India and ASEAN / East Asia

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Sanjay M
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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Sanjay M » 06 Sep 2010 07:08


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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby A_Gupta » 07 Sep 2010 22:37

India needs more economic clout:
http://blogs.cfr.org/asia/2010/09/07/as ... economics/

But, at the end of the day, strategic intentions alone cannot sustain a larger role for India in Asia writ large. As America is rediscovering, economic content is essential. Greater economic content to India’s relations with East Asia will be required.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby RajeshA » 09 Sep 2010 19:47

Malaysia, Indonesia bid to ease tensions after maritime spat: AFP
KOTA KINABALU, Malaysia — Malaysia and Indonesia Monday moved to calm a maritime border dispute that has sparked angry protests, with their foreign ministers agreeing to take action to prevent a repeat incident.
Malaysian Foreign Minister Anifah Aman met his Indonesian counterpart Marty Natalegawa in eastern Sabah state after last month's flare-up triggered by the detention of Malaysian fishermen and Indonesian officials in disputed waters.
In the ensuing protest, human faeces were flung at the Malaysian embassy in Jakarta :shock: , forcing security at the Malaysian mission to be stepped up.
"Both nations agreed that preventive measures will be required to prevent a recurrence of the August 13 incident, and appropriate action will be taken to resolve various maritime border issues," the two ministers said.

Never heard that before. These Indonesians are really creative! :rotfl:

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Ameet » 11 Sep 2010 01:15

India commits wide-ranging assistance to Laos

http://www.hindu.com/2010/09/11/stories ... 041300.htm

$72.55 million credit for two power projects

ASI assistance for restoration of 6th century temple

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby krisna » 14 Sep 2010 06:21

leader Kim ill
First conference of ruling Workers' Party in 30 years postponed, with leader Kim apparently "ill".

Kim, 68, has apparently faced worsening health since his five-day trip to China last month, but his condition was not bad enough to warrant a cancellation of the meeting, South Korea's YTN reported on Monday.

The Korean Central News Agency reported in June that the WPK would meet in early September to elect the party's "highest leadering body" and North Korea analysts thought Kim would use the opportunity to pass the reigns of power to his youngest son, Kim Jong-un.

Tensions on the peninsula, however, are showing signs of easing, with Seoul and Pyongyang making more conciliatory gestures towards each other.
The South announced on Monday its biggest aid package to its impoverished neighbour in more than two years.
The two agreed to meet in the North Korean border town of Kaesung on Friday to discuss a resumption of reunions of families separated by war.


Can both the koreas unite :?:


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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby ManjaM » 20 Sep 2010 23:07

http://sify.com/news/asean-envoys-visit ... aajeb.html

Imphal, Sep 20 (IANS) Ambassadors of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) member-states are visiting the northeastern states to explore prospects of tourism and trade and to enhance people to people contacts between their countries and India, officials said Monday.

'The northeast visit of the ASEAN envoys followed a series of meetings Development of North Eastern Region (DoNER) Minister Bijoy Krishna Handique held recently in New Delhi with the ambassadors and diplomats of ASEAN countries,' a senior Manipur government official told reporters.


Referring to a DoNER ministry communique, the official said that both the northeastern states and the ASEAN countries would benefit from trade and economic activities between the two regions.


A seven-member delegation, led by Malaysian ambassador Dato Tan Seng Sung, arrived in Imphal Sunday for the visit. The other members are Myanmar ambassador Kyl Thein, Singapore ambassador Calvin Eu, Brunei ambassador Dato Paduka Haji Sidek Ali, Indonesian ambassador Ardi Muhammad Ghalib, Thailand ambassador Krit Kraichiffe and Laos ambassador Thonghpanh Syackha Chom.


After holding a meeting with Manipur Chief Minister O.Ibobi Singh, his cabinet colleagues and state government officials Monday, the ASEAN envoys left for Moreh, the key town on the border with Myanmar.


Moreh, 110 km east of Imphal, is already teeming with commercial activity and Myanmar has also constructed a huge market at Tamu on its side of the border. Trade is now on full-scale during day time.


From Manipur, the ASEAN ambassadors will visit Mizoram, where they would visit India-Myanmar border trade centre of Zokhawthar.


The envoys would also meet the Mizoram governor, the chief minister and top officials during their stay in Aizawl.


According to a DoNER ministry official: 'As part of initiatives to improve connectivity between northeast India and Southeast Asia, the union government is considering a rail link from Manipur to Vietnam. Efforts are under way to have a rail link from Jiribam (close to the Assam border) to Hanoi in Vietnam, passing through Myanmar.'


Improved connectivity between the northeast and the southeast Asian countries will not only help the region discover a larger market but also integrate India with these countries, the official said.

SEARCH

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby shynee » 03 Oct 2010 00:56

Loss of Young Talent Thwarts Malaysia’s Growth
Many interviewees, when asked about their concerns about returning to Malaysia, cited racial tensions and the country’s affirmative action policy, which gives special privileges to ethnic Malays, who make up 60 percent of the population. The government has recognized the need to change the policy, which was introduced in the 1970s to improve the economic standing of Malays, who were more highly represented among the nation’s poor than its Chinese and Indian minorities.

Prime Minister Najib Razak has repeatedly emphasized that affirmative action would be made “market-friendly, merit-based, transparent and needs-based” under the country’s latest plan, the New Economic Model, which is designed to steer Malaysia toward its development goals. Ethnic Malays, or bumiputras, still benefit from privileges like discounted housing, and some government contracts are available only to companies they control.

