India-Russia: News & Analysis

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 04 Sep 2019 09:47

Putin sees India and China as Moscow’s partner in multipolar world: Alexander Dugin

https://www.thehindu.com/news/internati ... 316215.ece

PM Modi is Putin’s special invitee to the Eastern Economic Forum in Vladivostok

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s special invite to Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the Eastern Economic Forum (EEF) in Vladivostok that begins on Wednesday is a step to fulfill his vision of establishing a multipolar world with India and China as Moscow’s core partner, says a leading Russian thinker.

In an interview with The Hindu in Beijing — Alexander Dugin, also known a President Putin’s “brain” as well as the architect of the Fourth Political Theory — stressed that President Putin’s invitation to Mr. Modi as the chief guest at this year’s EEF is “first of all “a recognition of modern India to the Eurasian continent and the world in general”.

He added: “It also reflects as well the strategic vision of (Mr.) Putin towards shaping the future world order. This order, according to the Russian President, should be multipolar, based on the absolute sovereignty of powerful civilisations instead of liberal western hegemony.”

Among global leaders, President Putin is at the forefront as he recognises that the “multipolar moment” has already arrived, and the unipolar world order, led by the U.S., which followed the collapse of the Soviet Union, is being eclipsed by new rising powers, such as India, which have a deep civilisational past.

“Putin understands well the lesson of the former Soviet Union in the Cold War. Russia alone cannot bear the burden to oppose the liberal capitalist hegemony. So Moscow has to share the task of multipolarity with other major emergent players — first of all China and India. Hence, the role of India as one of the main pillars of multipolar world order,” Mr. Dugin observed.

The Russian scholar noted that Mr. Modi comes from a non-western ideological background, and his mind has been shaped by a deep Indian civilizational tradition — ideal for his emergence as a leader of the multipolar world. “Mr. Modi is exactly the kind of leader the multipolar world needs. He represents Indian identity as civilization.

He is symbol of modernisation without westernisation, representing a kind of conservative revolution of Indian politics based on deep cultural and spiritual identity.”

Mr. Dugin nailed the pioneering legacy Indian freedom fighter, Bal Gangadhar Tilak “who tried to combine anti-colonialism by return to the roots of tradition” as the philosophic template that India could pursue. “I think this third line of Indian traditionalism, which was not inspired by western modern nationalism, nor liberalism but was rooted in classic Indian traditionalism can be the way forward.”

“We need deep decolonisation and we need to restore our identity with our terms based on or tradition, our spiritual values and our historical experiences. This is deep decolonisation of the mind,” Mr. Dugin observed.

After joining the eight nation Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) pillared by Russia and China, India should take “the next decisive step” of becoming an active player of the multipolar world, Mr. Dugin observed.

“With the growing importance of China and its growing opposition to the U.S. led world politics and deepening relations with Russia—other key opponent to Western hegemony— we are already inside the era of multipolarity. So India logically is invited to join the club – the sooner the better, because the norms of emerging multipolar world order are establishing now.”

Asked to identify modern western scholars who anticipated the rise of the multipolar world, Mr. Dugin singled out American scholar Samuel Huntington, the author of, “The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order”.

“Huntington could foresee that instead of ideology, modernisation, westernisation, technological assertion, there is some core of self-consciousness or identity that is more stable and stronger. I think he could see that we are coming to this moment, this deep truth of fundamental spiritual identity of civilizations, as they appear on the historical scene after the collapse of liberalism—the last utopic modern political theory.”

“Liberalism is obsolete as Putin has said recently, and instead of it, civilizations reappear, and now the problem is what will be the multipolar order? What are the borders, and that is very important and significant. What are the numbers of civilizations that are ready or not yet? What will be the juridical aspect of civilizational? All that has to be decided now. We live in the moment that nothing is as yet decided, but everything is put under question,” Mr. Dugin observed

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby ArjunPandit » 04 Sep 2019 20:08

Few news from the visit
1. PM visits ship building complex
https://www.dailypioneer.com/2019/top-s ... putin.html
2. Invite to 75 victory day celebrations, wondering if china would be there...
https://www.dailypioneer.com/2019/trend ... tions.html
Nothing tangible apart from teh business as usual statements of close friendship...and convergent interests..

