India-Russia: News & Analysis

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby member_28440 » 22 Apr 2014 05:48


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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 24 Apr 2014 06:34

A return to the Rupee-Rouble trade that was a great help to both countries during the Cold War,and would be equally welcomed today. Similar barter agreements should be entered into with Iran and a few other developing nations which are energy rich but face western imposed sanctions .India should carve out its own destiny in Asia,not as a spineless lackey of Uncle Sam as snake-oil Singh displayed.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 24 Apr 2014 11:35

[b]Excellent news and the hope of more Indo-Russian coordination in global affairs![/b]

India-Russia-Afghanistan synergy: India to pay for Russian arms supplies to Kabul
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Published time: April 23, 2014

It is a done deal and already under implementation, quietly but surely: securing India’s and Russia’s strategic interests in Afghanistan in the not-too-distant scenario of the drawdown of American and NATO forces from Afghanistan.

Under this historic deal, Russia will supply its own defense equipment to Afghanistan and India will pick the tab.

This way both India and Russia would be able to bolster Afghanistan’s self-defense capabilities and make Afghanistan’s armed forces more capable to take on imminent threat of the inevitable enemy: Taliban.

Both India and Russia see in Taliban a bug bear to their individual strategic interests. Taliban has inflicted deep wounds on India during its five-year rule in Afghanistan (1996-2001) that culminated in the hijack of Indian Airlines flight IC 814 on Christmas Eve of 1999. Russia too has its own concerns over the jihadists’ threat in Chechnya, Dagestan and Ingushetia where Taliban continues to have pockets of influence.

Thus the Indian and Russian strategic interests coalesce over the post 2014 Afghanistan. Both of them want to see the back of Taliban in the Afghanistan theater. Both would be keen to ensure that Taliban is not allowed to have a field day in Afghanistan like it did in the past. It is in this context that the Indo-Russian deal of sending supplies of arms and armaments to Afghanistan assumes importance.
The Indo-Russian deal

Under this deal, India will be financing supply of Russian artillery guns, armored vehicles, tanks and combat helicopters to Afghanistan. Besides this, the two sides have also done an inventory of sorts of a number of old Russian defense hardware gathering dust in Afghanistan for years.

The idea is to service and repair such equipment and make these combat worthy. India would be paying Russia for this too. This will be a more economical option and provide value for money. Also on offer are a host of other activities. Russia will also do its own bit to take this process forward at its own expense. Both India and Russia will be prepared to consider Afghanistan’s shopping list pertaining to non-lethal items too.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai has been pressing New Delhi for years to be more pro-active in its military cooperation with Afghanistan – both by way of training Afghan National Army in war games and defense supplies. India has dithered on both for its own foreign policy constraints.

Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh (R) talks to Afghan President Hamid Karzai at his residence in New Delhi on December 13, 2013. (AFP Photo / Saurabh Das)

Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh (R) talks to Afghan President Hamid Karzai at his residence in New Delhi on December 13, 2013. (AFP Photo / Saurabh Das)

The role of the United States has been that of a spoilsport in this context for two reasons. The US has deliberately kept the ANA as a primitive armed force due to pressures from Pakistan. Secondly, the US has been trying to be too clever by half by keeping the Taliban in good humor.

Both these American strategies are not liked by India and Russia. Therefore, under the circumstances this arrangement of Russia sending arms supplies to Afghanistan and India paying for these supplies was the next best alternative.

A major concern of India in not supplying weapons directly to Afghanistan was that inevitably many of these weapons will be funneled back into India through numerous pro-Pakistan terror outfits which are active in many parts of Afghanistan. This would be a major embarrassment for New Delhi.

The Indo-Russian deal would be an effective way of nipping this inevitable problem in the bud. This was a solid reason for India finally agreeing to this arrangement.
Why can’t India supply arms directly to Afghanistan?

In fact, this is the main reason behind India taking this circuitous route to send arms supplies to Afghanistan with the help of Russia.

Those who are not well familiar with South Asian geopolitics and complex Indian domestic political compulsions and unwritten do’s and don’ts may well ask: why this circuitous route? Why should India pay for supply of defense armaments by a foreign country to a third country? Why can’t India do this by itself?

Well, the answer is simple. India had burnt its fingers badly in Sri Lanka when the then Indian government led by Rajiv Gandhi had sent Indian Peace Keeping Force (IPKF) to Sri Lanka in the 1980’s. The IPKF eventually got sucked into Sri Lanka’s civil war and a situation arose where it turned into a bloody battle between Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) and the IPKF while the Sri Lankan armed forces stepped aside watching the unfolding drama gleefully.

Since then ‘once bitten twice shy’ India has been chary of involving itself militarily with its neighbors. India has consistently resisted requests to this effect from neighbors like Nepal, Sri Lanka and Maldives even though such a stance has been detrimental to India’s long-term strategic interests in these countries and has allowed powers like China to enlarge their strategic footprints in these countries.
The China factor

China is very concerned about the ‘T’ word and fears a situation where terror outfits of a jihadist variety entrench themselves in Chinese territory. That is why China is engaging with major powers that have stakes in Afghanistan in several trilateral dialogue formats.