A Malaysian Chinese businessman, who left Malaysia for Canada as a university student in the 1970s and stayed there, said that because of the policy, only a handful of his Malaysian Chinese classmates who also studied abroad had returned to Malaysia. Several other Malay and non-Malay interviewees also described the system as unfair.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Airavat » 07 Oct 2010 11:33

Malaysia Indonesia tensions
Tied by religion, language, proximity and a cultural heritage that dates back centuries, the social mores that separate Malaysia and Indonesia should seem small. Yet the pair have been lurching from one diplomatic spat to another as nationalists from both sides of the Malacca Strait trade insults and threats.

Issues bugging Indonesia include the abuse of Indonesian maids working in Malaysia, the mistreatment of illegal plantation workers and periodically flaring cultural disagreements (underscored by last year’s use of Balinese dancers to promote a Discovery Channel programme on Malaysia that resulted in accusations of cultural theft—and threats of war). Indonesia supplies about 85 percent of Malaysia’s maids and 2 million workers overall.

Economic disparities and Malaysia’s much lower population of 27 million, compared with Indonesia’s 234 million, also means Malaysia is unlikely to experience the stressful social issues attached to sending millions of women abroad, away from family and friends, to do menial work for a pittance. Indeed, some countries have banned the export of their women as domestic helpers.

Indonesia, divided into 17,000 islands, pressed for unity and independence from their Dutch masters through the 1945-50 conflict, while Malaysia was forged out of British colonial rule in 1957 through diplomacy that united the Malay Peninsula with Singapore, and Sarawak and Sabah in Borneo six years later. Singapore left the federation in 1965 while the rest of Malaysia—backed by the UK, Australia and New Zealand—was fighting the 1962-66 Konfrontasi against Indonesia for control of the two Borneo states (a fight it won).

Malaysia will always be an easier country to manage. The population sits on just two strips of land, is compact and dominated by one rarely challenged ethnic group. Jakarta, in contrast, must juggle the headaches associated with running a nation spread across a massive archipelago.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Ameet » 20 Oct 2010 13:22

India, Malaysia to announce free trade pact

http://www.thehindu.com/business/Econom ... 838141.ece

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Airavat » 26 Oct 2010 09:23

Look east policy
East Asian leaders have often traced India's Look East policy to the diplomatic realism of former Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao at a time of national crisis in the 1990s. Against this background, a dominant view in East Asia today is that Dr. Singh is setting the terms for India's long-term engagement with key regional powers. Inevitably, such diplomacy will extend beyond the economic realm. India's strategic calculations are easily discernible too.

A Japan-India Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA/EPA) was finalised by the negotiators on both sides in time for celebration during this visit. According to a Japanese negotiator, Takeshi Matsunaga, the EPA provides for “a high level of liberalisation” of tariff by both sides and places them on “an equal footing.” Also built into the agreement is India's preferred principle of free “movement of natural persons.” Not amounting to migration, this will mean a free flow of professional talent in the services sector.

India and Malaysia have firmed up a Comprehensive Economic Cooperation Agreement (CECA). The two sides are also keen to have a genuine strategic partnership. However, the world-view of Malaysia, which belongs to the Organisation of Islamic Conference, may not always be in sync with India's on all issues. At another level, the Hindu Rights Action Force (HINDRAF)-Makkal Sakthi, which seeks to espouse the cause of Malaysian-Indian minority, wants Dr. Singh to raise issues relating to its welfare in his talks with his counterpart, Najib Tun Razak.

At the annual East Asia Summit (EAS), Dr. Singh will be sitting with, among others, the leaders of South Korea and Singapore, with which India already has comprehensive economic pacts. But the EAS, which includes China, is a strategic forum, and this aspect will get heightened with the likely admission of the U.S. and Russia into this organisation. Issues of acute sensitivity to all major powers will then arise, especially in the ASEAN Defence Ministers' Meeting-Plus (ADMM+) forum, which might be co-opted by an expanding EAS as its security wing.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Vipul » 12 Nov 2010 02:02


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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby thayilv » 24 Nov 2010 07:01

http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/11/23/nkorea.skorea.military.fire/index.html

Hours after North Korea's deadly artillery attacks Tuesday, South Korea's president said "enormous retaliation" is needed to stop Pyongyang's incitement, but international diplomats urgently appealed for restraint.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby arun » 12 Dec 2010 14:51

Singapore diplomat calls India 'stupid': Leaked papers:

PTI via Hindustan Times

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Airavat » 19 Dec 2010 09:10

India-Asean services deal hits roadblock:

Asean is India’s fourth largest trading partner after EU, US and China with bilateral trade of more than $40 billion in 2009-10. The free trade agreement (FTA) between India and the Asean countries have hit a stonewall. Under the services sector, India had been demanding greater opening in the Mode IV category to ensure that professionals like doctors, nurses, chefs, accountants get more job opportunities in Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam — that makes the Asean bloc.

Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines are especially concerned with India’s expertise in various sectors such as telecom, IT, hospitality and healthcare among others with a qualified English-speaking human resources pool. India is the 10th largest services exporter in the world, while Asean is a net importer.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby abhishek_sharma » 22 Dec 2010 11:32


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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Airavat » 02 Jan 2011 05:45

Come 2011, travellers from Laos, Vietnam, the Philippines and Cambodia visiting India will get Visa on Arrival (VoA). The Indian Government on Thursday extended the VoA facility to the four Asean countries with effect from Jan 1, 2011. The facility will allow the travellers single entry facility with a validity of 30 days.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby somnath » 10 Jan 2011 12:37

Indonesia and Malaysia both has many natural resources, tin, rubber and most importantly the OIL. Their major portion of export solely depend on this. Indonesia chief export is Oil where as Malaysia's Palm oil and rubber. There is no Industrial base for manufacturing "engineering / capital goods" developed neither any brilliant exemplary institution of learnings are built to supplement IT like knowledge based industries


Where do you get such brilliant insights?