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby ramana » 04 Sep 2019 21:52

Karan M wrote:If you dont order enough, you cant set up lines! Then you end up cribbing about rate of delivery because the line is anemic. Brilliant chicken and egg problem!



Some powers hope is NaMo won't come back and imports can resume.
May 2019 has ended that and these powers will be retired by 2024.
Philip you know the genesis and origins of the Tejas problems.
its not like HAL is a private player which can setup production lines.
The anemic rate is due to the long delay in giving orders during which time imported parts go up in price.
The longest delay is in the production of the air-frames.
Rest can be assembly. The MoD and IAF are hell bent on self sabotage by delaying the total order.
Why cant they release the funds for the air-frames?

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 05 Sep 2019 08:33

Is the import lobby salivating with the 120 MMRCA 2.0 fruit dangling from the branch? There appears to be a none-too subtle attempt by babudom at delaying Tejas, starving it and HAL of funds due to it so that other acquisitions can be processed.If HAL is paid its dues, one is sure that it will improve deliveries of Tejas.Starving it of funds will affect its production rate.
Tejas' success is the biggest enemy of primarily the western aircraft lobby as the Russians still have the MKI upgrades around the corner and a strong contender, especially on price for the fighter contest.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby nandakumar » 05 Sep 2019 11:50

Why is the Vladivostok- Chennai maritime corridor such a big news? I mean Vladivostok has a seaport and so does Chennai. Ships have always have always enjoyed free passage across sea lanes for cargo movement. Is it that the Indo-Russian MOU is about dredging the sea for very large ships to be able to navigate easily?

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 05 Sep 2019 12:54

India and Russia target $30 billion in trade by 2025, announce new energy deals

https://www.livemint.com/news/india/ind ... 74631.html

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 05 Sep 2019 14:03

LIVE: Russian President Putin, Indian PM Modi, and Japanese PM Abe Give Speeches at EEF


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India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Peregrine » 05 Sep 2019 15:55

nandakumar wrote:Why is the Vladivostok- Chennai maritime corridor such a big news? I mean Vladivostok has a seaport and so does Chennai. Ships have always have always enjoyed free passage across sea lanes for cargo movement. Is it that the Indo-Russian MOU is about dredging the sea for very large ships to be able to navigate easily?
nandakumar Ji :

Here is an article about "THE CORRIDOR - It does not require any Dredging :

Russia’s Asian Pivot: The Vladivostok-Chennai Maritime Corridor.

My Comments : This Corridor could. might, possibly be "Cocking a Snook" at Chinawala penchant for "Corridors Galore :

Image

Cheers Image

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 05 Sep 2019 16:02

WEF News

India will provide a $ 1 billion credit line for the development of the Far East
https://tass.ru/ekonomika/6847476

This was announced at a plenary meeting of the Eastern Economic Forum on Thursday by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. "India will provide a $ 1 billion credit line. This is an unprecedented case, this is our launching pad in the Far East. The Indian government is very active in this region," he said.

Modi emphasized that this is a unique event when New Delhi provides such a special line of credit to another country.

According to Modi, India and Russia concluded at the WEF 50 investment agreements for $ 5 billion. He noted that the Far East has great natural resources and potential for active development.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 05 Sep 2019 16:03

The head of the FSVTS said that India ordered weapons from Russia for $ 14.5 billion

https://tass.ru/armiya-i-opk/6841832
"Last year and today marked the emergence of a huge portfolio of orders for $ 14.5 billion compared to all other years. This is a very significant figure and, indeed, this is a breakthrough," he told reporters on Wednesday.

"The military-technical cooperation between Russia and India is today the most important element of privileged strategic interaction," he added.