It is no secret that China is apprehensive of Pakistan’s role, whether by double-speak or by Islamabad’s sheer inability to deal with jihadist forces in Pakistan, when it comes to counter-terrorism.

China has enormous economic interests too in Afghanistan, where it has made an investment of over $5 billion in copper mines. A stable and terror-free Afghanistan is in China’s interest as well. China is in talks with India on improving infrastructure in Afghanistan. Thus, China knows where to draw a line with Pakistan on Afghanistan, something that the US doesn’t do.

A camp set up by the Chinese mining company sits mostly empty near a protective wall a few kilometers away from an ancient Buddhist site where a religious community set up more than 17 centuries ago to exploit the copper deposits in the arid mountains of Mes Ainak on October 10, 2012. (AFP Photo / Roberto Schmidt)

A camp set up by the Chinese mining company sits mostly empty near a protective wall a few kilometers away from an ancient Buddhist site where a religious community set up more than 17 centuries ago to exploit the copper deposits in the arid mountains of Mes Ainak on October 10, 2012. (AFP Photo / Roberto Schmidt)

Therefore, the Indo-Russian arrangement, the best workable Plan B to help Afghanistan build up its armed forces, should be supported by China too, whether overtly or covertly.

India and Russia are keeping the deal under wraps for obvious reasons. Thus specific details of what kind of defense equipment are being supplied to Afghanistan through Russia, what is the first order being executed and how much India would be spending under this arrangement are not available.

A key Indian official who is in the thick of Indo-Russian synergy over Afghanistan refused to speak a word on this deal when contacted by this writer. Silence, as they say, is golden.

Rajeev Sharma for RT

The writer is a New Delhi-based columnist and a strategic analyst who tweets @Kishkindha.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 07 May 2014 06:46

The annual May 9th,"Victory Day" parade is being upgraded this year as tensions in the Ukraine border upon an all out war between Russia and Kiev.

Victory Day parade in Moscow to showcase 69 aircraft, record number of military vehicles

May 06, 2014
http://rt.com/news/157156-victory-day-parade-russia/

A total of 69 warplanes and helicopters, 149 military vehicles and over 11,000 troops will feature in Moscow’s Red Square parade on May 9 to mark the 69th anniversary of Russia’s victory over Nazi Germany in World War II.

“Sixty-nine planes and helicopters from the Russian Air Force will fly over Red Square on May 9. The number symbolizes the 69th anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War. A total of 17 aviation groups will be employed during the parade,” Russian Air Force spokesman Col. Igor Klimov told RIA-Novosti.

Guests on Red Square and a worldwide TV audience will witness Su-24M and Su-34 bombers, Su-25 strike aircraft, Su-27 and MiG-29 fighter jets, MiG-31BM interceptors and military transport aircraft, refueling planes and military helicopters.

The renowned aerobatic groups, the Russian Knights (Russkiye Vityazi) and the Swifts (Strizhi), will participate in the May 9 celebration in the city of Sevastopol in Crimea, the groups said on their websites.

In Moscow, they will be replaced with four Mi-35M attack helicopters, which will debut at the Red Square parade, and five Su-25 jet fighters to maintain the previously announced number of 69 planes participating.

The mechanized column of 149 units appearing will set a record for the number of military vehicles taking part in the parade since the fall of USSR in 1991.

Tor-M2U antiaircraft missile systems, armored KamAZ-63968 ‘Typhoon’ combat cars, Khrizantema-S antitank missile systems and as well as modernized self-propelled artillery guns 2S19M2 Msta-S will be showcased on Red Square.

The parade will also see the reappearance of armored GAZ -2330 ‘Tiger’ combat cars, BTR- 80 and BTR-82A armored vehicles, T-90A tanks and various antiaircraft missile and ballistic missile systems.

Russian servicemen march during a rehearsal for the Victory parade on Moscow's Red Square May 5, 2014 (Reuters)

The honor to bear the historic Victory Banner, which was raised by the Soviet troops in Berlin in May 1945, was given to the Preobrazhensky Regiment, who will be followed by over 11,000 officers and soldiers representing all the branches of the Russian military.

An innovation at this year’s parade will be the participation of Special Forces units, which will be armed with Val silent machine guns and VSS Vintorez sniper rifles.

The infantry will march across the 256 meters of Red Square at the traditional pace of 110 to 120 steps per minute.

Victory Day is one of the most important holidays for Russia, as it marks the capitulation of Nazi Germany to the Soviet Union in the Second World War on May 9, 1945.

The first parade to commemorate the WWII victory was staged on Red Square on June 24, 1945, by order of Soviet leader Joseph Stalin.

The Soviet Union paid the highest price of any nation for this victory and lost over 26 million lives in the conflict, known as the Great Patriotic War in the former USSR.

Military parades were held annually on Red Square on May 9, beginning on the 20th anniversary of the victory in 1965. The tradition was dropped for some years after the collapse of the USSR, in the beginning of the turbulent 90s. However, the tradition was revived again in 1995, and has been followed ever since.


