Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 22 Dec 2017 18:46

Excerpt from December 21st speech made by US Vice President to US troops at Bagram Airfield dealing with the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan:

“For too long Pakistan has provided safe haven to the Taliban and many terrorist organizations, but those days are over. (Applause.) President Trump has put Pakistan on notice. As the President said, so I say now: Pakistan has much to gain from partnering with the United States, and Pakistan has much to lose by continuing to harbor criminals and terrorists.”

Full marks to the US for bellicose rhetoric though it remains to be seen if the bellicose rhetoric will actually be walked by the US or as we in India have so often seen the US will once again convince herself that it is more expedient to fork out Jaziya by way of military equipment supply and aid to the Islamic Republic.

From the Whitehouse website:

Remarks to the Troops by Vice President Pence in Afghanistan

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 01 Jan 2018 18:42

US President Donald Trump tweets the following about the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan.

The US was indeed a “foolish” Kaafir Dhimmi to have handed over USD 33 Billion as Jaziya to the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic.

The question off course remains as what the US is going to do, besides handing out yet more aid and equipment, to change the Islamic Republic of Pakistan’s duplicitious behaviour.

Donald J. Trump Verified account
@realDonaldTrump

The United States has foolishly given Pakistan more than 33 billion dollars in aid over the last 15 years, and they have given us nothing but lies & deceit, thinking of our leaders as fools. They give safe haven to the terrorists we hunt in Afghanistan, with little help. No more!

4:12 AM - 1 Jan 2018


From Twitter here:

Twitter

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 05 Jan 2018 08:27

X Posted from the Terroristan thread.

Chicago Tribune Editorial titled “To solve the Pakistan problem: Less carrot, more stick”:

Editorial: To solve the Pakistan problem: Less carrot, more stick

By Editorial Board

January 3, 2018, 4:45 PM

President Donald Trump’s first tweet of 2018, directed at Pakistan, was predictably clumsy and combative. “The United States has foolishly given Pakistan more than 33 billion dollars in aid over the last 15 years, and they have given us nothing but lies & deceit,” Trump huffed. “They give safe haven to the terrorists we hunt in Afghanistan, with little help. No more!”

As is often the case, the tweet is fact-challenged — $14 billion of that money was actually post-9/11 reimbursements to Pakistan for its support of U.S. anti-terrorism initiatives and operations in Afghanistan. Nevertheless the spirit of Trump’s remarks is on the mark.

For years, Pakistan has played a double game with its anti-terrorism efforts. At times, it has been helpful in ferreting out al-Qaida operatives, and has launched military offensives against its homegrown threat, the Pakistani Taliban. But Washington for years has accused Pakistan of a policy of covertly backing militant groups that target U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan — namely, the Haqqani network and the Afghan Taliban.

That coziness with extremist groups continues to confound American military commanders. Haqqani and Afghan Taliban militants launch ambushes and bombings on U.S.-allied forces in Afghanistan, then slip back over the border into the badlands of northwest Pakistan, insulated from retaliation by American and Afghan forces. Pakistani leaders issue boilerplate denials that they provide militants safe haven, yet continue the tacit support.

Trump’s predecessor, Barack Obama, was just as vexed. In August 2016, Obama withheld $300 million in military assistance to Pakistan because of Islamabad’s support for the Afghan Taliban and its ally, the Haqqani network. Last summer, the Trump administration signaled its displeasure with Islamabad by putting on hold $255 million in military aid to Pakistan. Administration officials said on Monday that the aid will not be sent to Pakistan.

Obama was right to withhold the money, and so is Trump.

It may not be enough of a cudgel to get Pakistan to change its ways. It certainly hasn’t been in the past. But it’s hard to justify sending hundreds of millions of dollars in anti-terrorism aid to a country that continues to give shelter to terrorist groups. Assistance to Pakistan has always been framed as incentive for Pakistan to do more in the fight on terror. But the right way to frame the rationale is to flip it around. Aid to Pakistan should be contingent on the country’s earnest cooperation in battling terrorists, regardless of their affiliation.

The war in Afghanistan, America’s longest ever, is far from over. Afghan Taliban militants control a large chunk of the country, the most since the U.S.-led invasion in 2001. Last year, Trump beefed up the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. They aren’t a combat force. Instead, they focus on counterterrorism missions and advising Afghan officers who battle Taliban militants.

Without their presence, Kabul’s dysfunctional government likely wouldn’t be able to reverse Taliban momentum. But just as critical to the mission in Afghanistan is Pakistan’s cooperation.

Pakistan’s long-standing under-the-table policy of drawing distinctions between terrorists to target and terrorists to coddle is bad policy for the simple reason that terrorism under any banner is wrong and lethal to innocents. In Afghanistan, terrorism equals instability on Pakistan’s doorstep. That’s not good for the U.S. and the rest of the West, but it’s also not good for Pakistan and its wrecked economy. Doling out more U.S. money to Pakistan year after year hasn’t made its leaders realize that. Freezing the aid sends a stronger message.


From the Chicago Tribune here:

Clicky

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 05 Jan 2018 10:18

X Posted from the Terroristan thread.

Afghan origin Zalmay Khalilzad, former U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq and the United Nations, on the duplicitious “Double Game” of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan.

Calls among others for sanction on the ISI and individual Pakistanis who are involved in supporting terrorists, undertake unilateral U.S. military strikes on Terrosits in territory of the Islamic Republic, prepare to designate the Islamic Republic as a state sponsor of terrorism, suspend economic assistance. Completely misses the most effective of all measures in the US basket namely the embargoing of all sales of US military equipment and US spare parts including those sourced via users of US Military equipment like Turkey, Jordan, UAE and Saudi Arabia, and ditto from the NATO partners of the US like UK, France, Germany etc..

It's Time to End Pakistan's Double Game

Zalmay Khalilzad
January 3, 2018

President Trump, in his tweet about Pakistan, called a spade a spade. Since 9/11, Pakistan has consistently played a double game, providing just enough sporadic assistance in capturing members of Al Qaeda and logistical support for our forces to give an impression of helpfulness, while at the same time harboring, training, and assisting violent extremist groups such as the Taliban and the Haqqani network that have killed thousands of American, Coalition, and Afghan soldiers and an even greater number of innocent Afghan civilians.