Shugaev also recalled that last year, despite the fact that India was under pressure, primarily from the United States, large contracts were signed for the supply of S-400 systems, project 11356 frigates, as well as a large consignment of ammunition for the air force , naval and land forces.

“Today, we continue negotiations on the supply and licensed production of the Igla-S portable anti-aircraft missile system for India. Last year, as you know, we won a tender of almost $ 1 billion,” said Shugaev.


He added that after-sales service also remains an important topic. "Today this is one of the main topics on the agenda, and a joint Russian-Indian working group on after-sales services has been created and is working for these purposes," said the head of the Federal High-Tech Transport Service of Russia.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 05 Sep 2019 16:04

Russia and India agree on joint production of spare parts for Russian military equipment

https://tass.ru/ekonomika/6840970

VLADIVOSTOK, September 4. / TASS /. Russia and India, as part of the Eastern Economic Forum, have concluded an agreement on the joint production of spare parts and components for Russian-made military equipment.

We are talking about "cooperation in the joint production of spare parts, components, assemblies and other products for weapons and military equipment of Russian production."

The agreement was signed between the governments of the Russian Federation and India during a visit to Russia by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. .


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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 05 Sep 2019 18:41

Any deal for military hardware signed? No news on order/deal for Kamov helicopters, additional SU30 and Mig 29, or formal offer of T-14 and Amur 1650. Seems the Indians have corrupted the Russians and they have started enjoying the endless rounds of chai, biskoot and samosa's.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 05 Sep 2019 19:14

De vulture is a patient bird.There's more beneath the tip of the berg. Details will filter out at the appropriate time.
Suffice it to say that we have Russia's unstinted diplomatic backing ( on Kashmir) and military cooperation , plus civil space and nuclear cooperation too.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby chetak » 05 Sep 2019 22:49

Austin wrote:WEF News

India will provide a $ 1 billion credit line for the development of the Far East
https://tass.ru/ekonomika/6847476

This was announced at a plenary meeting of the Eastern Economic Forum on Thursday by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. "India will provide a $ 1 billion credit line. This is an unprecedented case, this is our launching pad in the Far East. The Indian government is very active in this region," he said.

Modi emphasized that this is a unique event when New Delhi provides such a special line of credit to another country.

According to Modi, India and Russia concluded at the WEF 50 investment agreements for $ 5 billion. He noted that the Far East has great natural resources and potential for active development.



Yusuf Unjhawala Verified account @YusufDFI 8h8 hours ago

India giving $1bn loan to Russia for development of Far East. From taking Soviet Russian aid to giving loans to Russia!

Messages too in it. India to give loan to develop Russian area bordering/close to China with considerable Chinese presence.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby nandakumar » 06 Sep 2019 10:09

Peregrine wrote:
nandakumar wrote:Why is the Vladivostok- Chennai maritime corridor such a big news? I mean Vladivostok has a seaport and so does Chennai. Ships have always have always enjoyed free passage across sea lanes for cargo movement. Is it that the Indo-Russian MOU is about dredging the sea for very large ships to be able to navigate easily?
nandakumar Ji :

Here is an article about "THE CORRIDOR - It does not require any Dredging :

Russia’s Asian Pivot: The Vladivostok-Chennai Maritime Corridor.

My Comments : This Corridor could. might, possibly be "Cocking a Snook" at Chinawala penchant for "Corridors Galore :

Image

Cheers Image

Thanks. But have a question. If the idea is to do a BRI type corridor (on a much smaller scale) as China is doing, is the Vladivostok-Chennai maritime corridor an apt comparison? China's BRI involves construction of full fledged ports where none exists. But in the present case ports already exist. Does the project involve dredging the passage to accommodate larger crude carrying vessels or construction of additional berths or outer harbour and such stuff.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Yogi_G » 06 Sep 2019 13:40

Will the Vladivostok Chennai route be to us what the malacca straits is to China? A strategic chokepoint in the case of war? Would Russians remain silent when Indian or other vessels delivering to Chennai is intercepted during a time of crisis? Would Japanese help in case of Chinese involvement as the Russians are involved in the game and Unkil could frown upon? Seems to open up some questions, the economic plausible deniability at the outset makes sense but on deeper thought it is not fully clear on the options before the various players in the south china sea theater during times of conflict.