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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Prem » 08 May 2014 00:20

Russia offers to develop supercomputer with India to counter
Chinese supremacy

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/art ... aign=cppst

Russian supercomputing company RSC group and the Russian
Academy of Sciences have proposed collaboration with India to set up
supercomputing facilitiesthat will rival China's Tianhe-2, the world's fastest supercomputer. "India has many skills for building supercomputers. It is very
strong in software," said Alexey Shmelev, cofounder and chief operations said Alexey Shmelev, cofounder and chief operations officer of RSC group and
delegate to the Russian Academy of Sciences. "I am ready to share technology
with India. I guess there would not be many players who are willing to do so."
CNR Rao. a Bharat Ratna awardee who heads the scientific advisory council to the prime minister, said it is difficult to assess a potential collaboration right away,
but was of the view that "the Chinese are way ahead". Tianhe-2, developed by China's National University of Defense Technology retained its position as the world's number one system according to TOP500 project which ranks the most powerful computer systems in the world.
India's supercomputer Param Yuva - II is ranked at 83 while Russia's Lomonosov
supercomputer is ranked at 37. If the joint cooperation between Russia and
India is found viable, it can result in a computing system as big as a
basketball court that can perform approximately as many operations per second as several million personal computers. In 2009, India had taken a huge leap
in supercomputing with EKA. It was then the fourth fastest supercomputer in the
world and fastest in ..High performance computing can deliver multiple applications for everyday use from weather and climate prediction to what kind of seeds to sow at a location based on the climate, preventing water seepage, oil and gas exploration, simulation of nuclear devices and designing better missiles.
It can also help design drugs for diseases which are more prevalent in India, building better fuel efficient cars and preventing terrorist attacks. India has committed over Rs 12,000 crore to the Indian Space Research Organisation and the Indian Institute of Science to develop a high-performance supercomputer by 2018. The government has also announced a Rs 4,500 crore national mission on high-performance computing. "Building the world's fastest supercomputer would send a powerful message to young engineers that we are leading in science and technology and give them confidence," said Anand Babu Periasamy, cofounder of technology company Gluster and who was part of the team that built the US' 'Thunder' supercomputer which in 2004 was the second-fastest supercomputer in the world. "We can easily build faster supercomputer than China; we have very high skilled people. It is just a matter of budget and will.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 19 May 2014 12:52

Russia to develop strategic cooperation with new Indian administration - President Putin

The congratulatory message of the Russian leader hailed the traditionally friendly relations between Russia and India based on the Strategic Partnership Declaration, which was signed in the period of office of the Bharatiya Janata Party and determined the development of bilateral relations for many years.

"The impressive results of the fruitful joint work confirmed the historic significance of the declaration.

"Extensive mutually beneficial projects have been implemented in the economic, military-technological, scientific, cultural and humanitarian fields," the Russian president said.

Putin said he was confident Russia and India could multiply the achievements of the previous period by joint efforts, Interfax reports.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Cosmo_R » 20 May 2014 18:13

Ukraine Crisis Pushing Putin Toward China:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/20/world ... ref=europe

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-27481454

"Mr. Putin has stressed repeatedly in recent weeks that Russia sees its economic future with China, noting that its Asian neighbor was on track to surpass the United States as the leading global economic power. A tilt to the East is also in keeping with Mr. Putin’s recent turn to a conservative nationalist ideology, emphasizing religion, family values and patriotism in contrast to what he sees as the increasingly godless, relativist and decadent West."

This is bad news for India. Guess what the PRC will want? Defense technology (funded by India)

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Yagnasri » 20 May 2014 18:29

Russia can be now trusted so for as it is leaning towards China more. The reason may be it knows the real colors of Snake Oil Singh and gave up on India. With NM and BJP in power and with Ind-Khan relations expected to dip down Putin may want to have greater closeness with India. He is now forced to deal with China with whom he has serious border disputes and he knows in a couple of decades China may want Amur region back. No such problems with India. Further getting India out of US orbit will serve Putin well.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby svinayak » 20 May 2014 19:52

Narayana Rao wrote:Russia can be now trusted so for as it is leaning towards China more. The reason may be it knows the real colors of Snake Oil Singh and gave up on India. With NM and BJP in power and with Ind-Khan relations expected to dip down Putin may want to have greater closeness with India. He is now forced to deal with China with whom he has serious border disputes and he knows in a couple of decades China may want Amur region back. No such problems with India. Further getting India out of US orbit will serve Putin well.


There is nothing like relations expected to dip down. What we are seeing is the global multi polar world order being formed.
Again see the video Can India be Cunning in the youtube.

India has not reached the full potential with economy and political power.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Altair » 20 May 2014 20:20

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-20/china-signs-non-dollar-settlement-deal-russias-largest-bank
China Signs Non-Dollar Settlement Deal With Russia's Largest Bank
Slowly - but surely - the USD's hegemony is being chipped away whether by foreign policy faux pas, crossed red-lines, or economic fragility. However, on Day 1 of Vladimir Putin's trip to China it is clear that the two nations are as close as ever. VTB - among Russia's largest banks - has signed a deal with Bank of China to pay each other in domestic currencies, bypassing the need for US Dollars for "investment banking, inter-bank lending, trade finance and capital-markets transactions." Kirill Dmitriyev the head of Russia’s Direct Investment Fund notes, "together it’ll be possible to discuss investment in various projects much more efficiently and clearly," as Russia's pivot to Asia continues to gather steam.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Altair » 20 May 2014 20:21

Can India arrive at similar arrangement with China and Russia? The impact on Dollar would be huge.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby rsingh » 20 May 2014 20:24

What are pros and cons of such deal with China? We can have similar deal for IntraBRIC trading.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Karan M » 20 May 2014 20:39

We should be doing this as well. Non $ trade with Africa, Russia and South America.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 20 May 2014 21:09

With Rupee gradually gaining its lost ground and strengthening against major reserve currency , Rouble-Rupee trade is a real possibility.