Islamabad's duplicitous policy has been the single most important factor preventing success in Afghanistan. Ending Pakistani support for terrorists and insurgents is essential if we hope to reduce the terrorist threat in and from the region, contain the pernicious violence and achieve the negotiated settlement of the conflict in Afghanistan that will finally bring relief to the people of that country and allow our troops to come home.

After the Coalition toppled the Taliban in late 2001, there was a key moment—a golden hour when the United States could have achieved the conditions to win the War on Terror in the Afghanistan-Pakistan theater. President Bush declared that countries needed to choose whether they were “with us or against us,” which in the case of Pakistan meant that we required them to support Operation Enduring Freedom, which targeted Islamabad’s Taliban protégés, and cooperate in the hunt for Al Qaeda leaders.

But soon Pakistan concocted a complex strategy of cooperating on logistics and occasional help with hunting Al Qaeda leaders in exchange for massive U.S. aid, while simultaneously building out a clandestine program to reconstitute the Taliban. Yet, when evidence began to emerge that Pakistan was providing sanctuary and active support to the Taliban, the Bush administration did not follow through on its earlier "with us or against us" dictate but instead gave Islamabad what amounted to a pass.

The situation grew worse under President Obama. The administration enhanced U.S. diplomatic engagement and significantly increased the already generous economic and military assistance to Pakistan. The Pakistanis had indicated that, with enhanced military capability and economic inducements, they would move against the Afghan insurgents based on their territory. Then—continuing their earlier pattern—they took the aid but continued with sanctuary and support for the insurgents.

U.S. commanders developed a northern logistical route to reduce dependence on Pakistan for logistical access to landlocked Afghanistan, but the Obama administration did not confront Pakistan about its conduct. At the end of the day, Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff Michael Mullen openly stated that the Haqqani Group acted as “a veritable arm of Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence agency,” the ISI, which is the intelligence service that operates support programs to the Afghan insurgent groups. The network not only carries out deadly attacks but also holds Americans and others as hostages in Pakistan.

With welcome clarity, in his speech announcing a new strategy for Central and South Asia, President Trump said that:

Pakistan has also sheltered the same organizations that try every single day to kill our people. We have been paying Pakistan billions and billions of dollars at the same time they are housing the very terrorists that we are fighting. But that will have to change, and that will change immediately. No partnership can survive a country’s harboring of militants and terrorists who target U.S. service members and officials. It is time for Pakistan to demonstrate its commitment to civilization, order, and to peace.

And the administration provided a list of actions that Pakistan should take.

Islamabad has been unresponsive. The Pakistani military leaders probably believe that the United States once again will get distracted by other crises and that U.S. officials will ultimately be sufficiently fooled by the occasional helpful action to let Pakistan continue to get away with its double game. However, his tweet indicates that President Trump seems prepared to break with this pattern. Now, the issue is how to implement that resolve. There will be a role for intensified diplomatic engagement, but to fully get Pakistan's attention the United States should also lead a multilateral effort to dramatically increase the costs to Pakistan, and especially to those parts of its security establishment that run Afghan policy. This should involve several steps:

First, sanction the ISI and individual Pakistanis who are involved in supporting insurgents and terrorists, including bans for them and their family members on travel to the United States and freezing of financial assets. U.S. intelligence agencies have the ability to identify everyone playing a role in Pakistan’s pro-terrorist programs, including senior officials. The United States should also designate key figures as supporters of terrorism. Washington should end Pakistan’s status as a major non-NATO ally, a designation that provides benefits such as preferential access for military technology and sales. We should also suspend all military assistance including military support funds.

Second, undertake unilateral U.S. military strikes on insurgent targets in Pakistani territory. While the United States has targeted Al Qaeda and the Pakistani Taliban with drone and other strikes, it has only on rare occasions attacked insurgents operating against the Coalition and Afghanistan. This has given such groups a free hand.

Third, prepare to designate Pakistan as a state sponsor of terrorism unless it changes course and abandons support for terrorists Such a designation will impose ongoing restrictions to assistance, bans on defense exports and sales, limitations on exports of dual use items, and other financial restrictions.

Fourth, suspend our economic assistance to Pakistan. This should include not just bilateral assistance but also multilateral assistance through institutions such as the IMF and World Bank, where the United States has major decision-making power. Also, the Treasury should prepare a campaign of escalating financial sanctions, like those imposed on Iran before the nuclear deal, that will curtail Pakistani access to the international financial system. The United States should encourage allies and partners around the world including Saudi Arabia—which has strong ties with Pakistan—to do the same. China has been supporting Pakistan to gain leverage against India and access to the Arabian Sea. We should press Beijing to make its support conditional on Islamabad ending its support for terrorists and extremists.

Fifth, together with the major regional victims of Pakistan’s actions, including Afghanistan and India, we should hold Islamabad accountable before regional and international organizations.

Lastly, it will be important to reach out to the people of Pakistan and document Pakistan’s support for terrorists and extremists that has brought about the change in our approach to their country. We should make it clear that we look forward to cooperation and partnership with Pakistan once its government abandons its policy of support for terror and extremism. As indicated by the January 3, 2018, response of former prime minister Nawaz Sharif to President Trump’s tweet, Pakistani civilian leaders are not united in their support of terrorists and question the wisdom of the military establishment’s policy. Sharif has called for abandoning “self-deception” by the Pakistani military and an end to policies that are leading to Pakistan’s international isolation. Sharif’s statement is important because his family dominates the country’s largest and most important province, Punjab, and his brother is the likely next prime minister of Pakistan. Punjabis dominate Pakistan. Opposition to the military’s policies of support for terrorists have been widespread among non-Punjabis especially the Pashtun and Baluch nationalists. The leaders of the previous civilian government, led by the Pakistan People’s Party, similarly opposed the military’s policy. The Trump administration should consider how to help mobilize civilian opponents of support for terror against the military supporters.