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India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Peregrine » 06 Sep 2019 14:55

Peregrine wrote:nandakumar Ji :
1. Here is an article about "THE CORRIDOR - It does not require any Dredging :
Russia’s Asian Pivot: The Vladivostok-Chennai Maritime Corridor.

My Comments : This Corridor could. might, possibly be "Cocking a Snook" at Chinawala penchant for "Corridors Galore :

https://images.stockfreeimages.com/545/ ... 450299.jpg

Cheers Image
nandakumar wrote:Thanks. But have a question. If the idea is to do a BRI type corridor (on a much smaller scale) as China is doing, is the Vladivostok-Chennai maritime corridor an apt comparison? China's BRI involves construction of full fledged ports where none exists. But in the present case ports already exist. Does the project involve dredging the passage to accommodate larger crude carrying vessels or construction of additional berths or outer harbour and such stuff.


nandakumar Ji & Yogi_G Ji - Your Post 06 Sep 2019 13:40:

There is an alternative to the Malacca Strait as the Largest Ultra Large Crude Carriers are unable to use the Malacca Straits as per following dimensions :

Malaccamax is a naval architecture term for the largest tonnage of ship capable of fitting through the 25-metre-deep (82 ft) Strait of Malacca. Bulk carriers and supertankers have been built to this tonnage, and the term is chosen for very large crude carriers (VLCC). They can transport oil from Arabia to China. A typical Malaccamax tanker can have a maximum length of 333 m (1,093 ft), beam of 60 m (197 ft), draught of 20.5 m (67.3 ft), and tonnage of 300,000 DWT.


Oil Tankers and vessels having a deeper immersion are-will not be able to use the Malacca Strait.

In the Past U L C C Tankers were using the Lambok Strait - Ships Like Globtik London, Globtik Tokyo and some other Japaneses U L C C Tankers used the Lambok Strait when going from PG to Japan and the Malacca Strait on the Empty Voyage back to PG.

As such NO DREDGING! STOP WORRYING GENTLEMEN!!

Cheers Image

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 07 Sep 2019 05:17

The aim of the "corridor" is to gain access to the huge mineral and energy deposits in Siberia and the Russian Far East by sea to India as an alternative to conventional routes via the canal and overland through Chahbahar in the future.This will also benefit our industry on our eastern seaboard benefiting our " look east" policy of recent years. It also gives us a strategic alternative for our energy supplies instead of the volative Gulf which threatens to explode from time to time.Let's not forget too that China has already- a few years ago, signed a huge deal with Russia for supply of energy, its own insurance policy. Indian investment in the Russian east gives us direct access to the vast tapped and untapped resources of that region which will last for centuries.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 08 Sep 2019 05:42

During Modi's visit, India and Russia did not sign the expected Military Logistics sharing agreement that would have enabled use of each others military ports/bases.

In addition to no new pacts on any military hardware purchases there was also no agreement on the very important logistics sharing agreement that was expected in Vladivostok during the annual summit meeting. I am surprised why this is not a priority considering India has already signed such agreements with USA, France, Singapore, Indonesia and South Korea.

Is there going to be a separate meeting or date for signing all the military/strategic agreements? A sizeable backlog of things to sign on is now built up.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby ArjunPandit » 08 Sep 2019 23:59

vps ji what logistics we can share from a locational perspective with russia..with regards to hardware...we already have ..if we can maintain the existing trajectory that itself will be a big thing with russia...