Here is the trade basket of Malaysia and Indonesia..

http://www.wto.org/english/res_e/statis ... _dev_e.pdf

For both, manufactured goods is >65% of their export basket...

Similar basket for India? Here...http://rbi.org.in/scripts/PublicationsV ... x?id=12304

Manufactured goods exports are about 66.5% of the basket! Not very different from M'sia/Indonesia...

Palm oil is an important commodity for M'sia because of the dependence of lots of farmers on the trade, not because it is the "crude oil" of m'sia..And Indonesia has stpped exporting crude for 3 years now - it has been kicked out of OPEC as well as it has now become an importer of crude....So much for "oil dependence"!

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Arjun » 10 Jan 2011 17:47

somnath wrote:Ahh, so it isnt "economic development", but only "trade" - it didnt come out so well in your claim, but unfortunately even this is a completely unfounded assertion..Both Malaysia and Indonesia have export-to-GDP ratios FAR in excess of India's...

Somnath, I am including below the various quotes I have made on this topic. This whole issue came up as an example to my central point that a country's image and soft-power is a key determinant of its external trade success. You have already agreed with this central thesis, so really this back-and forth with you on an example which was meant to prove the thesis is of peripheral interest to me at this point.

My example related to the success of Muslim countries in obtaining outsourcing business from the West - and certainly large Muslim countries such as Indonesia, Bangladesh, Pakistan which have the demographic potential to pose a challenge to India in this domain- have underperformed compared to their potential. Whether this is primarily due to supply-side constraints (quality entrepreneurs, quality workforce) or due to image issues (cultural compatibility, security considerations) can at best be a matter of speculation - but it is most certainly due to all of the factors mentioned in varying degrees. Malaysia in any case does not have the demographic scale to seriously challenge India in a meaningful way in outsourcing.

To the extent that outsourcing can be a very significant part of a country's overall exports (it is close to 30% of India's) - underperformance on outsourcing can lead to underperformance against potential, wrt overall trade. However, cultural compatibility is a key issue primarily on the high-end services business, and therefore I would be chary of extrapolating the effect to merchandise trade.

Anyway, last post from me on this front. Will await your response on security categorization on the other thread.

...consider the $70 Bn software outsourcing / BPO industry that accounts for 25% of India's exports today. While India's #1 position is largely due to the expertise of its entrepreneurs and workers, it is also due to the soft power and values associated with India, that provides comfort to the largely Christian Western economies to outsource to the country. To put it slightly more crudely, in today's environment - a largely Muslim country could never have hoped to reach the same position even if Muslim nations somehow developed the knowledge and entrepreneurial strengths to compete; and conversely if India had been Christian (without affecting the quality of manpower and entrepreneurs) it would have been a larger industry. Any change to India's soft power and image has the potential of impacting this dynamic.

The reference to Muslim nations was as an example for point 3. The image of the largest demographic in the country is a key determinant to the economic success of the country. There are certainly Muslim countries that are doing relatively well economically, but if you believe Muslim countries are not getting hurt because of the image of Islam in Western eyes - do let me know and we can debate further.

My statement was that the image of Islam in the West is HURTING the chances of Muslim nations in winning larger volume of trade and business from the same West.

My argument was with regard to Muslim nations' trade volume with the west, and more specifically the outsourcing business obtained from the West - and has nothing whatsoever to do with human development statistics.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby somnath » 17 Jan 2011 13:11

B- The example I provided goes to underscore that Muslim nations that could have posed a considerable challenge to India's runaway #1 position in outsourcing, (obviously those that have other key requisites for the industry, such as a large population base) are underperforming against their potential - due in part to image issues.


>>> Ahh, so Pak underperforms India on outsourcing only on "image" issues! Not on infrastructure, educational indices etc..Maybe Indonesia is unsuccessful in s/w outsourcing because it is "muslim", not because its higher education base is mighty narrow, has been so for decades..And of course, a large population base is a prerequisite for success in outsourcing - Ireland, Isael, Philippines - quo vadis?

C) Underperformance on outsourcing exports implies underperformance on trade which implies underperformance on potential economic heft.


Gem..So a country that underperforms on outsourcing underperforms on trade, and a country that underperforms on trade underperforms on the economy!!!! China has a fragmented, relatively underdeveloped and small "s/w outsourcing" industry - its the #1 trader in the world...And India massively underperforms in world trade - we are the second fastest growing major economy...Some logic...

D) Does this apply to all Muslim nations? No, only to those that have the population base as noted above that would allow for an outsourcing industry large enough to make a difference to the economy. QED...


Another gem...So the outsourcing industry can be significant only in countries with large populations..No one told Israel...No one told Ireland (BTW, another spectacular success story on outsourcing, but massive macroeconomic financial failure - so much for your "implied implications"!)...And no one's obviously told Philippines either...Of course, someone should have told Malaysia as well - poor guys are busy attracting tech companies to Putrajaya!

You might want to take some lessons in English comprehension and reasoning skills before debating on matters that are beyond your capacity.

If you are feeling particularly masochistic, I am happy to continue the discussion on another thread, since it is OT here.