Some will argue that forceful actions like those listed above would be counterproductive, causing Pakistan to cut the supply lines that run across its territory. To this, one could answer that the need to supply Afghanistan is only necessary because Pakistan has kept the conflict at a constant boil. In essence, this has been a racket. While the best and cheapest routes do indeed go through Pakistan, there are acceptable alternatives. Fuel can be sourced in Central Asia. Personnel and munitions are brought in by air. The east-west route going through Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan or Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan or the northern route through Russia and Central Asia can bring in other heavy equipment and materiel. It is notable that President Putin recently acknowledged that the situation in Afghanistan would be worse if the United States withdrew. This might be a matter on which the United States and Russia could cooperate.

If Pakistani support for the insurgents is curtailed, a definitive reduction of Afghanistan's conflict is achievable. With reduced levels of violence, Afghan forces should be able to handle the residual violence, greatly reducing the burden on U.S. and Coalition forces. Such a development in turn can lead the Taliban to realize that time is not on their side and that they should cooperate in a negotiated settlement, the outcome that the United States prefers. To achieve this turnaround, we need to remain firm and consistent in the imposition of coercive measures. And, in the event that Pakistan changes its policy, we should be ready to return to a positive relationship and encourage improved regional relations, including with Afghanistan, that respect legitimate Pakistani concerns.

Patience, positive incentives, and occasional feeble pressure have not induced Pakistan to end its double game. Yet, success against terrorism and extremism in Afghanistan and the region requires a change in Pakistan’s policy of support for such groups. To bring about such a change, the time has come to embrace a strategy that dramatically increases the cost to Pakistan of its current approach.


From National Interest here:

It's Time to End Pakistan's Double Game

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 05 Jan 2018 11:43

X Posted from the Terroristan thread.

Excerpt from Background Briefing with Senior US State Department Officials on Security Assistance to Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan or more correctly its scaling back,dealing with India specific Mohammadden Terrorist groups and individuals namely Lashkar e Tayyiba (LeT), Jaish e Mohammad (JeM) and Hafiz Mohammad Saeed operating in the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan:

The bottom line is that we can’t continue to have a relationship that has business as usual with Pakistan. This conversation is not new to this administration. There have been concerns about Pakistan’s – and I focused on the issue of sanctuaries for the Haqqani Network and the Taliban, but we have concerns about their nuclear program; we have concerns about the ability of anti-India groups like Lashkar-e Tayyiba and Jaish-e Mohammed to fundraise and operate; and Hafiz Saeed, the head of Lashkar-e Tayyiba, who was recently released from house arrest. All of these issues have been a feature of our relationship or a feature of our conversation with Pakistan for many years, and this administration felt that we needed to take additional steps to underscore that we’re not going to be able to continue the relationship on autopilot; we can’t continue a status quo relationship; we need to be able to move beyond these challenges and put our relationship on more solid footing.


Also excerpt dealing with supply of military equipment and aid. Here it may be noted the US has left a two barn doors open for resuming the payment of Jaziya to Major Non NATO Ally the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan. The first is where "required by law" and the second where "critical to national security interests".

The weasel words:

The United States will not deliver military equipment or transfer security-related funds to Pakistan unless required by law. Exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis if they are determined to be critical to national security interests.


From the US State Department Website:

Briefing with Senior State Department Officials on Security Assistance to Pakistan

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 09 Jan 2018 10:01

Excerpt from “Transcript: CIA Director Mike Pompeo on "Face the Nation," Jan. 7, 2018” dealing with the US suspension of Jaziya to US’ Major Non-NATO Ally, the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan:

JOHN DICKERSON: Let me ask you about Pakistan. The U.S. is cutting off aid to Pakistan. That's a- Pakistan is a nuclear power. Is it a good idea pressuring Pakistan, given all that's on the rest of the plate in the United States with a nuclear power?

MIKE POMPEO: John, again, I'm going to avoid the policy that you asked about, but I'll talk to you from the intelligence perspective what we see. We see that Pakistan is continuing to provide safe harbor havens inside of Pakistan for terrorists who present risks to the United States of America. We are doing our best to inform the Pakistanis that that is no longer going to be acceptable. So this- this conditioned aid, we've given them a chance. If they fix this problem, we're happy to continue to engage with them and be their partner. But if they don't, we're going to protect America.

JOHN DICKERSON: Haven't we always though- We get a lot of the U.S. intelligence benefits from things that the Pakistanis let the United States do as well. And so isn't there kind of a relationship that may not be perfect, but for the bad things they do they allow U.S. counterterrorism forces to benefit from staging or other benefits out of Pakistan? So isn't that at risk as a national security problem for the United States?

MIKE POMPEO: The president has made very clear that he needs Pakistan to cease being a safe haven for terrorists that threaten the United States of America. End. Period. Full stop.


From CBS here:

Transcript: CIA Director Mike Pompeo on "Face the Nation," Jan. 7, 2018

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 16 Jan 2018 20:17

X Posted from the Terroristan thread.

Fatwa against suicide bombings: Pakistan seeks to build national narrative against terrorism

Above “Fatwa” on the IED Mubarak variant of the IEDology of Pakistan is best approached as yet another likely attempt to gull credulous Non-Mohammadden Kaafir Dhimmis with an application of the Mohammadden doctrine of dissimulation, the polite term for lying, aka Taqiyyah / Taqiya, and hence to be taken with a camel-load of salt given that the last time around there was such “Fatwa” regards the IED Mubarak variant of the IEDology of Pakistan issued by keepers of the flame of Mohammadden belief in the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan, the fine print exempted Mohammadden belief inspired acts of suicide bombing in Jammu & Kashmir.

Edict against suicide attacks

May 18, 2005

A group of 58 religious scholars belonging to all schools of thought issued here on Tuesday an edict (fatwa) against suicide attacks. However, they said that the fatwa was applicable only in Pakistan. The edict was issued by Ruet Hilal Committee Chairman Mufti Muneebur Rahman at a press conference where only some TV channels had been invited. …………………………..

