India-Russia: News & Analysis

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21060
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 31 Dec 2017 08:59

Indo-Russian relations are not in any crisis but differing viewpoints on Afghanistan,etc. , where each nation has its own priorities require a better understanding with more solid interaction on the various global issues.India must establish and unfurl its own standard under which many smaller nations may gain shelter.

Dipanker
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3021
Joined: 14 May 2002 11:31

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Dipanker » 31 Dec 2017 10:13

Pulikeshi wrote:
Dipanker wrote:India should offer to join OBOR provided China exerts pressure on Pakistan to handover control of POK to India. In that case Chinese roads to Pakistan would pass through Indian Gilgit/Baltistan thus India automatically becoming part of OBOR. Otherwise India can not join OBOR.


Say this as friendly advice: strategy is counter intuitive - the above is non-Chankiyan thinking onlee

Why phor give Chinese Forefather power to interfere in India's internal affair? :evil:
POK has been and will be a bilateral matter between Porki and Indu, why Cheeni gustaki? If so, then why not Mai Bhap be given same role?


1. What are the chances China will put pressure on Pakistan to hand over POK to India?
2. What are the chances of Pakistan listening to China and handing over POK to India?
3. In the even of 1 & 2 materializing, would we say we don't want POK ?

Anyway OT for this thread!

Pulikeshi
BRFite
Posts: 1513
Joined: 31 Oct 2002 12:31
Location: Badami

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Pulikeshi » 31 Dec 2017 13:35

^ur missing the point! Never cede power when uneccessary. Also from what I know 'hack thoo' diplomacy seems to indicate NSG for OBOR consideration...
since OT find suitable thread, if you want!

Mukesh.Kumar
BRFite
Posts: 1183
Joined: 06 Dec 2009 14:09

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Mukesh.Kumar » 31 Dec 2017 19:00

Dipanker wrote:
Pulikeshi wrote:
Say this as friendly advice: strategy is counter intuitive - the above is non-Chankiyan thinking onlee

Why phor give Chinese Forefather power to interfere in India's internal affair? :evil:
POK has been and will be a bilateral matter between Porki and Indu, why Cheeni gustaki? If so, then why not Mai Bhap be given same role?


1. What are the chances China will put pressure on Pakistan to hand over POK to India?
2. What are the chances of Pakistan listening to China and handing over POK to India?
3. In the even of 1 & 2 materializing, would we say we don't want POK ?

Anyway OT for this thread!


Remember the cry baby in school who always complained, "Teacher, teacher, he is pinching me." No one respected him. What you are proposing is the same. No one gives a rat's a** when you whine on international forums. No one is going to respect you for this. Be strong, take what you want.

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3059
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 09 Jan 2018 02:00

The Diplomat: The Coming India-Russia Split.

The Russian-Indian partnership has experienced an upward trend in the past years. Russian President Vladimir Putin and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi enjoy cordial relations, meet regularly, hold telephone conversations, and seek ways to boost further bilateral trade. Although the official presentation of mutual ties seems cloudless, fundamental shifts are happening behind the curtains.

The previous year was a breakthrough in bilateral relations for Moscow and New Delhi. Both nations experienced impressive 22 percent growth in trade and boosted cooperation in a number of spheres ranging from agriculture to energy to pharmaceuticals. Earlier, Russia’s largest oil producer, Rosneft, closed a $12.9 billion purchase of India’s second largest private oil refiner, Essar Oil, which marked one of the biggest foreign investment in India. New Delhi likewise was the major guest country of the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF) in 2017, Russia’s top national event for international cooperation, and hosted the pavilion titled “Make in India” along with Modi’s participation in a plenary session next to Putin.

The two countries likewise seek stronger ties in the military sector. The Kremlin keeps its competitive edge and remains the largest supplier of weapons to the Indian market. Both nations signed an inter-governmental agreement for the purchase of the S-400 Triumf advanced Air Defense Systems (NATO: SA-21 Growler) estimated at $4.5 billion. Moscow and New Delhi also agreed on the import of Kamov Ka 226T light utility helicopters and collaboration in manufacturing of four Admiral Grigorovich–class guided-missile stealth frigates. The previous calendar year was likewise marked by a rare feat: the Indian defense minister and national security advisor each visited Russia twice.

Growing trade and new defense contracts combined with the personal friendship between Putin and Modi facilitate an impression of strategic bilateral relations. But shifting geopolitical dynamics driven by the rise of China, international sanctions against the Kremlin, and its never-ending economic stagnation point to imminent changes for India-Russia relations in the coming years.