Get some elementary knowledge on real world business, get some 101 lessons on economics - your discussions will be less facile..

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Arjun » 17 Jan 2011 14:00

Somnath, you might have passed economics 201 - but you sure didn't pass Logic 101. Here's the kind of arguments you use in your reply :

1) I say
...are underperforming against their potential - due in part to image issues.
and you reply with
somnath wrote:>>> Ahh, so Pak underperforms India on outsourcing only on "image" issues!

and you build up an extensive case based on this completely faulty grip on logic.

2) You have no idea what 'underperformance against potential' means nor what 'underperformance against potential economic heft' means.

I am open to debates, but seriously I don't have the time nor energy to be teaching you the basics of logic and comprehension. And frankly this quality of debate has been your hallmark throughout...

We are done with this topic. Thanks

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Prem » 21 Jan 2011 23:00

x-post
RI expects to sign $15b in deals with India
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2011 ... india.html
Indonesia expects to sign business contracts and an investment commitment worth more than US$ 15 billion from the Indian government and companies during the visit of President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono to the country next week.Coordinating Economics Minister Hatta Rajasa said Thursday that there would be more than 15 agreements and contracts for signing during Yudhoyono’s visit to the Indian capital from Monday to Wednesday next week.
“Among the deals are the South Sumatra train projects worth up to $2 billion and other infrastructure projects to grow several regions in the country. We’re targeting a total $15 billion value in potential agreements,” he told reporters at his office in Jakarta.President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono will visit India at the invitation of Indian President Pratibha Devisingh Patil to further strengthen the two country’s economic cooperation.
“There will be a business gathering between Indonesia and India’s chambers of commerce, and India’s president will also give a speech there,” he added.Industry Ministry Mohamad Suleman Hidayat said that the business-to-business contracts would cover a number of infrastructure and power plant projects, while the government-to-government agreements would cover cooperation in the development of fertilizer and petrochemical plants.“Through the government-to-government agreement, Indonesia’s Industry Ministry and India’s Chemicals and Fertilizers Ministry plan to establish a coal gasification-based fertilizer industry,” he said, adding that the project could be worth around $1 billion.Hidayat added that there would also be a $1 billion government business deal on iron sand between the Industry Ministry and India’s Primax. “There will be a business gathering between Indonesia and India’s chambers of commerce, and India’s president will also give a speech there,”“The deal will be for the processing of iron sand into titanium and uranium, so that the country’s industries will no longer need to export raw materials.”

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby ramana » 21 Jan 2011 23:22

Arjun, no derogatory remarks. Thanks, ramana

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Prem » 26 Jan 2011 00:13

India, Indonesia poised to reshape ties, recapture the old magic
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2011 ... magic.html
Last decade’s watching each other, soft diplomacy and hard trade, have brought two nations with obvious affinity, located just 90 nautical miles apart, cautiously closer. Also conscious that there could be much more going between them. Sixty-one years after Sukarno was chief guest at India’s first Republic Day in 1950, President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono will be receiving the same honor.Besides the fact that such repetition is rare among nations selecting their special guests, it is a mutual recognition that two large democracies, multi-racial and multi-religious yet secular, are a mirror image of each other.On his second visit after 2005, Yudhoyono would like to reiterate ties as a “strategic partner”. There is every reason for India to reciprocate. Scaling up ties with the largest Southeast Asian nation jells well with its “Look East” policy. A recent debate at the Institute for Defense Studies and Analyzes (IDSA), India’s premier think tank, showed that this is potentially a defining moment in bilateral ties; and both seem to acknowledge it. India’s rising profile and its acknowledgement by the major powers have painted a different scenario. Within ASEAN, Indonesia notices that India has better dealings with tiny Singapore or Malaysia. It seems poised to deal with a “resurgent” India, whose economy is growing at a pace next only to China.“Indians hope Indonesia would not stick to its past claim, if it really wants India to counter-balance China.”
A new set of contexts are evolving. Indonesia has the world’s largest Muslim population and India, the second largest. Watching Indonesians practice a moderate form of Islam that is prevalent in Southeast Asia is a source of strength and relief for India that has on its western frontiers and beyond proponents of hard-line Wahabi school.Both India and Indonesia are threatened by terrorism. Both need to cooperate and learn from each other. Indonesia’s Ambassador to India, Lt. Gen. (ret.) Andi M. Ghalib says terrorism will be high on the agenda for bilateral talks.
Like Parliament and Mumbai attacks in India, Indonesia too has suffered terror attacks as the October 2002 Bali bombings and the July 2009 incident amply illustrate. In their respective homes, both have followed their own brands of secularism. Indonesia, despite being overwhelmingly Muslim, is not an Islamic nation.
Various strands of Buddhism have thrived there alongside Hinduism. Indian epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata, are inherent part of the Indonesian culture.At the international level, Indonesia’s growing ties with the United States, as signified in the Comprehensive Partnership Agreement, match with India’s own journey, especially since the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the Indo-US nuclear deal. This places them comfortably in the same broadly pro-western camp, while guarding their respective national and regional interests and erasing cold war era distance.At the bilateral levels, India and Indonesia are poised to reshaping their ties at the economic and strategic levels. Indonesia is India’s third largest trading partner in ASEAN and bilateral trade is targeted at US$25 billion by 2015. It rose from just $4 billion in 2005 to $14 billion in 2010. Indeed, the $10 billion target was reached by 2008. A record 34 memorandums of understanding, 17 of the business, will be signed this week

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Rony » 26 Jan 2011 21:44

India and Indonesia

India and Indonesia are more than just nations. The world’s second and fourth most populous countries are almost continents. They are gigantic and exuberant, tragic yet triumphant, diverse and dizzyingly complex. Their people — India’s 1.2 billion and Indonesia’s 233 million — speak hundreds of languages and practice a multitude of cultures.