Although it should be seen more in terms of strengthening BRICS own currency with intra-trading rather then crushing dollar or Euro ...considering only China and India has consistently growing at 6-7 % and will continue along that path.

Consider this recent report

Indian businessmen ready to make deals in ruble

No longer emerging, BRICS have arrived

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 23 May 2014 15:54

Putin on Russian-Indian relations

Russian President Vladimir Putin has announced that he recently held a telephone conversation with India's next prime minister, Narendra Modi, and they agreed to hold a meeting soon.

"I have just had the pleasure of speaking to the leader of the party that won the elections, the person who will become prime minister [of India] in the near future. We have agreed to hold our meeting soon," the Russian president said at a meeting with global business leaders on the sidelines of the St. Petersburg Economic Forum on Friday.

"We also agreed to continue all of our projects and all of our plans that are already being implemented, already "on the move", so to speak, and create new conditions for joint work," Putin said.

"We have long-time friendly relations with India," he added.

The Kremlin press service reported later that Putin had congratulated Modi on his party's electoral success and his nomination for the post of prime minister.

"Both sides reaffirmed the continuity of traditionally friendly Russian-Indian relations, which have been developing steadily on the basis of the Strategic Partnership Declaration," the press service said.

"They also reiterated their mutual commitment to further bolstering diverse ties in trade, the economy, science, technologies, humanitarian affairs and other areas, as well as effective coordination on key international issues, including within multilateral organizations such as the UN, the G20, BRICS [Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa] and others," it said.

The opposition Bharatyia Janata Party won May's elections to the lower chamber of the Indian parliament.


Read more: http://voiceofrussia.com/news/2014_05_2 ... deal-3902/

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby anmol » 24 May 2014 06:45

What Does Narendra Modi’s Victory Mean for Moscow?

by Petr Topychkanov, carnegie.ru

November 30th -0001

Russian President Vladimir Putin congratulated Modi on the BJP’s 2014 election victory, stressing the key role of the Declaration on Strategic Partnership signed by Putin and the BJP Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee in 2000. In his telegram, the Russian president expressed hopes that Russia and India will be able to “multiply their past achievements.” In his response to the Russian president’s wishes, Modi declared his intention to make India’s relations with Russia “even stronger.”

Unless these pronouncements are followed by some serious steps, Putin and Modi are not likely to elevate Russian-Indian relations to a new level. After all, the BJP is not ready to offer Russia any special preferences as of now. For instance, the party staunchly supports the 2010 Nuclear Liability Act, which effectively halted the Russian-Indian cooperation on atomic energy. New nuclear contracts between Russia and India will not be possible unless the Modi government alters its position on the Nuclear Liability Act.

When it comes to cooperation on military technology, the BJP articulated its position in its election manifesto, which expresses a commitment to “developing indigenous defense technologies.” The manifesto also talks about encouraging domestic industry to have a larger share in design and production of military hardware for both domestic use and exports. In light of Modi’s strong desire to also strengthen India’s relations with Israel, Germany, France, and Japan, it is becoming apparent that Russian arms manufacturers will not benefit from the government change in New Delhi. In fact, during Modi’s rule, India may start competing against Russia in the regions where Russia is still one of the major arms and military technology exporters.

These are only two of many areas in which Russia’s and India’s positions have to be corrected so that the countries find new, mutually beneficial approaches to multiplying their past achievements. Putin’s and Modi’s personal political wills, as well as active efforts on the part of state, commercial, academic and civic institutions, are required to affect the change. Otherwise, the strategic partnership is likely to remain where it was before: at a declarative stage that lacks a strong foundation. To avoid this outcome, Moscow and New Delhi must intensify dialogue on restarting their strategic partnership. The parties have to set the priorities for Russia-India relations, work out a road map for developing ties, take stock of bilateral mechanisms, and, if necessary, create new ones.

In 2012-2013 the Russian International Affairs Council set out to analyze the state and the prospects of Russian-Indian relations. While the project was incomplete and imperfect, it stands out as the only instance of a serious collective effort to analyze bilateral relations between the two countries in recent years. Without such unilateral and bilateral projects, Moscow and New Delhi will fail to produce an analytical foundation for their strategic partnership, thus failing to raise their relations to new heights.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 31 May 2014 15:18

Putin's EEU, "EurAsian Economic Union" is a bold move,in an attempt to bring together economically former Soviet bloc states ,into a club where Russia with its vast reserves of oil and gas,mineral wealth,et al,can assist in a regional eco development of the member states. Subsidised energy supplies,as was provided to Ukraine might be very welcome to some states.The inclusion of the word "Asian" is intriguing,because it offers a far wider reach of this eco club beyond the East European states and could include many former Russian republics.At ghe moment the EU is in deep crisis as recent EU elections have brought to the fore many "Euro-sceptic" parties of the far right ,fed up with the Brussels bureaucracy dominating their individual ways of life.
One sees the Central Asian states who are alarmed at Islamist terrorism via the Taliban enter their region via Af-Pak,warming up to the idea too.Even Afghanistan could join and imagine what the repercussions would be if we see another Rupee-Rouble deal sometime in the future .Could SAARC too become an eco unit like the EEU with ties to it? The possibilities are exciting.

