently building are in violation of the Indus Water Treaty brokered by the good offices of the World Bank to settle the water dispute in 1960. Pakistan is currently facing severe water and power crises, and the construction of those dams would virtually turn Pakistan into a wasteland. The water level in our dams is already below the danger level and the wheat crop is facing problems, mainly due to the shortage of water. There are also reports indicating that this time around, the production of wheat will be much below the target. The construction of these dams flies in the face of the CBM mantra voiced by India besides proving its mindset of pulling the rug from under its neighbour's feet. It is hoped that Islamabad will take up the issue more firmly and press New Delhi to stop construction of those dams.

SureshP
BRFite
Posts: 256
Joined: 10 Apr 2002 11:31

Postby SureshP » 15 Mar 2008 21:33

Centre approves creation of Ravi-Beas link under AIBP
13 Mar, 2008, 2021 hrs IST, PTI

CHANDIGARH: The Central Government has approved creation of a second Ravi-Beas link that will prevent large quantities of Ravi water from flowing to Pakistan, Haryana Governement on Thursday said.

"Earlier, Army authorities had conveyed that a huge quantity of water continues to flow to Pakistan. Surprisingly, this logical suggestion of Haryana met with serious opposition from Punjab and they took the strange stand that a Central organisation like CWC would not be allowed to install and monitor the gauge," he said.

The Minister said that now, when the proposed second link shall increase the availability of water for everyone.

Singh said that Haryana had repeatedly raised the issue of Ravi waters flowing to Pakistan when under the Indus Water Treaty, the entire waters of the eastern rivers that is, Satluj, Ravi and Beas were allotted to India and the waters of the western rivers that is Indus, Chenab and Jhelum was allotted to Pakistan.

"In addition, the Central Government had given Rs 100 crores to Pakistan. Therefore, the waters of the eastern rivers became national assets.
These waters were subsequently apportioned between Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan and Delhi through various agreements managed and administered through Bhakra Beas Management Board", he said.

Economic Times

Vivek_A
BRFite
Posts: 593
Joined: 17 Nov 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Postby Vivek_A » 17 Mar 2008 06:15

deleted: posted below with highlighting :D
Last edited by Vivek_A on 17 Mar 2008 07:25, edited 1 time in total.

SureshP
BRFite
Posts: 256
Joined: 10 Apr 2002 11:31

Postby SureshP » 17 Mar 2008 06:20

Just for the record and to compare with other figures the Pakis come up from time to time

River inflows lowest in 10 years

* Hydroelectric power production down by 1,000 MW a day

By Zafar Bhutta

ISLAMABAD: River system inflows on Saturday reached the lowest level in 10 years, lowering water in Tarbela to dead level, officials told Daily Times.

River inflows in the first three months of 2008 have been lowest compared to the corresponding period in the last ten years, they said.

The total inflow in rivers was recorded at 69,380 cusecs on Saturday, they said. The lowest level of inflows recorded in the last 10 years was 89,400 cusecs. The total outflows on Saturday were 23,384 cusecs.


Water storage in Tarbela was recorded at 1,359 feet, which is the dead level. The Indus River System Authority (IRSA) is not storing any water in Tarbela and releasing all of its 19,300 cusecs inflow for irrigation.

Water level in Mangla has increased because of an increased inflow from Jhelum River. Inflow in Mangla was 23,384 cusecs on Saturday and outflow 24,000 cusecs.

The alarming decline in water levels is causing concerns about the last irrigation of Rabi crops and the sowing of Kharif crops, sources told Daily Times. But some officials expect the situation to normalise by March 25, when snow will begin to melt in the Northern Areas. Dams may then be able to store water for the irrigation of Kharif crops.

IRSA will call an inter-provincial meeting in the last week of current month, sources said, to review the water situation for the Kharif crops.

Hydroelectric power: Sources in the Pakistan Electric Power Company (PEPCO) said water releases for hydroelectric power production had been reduced from 29,000 cusecs to 18,000 cusecs after water reached dead level in Tarbela, lowering power production by 1,000 megawatts (MW) a day to 2,200 MW.