There are deep-rooted and profound bonds between these two civilizational forces: bonds that stretch back many thousands of years encompassing faith (Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam), language (Sanskrit and Urdu) and cultural forms such as the Mahabharata and the Ramayana.

However, most young Indonesians are unfamiliar with these linkages. India for them is terra incognito : vast and unknown.

While many young Indonesians are fans of Bollywood, they are often ignorant of the extent to which Indian culture has influenced Indonesia over the centuries.

Indeed, recent history has tended to focus people’s attention on Indonesia’s relations with another great Asian civilizational force: China.

Certainly Indian influences permeate Indonesian popular culture — especially dangdut music — with its self-evident debt to Hindi film soundtracks. How can we ignore the infectious syncopated beat in Rhoma Irama’s music?

Similarly in the 50s and 60s, Sukarno and Nehru shared a political vision: becoming the principal advocates of the Non-Aligned Movement as they sought to steer their nations between the forces of capitalism and communism.

However, the current linkages are woefully inadequate. Indeed, there are not even any direct flights between the two countries, with travellers between Jakarta and Delhi or Mumbai having to transit through either Singapore or Kuala Lumpur.

President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s state visit to India, en route to the World Economic Forum in Davos, looks set to reverse this trend.

Recognizing the shifts in global politics with China’s steady rise and the decline of the United States, both India and Indonesia clearly want the relationship to grow and flourish.

Diplomacy is about public gestures and Yudhoyono’s presence as the chief guest at the Indian Republic Day celebrations underlines the importance of the entire trip.

At the same time, the flurry of MoUs indicates the desire to take the relationship beyond the symbolic.

India is a nation in a hurry.

Nehru’s quasi-socialist state has become an eager convert to Mammon and now, hungry for natural resources, technology and markets, India views Indonesia as a perfect match for two of its key strategic goals: obtaining coal and selling its wares to millions of new consumers.

Indeed, Indian firms are expected to invest some $15 billion in Indonesia this year, and trade between the two — worth only $4 billion in 2005 — will soar to $25 billion by 2015. Indonesia’s palm oil, electricity and transportation industries will be of special interest to giants like Bharti, Reliance and Tata.

Many Indian elites view Indonesia as a critical gateway to Southeast Asia and the Pacific.

With an eye cocked to the north observing China, India is also focused on expanding its influence in the region and beyond.

In this respect, cooperation with Indonesia is critical. Indeed the death toll from the 2004 tsunami stretching across India, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Indonesia reminds us of the interconnectedness of the Indian Ocean.

As the two great democracies seek a closer alignment we’ll have to watch to see if they endeavor to create an alternative to China’s authoritarian development model.

My hunch is that neither country would want to be seen furthering such an overtly pro-American agenda.

Still, one would caution Indonesians from being too easily taken in by India’s relentless promotional pizzazz.

And with Yudhoyono arriving in Davos today, he’ll be face-to-face with the full might of India’s mounting global confidence as India Inclusive advertising billboards crowd out the more under-stated Swiss.

Many observers are skeptical of the boosterism. One of the subcontinent’s most thoughtful writers, Pankaj Mishra :rotfl: , cautions that “India is facing multiple threats to its sovereignty and stability,” citing both the long-running Naxalite insurgency as well as conflicts in Kashmir and the Northeast.

Meanwhile, tens of millions of its citizens remain mired in poverty and despair.

In any case, there is an inevitability about the relationship between India and Indonesia.

Let’s hope that over the next decade we’ll be seeing much more interaction.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby rsingh » 26 Jan 2011 22:23

From Antara news: Indonesian news agency


Jakarta (ANTARA News) - Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono`s presence as the chief guest for the 61st Republic Day celebrations in New Delhi, India, this year is heartily welcomed by all sections of the Indian population.

President Yudhoyono was welcomed at a state ceremony by his Indian counterpart Shrimati Pratibha Devisingh Patil at the Rashtrapati Bhavan presidential palace in the Indian capital on Tuesday.

After the ceremony, the Indonesian head of state said he appreciated the invitation as the guest of honor at India`s Republic Day Celebrations and hoped his visit would result in new economic cooperation opportunities.

On Wednesday, January 26, 2011 in New Delhi, Yudhoyono attended the Republic Day of India, a holiday marking the creation of the Constitution of India to replace the Government of India Act 1935 as the country`s governing document on January 26, 1950.

The New Indian Express in its official website said Indonesia has always evoked fond memories in Indian minds because geographic contiguity, shared cultural heritage, being comrades in the struggle against long spell of imperialism, and population and economic potentials have led to the forging of close bonds between the two countries during recent years.

"Yodhoyono is not the first Indonesian head of state to be the Republic Day celebrations chief guest. On January 26, 1950, the chief guest was President Sukarno. When Rajendra Prasad and Sukarno drove down from Vijay Chowk to the saluting base in the Rajpath, there was wild cheering and unprecedented display of popular enthusiasm," the New Indian Express said.

It said Sukarno was extremely effusive in acknowledging his indebtedness to India for mobilizing international opinion.

"The strong cultural links between the two countries provided a solid foundation for forging close political links," the Express said.