Eurasian Economic Union is wake-up call for US
Patrick L Young is expert in global financial markets working in multiple disciplines, ranging from trading independently to running exchanges.
Published time: May 30, 2014 08:28

Russian President Vladimir Putin (R), Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev (C) and Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko shake hands during a meeting of the Eurasian Economic Union in Astana May 29, 2014. (Reuters / RIA Novosti / Mikhail Klimentyev)

The Eurasian Economic Union is a historic deal and represents a pivot to the East, global financial markets expert Patrick Young told RT. The new union will force the EU to be more competitive and will be a wake-up call for US.

On Thursday, Russia, Belarus, and Kazakhstan signed the Eurasian Economic Union which will come into effect in January 2015. The new bloc will cut down trade barriers and comprises of over 170 million people, making it the largest common market in the former Soviet space.

RT: Just how big a deal is this?

Patrick Young: This is a very interesting deal. It is one huge step, part of the pivot to the East that Russia has been behind, and of course we have seen in recent weeks really come together. Think about it this way — amongst these three countries alone in the customs union they’ve had over the last few years they’ve increased their trade between themselves by the equivalent of the entirety of Russia’s trade with the US. It has multiple possible impacts - some possibilities for every business, small and large, whether you are sitting in Minsk or Almaty, or wherever you are in Russia to profit from the opportunity. Eurasian economic union is a new power-trading bloc. It has many resources, a huge number of people. We are talking about 170 million people - 1.5 percent of the world’s population. They are covering thought 15 percent of the world’s land, 20 percent of the world’s gas resources, 15 percent of the world’s oil resources and a great deal of industry and also agriculture.

RT: Europe is Russia’s biggest trading partner at the moment, should it be worried?

PY: Europe has to start looking at things from the competitive sensible perspective. Europe was not going to be the only union in the world, just as the same as NAFTA in America was never going to be the only trade agreement there. Europe needs to understand the idea that just because you happen to be on the eastern fringes of the European Union, it doesn’t automatically mean that you are going to try to fight your way into the EU as it currently is. Why not go with something like this Eurasian union, where you’ve got effectively all the benefits of the first stage of the European economic community, i.e. free trade, but you don't have to worry about the silly regulation, plutocratic red tape, which plunged the EU community into crisis.

RT: What impact will this have on US economy?

PY: This is a high wake-up call. This is part two or part three for the US over the course of the last few weeks. Obviously the gas pipeline deal – that was the whole pride of Siberia project – was absolutely fascinating. The point about whether America needs to get worried is:

a) America needs to realize that just because it is the world’s largest economic power; it is no longer the uni-power in the world in terms of economics. Russia and the rest of the world have alternatives in how they trade.

b) And the most significant thing - and this is a very long-term trend for the US - is that none of it will be conducted in US dollars. People will find another way to trade. That is a big impact because the US dollar reserve currency status is the thing whereby it is the most dominant money on Earth ultimately is under threat. As soon as US dollars are under threat, the hegemony of the US project is going to find itself in problems. This is a big pivot and the US ignores it at its peril long term.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Karan Dixit » 03 Jun 2014 08:38

Why is Russia lifting embargo on military supplies to Pakistan?

http://rt.com/op-edge/163116-russian-em ... -pakistan/

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 03 Jun 2014 09:17

Karan Dixit wrote:Why is Russia lifting embargo on military supplies to Pakistan?

http://rt.com/op-edge/163116-russian-em ... -pakistan/


Russia needs infulence over Pakistan atleast some infulence so that post US Forces leaving Afghanistan the Taliban wont end up spreading over the CIS , Once US leaves Afghanistan Taliban taking over is a real possibility.

Not to mention the rise of Narcotics trade via CIS thats a real cause of worry for them besides rise of terrorism that a rising taliban can bring.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby svinayak » 03 Jun 2014 11:53

Karan Dixit wrote:Why is Russia lifting embargo on military supplies to Pakistan?

http://rt.com/op-edge/163116-russian-em ... -pakistan/

To compensate for this India need more access inside Af Pak and greater say in the area. India will need its own base in Afghanisatn

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 03 Jun 2014 13:20

Thats not possible if India manages to get any base inside Afghanistan which has military significant Pakistan will react in the way it does using Force or Terrorism.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Shreeman » 03 Jun 2014 13:21

Austin wrote:
Karan Dixit wrote:Why is Russia lifting embargo on military supplies to Pakistan?

http://rt.com/op-edge/163116-russian-em ... -pakistan/


Russia needs infulence over Pakistan atleast some infulence so that post US Forces leaving Afghanistan the Taliban wont end up spreading over the CIS , Once US leaves Afghanistan Taliban taking over is a real possibility.

Not to mention the rise of Narcotics trade via CIS thats a real cause of worry for them besides rise of terrorism that a rising taliban can bring.