Power generation by Independent Power Producers (IPPs) had reached a record 5,126 MW during the current year, they said. As per their agreements with the government, IPPs are bound to generate 5,728 MW of electricity.

Sources said a shortage of gas was also causing a decline in power production. Thermal power generation plants were only getting 20 percent of their total requirement of gas, they added.

Daily Times

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 23 Mar 2008 12:11

Chinese company to build Neelum-Jhelum PoK Project

This is the tenth time we are hearing of this project 'about to get off the ground'. Let's wait and watch.
Pakistan is expected to conclude soon reinsurance deals with a Chinese consortium for the strategically important Neelam-Jhelum hydro-electric project being built by it at a cost of USD 1.5 billion in Pakistan- Occupied Kashmir (POK), over which India has voiced concerns.

"The talks are in very advanced stages and close of the deal is expected by April end or early May," a senior executive of Adamjee Insurance Company, Pakistan-based insurer, who is tying up the deals, said.

A consortium consisting of China's Gezhouba Water and Power Company and China National Machinery and Equipment Import and Export Corporation (CMEC) were awarded contracts by Pakistan in December last year to build the Rs 7,873 crore project in eight years.

Chinese insurance companies PICC, Ping An, China Pacific and AIG (China) have experience in insuring the works carried out by the Chinese contractors in China-based domestic projects, Zersis Rustom Birdie, General Manager (Development) of the Karachi-based insurance company, said.

"We feel they (Chinese firms) are better experienced than European-based reinsurance companies to cover the works carried out by Chinese contractors in Pakistan," he said.

Asked if the premiums from the international reinsurance companies were high because of war and terrorism-related risks, Birdie did not comment directly but said European firms were tough on terms for such a project as they did not have Chinese domestic experience directly and used PICC or Ping An in the past.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 23 Mar 2008 12:38

Pressure sought on India for water diversion
[quote]Construction of Baglihar, {BHP is a done deal. What are you talking about. Are you saying that morally India should not store any water there ? I cannot believe that it comes from the TSP Commissioner of IWC}Kishan Ganga and Wullar dams on the Indus river system will create water shortage in Pakistan, a senior government official warned on Friday.

“The government must take necessary steps to ensure that any such ploy of creating water-related problems for Pakistan could be foiled,â€

sum
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10113
Joined: 08 May 2007 17:04
Location: (IT-vity && DRDO) nagar

Postby sum » 23 Mar 2008 13:43

Many people, Mr Shah said, did not know that the Indian government blocked the canal water in 1948 that brought both countries to the brink of war.

What is he talking about?
Did Nehru" the great peacenik" actually do that??

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 23 Mar 2008 18:11

sum wrote:What is he talking about?
Did Nehru" the great peacenik" actually do that??


You may read this

sum
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10113
Joined: 08 May 2007 17:04
Location: (IT-vity && DRDO) nagar

Postby sum » 23 Mar 2008 21:32

Thanks,Sridhar saar...that article sure is a treasure trove of info...

Vivek_A
BRFite
Posts: 593
Joined: 17 Nov 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Postby Vivek_A » 31 Mar 2008 18:08

http://www.dawn.com/2008/03/31/ebr4.htm

Indus river pollution a risk to livelihoods



By F. H. Mughal


A RECENT seminar organised by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Sindh, was informed that the Indus river is highly polluted. The levels of various parameters are high enough to classify the river as polluted. Even the coliform level, which should have not been present in water bodies at all, averaged 800 per 100 ml.

It is a fact that the Indus river is polluted due to indiscriminate discharges of untreated municipal and industrial wastewater, the Manchar Lake discharges make the pollution further distinct during periods of low flows (December-January). But the comparison of water quality of this river and other water bodies with the international standards made at the seminar, was not justified. The water quality of Indus river was compared with the WHO’s guidelines for drinking-water and the EU’s drinking-water standards.