According to the Express, the strong cultural links could be seen in the Indianised kingdoms like Sri Vijaya, Sailendra, Kediri, Singosari and Majapahit; the familiar Indian words in Bahasa Indonesia; architectural monuments like Borobudur and Lara Jonggrang; the literary masterpieces like Arjuna Vivaha, Bharata Yuddha and Amaramala; the Wajang Kulit (shadow play) based on Ramayana and Mahabharata themes; the living Hindu traditions in Bali - all bear testimony to the pioneering zeal of Indians and the assimilable qualities of Indonesians.

Therefore, Yudhoyono`s visit should lead to the building of more bridges of understanding between the two largest democracies of Asia, who are struggling to maintain their secular traditions against heavy odds.

"If India and Indonesia succeed through democratic methods, we will be the beacon of hope for mankind in the 21st century," the New Indian Express said.

Meanwhile, Deccan Herald in its official website also said President Yudhoyono`s Indian trip was intended to give a boost to

India`s "Look East" policy, underscoring the need for greater integration and deeper engagement between India and East Asia in trade and other strategic sectors.

Prime minister Manmohan Singh, who had traveled to Japan and Malaysia for bilateral visits and to Vietnam for the 8th Asean-India summit last November, has made it clear that his government`s foreign-policy priority will be East and Southeast Asia, which are poised for sustained growth in the 21st century.

"The basis of India-Indonesia partnership dates back to the founding fathers of these two nations, Jawaharlal Nehru and Sukarno, who offered a distinct foreign policy world view that drew on their shared colonial experiences," Deccan Herald said.

It said Nehru and Sukarno visualized an Asian region that could challenge the cold war threat perceptions of the two superpowers. Nehru and Sukarno were among the founder members of the Non Aligned Movement.

In the contemporary context, the rise of China has drawn the two states of Indonesia and India closer.

"The last few years have witnessed a new phase in this relationship where the two states have pushed their ties to a historic high with strong emphasis on economic and security issues," Herald said.

India has decided to substantially enhance its presence in the region while Indonesia took the lead in bringing India closer to the Asean, according to the paper.

The changing strategic landscape of Asia during the post cold war era has broadened the canvas of India`s engagement with Indonesia.

Both want to seize the opportunities being offered by the landmark economic growth being witnessed by the Asian region.

Following the signing of the India-Asean free trade agreement last year, the economic engagement between the two is growing rapidly an will gain further momentum.

According to the paper, Indonesia was an important source of energy and raw materials for India, while bilateral trade exceeded the target set by the two states in 2010 of $10 billion.

Major Indian companies, including the Birla group, the Tatas, Essar, Jindal Steel, Bajaj Motors, are now operating in Indonesia.

Indian investment is spread across a range of areas including banking, mining, oil and gas, iron and steel, aluminum, IT, textiles and telecommunications.

During President Yudhoyono`s visit, Indonesia and India on Tuesday signed 11 memorandums of understanding (MoUs) in various fields as part of efforts to implement comprehensive cooperation they declared in 2005.

The MoUs were signed by the ministers of the two countries in the presence of President Yudhoyono and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh following their bilateral talks at Hyderabad House in New Delhi.

The MoUs include cooperation agreement on extradition and mutual legal assistance signed by Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa and Indian External Affairs Minister Shri SM Krishna.

The other MoUs deal with trade, education, oil and gas, maritime affairs and fisheries, science

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby VinodTK » 29 Jan 2011 05:06

India and Indonesia: China worries

During his visit to India last year, President Barack Obama urged India to engage East and South-East Asian countries “to enhance security and prosperity of all our nations”.

Indians are doing exactly that: the chief guest at India’s 62nd Republic Day celebrations this week was Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, the Indonesian president – head of state of a formidable naval power that India views as a strategic partner.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby VinodTK » 29 Jan 2011 05:21

Chines view of India and Indonesia relationship

India and Indonesia forging bonds


Although China looms large in the consciousness of both nations, neither is keen to be seen as ganging up against Beijing, given their own expanding ties with Asia's top economic and military power.

For that reason, amid all the armaments and performances on display, observers will likely take note of what India did not showcase at the parade.

New Delhi avoided presenting dances and performers from the northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh, which China claims in its entirety.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Vipul » 22 Feb 2011 19:25


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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Airavat » 08 Mar 2011 07:50

Thailand and India intelligence-sharing and connectivity:

Foreign Minister of Thailand Kasit Piromya wanted closely coordinated positions on Myanmar — opposing western sanctions while encouraging the regime to take democracy-icon Aung San Suu Kyi on board for nation-building.

In the security area, Mr. Piromya felt the first priority should be intelligence-networking in order to check money laundering, cross-border drugs and human trafficking. “Second is that we have been more affected by the Somalian pirates. Our fishing and commercial fleet has been subjected to ransom. We should be working closely on this, I told External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna, not only in terms of providing ships off the Somalian coast but to work on beefing up preventive and self-help measures for the merchant fleet."

On air connectivity, he said: “What is needed is an open skies policy and the upgrading of regional airports. For better sea linkages, the Asian Development Bank could be involved to examine the port infrastructure and provide a soft loan.” As far as road linkage was concerned, the Thai Minister felt that with the Myanmar capital moving to the north, its government would pay more attention to a linkage between northern Thailand and India via Mandalay.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby devesh » 08 Mar 2011 08:46

VinodTK wrote:Chines view of India and Indonesia relationship

India and Indonesia forging bonds


Although China looms large in the consciousness of both nations, neither is keen to be seen as ganging up against Beijing, given their own expanding ties with Asia's top economic and military power.