The Kremlin played a key role in facilitating New Delhi’s membership in the Shanghai Cooperation Organization. Moscow pushed forward India’s membership in order to dilute China’s dominance in the group. Its efforts likewise played vital role in maintaining the Russia-India-China trilateral format, during which the nations reconcile on a mutually shared vision and responsibility for the future of the Eurasian continent. The Kremlin also perceives such meetings as vital steps for pushing forward its ideological agenda of a multipolar world and challenging Western dominance, but India maintains a far more pragmatic vision.

New Delhi has great capacity to effectively respond to structural and geopolitical shifts and is extremely skillful in learning to adjust to changing power dynamics. For instance, in 1971 India signed a treaty of friendship and cooperation with the Soviet Union to balance Sino-U.S. rapprochement. After the end of the Cold War, India was keen on joining the Moscow-led Eurasian movement and agreed to embrace institutional cooperation with Beijing. The impetus was to secure its geopolitical ambitions as well as resist Washington’s threats to roll back New Delhi’s nuclear goals and possible interventions in a regional dispute with Pakistan over Jammu and Kashmir.

Currently the geopolitical realities in the region are changing again. Growing Chinese power and Indian ambitions mean that sooner or later both nations will start confronting each other more. The new setting prescribes the need to revise previous formats of interactions and seek diversification in foreign policy. Given Moscow’s weakness and growing dependence on Beijing, India will need to look for another strong player to maintain its geopolitical ambitions.

Beijing is currently posing the biggest geopolitical threat to India. Both nations have a disputed border, which was highlighted during the recent standoff on the Doklam plateau in territory claimed by both China and Bhutan. China and India likewise compete for influence in the Asia-Pacific region and the Indian Ocean. With China’s current GDP four times larger and its defense spending almost three times bigger than that of India, the broken parity pushes New Delhi to seek for ways to counter its neighbor’s power.

Sino-India relations have been deteriorating for the past decades, while U.S.-India relations have experienced improvement simultaneously. The White House supports New Delhi’s claim for a permanent seat at the United Nations Security Council and its entry into the Nuclear Suppliers Group – moves that are opposed by Beijing. The United States likewise is more keen on supporting India’s pursuit for regional leadership in its opposition to China’s ambitions in South Asia and the Indian Ocean and has lots to offer in terms of trade and defense technologies. The latter is particularly appealing in lights of India’s quest to diversify its military suppliers.

Washington’s previous support for Pakistan has posed a serious challenge to India’s geopolitical ambitions and the two nations’ relations. In effect, the Trump administration’s latest unexpected move to freeze aid to Pakistan could deliver positive vibes to India-U.S. relations. New Delhi has a lengthy record of accusing Islamabad of supporting cross-border terrorism, claims that might find support in Washington considering its own criticism of Pakistan’s poor efforts in combating terrorism. (So Russia still thinks it is only accusation, not a fact that Pakistan is involved in Cross border terrorism against india)

The Kremlin could still help New Delhi with some of its cutting-edge technologies and international diplomatic support, but India will ultimately keep shifting to the pro-Western orbit. Despite augmenting trade volumes, Russia’s exports to India are barely 2 percent of India’s total imports and in an economic sense, Russia’s struggling economy has little to offer to India in the long-term. The Kremlin’s growing political and economic dependence on Beijing ultimately means that the current momentum of Russia-India relations will be imminently challenged in the upcoming years.

For New Delhi, the anticipated shift will necessitate rational support for its independent foreign policy, which aims to diversify political relations while nurturing the goal of keeping “India first.” The latter is proven by India’s participation in a November 2017 working-level meeting of the so-called “Quad” of countries along with Japan, the United States, and Australia to counter China’s growing influence in the Asia-Pacific. As a growing power, India needs to find its ways to improve its weight in the world order and it’s unlikely that its historically pro-independence foreign policy will make an exception for the Kremlin.

Mukesh.Kumar
BRFite
Posts: 1183
Joined: 06 Dec 2009 14:09

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Mukesh.Kumar » 09 Jan 2018 02:58

Vips wrote:The Diplomat: The Coming India-Russia Split.

The Russian-Indian partnership has experienced an upward trend in the past years. Russian President Vladimir Putin and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi enjoy cordial relations, meet regularly, hold telephone conversations, and seek ways to boost further bilateral trade. Although the official presentation of mutual ties seems cloudless, fundamental shifts are happening behind the curtains.

.......


For New Delhi, the anticipated shift will necessitate rational support for its independent foreign policy, which aims to diversify political relations while nurturing the goal of keeping “India first.” The latter is proven by India’s participation in a November 2017 working-level meeting of the so-called “Quad” of countries along with Japan, the United States, and Australia to counter China’s growing influence in the Asia-Pacific. As a growing power, India needs to find its ways to improve its weight in the world order and it’s unlikely that its historically pro-independence foreign policy will make an exception for the Kremlin.