Probably more to this, than these explanations. Lets see if any sales materialize, in a way it cuts into china's captive export market aka beta test program.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Shreeman » 03 Jun 2014 13:23

Austin wrote:Thats not possible if India manages to get any base inside Afghanistan which has military significant Pakistan will react in the way it does using Force or Terrorism.


This is exactly how you move the focus away from "mainland" -- to iraq or libya or syria or af-pak or to taiwan or spratlys or senkaku or whatever.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby member_28539 » 03 Jun 2014 14:08

Austin wrote:
Karan Dixit wrote:Why is Russia lifting embargo on military supplies to Pakistan?

http://rt.com/op-edge/163116-russian-em ... -pakistan/


Russia needs infulence over Pakistan atleast some infulence so that post US Forces leaving Afghanistan the Taliban wont end up spreading over the CIS , Once US leaves Afghanistan Taliban taking over is a real possibility.

Not to mention the rise of Narcotics trade via CIS thats a real cause of worry for them besides rise of terrorism that a rising taliban can bring.


But Austin Sir...once bitten..twice shy... the Russians have already been in the Af mess & will they really care about influence over Pak or narcotics threat. Also, since they have realtively close connections with us, they would know the state of affairs in Pak & demerits of dealing with them...

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby member_28539 » 03 Jun 2014 14:13

Shreeman wrote:
Austin wrote:Thats not possible if India manages to get any base inside Afghanistan which has military significant Pakistan will react in the way it does using Force or Terrorism.


This is exactly how you move the focus away from "mainland" -- to iraq or libya or syria or af-pak or to taiwan or spratlys or senkaku or whatever.


+1 to the understanding of the concept here..

But Shreeman Ji, do we have the necessary Economic Muscle to carry this out like Khan? I mean wouldn't it be just draining our resources & manpower..it is already such pain to maintain embassies & consulates in Af as we have seen in past...

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Shreeman » 03 Jun 2014 14:49

Joshi_Sa wrote:
Shreeman wrote:Thats not possible if India manages to get any base inside Afghanistan which has military significant Pakistan will react in the way it does using Force or Terrorism.

This is exactly how you move the focus away from "mainland" -- to iraq or libya or syria or af-pak or to taiwan or spratlys or senkaku or whatever.


+1 to the understanding of the concept here..

But Shreeman Ji, do we have the necessary Economic Muscle to carry this out like Khan? I mean wouldn't it be just draining our resources & manpower..it is already such pain to maintain embassies & consulates in Af as we have seen in past...


You pay the piper either way in Kashmir or Kandhar. In kandhar you gain afghan gratefulness if you dont act all amreeki. In kashmir you have to burn down you own houses to evict the vermin. One is not a complete substitute for the other. But not taking a prominent role in Afg. after 2014 (if Abdullah wins) would be silly. Hopefully the new dispension in Delhi understands that acting in the shadows can only bring so much benefit.

ps -- half-hearted methods will work only thusly.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby ramana » 03 Jun 2014 22:58

Shreeman, That unfortunate gentleman was kidnapped for Christian missionary activity in Taliban lands.

Not really for promoting Indian interests.

He was misused cynically by the missonary organization which used him as cannon fodder.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 03 Jun 2014 23:20

India is allegedly already in an agreement where we are paying for deliveries of arms supplied by Russia to the Afghan govt. If we go "whole hog" in investing in the Chabahar port in Iran,where the rail link to Central Asia takes off from,and where supplies to Afghanistan are routed avoiding Paki territory,Pak will be outflanked in the west.If Russia can influence and cobble together elements of the former "northern alliance" of Central Asian states that are anti-Taliban/AlQ,and thereby inherently anti-Pak,it will be tough going for Pak to wrest control over Afghanistan with the encirclement movement.A little bestirring by India with regard to Paki terror will see redeployment of Paki forces on the Indo-Pak border,now that the snake-oil Singh honeymoon period is over,where we assured Pak of no trouble from our side as it dealt with its own brand of the Taliban upto mischief in Pak. A few helicopters to Pak does not mean an about turn in Russo-India relations.Who knows,Russia may have already indicated to India about the proposed helo sale.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 05 Jun 2014 04:18

http://rt.com/op-edge/163116-russian-em ... -pakistan/
Why is Russia lifting embargo on military supplies to Pakistan?

Rajeev Sharma is a New Delhi-based journalist, author and strategic analyst. He tweets @Kishkindha and can be reached at bhootnath004@yahoo.com.

Published time: June 02, 2014 16:06
RIA Novosti / Sergey Kuznecov

Russia has just announced a hugely strategic decision that may alter the regional power matrix and bug India at a time when the just-installed Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi was looking to deepen ties with Moscow.

Sergey Chemezov, head of Russian state-run technologies corporation Rostec, announced on Monday that Russia has lifted an embargo on supplying weapons and military hardware to Pakistan. He also said that Moscow is negotiating the delivery of several Mi-25 helicopter gunships to Islamabad. "The decision was taken and we are negotiating the delivery of helicopters," the Voice of Russia quoted Chemezov as saying.
Why this move and why now?

The Russian decision is indicative of a paradigm shift in Russian foreign policy, a kind of move which one sees once in several decades.