The international drinking-water guidelines and standards do not apply to waters of the surface water bodies (Indus river, Phuleli Canal, Manchar Lake, Danistar Canal, Haleji Lake, Pinyari Canal, etc). It is just like comparing oranges with apples.

Vivek_A
BRFite
Posts: 593
Joined: 17 Nov 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Postby Vivek_A » 05 Apr 2008 06:18

http://www.thenews.com.pk/top_story_detail.asp?Id=13950

IHC seeks report on Indian dams’ construction
ISLAMABAD: The Islamabad High Court has directed the Secretary Cabinet Division to submit a report on construction of dams on the Indian side, which is interrupting water flow. IHC Chief Justice Sardar Mohammad Aslam heard a plea filed by Kowkab Iqbal advocate. The petitioner raised concerns over the construction of Baglihar Dam, Kishan Ganga Dam and other proposed projects by India. He said India was using about 80 per cent of water of rivers Jehlum and Chenab, creating a barren-like situation in the country.

Vivek_A
BRFite
Posts: 593
Joined: 17 Nov 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Postby Vivek_A » 08 Apr 2008 04:36

development: Pakistan’s water woes —Syed Mohammad Ali

There is unquestionable need to give more attention to water conservation and preventing water loss within the existing irrigation system, besides trying to increase water supplies

The increasing imbalance between the availability and demand of water is becoming a very serious problem. The UN keeps warning that during the next 25 years, many violent water conflicts could emerge within and between countries around the world. But the situation is no less alarming even today. Nearly twenty percent of the current world population — over one billion people — lacks access to safe drinking water.

Given the evident importance of water in the lives of individuals and nations led the UN to designate March 22 as World Water Day, so that it should be celebrated across the world as a day of action to help address this global public crisis. Although numerous countries are faced with a similar threat of water shortages, let us look at the challenges facing our own country and try to see what can be done to overcome them.

It is surprising to note that just a few decades ago Pakistan was considered to have an abundance of fresh water. Yet a recent World Bank report has listed Pakistan among 17 countries that are facing an acute water shortage. Government sources also confirm that the per capita availability of water has gradually dwindled from over 5,000 cubic metres in 1951 to 1,100 cubic metres. Such estimates based on averages are misleading, however, since they do not distinguish between those who have excess access to water and others without access to even the average amount.

Thus, looking at other data to understand the severity of the problem is necessary. A revealing alternative statistic maintains that less then sixty percent of the current population of the country has no access to safe drinking water.

One obvious reason for this decreasing water availability is that the nation’s population was under 34 million in 1951, but it has exceeded the 160 million mark, and is further expected to grow to around 220 million by 2025. Water scarcity will obviously be compounded in the future when more and more water will be required to meet increased agricultural, domestic and industrial demand.

The World Bank has pointed out that Pakistan is currently close to using up all its surface and ground water. It backs this claim by pointing to the fact that Pakistan only stores 30 days of river water. India, on the other hand, stores four times as much. The decreasing reservoirs capacity is predicted to lessen the capita availability to about 550 cubic metres by 2025.

Despite this serious problem, however, the ongoing diversion of freshwater for industrial and agricultural production and the degradation of freshwater sources due to the discharge of industrial wastes, chemical inputs like pesticides, and even household sewage, continues causing further degradation of surface water quality.

Not focusing much on a more integrated approach to water management which aims to undertake a less disrupting and more holistic view towards utilisation of natural flows including their conservation, the World Bank is instead encouraging Pakistan to build new reservoirs to meet electricity demand and to fulfil its industrial and agricultural demands. The World Bank argues that these new water reservoirs can aggressively push Pakistan’s economy forward, and it has put forth optimistic projections in support of this claim, such as the estimation that every new dam built by the country will add four to five percent to Pakistan’s GDP.

New reservoirs are also considered vital to save the industrial sector from the consequences of a water shortage. There are over half a million small and big industrial units in the country and the estimated usage of water by all industries is 3.5 million acre feet at present but this demand is also going to continue increasing in line with ambitious production targets. Yet simultaneous measures to ensure the contamination of existing water supplies by these industries are still not being given the attention they need.

