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Re: U.S. can attack Russia in 2012-2015 - Russian military a

Postby bulsara » 04 Mar 2008 05:50

Raju wrote:U.S. can attack Russia in 2012-2015 - Russian military analyst

MOSCOW. Feb 23 (Interfax-AVN) - After 2012-2015, the U.S. will be able to annihilate Russian strategic nuclear forces by a non-nuclear preemptive strike, said Konstantin Sivkov, the first vice president of the Russian Academy of Geopolitical Problems.

"I declare that the likelihood of a military threat is great as never before now," Sivkov told Interfax on Saturday.

Western military experts have recently started to talk about the possibility of attacking Russia and annexing its territory, Sivkov said. "Russia is supposed to be dismembered into three parts, with the Western part going to the European Union, the central part and Siberia to the U.S., and the eastern to China. This is a rough scenario," he said.

Russian armed forces will be unable to successfully counter an aggression, Sivkov said. "At the present time, the conventional armed forces cannot properly perform their duties in a regional war, like the Great Patriotic War, even in theory. Even if fully deployed, their potential is limited even in local wars. The only factor that deters [the U.S.] now is the nuclear arsenal," he said.

http://www.interfax.ru/e/B/politics/28. ... e=11975866


what is this? is this a joke or something? i think Russia is still capable of defending itself. and you can never forget the nuclear arsenal. no one has that first strike capabilities that can cripple russia before it gets some nukes in the air, not even US. i really think this is BIG and STUPID joke.

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Postby Igorr » 04 Mar 2008 17:55

sanjaychoudhry wrote:The following two reports show the ancient relations between Russian and Indian cultures.

New Russian President has an India link
Moscow (PTI): Russian president-elect Dmitry Medvedev apparently shares an India link unknown to many. The 42-year-old successor of Vladimir Putin has a surname which can trace its origin to Sanskrit.

Medvedev is derived from 'medved' the Russian word for bear. For pre-Christian Russians, who were the worshippers of wooden idols of 'Balvan' (almighty god), the use of the word 'ber' was a taboo and so they preferred to call the animal "Medved'.

While in Russian, 'Medved' would have translated to 'someone having the knowledge of honey', in Sanskrit, the word 'Madhu Vedi' has the same meaning.

http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/001200803031241.htm

- It's true, the Medvedevs family name has pre-christian origin. Not like Ivanov (from Iohannan) or Petrov (Peter) - that indeed the Slavonic transformation of Hebrew, Latin or Greece names. BTW, before centures the Church didnt love non-cristian family names.
'vedati' - means 'to know' in Russian, 'vedaet' - means 'he knows'. it's a common root with sankskritic 'Vedas', when these two pra-languages were only slightly different dialects of two related tribes in Volga-Dniepr region.

Ancient Vishnu idol found in Russian town
PTI | 4 Jan, 2007 1109hrs IST | PTI

MOSCOW: An ancient Vishnu idol has been found during excavation in an old village in Russia's Volga region, raising questions about the prevalent view on the origin of ancient Russia.


- Not only Russian, but also the Finn-Uralic languages have adopted words from Proto-indoiranic. It means the Proto-indoiranic tribes initially inhabited South Ural steppes and Low Volga bassin, while their Northern neibours were Finns and the Western - the kindred Balto-Slavonic tribes.

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Postby Igorr » 05 Mar 2008 16:42

"In Parliament Square, as we watch Plane Stupid activists unroll a banner from the roof of parliament, she says pointedly that protest in Red Square is permitted even without prior permission" -
- He-he, it's true. Russia now is more free country then GB, 100%.

March 2, 2008
From Russia with bile – you British are drunken oafs
Russian author Olga Freer has branded Britons as bottom-scratching philistines. So why has she become one?

Forget the Crimea and the cold war: Anglo-Russian relations have never been so awkward. Moscow resents us giving a home to opponents of Vladimir Putin such as the oligarch Boris Berezovsky and the Chechen separatist Akhmed Zakayev. We’d like the extradition of the agent suspected of sprinkling radioactive polonium210 in London restaurants and hotels. We expel Russian diplomats, and the Russians make life hell for British Council staff. There’s a permanent threat that Russia may one day cut off our gas supply Now a 23-year-old Russian author, based in London, has piled in with rude observations about Britain. In her book, The UK for Beginners, Olga Freer claims Britons scratch their bottoms in public, don’t iron their clothes and are obsessed with television programmes about buying and selling houses.