The fatwa, Mufti Muneeb said, would apply only in Pakistan, while people waging freedom movements against alien occupation like in Palestine and Kashmir, were exempted of its scope.


From the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan’s Dawn News Paper:

Edict against suicide attacks

Meanwhile when the 2005 Fatwa clearly did not work, what makes the Punjabi military dominated Uniformed Jihadis of the Deep State of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan think the 2018 Fatwa will work?

UlanBatori
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9105
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby UlanBatori » 18 Jan 2018 03:28

Stopwatch on: Sweden enjoys fruits of welcoming Pakis

Police station inflated in Swedenistan

Amber G.
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5986
Joined: 17 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: Ohio, USA

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby Amber G. » 18 Jan 2018 04:19

^^^ Not the first grenade blast .. happened quite a few in last few weeks..

Vips
BRFite
Posts: 785
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby Vips » 19 Jan 2018 19:18

Thai cops nab Pakistani passport forger with Islamic State links.

A Pakistani passport forger whose fakes may have been sold to Islamic State (IS) operatives has been arrested in Thailand, ending a career that helped people slip into Europe illegally.

Mohammad Iqbal, 52, was arrested on January 14 in a Bangkok suburb in possession of Singaporean and Indian fake passports as well as plates and laminates to forge entry visas to France, Italy and Spain.

“He has worked on faking documents for a long time using Thailand as his base,” Commander of the Immigration Bureau Lt-Gen Suttipong Vongpint told reporters in Bangkok.The arrest is the latest in a series of targeted operations against skilled passport forgers in Thailand as fears over security and immigration have compelled authorities to tackle a shadowy industry that has thrived in the kingdom for decades.

Iqbal, who is believed to have operated from Thailand for more than 10 years, was charged with falsifying passports, visa seals and trafficking of fake passports a few days after police seized him as he pulled into his Bangkok condo on a motorbike.

Earlier this week, Defence minister Prawit Wongsuwan linked Iqbal to a group selling passports to the IS.

“The suspect has falsified visa and passports for the IS group with the attempt to make them travel from the Middle East into Thailand,” he said before adding that the attempts were unsuccessful.

But at Friday’s press conference officials downplayed the IS connections in favor of a portrait of a businessman who welcomed all clients. “Based on the investigation he will sell to every group, not particularly to IS, he just made them by orders,” Suttipong said.

A typical fake passport would sell for only a few hundred dollars, according to the immigration bureau.

Thailand’s role as a global hub for fake passports came under renewed scrutiny following the 2014 disappearance of Malaysian Airlines MH370. Two Iranians travelling on European passports bought and modified in Thailand were on board the ill-fated flight.

It is an industry dominated by highly skilled Iranians and Pakistanis serving customers from South Asia, the Middle East and further afield.

Immigration police said Iqbal was affiliated with a shadowy Iranian master forger known as “The Doctor” who sold “Triple A” quality passports to refugees, economic migrants and criminals from a Bangkok suburb for nearly 20 years.

Detectives hailed his 2016 arrest as a major breakthrough in the fight against passport crime – although other forgers have taken his place.

Transient, vast and permissive, Bangkok has for long provided sanctuary for people wanting to disappear or re-invent. Thailand welcomes visa-free travel to many countries and is Southeast Asia’s best connected transport hub, sharing long, ungovernable borders with Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia.

That draws transnational criminals moving everything from people and rare wildlife to drugs, weapons and gems.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 24 Jan 2018 16:17

A case of “Good Terrorists” being plausibly deniably backed with COTS explosives by the Inter Services Intelligence Directorate aka ISID aka ISI, the notorious intelligence arm of the Uniformed Jihadi’s of the Military of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan.

Afghanistan’s Tolo News reports that Afghan intelligence agency, the National Directorate of Security (NDS), have announced that initial investigations show that the explosives used by Mohammadden belief motivated group, Taliban, in the attack on the Intercontinental Hotel in Kabul on Saturday unsurprisingly came from the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan:

Explosives Used in Hotel Attack Traced Back To Pakistan: NDS

National Directorate of Security (NDS) on Tuesday announced that initial investigations show that the explosives used by Taliban insurgents in the attack on the Intercontinental Hotel in Kabul on Saturday came from Pakistan.

The NDS also recovered the vehicle that attackers used to enter the hotel compound.

“The explosive materials seized in the vehicle shows that the material is made in Pakistan,” said the NDS in a press release.

According to the NDS statement, the explosive chemical used by the insurgents was produced by a company in Islamabad called Biafo Industries Limited.

According to Biafo’s website, the company is a modern state of the art explosive manufacturing company. It states it is highly automated and can produce more than 2,500 metric tons of explosives per shift annually.

Saturday’s deadly attack left at least 43 people dead and many more wounded. However, government has only confirmed the death of 29 people so far.


From Tolo News here:

Explosives Used in Hotel Attack Traced Back To Pakistan: NDS

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 24 Jan 2018 17:21

Excerpt from Press Briefing by US Whitehouse Press Secretary Sarah Sanders

Press Briefing by Press Secretary Sarah Sanders

Issued on: January 22, 2018 ……………………

In Afghanistan, where terrorists attacked a hotel in Kabul, such attacks on civilians only strengthen our resolve to support our Afghan partners. We commend the swift and effective response of the Afghan security forces. Afghan forces, with our support, will continue to relentlessly pursue the enemies of Afghanistan, who also seek to export terror around the world.

We call on Pakistan to immediately arrest or expel the Taliban’s leaders and prevent the group from using Pakistani territory to support its operations. …………………………….


From the US Whitehouse website:

Press Briefing by Press Secretary Sarah Sanders

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 09 Mar 2018 12:53

X Posted from the Pakistani Role In Global Terrorism thread.