A similar trend is evident with regards to energy generation. Pakistan’s electricity demand is increasing by seven percent annually, due to which the need for new water reservoirs is considered urgent. It has been calculated that Pakistan has 50,000 MW of hydropower potential, but it is merely harnessing 14 percent against its total current requirement of 20,000 MW. Conversely, the example of China and India is cited which apparently produce 30 percent of their required power through water, while even more developed countries are harnessing 70 to 80 percent of their hydro-potential for energy generation.

Pakistan, instead of generating hydropower, is producing expensive thermal power. While the discovery of coal reserves in Thar may alter the economic cost of thermal energy, the fact remains that burning fossil fuels are a very polluting source of energy production.

Given the state of the environment, it is no longer feasible for even developing countries to merely brush aside the sustainability costs of energy production. Yet brushing aside legitimate fears of increased flooding and seawater intrusion, Pakistan recently unveiled plans to build a series of dams. The stated intentions in this regard include completing the Mangla Dam raising project by September 2008, and the construction of Mirani Dam, Gomal Zam Dam, Subakzai Dam and Satpara Dam by 2009.

Whether the new government would continue with plans to construct these mega water reservoirs, and thereafter the controversial Kalabagh Dam, remains to be seen. However, there is unquestionable need to give more attention to water conservation and preventing water loss within the existing irrigation system, besides trying to increase water supplies. Yet no new and encouraging policy announcements have been put forth to this effect to date.

It is also important to realise that water scarcity is exacerbating inter-household burdens, and interregional and international conflicts. For example, water scarcity leads women in poorer households to spend more time and effort to fetch water. These households also have to bear medical costs incurred due to increased sickness brought about by waterborne diseases. These issues also must be borne in mind and adequate steps taken to address them, instead of singularly thinking of increasing water availability for boosting industrial and agricultural output.

The writer is a researcher. He can be contacted at ali@policy.hu

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 09 Apr 2008 20:54

TSP requests Baglihar Inspection
Islamabad (PTI): India has not responded to Pakistan's request for an inspection of the Baglihar hydro-power project in Jammu and Kashmir before its formal commissioning, a media report claimed here on wednesday.

The Permanent Indus Commission (PIC), a body that exists between Pakistan and India since 1960, will meet in the end of May to take up the routine agenda rather than the most crucial inspection of the Indian Baglihar hydro-power project before its formal commissioning, it said.

"There is cold response on the part of India on the question of inspection of the Baglihar project despite Pakistan's repeated reminders, and this issue is not on the agenda of the coming PIC session," The News reported, quoting sources.

India is expected to start commissioning of the Baglihar project, regular power generation and enhanced utilisation of water, within the next two to three months after it received go-ahead with the neutral expert finding modification in its original design, the report said.

The May meeting, for which dates are yet to be finalised, would discuss the exchange of the outgoing year's reports and next monsoon arrangements between the two countries, it said.

Pakistan has also written to New Delhi for taking up another controversial project, Kishanganga, and its water rights, the sources said.

"We try our best to protect Pakistan's interests and ensure all rights under the 1960 Water Treaty which the two countries signed 48 years back," the commissioner for PIC, Syed Jamaat Ali Shah said.

Pakistan, in its objections submitted before the World Bank-appointed neutral expert, Prof Raymond Lafitte, had raised four concerns on the design of the Baglihar project and sought modification on freeboard, level of power intakes, pondage and spillway. {and failed in all of them miserably}


While the IWT talks extensively about the dispute settlement mechanism, it stops with the final award by either the Neutral Expert or an Arbitration Panel. It doesn't talk about the follow-up action after the award. That is left to the normal mechanism of the Permanent Indus Commission.