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 09 Sep 2019 04:57

Russia is reportedly going to use Chahbahar port in Iran for its navy which India is helping develop. One is confident that such a deal will be forthconing as it may include extra provisions beyond mere logistics.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby jaysimha » 10 Sep 2019 15:22

PM visit to russia for records.
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The Prime Minister, Shri Narendra Modi with the President of Russian Federation, Mr. Vladimir Putin visiting the ‘Zvezda’ Shipbuilding Plant, at Vladivostok, in Russia on September 04, 2019.
Image
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visit to the ‘Street of the Far East’ exhibition, at Vladivostok, in Russia on September 04, 2019. wonder what this is???
Image
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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby kit » 13 Sep 2019 00:40

https://worldview.stratfor.com/article/russias-pivot-asia-economic-attraction-lags-behind-hard-power-far-east-eef-putin-china-india

Chinese money is not rushing to the Russian Far East partly because Russia is not a developing country where Chinese companies can exploit natural resources with relatively little oversight and few regulations.

While the Eastern Economic Forum featured Chinese President Xi Jinping as the main guest in 2018, this year Putin feted Narendra Modi of India as the guest of honor in Vladivostok. Though India is quite remote from the Russian Far East, it has had a long-time interest in the region. After Vladivostok was officially opened to foreigners in 1992, India was the first to establish its consulate there. In the 1990s, India's state-owned Oil and Natural Gas Corp. (ONGC) acquired a 20 percent stake in the Sakhalin-1 oil and gas project, which became India's first major investment in the energy sector overseas. Unsurprisingly, what the Indian business community covets from the Russian Far East is mainly its natural resources, in particular, coal, hydrocarbons, gold, timber and diamonds. During Modi's visit to Vladivostok, Russia's leading private gas company Novatek signed a memorandum of understanding to provide long-term liquefied natural gas (LNG) supplies to India. The Indian Tata Group will develop coal deposits in the Kamchatka Peninsula. It was also announced that a major LNG plant will be built in the Russian Far East, in which India's ONGC will be one of the partners and co-investors, along with Russia's Rosneft, ExxonMobil and Japan's Sakhalin Oil and Gas Development Co. There is also some talk of bringing Indian workers to the labor-deficient region.

Apart from seeking commercial opportunities in Russia, Modi's visit to the Russian Far East had a pronounced geopolitical context. It was intended to demonstrate New Delhi's commitment to maintaining a strategic friendship with the Kremlin, as Modi is aware that the Russian Far East's development is an important priority for Putin. Modi's visit was also a message to Beijing, with New Delhi signaling that it can raise Indian geo-economic presence in the areas close to and sensitive to China. The highlight of Modi's visit to Vladivostok was his pledge to extend a $1 billion credit line for the development of the Russian Far East. Modi previously offered similar $1 billion and $500 million loans to Mongolia, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and Vietnam. New Delhi plays the geopolitical game of Go, aiming to increase India's presence in countries and regions around China. Of course, Beijing plays the same game with India, by keeping strong ties with Pakistan and building up China's geo-economic presence in other South Asian and Indian Ocean countries.

It remains to be seen whether Modi's newly launched "Act Far East" policy will be able to serve as a counterbalance to Russia's growing dependence on China. In 2018, India's trade with Russia stood at a mere $11 billion, while Russia-China trade was $107 billion. And, unlike Russia and China, India and Russia are geographically separated, which complicates trade logistics. Also, India's strategic credit lines to counterbalance China, similar to the one Modi pledged for the Russian Far East, are a complex and slow process, especially given the well-known unhurriedness of Indian bureaucracy.

India's desire to counterbalance China aligns its interests in the Russian Far East with those of Japan. This could lead to joint Indian-Japanese undertakings in Russia and its Far East, though none have been announced so far.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 15 Sep 2019 21:00

Indian workers could do the same for Russia's far eastern region just as they did in the Gulf.Russia has vast natural resources that could last for centuries and our traditional relations would see no problem in lakhs of Indian workers working on Indo-Russian JVs .Our Gulfie exodus could turn from the desrt to the colder climes of Vladivostok!