Naturally, when a state takes such a decision it must not be without considering the pros and cons of the matter, the strategic takeaways and the possible pitfalls.

Two compelling reasons for the Russian move may well be Afghanistan and the Russia-West spat over Ukraine.

Like India and China, Russia too is waiting with bated breath the post-2014 Afghanistan as American/NATO are scheduled to pull out most of their troops from the land-locked country by this year end. The Taliban is in a resurgent mode. Everybody knows that during the Taliban rule (1996-2001), Afghanistan had become the most productive and flourishing factory of jihad in the world. Therefore, the withdrawal of American/NATO troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014 may well turn the country into a tinder box again.

While Russia would definitely not like this scenario, it can hardly change the situation and counter the new situation with a Plan B. Pakistan’s importance would increase enormously in the post-2014 situation in Afghanistan.

Improving relations with Pakistan would give an important leverage to Russia in the post-2014 Afghanistan. If Russia and China do not want the loose canons of the Taliban to unleash themselves at them, then it is Pakistan and no one else that can make it happen.

The Russian move may be far shrewder than one can think. It may well be indicative of a China-Russia-Pakistan (CRP) axis, largely because of flawed policies of the Obama administration.

Russia and Pakistan have had a rather cold relationship, despite the latter’s sustained attempts over recent years to mend the ties. Reasons for the Russian coldness toward Pakistan are not difficult to see. It is the India factor. India clearly does not favor Russia cozying up to Pakistan and Russia could not have afforded to annoy the Indians. Why, after all, Russia should play a zero-sum game in South Asia when it is having the best of relations with India, a sworn enemy of Pakistan?

That was the argument of most Russians who opposed the very idea of needling India, the largest importer of Russian weapons. But even this defense relationship received setbacks in the past two years as Russia lost out to other competitors like Israel, the United States and Europe on several big-ticket Indian defense deals.
The India angle

Let me begin the India angle in this context with two seemingly contradictory statements.

One, the Russian decision of lifting its embargo on weapons supplies to Pakistan is a huge setback to India. Two, India and Russia will continue to do business together as both need each other immensely.

It is highly unlikely that the Russian move would have come as a complete surprise to the Indians. New Delhi has been aware of formal consultations between Russia and Pakistan in the trilateral format on Afghanistan – the third country being China.

It is quite possible that Moscow may have taken the Indians into its confidence on its upcoming policy change and put forth its strategic compulsions.

Russia and India are working very closely in the Afghan theater and have embarked on a novel understanding wherein India pays for Russian arms supplied by Russia to Afghanistan for boosting Afghan armed forces’ capabilities. Is there a possibility that the Russians have taken a sort of ‘no-objection certificate’ from the Indians for their unprecedented outreach to Pakistan?

One cannot rule out anything. Games such as these are often played on the strategic chessboards. What can be a bigger strategic chessboard than Afghanistan where all the top powers of the world are directly involved?

Moreover, one should not expect an official statement from either Moscow or New Delhi on this issue. Games such as these are often played in the back alleys, far from the media glare.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Shreeman » 05 Jun 2014 04:32

ramana wrote:Shreeman, That unfortunate gentleman was kidnapped for Christian missionary activity in Taliban lands.

Not really for promoting Indian interests.

He was misused cynically by the missonary organization which used him as cannon fodder.


Yes, true. The news appeared the same say and I picked the first goigle hit. Plenty of better examples though. Consulates and all.

I cant really understand the missionary activities in Afghanistsn, is the monetary incentive for folks like this mercenary level high?

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Agnimitra » 05 Jun 2014 04:38

Shreeman wrote:I cant really understand the missionary activities in Afghanistsn, is the monetary incentive for folks like this mercenary level high?

The problem is that you think such neo-converts do this out of monetary incentive rather than zeal and faith.

The highest number of Christian missionaries who volunteered to go into post-invasion Iraq (when things were very volatile) were Korean Christian neo-converts. I personally met and spoke with Korean Christians in the US. Very passionate, and widely traveled to proselytize. Interesting to see Indian neo-converts now volunteering.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Shreeman » 05 Jun 2014 05:30

Agnimitra wrote:
Shreeman wrote:I cant really understand the missionary activities in Afghanistsn, is the monetary incentive for folks like this mercenary level high?

The problem is that you think such neo-converts do this out of monetary incentive rather than zeal and faith.

The highest number of Christian missionaries who volunteered to go into post-invasion Iraq (when things were very volatile) were Korean Christian neo-converts. I personally met and spoke with Korean Christians in the US. Very passionate, and widely traveled to proselytize. Interesting to see Indian neo-converts now volunteering.


I am sorry to hear this. The last thing they need is more bibles. No different than the fanatic suicidals on the other side. Opiated by religion in the land of poppy.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby putnanja » 05 Jun 2014 07:09

Shreeman wrote:
Agnimitra wrote:The problem is that you think such neo-converts do this out of monetary incentive rather than zeal and faith.

The highest number of Christian missionaries who volunteered to go into post-invasion Iraq (when things were very volatile) were Korean Christian neo-converts. I personally met and spoke with Korean Christians in the US. Very passionate, and widely traveled to proselytize. Interesting to see Indian neo-converts now volunteering.