Un-uniformed Jihadis of the Judicial branch of the Punjabi Uniformed Jihadi dominated Deep State of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan goes all out to slow down action against UN designated Mohammadden Terrorist/Terrorist outfit

March 8:

Pakistani Court Rules in Favor of Political Party Tied to Global Terror Suspect

March 7:

LHC extends stay against likely arrest of Hafiz Saeed

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 10 Mar 2018 09:53

X Posted from the Terroristan thread to the Pakistani Role In Global Terrorism and Oppression of Minorities In Pakistan threads.

arun wrote:





Right of Reply by India at the 37th Session of Human Rights Council (26 February-23 March 2018) in response to the Statement made by Pakistan under the Agenda Item 2, delivered by Ms. Mini Devi Kumam, Second Secretary. [Geneva, 08 March 2018] :

Mr. President

My delegation wishes to exercise its right of reply in response to the statement made by Pakistan.

2. We strongly object to Pakistan’s habitual misuse of the Council to make misleading references about internal matters pertaining to the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. This council should be mindful that the dubious concern for human rights is coming from a country, which has systematically abused and violated human rights of the people in Balochistan, Sindh, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa as well as Pakistan Occupied Kashmir. Pakistan has long been attempting to mask its territorial ambitions and use of terrorism as a state policy under the guise of concern for human rights.

3. Terrorism is the grossest violation of human rights. The real problem in the State of Jammu and Kashmir is terrorism, which has constantly received sustenance from Pakistan and territories under its control. We urge the Council to call on Pakistan to end cross border infiltration; to dismantle special terrorist zones, safe havens and sanctuaries, to take verifiable actions, including on terror financing; to provide freedom to the people of Pakistan occupied Kashmir by ending its illegal and forcible occupation; to end harassment of minorities, to place procedural and institutional safeguards to prevent misuse of blasphemy law; to end forced conversions and marriages of minorities; including Hindu, Sikh and Christian women, to prosecute all such cases; to stop targeting political dissidents and legitimate criticism in Sindh, Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa; to stop torture, enforced disappearances and unlawful killing; including that of journalists and activists by its security agencies and prosecute all perpetrators; to stop sectarian violence, systemic persecution and attacks on Muslim minorities, such as Shias, Ahmadiyas, Ismailia and Hazaras.

Thank you, Mr. President.


From the website of the Permanent Mission of India, Geneva:

Right of Reply by India at the 37th Session of Human Rights Council (26 February-23 March 2018) in response to the Statement made by Pakistan under the Agenda Item 2, delivered by Ms. Mini Devi Kumam, Second Secretary. [Geneva, 08 March 2018]



India exercises the right of reply for the second day running at the 37th Session of the UN Human Rights Council and fires the below broadside at the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic Of Pakistan:


Right of Reply by India at the 37th Session of Human Rights Council in response to the Statement made by Pakistan under the Agenda Item 3, delivered by Ms. Mini Devi Kumam, Second Secretary. [Geneva, 09 March 2018]

Mr. President,

My delegation would like to exercise its right of reply in response to a statement made by Pakistan under the Agenda Item 3.

2. Various international organizations have documented how enforced disappearances continue with impunity, particularly in Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Sindh where people are routinely abducted and unlawfully killed. More than a million people remain displaced as a result of the current and past armed conflicts in the northwest of Pakistan. Women and girls, especially from minority communities, are routinely abducted and forcibly married. The minorities are persecuted, including through notorious blasphemy laws.

3. It is extraordinary that the state which protected Osama Bin Laden and sheltered Mullah Omar should have the gumption to play the victim. In gross violation of UN Security Council resolution 1267, the UN designated terrorists like Hafiz Mohammed Saeed are freely operating with State support, and the UN designated entities are being politically mainstreamed in Pakistan. They are raising funds in flagrant violations of Pakistan’s international obligations.

4. Pakistan keeps referring to UN Security Council Resolutions on Jammu and Kashmir. However, it very conveniently forgets its own obligation under these resolutions to first vacate the illegal occupation of Pakistan Occupied Kashmir. It has also blatantly disregarded its other commitments, be it under the 1972 Simla Agreement or Lahore Declaration of February 1999. They continue to support cross-border terrorism in India. We await credible action by the Government of Pakistan to bring all those involved in the 2008 Mumbai attack and the 2016 Pathankot and Uri attacks to justice.

5. Even as terrorists thrive in Pakistan and roam its streets with impunity, we have heard it lecture about the protection of human rights in India. The World does not need lessons on democracy and human rights from a country whose own situation is charitably described as a failed state.

Thank you, Mr. President.


From the website of the Permanent Mission Of India, Geneva:

Right of Reply by India at the 37th Session of Human Rights Council in response to the Statement made by Pakistan under the Agenda Item 3, delivered by Ms. Mini Devi Kumam, Second Secretary. [Geneva, 09 March 2018]

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 19 Mar 2018 14:51

X Posted from the Terroristan thread.

Journalist from the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan, Kunwar Khuldune Shahid interviews the “Good” Haqqani, namely former Ambassador of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan and now Director at the US based Hudson Institute, Husain Haqqani, for the A Times:

Pakistan will be put on the Financial Action Task Force (on Money Laundering) gray list in June. Is this owing to US pressure?

Pakistan’s policy of tolerating and supporting some jihadi terrorist groups and treating terrorist financing lightly is the real reason.

It has been 16 years since 2001, when in the aftermath of 9/11 [terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001], Pakistan promised to comply with international sanctions relating to terrorist financing laid down in UN [Security Council] Resolution 1267 of 1999. Pakistan has yet to act against groups and individuals like Lashkar-e-Taiba and Hafiz Saeed. Groups are banned, only to re-emerge with new names. Hafiz Saeed was listed as a terrorist by the UN in December 2008 but remains free and operational. Close ties with the United States have so far helped Pakistan [avoid] tough international sanctions.

This time, the prospect of it being put on the “black list” also exists because the United States is not alone in its view that Pakistan only acts against terrorists under international pressure.

For some time now, Pakistan has been able to take one step forward to get relief from international pressure, followed by two steps back once the pressure is off and another step forward, when the pressure resumes. The fundamental change in attitude has not been forthcoming.

Pakistan recently issued another ordinance and announced restrictions on the finances of terrorist groups, including charities linked to Lashkar-e-Taiba, but these measures are aimed not at permanently shutting down favored jihadi groups but at evading the immediate pressure.