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Shwetank » 25 Sep 2019 13:07


Stephen F. Cohen argues that cracks are emerging within the NATO-led consensus that has pushed Moscow from the West.

Guest: Stephen F. Cohen, professor emeritus of Russian studies at New York University and Princeton University, contributing editor at The Nation, and author of "War with Russia: From Putin & Ukraine to Trump & Russiagate."

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Rony » 07 Oct 2019 11:50

The Rise and Fall of a Russian Mercenary Army

The Russian firm Wagner Group, a shadowy mercenary outfit waging secret wars on the Kremlin’s behalf from Ukraine to Syria to the Central African Republic, seems like something from a Tom Clancy novel. Born out of a need for plausible deniability in Moscow’s military operations abroad, Wagner contractors were at the forefront of some of the heaviest fighting in eastern Ukraine and Syria in recent years before exploding into the headlines with their brazen assault on a U.S. military position in northeast Syria in February 2018.

The past few months have been filled with revelations about the group’s reversal of fortune. On July 28, an investigation by the Russian independent media outlet Novaya Gazeta revealed that three Russian military contractors killed in central Syria in mid-June were not Wagner employees but part of another such firm, called Shield. The casualties were the first confirmed non-Wagner-linked Russian contractors killed in the country

The outfit has reportedly hemorrhaged experienced veterans to several other such groups, including the firms Shield and Patriot, in recent months, while it has lost its autonomy in decision-making and has been downgraded to guard duty in Syria. Wagner has become a shell of its former self, having had its wings clipped by the Kremlin after the February 2018 debacle and its most valuable personnel stripped away by competitors.

Wagner’s confrontation with U.S. troops in Deir Ezzor in February 2018 marked the beginning of the end for the firm. On Feb. 7, 2018, roughly 600 Wagner contractors, armed with tanks and artillery, launched an assault on a position of the Syrian Democratic Forces, a largely Kurdish militia force that had worked closely with the U.S.-led anti-Islamic State coalition, in northeast Syria. What they may not have known is that U.S. advisors were embedded with the unit and promptly called for air support. Wagner forces nevertheless maintained the assault for a full four hours, during which they were hammered by U.S. artillery, airstrikes, helicopters, and even an AC-130 gunship. When the dust cleared, an estimated 300 of the 600 Russians were dead or wounded, in the first direct battle between Washington’s and Moscow’s forces since the Vietnam War.

The most astonishing aspect of this incident was that it evidently occurred without being ordered by, or even fully known to, the Kremlin itself. Leaked telephone conversations revealed that Yevgeny Prigozhin, a man referred to as President Vladimir Putin’s “chef” who is believed to lead Wagner, ordered the assault after conversing with several Syrian business colleagues. (Prigozhin also controls a company with oil and gas stakes in the region.) Prigozhin himself has been sanctioned by the U.S. Treasury Department for his role in Russia’s 2016 U.S. election interference several times, most recently on Sept. 30.

The disjointed response from official Moscow also suggests they were uninformed: It took a week for Kremlin officials to say that there “may be citizens of the Russian Federation” not linked to the Russian armed forces fighting in Syria, before later saying that five Russians may have been killed, a number that later grew to “several dozen.” Sources close to the Russian Ministry of Defense told the Russian investigative outlet the Bell they were “simply stunned” when they learned the attack had occurred and that a deeply embarrassed Prigozhin then had to grovel to Kremlin officials that such an error would not happen again.

The waning of Wagner will elicit few tears in and around the Kremlin.The group appears to have been downgraded without major scandal, its personnel dispersed among similar groups, and its operations curtailed. Prigozhin himself, never one for the spotlight, has certainly not attempted to complicate matters in any remotely public manner, likely aware that doing so would only further jeopardize his position.