For that reason, amid all the armaments and performances on display, observers will likely take note of what India did not showcase at the parade.

New Delhi avoided presenting dances and performers from the northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh, which China claims in its entirety.



an epitome of deracination. this should go in that thread too. this is a completely different special of humans. homo sapiens have spines. this species doesn't have one. scientists completely missed its development. i think we can official declare it homo non-spinosum-sapiens.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Rony » 28 Mar 2011 22:00

India Gives Food Aid as U.S.-SK Think

As the United States and South Korea continue to debate the need to send humanitarian food aid to North Korea, India has decided that the situation is sufficiently serious to warrant assistance and has announced it is making pulses worth $1 million available for distribution through the World Food Programme.

The decision was revealed by the country’s Ministry of External Affairs on Friday.

Speaking about the move, Minister of State for External Affairs E. Ahamed explained, “We value our relationship with the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” adding, “India is sensitive to the scarcity of food in the DPRK and, in this hour of need, has decided to grant humanitarian food assistance of $1 million, which will provide for 1300 tons of pulses.”

However, the Lee administration seems less concerned, as a Ministry of Unification spokesperson reiterated the administration’s position on the subject in Seoul this morning, saying, “Currently, there is nothing to look into.”

However, Cheon Hae Seong added to reporters, “There are requests from private organizations etc, and we are now looking into those.”

On the other side of the Pacific, Andy Laine, a spokesperson for the U.S. State Department, told Fox News on Friday that the position of the U.S. government has not changed, while a source in the South Korean government pointed out to The Daily NK back on Thursday, “We will not be able to provide unilateral rice aid to North Korea in the absence of prior consultation between the U.S. and South Korean governments.”

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Rony » 29 Mar 2011 23:45

India’s role in the Indian Ocean, E. Asian regions



By Sabam Siagian

I attended the ASEAN Defense Ministers Meeting (ADMM) Plus meeting in Hanoi last October as advisor to Indonesian Defense Minister Purnomo Yusgiantoro. It was quite a colorful sight to see the uniforms of various officers from so many countries.

Both the ADMM and ADMM Plus are currently at a stage of mutual familiarization and trust-building — by adopting non-controversial joint programs, such as peacekeeping, disaster management, military medical programs and maritime security.

The East Asia Summit (EAS), initiated by the 10 ASEAN members, is attended by the leaders (preferably the heads of governments) of the United States, China, India, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, South Korea and Japan.

If we link the heading of this session and the overall theme of this Delhi Dialogue III, “Beyond the First Twenty Years of India-ASEAN Engagement”, it should be obvious that we are dealing for years to come with a changing geopolitical map, both in the East Asia/Pacific area and in the Indian Ocean area.

And it is also obvious that with the impressive economic and technological achievements, including the growing military capabilities of China and India, these two major Asian powers have a dominating presence on the geopolitical map of East Asia, the Pacific region and the Indian Ocean regions.

Today’s India is not the same as the India of 20 years ago. Similarly, the geopolitical setting within which ASEAN existed 20 years ago in East Asia, with the dramatic rise of China, is totally different today.

ASEAN too, after 20 years, in all modesty, is now more cohesively equipped with a clearly formulated vision in coping with the future.

Again, in all modesty, ASEAN has remained cohesive thanks to Indonesia’s achievement as the largest member state since the critical year of 1998 — critical, because of the Asian financial crisis and the resignation of then president Soeharto. The subsequent reformation movement pushed Indonesia into a new era of participatory democracy.

The large archipelagic state did not disintegrate. As a matter of fact, Indonesia has managed to achieve constant economic growth during the last years, albeit more modest compared to India’s success, while consolidating its democratic institutions.

It is in this context of a fluid geopolitical map that Indonesian Foreign Minister Dr. Marty Natalegawa calls for the establishment of a “dynamic equilibrium” between the new geopolitical actors in Asia.

I do not believe that from the outset the two Asian big powers, India and China, are locked in a confrontational trajectory.

It’s true, however, that in order to protect and secure their extensive supply lines underpinning their respective high economic growth, each must enhance their naval capabilities. Both have to import a large percentage of their energy needs.

Robert Kaplan, in an article in Foreign Affairs in 2009, which he expanded in his remarkable book recently published, Monsoon-The Future of American Power in the Indian Ocean, describes the unintended naval competition between India and China that could cause unnecessary destabilizing consequences in the wider Indian Ocean region. (See “Rivalry in the Indian Ocean” by Robert Kaplan, Foreign Affairs, New York, March/April 2009; Monsoon-The Indian Ocean And The Future of American Power, New York, 2010).

It is very advisable indeed for ASEAN and its dialogue partners, or probably by maximizing the East Asia Summit process, to keep in constant touch with each other sorting out whatever misunderstandings or conflicts may arise.

The journey toward reaching a new mutually acceptable strategic balance, or you may wish to call it a “dynamic equilibrium” venture, will certainly not be an easy path
to tread.

Within the context of these notes I interpret the theme of our dialogue and the heading of this session as an indirect invitation to request our views regarding India’s role, given the emergence of a new geopolitical map in the Indian Ocean region and the East Asia/West Pacific region.

For what it’s worth, this Indonesian advice to our host country covers the following points:

• India should enhance its diplomatic presence in the East Asian countries — beef-up your embassies with quality staffing and adequate operational funding.

• Activities related to public diplomacy should be expanded, including spreading the rich Indian culture, also in its modern forms. The magic of Bollywood is one of India’s most effective communication channels.