How do you view China and Saudi Arabia backing away from supporting Pakistan during the US-summoned second vote at the FATF meeting, and Turkey being the sole supporter?

Pakistan has always presumed that if a country is its ally, that country must support Pakistan in all that it does – from ignoring Pakistani support for terror groups to standing firm behind Pakistan against India.

China and Saudi Arabia are seen as strong allies, and Pakistan presumed that their close ties with Pakistan would lead them to automatically vote in Pakistan’s favor. But countries have their own interests, and in this case neither Saudi Arabia nor China saw it in their interest to support Pakistan beyond the initial phase. These countries probably also wanted to send a message to Pakistan about the need to crack down on terror financing. China and Saudi Arabia both face their own terrorism threats.

Other factors were at play, too. Saudi Arabia had to weigh in its close ties with the US and even India; China wanted to secure its position as head of the FATF board, for which it needs American and Indian support in future. Above all, Pakistan simply did not fulfill the FATF criteria, and it came down to whether others wanted to do it an out-of-the-way favor.

Turkey, under President [Recep Tayyip] Erdogan, has its own agenda of forming alliances, and its support for Pakistan was to make Pakistanis feel good while knowing its stand alone won’t really make a difference.

What do you make of the Trump regime blatantly calling out Pakistan for providing safe havens to jihadist groups throughout the past year? Does it stem from President Trump’s own stance, and that of his team, or is this reflective of US foreign policy of recent years?

Mr [Donald] Trump may be the first American president to openly and unreservedly speak out against Pakistan publicly, but US frustrations with Pakistan go back many years. As far back as 1992, the United States warned Pakistan that it would be declared a state sponsor of terrorism if it did not crack down on jihadis who, at that time, had kidnapped Western tourists, including Americans, in Jammu and Kashmir.

President Trump’s South Asia policy speech last August, his New Year’s Day tweet, and his administration’s policy towards Pakistan are not random comments by an instinctive American leader. They reflect the deep mistrust that has characterized the US-Pakistan relationship and has only grown since 9/11 within the US foreign-policy community, especially after the discovery of Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad.

The divergence in the goals and interests of both countries has expanded over the decades. The US wants to eliminate global terrorism; Pakistan prefers to selectively use terrorists as an instrument of regional influence. America has invested blood and treasure to build a modern multi-ethnic Afghanistan; Pakistan wants a government in Kabul dominated by ethnic-Pashtun Islamists, such as the Afghan Taliban and members of the Haqqani Network. The US sees India as a friend, while Pakistan’s establishment views India as an eternal enemy.

Pakistanis want the US to ignore that divergence and continue to assist Pakistan on the promise of small cooperative steps. But recognition of that divergence of interests is at the heart of President Trump’s unwillingness to revert to the old pattern of praising Pakistan in the hope that it will eventually change its policies to match America’s interests.

How do you see Indian involvement in Baluchistan as confessed by Research & Analysis Wing [India’s foreign intelligence agency] spy Kulbhushan Jadhav?

That India and Pakistan spy on each other is not much of a secret, nor is the claim by both sides that the other supports insurgencies inside its territory.

Many Pakistanis believe there is Indian involvement in Baluchistan. The question is whether that belief can translate into evidence that is accepted by the international community. Pakistan has delivered multiple dossiers to India and the international community but the Pakistani side has also grudgingly acknowledged that these do not contain “material evidence.” Sartaj Aziz [deputy chairman of the Planning Commission of Pakistan] once remarked that the primary purpose of these dossiers is to “help build a narrative about India’s patronage of subversive activities in Pakistan.”

On the Jadhav case, too, Pakistan has succeeded in convincing Pakistanis of his being a spy but his confessions have had little effect outside Pakistan. Pakistanis must think about why their case is believed less and less on the international level. It is almost as if there are two parallel narratives, one that finds resonance among Pakistanis and one that resonates with the rest of the world.

How do you see Indian involvement in Afghanistan, concerns regarding which were shared by the civil-military leadership during [then-US secretary of state] Rex Tillerson’s visit to Pakistan in October?

Again, the concerns shared by Pakistan’s leaders and officials on Afghanistan are deemed less convincing by their foreign interlocutors, notwithstanding the passion with which these are repeated. Pakistan’s fears of close relations between India and Afghanistan are not new and date back to the years immediately after independence. But the rest of the world asks for specifics of how India threatens Pakistan through Afghanistan without having any troops or other military presence there.

The view outside Pakistan is that if Pakistan felt threatened by an Indian military presence in Afghanistan, that would be legitimate. Concern about covert operations across the Durand Line would also be considered seriously. But if Afghans studying in India or Indians building roads in Afghanistan are cited as threats to Pakistan’s security, then others see it as a psychological rather than a political or military issue.

In the last two decades Pakistan has justified its support for the Afghan Taliban, the Haqqani Network, and other jihadi groups on grounds of security concerns from India. When Americans say, “So far as we know India has no offensive military presence in Afghanistan and there is no evidence that the Afghans are willing to be part of India’s alleged plan for a two-front war with Pakistan,” Pakistanis seldom offer a convincing response. Pakistan’s leaders only question Afghanistan’s acceptance of economic assistance from India even though Pakistan does not have the capacity to provide such aid itself.

Is Pakistan’s support for jihadist factions the single common factor negatively impacting Islamabad relations with other countries? Do you see that being addressed?

Pakistan today is more isolated and has fewer friends in the international community. That clearly has primarily to do with Pakistan’s support for jihadi groups and its reluctance to change its policy despite the impact on other countries and itself.

There are fewer countries willing to accept Pakistan’s point of view on Kashmir, fewer countries where a Pakistani can travel without a visa, and fewer friends in multilateral fora.


From A Times:

‘Pakistan is isolated and has fewer friends in the international community’

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 03 Apr 2018 19:26

The US is not playing ball with the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan’s :wink: “strategically brilliant” gambit of allowing UN and US designated Mohammadden Terrorism outfit Lashkar- e-Taiba aka Lashkar e-Tayyiba to escape by the simple expedient of changing names. Concurrently 7 citizens of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan who constitute the central leadership body of the Milli Muslim Leagues, the vehicle chosen by the Punjabi Military Dominated Deep State of the Islamic Republic to mainstream L-e-T, have also been designated.