In the short term, Wagner’s fall has had few consequences for the Kremlin, which has no pressing need for a professional yet expendable military force at present. Combat in Syria has wound down significantly in the past year and a half, with Russian forces not engaging in large-scale operations aimed at capturing territory since the conclusion of their campaign against the Islamic State in December 2017. Eastern Ukraine, Wagner’s other primary area of operations, has likewise long since settled into a stable front line punctuated by occasional shootouts and shelling. It is thus quite serendipitous for Moscow that Wagner waited until it had already successfully completed its shock infantry missions in eastern Syria to engage in such a flagrant breach of established norms.

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Rony » 30 Oct 2019 07:36

Interesting piece on how the bear outfoxed the eagle in west asia. Long read but worth it.


https://www.fpri.org/wp-content/uploads ... ds2018.pdf

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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 30 Oct 2019 12:07

What South Block and its fixation with Yanquiland as the magic bullet to cure all our ills, appears blind to the realities on the ground both in Asia and the Middle East
where a Pax Moskova is replacing the Pax Americana that held sway in the 20th century.

The transformation in Syria where Russian military intervention saved the day for Assad and defeat of ISIS and now its political intervention between the Turks, Kurds and Syrians is restoring an uneasy peace instead of a huge conflagration after the Yanquis " beat the retreat" as many predicted. Similarly in Asia the Russo-growing military and diplomatic Sino cooperation is taking over from the US. It has stark implications for India still obsessed with being part of the US posse in the region.We will be left floundering if ghe sh*t hits the fan.More and more US analysts are saying that the US will not prevail over China in a non-nuclearmilitary spat
in the region.

Russia is perhaps the sole nation where we have no conflict of interest on any major issue, also willing to give us arms that it will not sell to China like Akula N-subs, FGFAs.etc. India should leverage our relations with Russia to the maximum and not lose huge opportunities at insuring both our energy as wrll as military sdcurity with it.A failure to do so will only see China seizinv further opportunities to our detriment.

Philip
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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 05 Nov 2019 07:43

A mutual Logistics agreement (ARLS) is expected to be signed by the Indian DM Rajnath Singh between India and Russia in Moscow this week for setting up JVs for manufacturing spares for Ru milware. A delegation of over 50 members from Indian industry is accompanying the minister for deals in various other non-defence spheres. What is very satisfying is that the relationship is broadening its scope from the major defence relationship encompassing energy, raw material, TOT,etc. and the setting up of JVs in India for local manufacture of a variety of items.

Vips
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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 05 Nov 2019 18:44

TOT - Really?

Vivek K
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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vivek K » 05 Nov 2019 22:10

India can now manufacture the entire range of military products - n-subs to ICBMs, ships like aircraft carriers, destroyers, tanks superior to Russian hardware, fighter jets and naval fighters. The only item that remains elusive is aircraft engines (perhaps also tank engines). And the focus of technology development should be in overcoming this last hurdle. A self reliant India should look at partnering in selective multi national projects that deliver some advancement to its force structure. Just willy nilly purchase of shiny new brochures will not work when real threats surround India.

Purchase of hardware with low uptimes should be totally avoided. As far as possible, India should look at reducing the complexity of its inventory management by reducing the types of systems used. The goal should be to use common systems wherever possible to make inventory management easier. Just because someone is showcasing a product in their brochures that has a concept we like does not necessarily mean that India should buy it. The first thought should be - a) is it needed to combat our threat environment, b) how rugged is it to fight in India's climates and using local materials, supplies? c) what will its impact be on our inventory system - are spares easily available to support 80%+ uptimes?

Instead of buying complete systems, India should look to buy technology. Most brochures over-report capabilities. Therefore, buy tech and develop your own. Join in with multiple nations only in selective cases.

vishvak
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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby vishvak » 05 Nov 2019 22:34

does not necessarily mean that India should buy it.

Compare it to west totally denying even manufactured products or USSR selling cheap products (120 MiGs for 100 mil then) or effects of USSR collapse on spares etc and it's not straightforward. Hopefully these logistics agreement s would simplyfy rather than dump anything in the name of 3rd party repairs. ToT much better.


Vips
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Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 14 Nov 2019 08:52


India-Russia Logistics Agreement


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