The book is not yet published in English, but following an interview with an English-language newspaper in Russia, her opinions have reached an unimpressed British public. Freer looks shocked by the reaction – much as one of her oligarch compatriots might have looked on discovering that HM Revenue and Customs had scent of his offshore loot.

“It’s only a novel,â€

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Postby Rahul Shukla » 07 Mar 2008 06:24

Russia's Psycho-war against India (Global Politician)
- How the psycho-war against India started
- The Russian Reflexes
- Why India Needs Russia
- Why Russia Needs India
- What India Should Do Now

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Postby Sanjay M » 07 Mar 2008 08:42


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Postby asprinzl » 08 Mar 2008 20:24

Igorr wrote:
sanjaychoudhry wrote:The following two reports show the ancient relations between Russian and Indian cultures.

New Russian President has an India link
Moscow (PTI): Russian president-elect Dmitry Medvedev apparently shares an India link unknown to many. The 42-year-old successor of Vladimir Putin has a surname which can trace its origin to Sanskrit.

Medvedev is derived from 'medved' the Russian word for bear. For pre-Christian Russians, who were the worshippers of wooden idols of 'Balvan' (almighty god), the use of the word 'ber' was a taboo and so they preferred to call the animal "Medved'.

While in Russian, 'Medved' would have translated to 'someone having the knowledge of honey', in Sanskrit, the word 'Madhu Vedi' has the same meaning.

http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/001200803031241.htm

- It's true, the Medvedevs family name has pre-christian origin. Not like Ivanov (from Iohannan) or Petrov (Peter) - that indeed the Slavonic transformation of Hebrew, Latin or Greece names. BTW, before centures the Church didnt love non-cristian family names.
'vedati' - means 'to know' in Russian, 'vedaet' - means 'he knows'. it's a common root with sankskritic 'Vedas', when these two pra-languages were only slightly different dialects of two related tribes in Volga-Dniepr region.

Ancient Vishnu idol found in Russian town
PTI | 4 Jan, 2007 1109hrs IST | PTI

MOSCOW: An ancient Vishnu idol has been found during excavation in an old village in Russia's Volga region, raising questions about the prevalent view on the origin of ancient Russia.


- Not only Russian, but also the Finn-Uralic languages have adopted words from Proto-indoiranic. It means the Proto-indoiranic tribes initially inhabited South Ural steppes and Low Volga bassin, while their Northern neibours were Finns and the Western - the kindred Balto-Slavonic tribes.


So, how does this connect the dots of "Aryan Invasion Theory" or the "Non Aryan Invasion Theory"?
Avram

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Postby Rye » 09 Mar 2008 00:18

From the nightwatch site:

http://nightwatch.afcea.org/NightWatch_20080306.htm

Russia- Georgia: Ria Novosti reported today that Russia has lifted trade, economic, financial and transport sanctions on Georgia's breakaway republic of Abkhazia, and urged other Commonwealth of Independent States member countries to follow suit, the Foreign Ministry announced. The Ministry statement said that "due to a change of circumstances, the Russian Federation no longer considered itself bound" by a resolution on the Abkhazia-Georgia conflict, which was adopted by the CIS Heads of State Council on January 19, 1996.

It said sanctions were imposed amid a confrontation between Georgia and Abkhazia that continued after the 1992-93 war and were designed to compel Abkhazia to adopt a more flexible position, primarily on the return of refugees and other displaced persons. Those conditions have ended.

What was not said is that this is part of the Russian retaliation for Kosovo’s independence. Putin said that Russia would respond to Kosovo’s independence with a prepared program of non-violent measures. Each week a new component of that plan appears.

Russia will not recognize Abkhazia because that would encourage secessionist movements in every corner of the Russian Federation. However, Russia apparently sees no harm in providing support that will ensure Abkhazia’s de facto independence and that it will enable it to continue to pose an unpredictable risk of tension and armed conflict within Georgia. Russia is likely to act the same with respect to South Ossetia. These measures would pretty much guarantee that Georgia is not sufficiently stable to gain membership in NATO.