“The Department of State has amended the designation of Pakistan-based terrorist organization Lashkar e-Tayyiba (LeT) to include the aliases Milli Muslim League (MML) and Tehreek-e- Azadi-e Kashmir (TAJK). The aliases have been added to LeT’s designations as a Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO) under Section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, and as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist (SDGT) under Executive Order 13224. ………………

Concurrently with today’s State Department actions, the U.S. Department of the Treasury designated seven members of the MML central leadership body for acting for on behalf of LeT: Saifullah Khalid, Muzammil Iqbal Hashimi, Muhammad Harris Dar, Tabish Qayyuum, Fayyaz Ahmad, Faisal Nadeem, and Muhammad Ehsan.”


US State Department Media Note of April 02, 2018:

Amendments to the Terrorist Designation of Lashkar e-Tayyiba

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 04 Apr 2018 07:52

For good order, the full text of the response of our Ministry of External Affairs welcoming the US designating the Milli Muslim League (MML), a vehicle designed by the Punjabi Uniformed Jihadis of the Military Dominated Deep State of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan and fully supported by the Judicial Jihadi’s of the Islamic Republic’s Court system to mainstream UN designated Mohammammden Terrorist outfit Lashkar-e-Tayibba; as an alias for the L-e-T:


Official Spokesperson's response to media queries on the designation of Milli Muslim League (MML) and 7 of its functionaries as global terrorists by the US

April 03, 2018

In response to media queries on the designation of Milli Muslim League (MML) and 7 of its functionaries as global terrorists by the US on April 2, the MEA Spokesperson said that:

"India welcomes the action taken by the US for designating the Milli Muslim League as an alias of Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), a Pakistan based terrorist group and its functionaries who are acting on behalf of LeT. It vindicates India’s position that Pakistan has not taken effective action against terrorist groups and individuals. It is also cognizance of the fact that terrorist individuals and entities are allowed to change names and continue to operate freely from territory under Pakistan’s control. The designation is a rejection of the attempts being made in Pakistan to mainstream terrorist individuals and entities; and highlights Pakistan’s failure to fulfil its international obligation to dismantle terrorist sanctuaries, and disrupt terror financing."


From the MEA Website:

Official Spokesperson's response to media queries on the designation of Milli Muslim League (MML) and 7 of its functionaries as global terrorists by the US.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 04 Apr 2018 08:02

arun wrote:Un-uniformed Jihadis of the Judicial branch of the Punjabi Uniformed Jihadi dominated Deep State of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan goes all out to slow down action against UN designated Mohammadden Terrorist/Terrorist outfit

March 8:

Pakistani Court Rules in Favor of Political Party Tied to Global Terror Suspect

March 7:

LHC extends stay against likely arrest of Hafiz Saeed


Efforts from as recently as last month of the Un-uniformed Jihadis of the Judicial branch of the Punjabi Uniformed Jihadi dominated Deep State of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan to protect UN Designated Terrorists by attempting to mainstream them certainly have gone for a toss :rotfl:

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 04 Apr 2018 08:57

Retired Uniformed Jihadi and National Coordinator of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan’s oxymoronic National Counter Terrorism Authority (Nacta), Lt. Cdr Ihsan Ghani (Retd), on the US designation of Milli Muslim League (MML) as an offshoot of UN designated Mohammadden Terrorist organisation Lashkar-e-Tayibba (L-e-T).

Seems the Uniformed Jihadi’s of the Punjabi Military Dominated Islamic Republic of Pakistan still hope and believe that they can protect Mohammadden Terrorist organisations created, nurtured and patronised by the Uniformed Jihadi’s by conning the Crusader Kaafir Dhimmi’s of the US and other Non Mohammadden Kaafir Dhimmi’s into believing that mainstreaming of Terrorist outfits targeting India is the way forward.

In response to a question about Jamaat-ud-Dawa's political offshoot Milli Muslim League (MML), which the United States recently designated as a terrorist organisation, he {Lt. Cdr. Ihsan Ghani (Retd)} said: "There exist two opinions with regard to such organisations.

"One is that these organisations should be brought into the [national] mainstream, other one is that these are terrorist organisations and if they came into politics, they would intimidate the voters and candidates would not get a chance to freely participate in elections," he {Lt. Cdr. Ihsan Ghani (Retd)} said.

Ghani said that "now we have to very carefully tread this; there are international laws, UN regulations; we have to keep them in view.

"If we understand that it is in our favour to mainstream these organisations, then we should apprise these [world] powers of it, convince them, and tell them this is in our favour and that would harm us," the top official said.


From Geo:

Pakistan does not support Haqqani Network, says Nacta chief

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 05 Apr 2018 13:57

arun wrote:Un-uniformed Jihadis of the Judicial branch of the Punjabi Uniformed Jihadi dominated Deep State of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan goes all out to slow down action against UN designated Mohammadden Terrorist/Terrorist outfit

March 8:

Pakistani Court Rules in Favor of Political Party Tied to Global Terror Suspect

March 7:

LHC extends stay against likely arrest of Hafiz Saeed



The Un-uniformed Jihadis of the Judicial branch of the Punjabi Uniformed Jihadi Dominated Deep State of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic Of Pakistan continue to go all out to slow down action against United Nations (UN) designated Mohammadden Terrorist/Terrorist outfit namely Lashkar-e-Toiba aka jamaat ud dawa, Falah-e-Insaniat Foundation, Milli Muslim League, whatever and Hafiz Muhammad Saeed.

LHC bars govt from 'harassing' Hafiz Saeed over welfare activities:

The Lahore High Court (LHC) on Thursday ordered government authorities to allow banned Jamaatud Dawa's (JuD) Chief Hafiz Saeed to continue his "social welfare activities" and not "harass" him until further orders.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 29 Apr 2018 22:31

NATO Foreign Ministers call on the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan “to close terrorist sanctuaries and to work to prevent terrorist financial flows and cross-border attacks, including by working with its neighbours”.