I am sorry to hear this. The last thing they need is more bibles. No different than the fanatic suicidals on the other side. Opiated by religion in the land of poppy.


No, there needs to be more proselytizers in the Islamic lands, not less :lol:

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby chetak » 05 Jun 2014 07:36

ramana wrote:Shreeman, That unfortunate gentleman was kidnapped for Christian missionary activity in Taliban lands.

Not really for promoting Indian interests.

He was misused cynically by the missonary organization which used him as cannon fodder.


and yet they knowingly put the sole responsibility on the GOI to get him back as his "employers" have wantonly receded far into the woodwork, err background

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 05 Jun 2014 10:24

Yes,Chetak is spot on! Why has Pope Francis,another Jesuit,the first Jesuit Pope been so quiet about one of his flock? After all the Vatican prides itself on being a "state",has a papal Nuncio accredited to the court of Mr.Modi.Surely it should send an envoy to Afghanistan as well,echoing whatever efforts India makes towards freeing one of its citizens?

The Western tactic of sending in "converters",the other side of the coin called "contractors",in a region of crisis,in the aftermath of natural disasters,etc.,is replete with danger.The onus of responsibility for the kidnapped priest should be primarily with those who sent him there in the first place.Who knows,with western chicanery,could it be a "false flag" op,deliberately engineered to put pressure upon India's new dispensation and PM?

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby chetak » 05 Jun 2014 10:35

Philip wrote:Yes,Chetak is spot on! Why has Pope Francis,another Jesuit,the first Jesuit Pope been so quiet about one of his flock? After all the Vatican prides itself on being a "state",has a papal Nuncio accredited to the court of Mr.Modi.Surely it should send an envoy to Afghanistan as well,echoing whatever efforts India makes towards freeing one of its citizens?

The Western tactic of sending in "converters",the other side of the coin called "contractors",in a region of crisis,in the aftermath of natural disasters,etc.,is replete with danger.The onus of responsibility for the kidnapped priest should be primarily with those who sent him there in the first place.Who knows,with western chicanery,could it be a "false flag" op,deliberately engineered to put pressure upon India's new dispensation and PM?


These guys are paid very heavily because of the "risk" component. Easier to send brown skinned sacrificial goats rather than risk white skin body bags.

This particularly unfortunate gent had never cared to establish any contact with the Indian consulate folks because his employers did not want anyone asking uncomfortable questions.

Yet, Modi is to be held squarely responsible. It is being seen as a "test" for him.

Once the fire has been lit and the willfully fanned flames are burning brightly, the "employers" have quickly taken themselves out of the loop.

Indian remote controlled TV channels will faithfully continue to dance like puppets on a string.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Pratyush » 05 Jun 2014 10:54

Don't think that it will become a major issue for the Indian government. As his activities were most likely not sanctioned by the GOI. They can get away by issuing standard comments and hope that the Taliban will let him get away with the payment of his ransom.

It will be interesting to note who will pay for his ransom.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby vishvak » 05 Jun 2014 14:52

Worst part is how Indians have to deal with and spend limited resources on such covert and over enthusiastic people doing their own thing and own agenda. Hopefully Afghan and Indian relationship won't be disturbed because of such unexpected and unwanted events.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 07 Jun 2014 02:12

The US just got back one of its soldiers after a 5 yr. holiday with the ungodly.Ample time for the aid worker to convert his captors.Who knows,his infection might spread!

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Y. Kanan » 10 Jun 2014 21:37

Karan Dixit wrote:Why is Russia lifting embargo on military supplies to Pakistan?

http://rt.com/op-edge/163116-russian-em ... -pakistan/


... and this is why I voiced my misgivings over the last several major arms purchases from the United States. The C-17's, C-130's, P-8I's, Apaches and all the other big ticket items we chose to buy from the US over the past 7-8 years... I don't see why we couldn't have found Russian, French or other non-US alternatives to these platforms. And not just because buying American would p*ss off the Russians, but also because the US is fundamentally untrustworthy. They have a long record of stabbing us in the back and betraying us at the worst possible moment. It was foolish of the MMS gov't to ever think the US could be an ally.

And consider the Russian POV: the US has been taking a very aggressive and hostile approach to Russia over the last 7-8 years, and during this same time frame we've jumped into bed with the Americans in a misguided attempt to curry their favor. I'm sure this hasn't gone over well with the Russians.

And it's not like we had to buy 100% Russian. If we'd bought from France, Sweden or any other country that isn't actively trying to isolate and destroy Russia, our defense relationship with Russia wouldn't have been affected. But to snub Russia repeatedly and buy one big ticket item after another from the Americans, while those same Americans are working actively to undermine Russia at every opportunity... well I guess we asked for it.

It's a shame the previous gov't was so short-sighted. Now it may be too late; China and Russia have entered into a long-term energy and defense pact. I suspect China agreed to this new cozying up with Russia in exchange for Russia dumping India as an ally. As part of the deal, China probably promised the Russians they'd use their influence over Pakistan to keep them from pushing into Central Asia once they've finished taking over Afghanistan. Russia won't care about Afghanistan coming back under the control of Pakistan as long as their Central Asian allies are safe from further expansion.

There's clearly some sort of major realignment going on and I fear the end result may be an India without any friends. Basically the 1990's all over again.


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