• The Indian Navy should increase its activities in East Asia by frequent port calls and various joint naval exercises. Whatever joint programs ADMM Plus states are planning, India should offer its active participation. In July 2005, India’s Naval Chief Adm. Arun Prakash made a port call to Tanjung Priok in Jakarta, with the carrier INS Viraat, accompanied by two guided missile destroyers. When The Jakarta Post interviewed him, his impressive personality and his informative interview was one effective example of India’s effective naval diplomacy (See The Jakarta Post, Friday, July 29, 2005: Admiral confident of India’s future role).

• My last, modest, suggestion, looking at the map of the Indian Ocean region, especially the eastern part, it should be obvious that a broader and deeper naval cooperation is indeed necessary between the three littoral countries: India, Indonesia and Australia. Indonesia’s naval capability is still modest while the strategic sea lanes are
located in the Indonesian archipelago: the Malacca Strait, the Sunda Strait, the Lombok Strait and the Makassar Strait.

Closer cooperation with Australia and India would enable Indonesia to enhance its naval capability in the shortest time possible.

Thus, the Indonesian Navy will be in a better position to carry out its responsibility to secure passage through the above mentioned strategic straits.

• Finally, it is interesting to observe China’s increasing presence in Timor Leste, displaying its generosity in constructing public buildings, including the presidential palace.

China is also apparently keen to secure passage through the Wetar Strait off Timor Leste, as a possible alternative, since the above mentioned straits are potential “choke points”. Chinese President Hu Jintao has bemoaned that the Malacca Strait is “China’s dilemma”.

The writer is former ambassador to Australia and currently the co-chairman of the Indonesian forum of (retired) ambassadors. The article is based on his speech delivered at the recently held India/Asean Dialogue in New Delhi.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby ramana » 06 Apr 2011 08:14

India Thailand FTA in two years. Trade to be $10B in two years from $6.7B in 2010.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Airavat » 11 Apr 2011 07:19

To end the deadlock on services pact with the ten-member Asean, India has decided to negotiate separate pacts with the key member states of the trade bloc. India had signed a Comprehensive Economic Cooperation Agreement (Ceca) with Singapore in 2005 and now plans to launch a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with Indonesia soon to put in place a Ceca. It also hopes to conclude dialogue on a comprehensive FTA with Thailand covering investment, services and trade in goods later this year and has already stitched up a Ceca with Malaysia earlier this year.

Assistant secretary general at Ficci, Manab Majumdar, said, “Indian industry is hopeful that services would be concluded despite the differences. Till the time service negotiations are completed bilateral trade agreements with member countries would be a good option.” A Delhi-based trade analyst said that once India enters into a multilateral framework on services with Asean, New Delhi would have to honour the negative list of all the ten countries. While India would in all likelihood have just one negative list. “It is unlikely that Asean countries would reach any consensus on the negative list. Hence they would put on the table individual negative lists, which India may not be in favour of,” he added.

Financial Express

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby VinodTK » 19 Apr 2011 02:50


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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby shyamd » 25 Apr 2011 14:37

This is very serious. Our 2 allies are killing each other over Hindu temples. Its time to get involved diplomatically and bring this issue to a close. We rely on these countries for the dharmic defence umbrella (we are the largest religion in the world) that we are building against PRC. I am surprised that GoI is acting slow on this. ABV worked hard to kick things off. Now post 2008, GoI has once again taken things up to the next level. Thankfully Indonesia is stepping in to resolve this diplomatically.

God Willing this issue will be solved soon.

Thailand denies using chemical weapons against Cambodia
From ANI

Phnom Penh, Apr 24: Thailand has strongly rejected accusations that it used chemical weapons against Cambodian troops in a clash that killed 10 soldiers and forced thousands of civilians from their homes.

Earlier, a statement Cambodian Defense Ministry had accused Thailand of firing 75 and 105 mm shells "loaded with poisonous gas" into Cambodian territory.

A Cambodian field commander said that Thailand used both cluster shells, anti-personnel weapons banned by many countries and artillery shells that gave off a debilitating gas.

The Defense Ministry accused Thailand of seeking to seize two ancient temples in disputed border territory, and said Thai aircraft supported the attacks, including reconnaissance planes that "flew deep into Cambodia's airspace."

But, Thailand rejected these accusations, and said it did not use any aircraft or chemical weapons during the clash.

"I'd like to categorically deny that the Thai military has used any kind of aircraft," said Thai Foreign Minister Kasit Piromya.

"I'd like to reiterate that the accusations from Cambodia hold no truth at all. What they said about us using poisonous gas was not true either," he added.

Colonel Tawatchai Samutsakorn, commander of Thailand's 2nd Army Region, denied that his forces had employed cluster bombs or poison gas.

However, Thailand acknowledged using cluster type munitions in border fighting in February, but argued that they were not of the type banned from use by 108 countries under an international treaty.

The countries have competing claims over small swaths of land along the border, with nationalistic politics fueling tensions.

Clashes have erupted several times since 2008, when the 11th-century Preah Vihear temple was given UN World Heritage status over Thai objections.


Copyright Asian News International/DailyIndia.com

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby shyamd » 28 Apr 2011 04:38

RAW chief in Myanmar

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Klaus » 03 May 2011 15:21

South Korea has staged a live fire artillery drill close to 2 frontline islands near the border with DPRK: Link.

Added later: Bali on alert, increased police and military personnel have been deployed to sensitive establishments such as US business interests: Link.

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Re: India and ASEAN / East Asia

Postby Airavat » 14 May 2011 10:18



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