All very well but when are NATO members going to impose real and materially significant punishment upon the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic :?:

Weblink for NATO Foreign Ministers Statement of April 27, 2018:

Statement by Foreign Ministers on Afghanistan

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 18 May 2018 19:45

X Posted from the Terroristan thread.

anupmisra wrote:'Pakistan is both the victim and sponsor of terrorism,' says Pentagon spokesperson

Pentagon Chief Spokesperson Dana W. White, while briefing the media on Thursday, said that Pakistan being both a "victim as well as a sponsor of terrorism" can do more about regional security.
"So we look to Pakistan to create more opportunities to secure the region."
:shock:
When asked about the recent remarks by former prime minister Nawaz Sharif about non-state actors' alleged involvement in Mumbai attacks, the Pentagon spokesperson said: "Again, this is an inflection point for Pakistan. Pakistan has decisions to make, and we hope that they will be a partner in safeguarding the region."


https://www.dawn.com/news/1408489/pakis ... okesperson


Excerpt from US DoD Press Briefing dealing with the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan’s involvement in Terrorism following the disclosure by the Islamic Republic’s former PM Nawaz Sharif that his country was involved in the 26/11 Mumbai Terrorist attack:

Department of Defense Press Briefing by Pentagon Chief Spokesperson Dana W. White in the Pentagon Briefing Room
Press Operations

Pentagon Chief Spokesperson Dana W. White; Colonel Rob Manning, Director, Defense Press Office
May 17, 2018 ………………………



Q: Well, one thing (inaudible) for a long time, not only the people of Afghanistan but also the -- the president and other officials in Pakistan -- in Afghanistan, they have been saying that Pakistan is behind all those strikes.

Is the U.S. listening them all this?


MS. WHITE: We believe that Pakistan can certainly do more with respect to regional security. It can certainly do more with respect to security within Afghanistan, and we would look to them and hope that they would both help, because they are both victims of terrorism and they've also sponsored terrorism.

So we look to Pakistan to create more opportunities to secure the region.

Q: And second, then, as far as terrorism in India is concerned, it's not surprising that, now, the former prime minister of Pakistan, Mr. Nawaz Sharif, on television, he made a -- an remark that Pakistan was behind all those attacks against India, in India, and Mumbai attacks and it was confirmed earlier by former president, Mr. -- Pakistan's former president.

And he said that Pakistan was always supporting terrorism against India. Now, where do we stand now? Because high officials, president and the prime minister -- of course, former -- now, they are claiming that Pakistan is supporting terrorism against India.


MS. WHITE: Again, this is an inflection point for Pakistan. Pakistan has decisions to make, and we hope that they will be a partner in safeguarding the region.


See here:

Clicky

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 18 May 2018 19:56

Posted for good order to be below the previous post for ease of quick memory refresh.

Former PM Nawaz Sharif on the involvement of the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan in the 26/11 Mumbai attack in an interview with Dawn’s Cyril Almeida datelined May 12, 2018:

For Nawaz, it’s not over till it’s over

Cyril Almeida
Updated May 12, 2018 ………………………..

In a wide-ranging and exclusive interview with Dawn ahead of his rally in Multan on Friday, a relaxed but adamant Sharif ………………..

Asked what he believes is the reason for his ouster from public office, Mr Sharif did not reply directly but steered the conversation towards foreign policy and national security. “We have isolated ourselves. Despite giving sacrifices, our narrative is not being accepted. Afghanistan’s narrative is being accepted, but ours is not. We must look into it.”

He continued: “Militant organisations are active. Call them non-state actors, should we allow them to cross the border and kill 150 people in Mumbai? Explain it to me. Why can’t we complete the trial?” — a reference to the Mumbai attacks-related trials which have stalled in a Rawalpindi anti-terrorism court.

“It’s absolutely unacceptable. This is exactly what we are struggling for. President Putin has said it. President Xi has said it,” Mr Sharif said. “We could have already been at seven per cent growth (in GDP), but we are not.”


From Dawn:

Clicky

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9843
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism

Postby arun » 19 May 2018 09:13

X Posted from the Terroristan thread to the “26/11/2008: Never Forget. Never Forgive” and the “Pakistani Role in Global Terrorism” threads.

After the US DoD Press Briefing, excerpt from the US State Department Press Briefing again dealing with the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan’s involvement in Terrorism following the disclosure by the Islamic Republic’s former PM Nawaz Sharif that his country was involved in the 26/11 Mumbai Terrorist attack:

Heather Nauert
Spokesperson
Department Press Briefing
Washington, DC
May 17, 2018 ……………………………………..

QUESTION: And second, madam, one strange thing is going on on Pakistani television is that former prime minister of Pakistan, Mr. Nawaz Sharif, he told the Pakistani television and – that Pakistan was behind the Mumbai attacks in India. Now, this also asserted that last year, General Musharraf said that Pakistan is favoring terrorism against India.

MS NAUERT: Say the last part again.

QUESTION: General Musharraf also said last year that Pakistan is supporting terrorism against India as far as Kashmir is concerned, and we are making it public that we will be supporting terrorism against India.

MS NAUERT: So --

QUESTION: And now it’s the prime minister of Pakistan who just stepped down.

MS NAUERT: Look, the only thing I can – I have to share with you about that in terms of the Mumbai attacks, and we’ve been – we’ve addressed this on numerous occasions from this podium here, and those would be our concerns about the mastermind behind the 2008 Mumbai attacks. And he’s a Lashkar-e-Tayyiba guy who was being held in Pakistan, and he was eventually let out on house arrest, and we have a reward out for – I believe it’s for his arrest – not information leading to his arrest, but his arrest. I don’t recall off the top of my head the award amount, but that person out in the open is a tremendous concern to the United States. In terms of your other question, I’d just have to look into that for you. Okay.

QUESTION: Thank you, madam.


See here:

Department Press Briefing - May 17, 2018


Return to “Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: chanakyaa, Falijee and 23 guests