Now, the IWT says the following regarding the inspection of the various works under Article VIII:

(c) to undertake, once in every five years,a general tour of inspection of the Rivers for ascertaining the facts connected with various developments and works on the Rivers ;

(d) to undertake
promptly, at the request of either Commissioner, a tour of inspection of such works or sites on the Rivers as may be considered necessary by him for ascertaining the facts connected with those works or sites ;

I do not expect GoI to act anytime soon on this request. It will most definitely not act before the BHP is commissioned and dedicated to the nation.

Vivek_A
BRFite
Posts: 593
Joined: 17 Nov 2003 12:31
Location: USA

Postby Vivek_A » 15 Apr 2008 06:18

http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.as ... 2008_pg7_2

India plans 3 more mega power projects on Chenab in IHK

* Projects will have power generation capacity of 2,120 MW

By Iftikhar Gilani

NEW DELHI: India is setting up a company called the Chenab Valley Power Projects (CVPP) to construct three power plants on the Chenab River in Indian-held Jammu and Kashmir. All three projects — Kiru (600 MW), Pakal Dul (1,000 MW) and Karwa (520 MW) — are to be constructed in the Doda district.t.

Pakal Dul is to be a reservoir-based scheme on the Marusudar River, the main right bank tributary of the Chenab River, in the Kishtwar tehsil of Doda district. The project envisages the construction of a 167 metre-high concrete face rockfill dam at Drangdhuran village, and an underground powerhouse.

The New Delhi-owned National Hydro-Electric Corporation (NHPC) will undertake the projects as joint ventures with the Indian-held Jammu and Kashmir government. The NHPC will have 51 percent stake in the projects, which is being seen as a boost for the power-starved state. For earlier projects, such as Salal, Dul Husti and Uri, the NHPC provided just 12.5 percent power as royalty to the state, while the bulk of power was transferred to supply power to the Rajasthan, Punjab Haryana and Delhi states.

After extensive negotiations between the NHPC and state government representatives Financial Adviser Dr Haseeb Drabu and Commissioner/Secretary Power Sandeep Nayak, in presence of Union Minister of State for Power Jairam Ramesh, it was decided that the CVPP would be set up.

Sources in the Union Power Ministry said that it was expected that a memorandum of understanding (MoU) would be signed between the parties on April 26, in presence of Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

According to the MoU, the NHPC will own 51 percent stake in the company. The remaining 49 percent will go to the Indian-held Jammu and Kashmir government-owned Power Development Corporation (JKPDC).

Aside from a 12.5 percent share as royalty, the state will get 61.5 percent of the power generated by these power plants, which are expected to start generating power in the next four years.

The three projects will have a cumulative installed capacity of around 2,120 MW, and will require an investment of Rs 12,720 crore. Both sides will shell out 30 percent equity, while the remaining amount is to be raised from loans.

According to the MoU, the NHPC will lose its equity if it fails to execute the projects within the prescribed deadlines.

Union Minister Jairam Ramesh has directed NHPC officials to start work on the projects simultaneously within 60 days of the signing of the MoU.

It has also been decided that a 12-member board will be set up, with six members from each side. According to the agreement, the JKPDC will nominate the chairman, while the NHPC will appoint the managing director. The state government has committed to appoint a non-political person with technical and professional integrity as chairman. It has also been decided that the company will employ all its human resources from the state, to address unemployment problems.

Thanks to the three power projects in Jammu and Kashmir, the NHPC earned profit of Rs 1,005 crore and its sales recorded the highest-ever figure of Rs 2,300 crore in the last fiscal year. The Corporation has earned Rs 300 crore from its three projects, Salal, Uri-I, and Dul Hasti, which were set up at an investment of Rs 9,454 crore.

BijuShet
BRFite
Posts: 1575
Joined: 09 Jan 2008 23:14
Location: under my tin foil hat

Postby BijuShet » 15 Apr 2008 21:50

Consensus needed on Kalabagh dam: Ashraf
The News - Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - By Mumtaz Alvi

ISLAMABAD: The National Assembly was informed on Monday that the construction of Kalabagh dam would begin after further projection of its benefits and features.