Russia-Far East: For the Record. A TU-142 BEAR-F maritime reconnaissance aircraft again over flew a US aircraft carrier, this time off the coast of South Korea. According to the US officials, the Russian aircraft came within three to five nautical miles and flew 2,000 feet (610 meters) above the USS Nimitz and its escorts. Two USN F/A-18 fighters were launched to intercept the Russian aircraft and escort it out of the area, according to one defense official. US defense officials said yesterday they did not consider the Russian aircraft a threat or a concern.

Four Republic of Korea F-16s also intercepted the Bear when it penetrated the Republic’s Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ). The TU-142 Bear F is the maritime reconnaissance/strike version of the TU-95 strategic bomber. NImitz is participating in joint US-ROK training. The Russians got good data on US reaction practices.

In February, two Russian bombers approached Nimitz near Japan and one flew over the carrier, escorted by a U.S. fighter. That was the first Russian over flight of a U.S. carrier since 2004, according to Reuters.

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Postby Sanjay M » 09 Mar 2008 08:20

Russians Are Playing a Good Hand in Southern Europe

But it shows that India is not the only one wanting to reject the Kosovo precedent.
Their independence is untenable. It's a 'bridge too far'.

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Postby bala » 15 Mar 2008 01:49

Boris Grebenshchikov, leader of ‘Aquarium Rock ‘N’ Roll Band’, in New Delhi.

Image

Rocking all the way from Russia

[quote]NEW DELHI: Affectionately known as “BGâ€

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Postby Karan Dixit » 17 Mar 2008 09:43

India-Russia fighter plane deal signed:

http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Top_News/2 ... gned/6940/

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Re: U.S. can attack Russia in 2012-2015 - Russian military a

Postby Johann » 17 Mar 2008 19:16

bulsara wrote:
Raju wrote:U.S. can attack Russia in 2012-2015 - Russian military analyst

MOSCOW. Feb 23 (Interfax-AVN) - After 2012-2015, the U.S. will be able to annihilate Russian strategic nuclear forces by a non-nuclear preemptive strike, said Konstantin Sivkov, the first vice president of the Russian Academy of Geopolitical Problems.

"I declare that the likelihood of a military threat is great as never before now," Sivkov told Interfax on Saturday.

Western military experts have recently started to talk about the possibility of attacking Russia and annexing its territory, Sivkov said. "Russia is supposed to be dismembered into three parts, with the Western part going to the European Union, the central part and Siberia to the U.S., and the eastern to China. This is a rough scenario," he said.

Russian armed forces will be unable to successfully counter an aggression, Sivkov said. "At the present time, the conventional armed forces cannot properly perform their duties in a regional war, like the Great Patriotic War, even in theory. Even if fully deployed, their potential is limited even in local wars. The only factor that deters [the U.S.] now is the nuclear arsenal," he said.

http://www.interfax.ru/e/B/politics/28. ... e=11975866


what is this? is this a joke or something? i think Russia is still capable of defending itself. and you can never forget the nuclear arsenal. no one has that first strike capabilities that can cripple russia before it gets some nukes in the air, not even US. i really think this is BIG and STUPID joke.


Of course its stupid.

There's no chance any American administration would take that kind of insane risk.

But it is also true that conventional armed forces are in bad shape, and that it limits Russia's options.

Today Russia is swimming in oil money, but there are *many* competitors for those funds - the collapsing health system, the school system, roads and railways, etc.

Most of the big increases in military spending since 1999 has been aimed at
a) maintaining nuclear parity with the US
b) beefing up internal security forces to handle terrorism, insurgency, and political dissent
c) injecting cash in to the military-industrial complex by giving it sufficient orders to keep it alive *without* depending on foreign sales.

The conventional ground forces, air forces and navy have remained step-children. They are undermanned, with poor housing, insufficient funding for training, low rate of equipment replacement, etc.