Federal Minister for Water and Power Raja Pervaiz Ashraf told the House in a written answer during the Question-Hour that the decision was made at the cabinet meeting in 2006 for which Wapda had prepared a media strategy for projection of the dam's benefits.

It was being widely speculated that Prime Minister Syed Yousuf Raza Gilani would be present during the first Question-Hour after the new coalition government was installed on March 31. However, he did arrive in the assembly but moments after the Question-Hour was over.

"The project can be taken up at appropriate time as decided by the government after consensus from all the provinces," the minister emphasised. Raja Asrhaf was replying to a question by Dr Donya Aziz.

He recalled that the cabinet in its 2006 meeting had decided that all the five projects, Akhori, Basha, Kalabagh dam, Kurram Tangi and Munda dam will be built by 2016 and that the construction of Basha and Munda projects be started immediately.

To another question, the minister said that the expected life span of Tarbela dam was 83 years from 1974, the year of its completion. It had been estimated on the basis of annual sediment inflow @ 5,50,000 tons.

Replying to a query by Ms Hasnain, the minister said that the cost of the Kurram Tangi dam had been increased from Rs 17,205 million to Rs 19,445 (an increase of 2,240 million) and it could go further up in view of inflation and price-hike.

However, the reasons for this increase in cost, he pointed out, were that the original design by Wapda envisaged 295 feet high dam with a storage capacity of 0.914 million acre feet (MAF) and 83 MW power generation.

Owing to reservations of the NWFP government, however, it was decided in a meeting chaired by Minister of Water and Power on February 02, 2007 to increase the height of the dam from 295 ft to 322 ft to increase the water storage capacity from 0.914 MAF to 1.2 MAF, to arrest the flood flows in wet year, Raja Ashraf noted.


To a question by Berjees Tahir, the minister said that during the last 12 years, not 1 MW of additional electricity was generated, as Pakistan continued to face severe supply and demand crisis.

He explained that Pakistan was facing daily shortage of 3,000 MW: the demand was 10,000 MW, whereas the supply was 7,000 MW. The government, he said, was trying to overcome this shortage as early as possible by adopting a number of short-term, long-term and emergency measures. He hoped that the situation would improve within six to seven months, whereas load-shedding would be eliminated within a span of three years.

Answering another question by Amir Muqam, the minister said that independent power producers (IPPs) were launched by the former PPP government, which were producing 5,000 MW electricity, adding had there been no such policy, power supply would have been for just an hour during 24 hours.

To a question by Riaz Hussain Pirzada, the minister said the government would encourage private firms to invest in power projects, adding during the last five years Alternate Energy Development Board had done nothing.

He noted that a windmill project on experimental basis would be launched shortly after which, the government would encourage and facilitate private firms to come forward and invest in this sector.

The minister said that the Mangla dam raising would be completed in September this year. In reply to a question by Yasmeen Rehman, the minister said that transmission and distribution losses in 2005 and 2006 were 22.9 per cent and 22.4 per cent respectively, adding the value of 1 per cent loss was estimated to be Rs3 billion.

The Minister for Law and Justice, Farooq H Naek, who is also the minister in-charge Cabinet Division, told the House in reply to question by Shakeela Khanam and Dr Azra Fazal that offices of the NA standing committees' chairmen would be built at the Parliament Lodges. The estimated cost at the time of design of the project to be built at 2.2 acre piece of land was Rs 1440 million. He agreed that the cost could go up.

BijuShet
BRFite
Posts: 1575
Joined: 09 Jan 2008 23:14
Location: under my tin foil hat

Postby BijuShet » 15 Apr 2008 21:52

‘80 pc of groundwater in Sindh not fit for consumption’
The News - Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - By our correspondent

HYDERABAD: Sindh University scientist and Project Director of High-Tech Resources Central Laboratories Prof Dr Muhammad Yar Khuhawar has disclosed that groundwater of 80 per cent of Sindh province is saline and not suitable for human consumption and added that whatever packets of sweet water are available may be contaminated with arsenic, one of the toxic substances.