The Russian military needs fundamental restructuring, but not only is that expensive, it would require a wholesale clearing of the decks. Many of the Russian army's senior ranks are filled with generals who have not come to terms with the fact that they can not use or maintain a cold-war style army. They can not count on sheer numerical superiority, they can not count on nuclear escalation, they can not count on a short war, they structure themsleves in line with budgetary and strategic realities, and they may not be able to count on conscription.

Putin has not been really keen on fundamentally restructuring most of the bureaucracies in Russian government, and the military is no exception.

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Postby Sanjay M » 20 Mar 2008 04:50

Haha, Johann, have you not noticed the far more dire straits of the US economy? Or have you not been reading the headlines?

EU nations aren't so comfortable either, following Northern Rock, and also now that union activism is back in fashion in Germany.

Meanwhile,

Russia's Veerappan Killed in Shootout with Police

Raju

Postby Raju » 20 Mar 2008 21:14

Spies foil Putin assassination plot
March 15, 2008 07:15pm
Article from: Agence France-Presse

Send this article: Print Email

RUSSIA'S secret service foiled an assassination attempt on President Vladimir Putin in Red Square on March 2, the day of the presidential election, the Tvoi Den daily reported today.
The newspaper did not cite any sources but gave a detailed account about the arrest of a Tajik national with a sniper rifle in a raid on a rented apartment near Red Square just hours before Putin was due to give a speech there.
Contacted by AFP, the Federal Security Service (FSB) could not immediately comment on the report. Tvoi Den, a popular daily, often prints exclusive reports on Russian politics citing unnamed officials.
An informant told FSB officials a few days before the election that Putin's assassination was being planned and that an apartment had been rented on the other side of the river from the Kremlin for the purpose, Tvoi Den said.
Security officers raided the apartment in the evening of March 2 and detained a 24-year-old Tajik national with a "whole arsenal of firearms,'' including a sniper rifle and a Kalashnikov assault rifle, the daily continued.
About three hours later, Mr Putin and his ally Dmitry Medvedev, who won the March 2 election by a landslide, walked out of the Kremlin onto Red Square and gave victory speeches at a concert there to thousands of screaming fans.
FSB chief Nikolai Patrushev gave a briefing earlier this week where he said that Russian security services had foiled "terrorist attacks'' during the election campaign and on election day but did not provide further details.


http://www.news.com.au/story/0%2C23599% ... 2C00.html#

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Postby Sanjay M » 23 Mar 2008 00:42

Dagestan continues to feel the spillover from Chechnya:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/7309004.stm

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Postby Igorr » 27 Mar 2008 00:39

ImageImageImageImage
ImageImage

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Postby Sanjay M » 30 Mar 2008 12:21

Look at these 2 Russian nuclear-powered icebreakers:

http://www.darkroastedblend.com/2008/03 ... north.html

They're huge! What size and strength!

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Postby Igorr » 04 Apr 2008 01:31

ImageImageImage
ImageImageImage

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Postby Igorr » 05 Apr 2008 12:56


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Postby Sanjay M » 06 Apr 2008 05:21

Russia has first post-Soviet baby boom

By DOUGLAS BIRCH, Associated Press Writer 11 minutes ago

MOSCOW - When they decided to have their first child, Alexander Gorlov and Laila Simanova discovered that something new was afoot in post-Soviet Russia: a baby boom.

Simanova, 31, now five months pregnant, said she was surprised by how many of her friends were becoming pregnant as well. When she signed up with the Pre-Natal Medical Center in Moscow, she found it swamped with expectant mothers.

"The doctors said when they opened two years ago, we could have played football in the halls," she said. "Now there are queues. When you call you can't get through. The line is always busy."

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia's population plummeted, and until recently was shrinking at the rate of about 750,000 people a year.

So the Kremlin made kids a priority. A 2007 law expanded maternity leave benefits and payments, and granted mothers educational and other vouchers worth $10,650 for a second child and any thereafter. More important, perhaps, Russia's surging economy has made it possible for young couples to plan for their future.

The population decline hasn't halted, and demographers warn it could plummet again. But today births are on the rise, from 1.4 million in 2006 to 1.6 million in 2007 — their highest level in 15 years.

Both Gorlov and Simanova, who lived together for years before their recent marriage, say their decision to start a family was deeply personal. But Simanova noted the public service ads on television every night that showcase big families and praise the virtues of adopting children. And she suspects this may have played a role in her current plan to have three children and adopt a fourth.

"They are promoting families, they are promoting babies, and somehow this message is getting through," she said.

Her husband, Alexander, a 30-year-old lawyer, wasn't so certain that government policy influenced his decision.

"It's not that we want to raise a lot of Russians to raise the booming economy," he joked after soccer practice one recent evening. But he did say that Russia's economic resurgence over the past decade has made it easier to raise children.

For Russia, the increase in births is more than a signal of a society recovering from decades of poverty and social upheaval. Because of falling birthrates and rising death rates, the number of Russians dropped between 1989 and 2008 from about 148 million to 141.4 million. Villages emptied, the pool of military recruits shrank and a labor shortage loomed.

Some experts have estimated that the number of Russians could fall below 100 million by 2050, making one of the world's most sparsely populated countries even more so and — some fear — threatening its very existence.

President Vladimir Putin says the baby boom is just one sign of a turnaround in the country's long demographic decline, and credits increased state spending on health and social programs.

"We have checked the falling birthrate and rising death rate," Putin said in a Feb. 8 speech in the Kremlin. "Many doubted that the state investments this program called for would be of any use. Today I am happy to say that they have been of use."

Putin also noted, however, that deaths still outpace births and that Russian life expectancy is the lowest in Europe. "This is a disgrace," he said. "Our population is declining with every passing year."

The 750,000 annual loss of previous years shrank to just 223,000 in the first 11 months of 2007, compared with 521,000 over the same period of 2006.

Between 2005 and 2006, life expectancy for males increased by 1.6 years, according to the Russian state statistical service, roughly a 2.7 percent jump.

Men in Russia today can expect to live to just over the age of 60 — about 15 years less than males in Europe, but still more than during the rest of Russia's post-Soviet history.

Demographic experts were impressed.

"In a normal country with a normal history, during one year, life expectancy can grow .02, .03 percent," said Yevgeny Andreev, a Russian researcher with the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany. "More than one percent is extremely high growth."

Russian women can expect to live to be about 73 on average, much longer than men but still about seven years shorter than the European Union.

While Russia's population decline has slowed, experts are divided over when and if it will ever grow again. The country may still be headed for a population crash, says Murray Feshbach, a prominent Western expert on Russia's population crisis.

Feshbach, who is with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, said the number of women aged 20-29, their prime childbearing years, will start to decline around 2013. Moreover, he predicts a sharp rise in deaths from AIDS, tuberculosis and hepatitis C over the next 5-10 years — a result, for the most part, of authorities having paid too little attention to preventing these diseases after the Soviet collapse.

Russia, he said, finds itself in a "demographic pit" that may be difficult to escape.

After almost two decades of low birthrates, Russian society can seem less child-friendly than other industrialized nations.

Employers rarely grant paternity leave, Simanova and others say. Working mothers-to-be also face job discrimination, because of a widespread belief that pregnant women lose their memory and become "weak-minded."

On the other hand, being pregnant no longer seems to carry a stigma, at least in Moscow. Simanova and others say subway riders now offer their seats to pregnant women, and avoid pushing or shoving them on the chronically overcrowded trains and platforms.

Previously, Simanova said, the attitude of many passengers was: "It's your fault, so suffer."

The roots of Russia's demographic implosion reach deep into the Soviet era, but the current crisis started as the Soviet Union began to break apart in the late 1980s. Couples stopped having children and the birthrate plummeted by 50 percent between 1987 and 1999.

Putin recently called for raising life expectancy to 75 by the year 2020 — a staggering increase.

Andreev of the Max Planck Institute said it was possible, but would need new curbs on alcohol and tobacco, better medical services, and other initiatives requiring both money and "political will."

"These will not be popular measures," he predicted.

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Postby akmandal » 06 Apr 2008 05:38

What do you guys think? According to your opinions will the new Russia succumb to western charms in their offensive against Islam?

I just don't get why Russia and US dont help each other out over Iran and Chechnya respectively. Each touts human rights issues, when the enemy is obviously common.