The research scholar recommended that there is a need to recognize the problem and efforts may be made to provide cheap filters for the removal of arsenic before consumption. According to a World Health Organisation (WHO) report, "long-term exposure to arsenic via drinking water causes cancer of the skin, lungs, urinary bladder and kidney, as well as other skin changes such as pigmentation changes and thickening (hyperkeratosis). Dr Khuhawar said the maximum permissible limit in water for human consumption by the WHO is 10 ppb.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 17 Apr 2008 19:21

Indus Waters - Editorial in Jung
NO one less than Pakistan's Commissioner on the Indus Waters Commission has revealed that India plans to put up no less than 40 projects, big and small, on the River Chenab, for the generation of 2100 MW of electricity. With no less than three dam sites in Doda district, India is exploiting the provision in the Indus Waters Treaty for the building of power projects, so long as they are just run-of-the-river. However, these projects will be converted into diversions of water, and Pakistan will be left to invoke the largely toothless mechanism provided in the Treaty, just as it has done over the Baghliar project, though it has not invoked it over Wullar, both of which are barrage projects.

Jamaat Ali Shah, who is an irrigation expert in his own right, made these remarks to the Nazria-e-Pakistan Foundation, which he addressed. As he made painfully clear, Indian claims were strengthened by the Pakistani failure to build major projects on the rivers it had got under the Treaty. Though apparently Mr Shah did not mention it, the most obvious project not to be built, though all the feasibility reports favour it, is the Kalabagh Dam on the Indus. {No, he is referring to the Neelum-Jhelum project in TSP}

Mr Shah told of the Indian plan to earn Rs 10.05 billion for the Indian government, while Held Kashmir would get a royalty of only 12.51 percent. Obviously, the Indian government has no compunctions about exploiting Kashmir's natural resources even though there is a UN dispute on the territory. :lol: {Firstb of all, the whole of J&K including Gilgit, Baltistan belong to India. It is TSP which is in illegal occupation. How about Mangla ? It was built on India's objection} This should also serve as an object lesson to the people of Pakistan to buckle down and get ready to use those resources they have been left with. The refusal to execute projects even though they are ready does not favour any province, though the unity of the federation is commonly made the excuse. It is India that is favoured by this approach, not any Pakistani province. India has always been exploitative in its approach to almost any problem, and this is yet another example. It is time that Pakistan stopped India from going any further on this issue. :lol: {Pray, how ?}

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21182
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Postby Prem » 17 Apr 2008 22:30

Paki=islam dont need water running from polluted kaffir land .May Allah provide abbe zam zam onlee to quench their thirst. :D

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 24221
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Postby SSridhar » 26 Apr 2008 14:38

PM dedicates Dulhusti Hdro Power Project to the Nation

Way to go in spite of the inordinate delays.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Saturday dedicated to the nation, a 390 MW hydro electric power project built on river Chenab in the newly created Kishtwar district of the state.

Singh, who inaugurated the project for which the foundation stone was laid 25 years ago by the then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, described it as another milestone in tapping the vast hydro power potential in Jammu and Kashmir.

About 20,000 MW of hydro-power potential has been identified in the country's northern most state and nearly 23 minor and major hydro projects are in the pipeline. :twisted:

This is the second power project on river Chenab after the 360-MW Salal project, which was commissioned in 1994.

Two more hydel power projects - 450 MW Baglihar hydel project and 600 MW Sawalakot hydel project in Ramban district are under construction on the river.

Describing the project built in the Pir Panjal ranges of Himalayas as an engineering marvel, NHPC (Dulhasti project) General Manager Roopak Jain told PTI that three turbines of 130 MW each started commercial generation from March 31, 2007 and has already surpassed generation targets.

The NHPC has set up a 65-meter high, 186-meter long concrete gravity dam with 7.46-meter and 7.7-meter diameter 10.59 km long head.

Work on the project was stopped for over five years from 1991 after a French engineer engaged for the project was abducted from Doda. The engineer was later released.


Return to “Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: mmasand and 49 guests