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Postby shyam » 06 Apr 2008 06:07

akmandal wrote:I just don't get why Russia and US dont help each other out over Iran and Chechnya respectively. Each touts human rights issues, when the enemy is obviously common.

Please lurke this forum for some time, you will understand.

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Postby Sanjay M » 06 Apr 2008 06:28

Atlanticism combined with American inertia keeps them focused on the same old enemy, even after the war is over, and prevents any new consensus from coalescing against new threats or enemies. The entrenched vested interests want to stick with the old war, and are loathe to change to embrace any new or different threat perceptions.

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Postby akmandal » 06 Apr 2008 07:03

shyam wrote:
akmandal wrote:I just don't get why Russia and US dont help each other out over Iran and Chechnya respectively. Each touts human rights issues, when the enemy is obviously common.

Please lurke this forum for some time, you will understand.


Will do. If only more political leaders were like the BRfites!

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Postby Gerard » 06 Apr 2008 17:09


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Postby Keshav » 07 Apr 2008 00:36



[quote]These facts could indeed cause Russia to turn away from India, but the ordinary people of these countries are deeply involved with each others’ cultures. For example, Indian films are familiar to many Russians, and some generations even remember the motto “Hindi-Russi bhai-bhaiâ€

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Postby Karan Dixit » 07 Apr 2008 08:20

It is a news to me that USA offered Kitty Hawk to India for sale or free of cost.

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Postby Sanjay M » 10 Apr 2008 04:50

Siberia's black market logging

By Lucy Ash
BBC Radio 4's Crossing Continents

The vast forests of Eastern Siberia, known as the Taiga, are a goldmine for Chinese wood traders, who send raw logs over the border to serve their home country's booming economy. But much of the wood trade is illegal.


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Postby Gerard » 13 Apr 2008 21:30

Ah... but they're still lagging behind the Ukrainians...
link

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Postby sanjaychoudhry » 13 Apr 2008 22:34

When did this happen?


In Delhi, go to Yashwant Place near Chanakya Cinema or Palika Bazaar, and you will find restaurant waiters and shop salesmen all fluent in Russian. They cater to the Russian tourist trade.

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Postby Igorr » 14 Apr 2008 13:11

Gerard wrote:Ah... but they're still lagging behind the Ukrainians...
link
It's policewomen. Also the form isnt new. Hovewer, some moving the Ukranian army also does towards new uniform. At least on the level of Mil Academy cadets I saw new digital cammo.

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Postby Igorr » 14 Apr 2008 13:19

sanjaychoudhry wrote:
When did this happen?


In Delhi, go to Yashwant Place near Chanakya Cinema or Palika Bazaar, and you will find restaurant waiters and shop salesmen all fluent in Russian. They cater to the Russian tourist trade.
I know at least one shop in Moscow and restaurant in San-Petesbourg, owned by Indians, they also fluently speak Russian.

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Postby derkonig » 14 Apr 2008 13:28

^
Therez that 'Darbar' in Moscow.

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Postby Igorr » 14 Apr 2008 13:35

derkonig wrote:^
Therez that 'Darbar' in Moscow.
Means 'Welcome acception' in Hindi?

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Postby ranganathan » 14 Apr 2008 13:40

Err no it means the royal court or something similar.

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Postby Gerard » 14 Apr 2008 16:38

Igorr wrote:
Gerard wrote:Ah... but they're still lagging behind the Ukrainians...
link
It's policewomen. Also the form isnt new. Hovewer, some moving the Ukranian army also does towards new uniform. At least on the level of Mil Academy cadets I saw new digital cammo.


:rotfl:
Igorr, I wasn't being serious, or referring to their clothes...

So these Ukrainians are policewomen...

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Art of Yoga Coming to Kremlin..

Postby pranab » 15 Apr 2008 14:55

Art of Yoga Coming to Kremlin

15 April 2008By Francesca Mereu / Staff Writer

Russia's first president organized a tennis revolution, and the second encouraged his people to practice martial arts.

If this trend continues, the country will soon be standing on its head.

President-elect Dmitry Medvedev has joined the thousands of Russians eager to learn the ancient Indian art of yoga.

"Little by little, I'm mastering yoga," Medvedev said in an April 2007 interview with the weekly magazine Itogi.

Yoga, he explained, helped him relax from the stress of working on the national projects.

"You get enormous experience from working on the realization of the national projects, but the responsibility is huge. To prevent headaches, I needed to practice sports more intensively than before," he said.

Medvedev's spokeswoman, Zhanna Odintsova, said the president-elect was unavailable for an interview about yoga and that she could not bother him with questions on the topic.

But the Trud newspaper reported that Medvedev's wife, Svetlana, convinced him to take up yoga.

It appears that after one year, Medvedev has made huge progress in developing his yoga skills, having mastered shirshasana, the headstand pose also called the "king of asanas" because of its positive effect on the entire body.

"I can even stand on my head," he told the glossy magazine Tainy Zvyozd last month.

There are dozens of different yoga schools, and it is unclear whether the president-elect practices the challenging Iyengar, or Ashtanga, yoga or the more meditative Kundalini yoga.

Prohibited during the Soviet era due to its connection with Hindu religious practices, yoga is becoming more and more popular in Russia. New yoga centers are opening every month in Moscow, and if Medvedev continues the tradition of his predecessors, Russia's yoga craze is likely to intensify, a White House official said.

"The past two presidents have launched the tennis and judo trends," the official said on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media. "If Dmitry Anatolyevich is fond of yoga, we will soon have more yoga schools than India. This is how things work in Russia. If the head of the state has a hobby, it will become the hobby of the nation."

Former president Boris Yeltsin started playing tennis to combat stress and developed the habit of playing three times a week. Under Yeltsin, tennis -- which enjoyed little popularity in the Soviet Union -- received generous funding.

It was under Yeltsin that Russia began producing a steady stream of world-class male and female tennis players. Yeltsin was so fond of tennis that he appointed Shamil Tarpishchev, the long-serving Soviet Davis Cup captain, as his personal coach and gave him an office in the Kremlin.

Under President Vladimir Putin, Russia learned to appreciate martial arts. Putin, a judo black belt who is known among his fellow judo club members for his haraigoshi, or wicked sweeping leg throw, began studying judo at 14. Last year, Putin and Yasuhiro Yamashita, a world judo champion from Japan, made an instructional video together.

During Putin's time in office, judo has become increasingly popular, and judo competitions and documentaries are frequently shown on television.

"Now the federal television channels show the European and world championships, even if they are usually broadcast very late," said Roman Karasyov, head of the Association of Amateur and Professional Judo Clubs.

Khatuna Kobiashvili, the publisher of Yoga Journal Russia, estimated that at least 100,000 people regularly practice yoga in Russia. The magazine -- published by The Moscow Times' parent company, Independent Media Sanoma Magazines -- sells 55,000 copies a month nationwide, she said.

"If we sell this much, this means people are practicing yoga," Kobiashvili said.

Asked whether he would start taking yoga classes out of respect for the new president, the government official laughed and said he would think about it.

"You need to be very flexible for this kind of sport," he said, "We'll see what the future holds for us."

Medvedev is an avid sportsman and enjoys swimming in addition to yoga, Odintsova, his spokeswoman, said. Russian media has also reported that he enjoys kayaking and weightlifting.




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shiv
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Re: Art of Yoga Coming to Kremlin..

Postby shiv » 15 Apr 2008 15:37

[quote="pranabrulez"][/quote]

The name pranabrulez is unacceptable as per forum guidelines. I will change it to pranab or something similar.

pranab
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Re: Art of Yoga Coming to Kremlin..

Postby pranab » 15 Apr 2008 15:48

shiv wrote:
pranabrulez wrote:


The name pranabrulez is unacceptable as per forum guidelines. I will change it to pranab or something similar.


okk..no probs.

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Postby ldev » 17 Apr 2008 22:08

Putin divorces wife and marries gymnast Alina Kabaeva

[quote]His new wife will be Alina Kabaeva, the rhythmic gymnast, who won a gold medal at the 2004 Olympics and obtained numerous European awards, the newspaper said. According to the newspaper, “Russians consider Kabaeva to be sexier than Sharapova and Kournikova.â€


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