Coming from the diplomat seems a hatchet job. The reporter seems to be a bit of the Dark Butt tours with numerous articles in NYT. We should not ascribe his comments to be representative of all of Russia.

No denying that there are tensions but I do not forsee india moving into Western orbit totally. Neither will Russia become a vassal if China with whom they have security concerns in the East.

Everyone is a frenemy.

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3059
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 09 Jan 2018 04:54

True as of date China has some security concerns but as the Russian economy sinks (or does not grow) and Chinese GDP grows, Russia becoming a vassal of China is inevitable. It is not just this author a couple of weeks back a high ranking Russian official even advised India to forego its concerns on CPEC passing through POK and to join it. (It is covered in the discussions on this thread) The oil/gas/commodity prices needs to grow substantially for Russia to maintain its independent and credible power status. Imagine the country is 5 times bigger than India with a GDP which is less than half of India. I doubt Russia would even have the capacity to maintain a hold over its large land mass. It is already losing small chunks in the far east to China.

ArjunPandit
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3528
Joined: 29 Mar 2017 06:37

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby ArjunPandit » 09 Jan 2018 06:57

Vips wrote:True as of date China has some security concerns but as the Russian economy sinks (or does not grow) and Chinese GDP grows, Russia becoming a vassal of China is inevitable. It is not just this author a couple of weeks back a high ranking Russian official even advised India to forego its concerns on CPEC passing through POK and to join it. (It is covered in the discussions on this thread) The oil/gas/commodity prices needs to grow substantially for Russia to maintain its independent and credible power status. Imagine the country is 5 times bigger than India with a GDP which is less than half of India. I doubt Russia would even have the capacity to maintain a hold over its large land mass. It is already losing small chunks in the far east to China.

Russia did not become vassal state of any power even half of it under german occupation, even in '80s and 90s at the zenith of its power and we are talking about it becoming vassal state to china a nation of traders. Some people dont like being bossed around, no matter what

Mukesh.Kumar
BRFite
Posts: 1183
Joined: 06 Dec 2009 14:09

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Mukesh.Kumar » 09 Jan 2018 16:45

ArjunPandit wrote:
Vips wrote:True as of date China has some security concerns but as the Russian economy sinks (or does not grow) and Chinese GDP grows, Russia becoming a vassal of China is inevitable. It is not just this author a couple of weeks back a high ranking Russian official even advised India to forego its concerns on CPEC passing through POK and to join it. (It is covered in the discussions on this thread) The oil/gas/commodity prices needs to grow substantially for Russia to maintain its independent and credible power status. Imagine the country is 5 times bigger than India with a GDP which is less than half of India. I doubt Russia would even have the capacity to maintain a hold over its large land mass. It is already losing small chunks in the far east to China.

Russia did not become vassal state of any power even half of it under german occupation, even in '80s and 90s at the zenith of its power and we are talking about it becoming vassal state to china a nation of traders. Some people dont like being bossed around, no matter what


True that Arjun. Having traveled in Russia, had a long association with a Russian, and numerous friends in Russia, I will agree to your, "We are Russians, don't boss us around." Russia will bide its time. But in the long run it would also like to have India as a countervail to China. They may not give us tipping point technology, but they will ensure that India exists as a large and powerful enough market for their hardware. Long ago, just after the August war, one evening over drinks in Moscow, I remember my friend describing how despite large differences, for Russia India was the perfect partner. Big, some shared values, and most important geography- We do not share land borders with Russia. Over the course of that night we discussed how he felt that India's strategy in IOR would have reduced impact when the Northern passage became ice free for trade between Far East and Europe, how the Russian soul was ripped apart by the Yeltsin years, what constituted the love for the land/ Rodina (too complicated to describe in a post), why Russians all hark for their summer dacha to grow veggies. I am digressing, but remember in the end Russia needs India as India needs them. That of course does not preclude them from playing their mind games, like a nagging wife who complaints, "You don't love me anymore, I will leave you."

Ufff, that was too much piskology in one post. :lol: :lol:

ArjunPandit
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3528
Joined: 29 Mar 2017 06:37

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby ArjunPandit » 09 Jan 2018 20:18

^^with all their mind games, We as a nation should never forget that they were besides/behind us in '71, the high point of modern Indian state(wont say the highest, as it is yet to come). I have heard very similar stories from my colleagues thanking indians for their friendship and treating as friends. In spite of being thankful to americans for my nation's and my own little prosperity, I will never trust them. Based on history, the only nation I will trust when it matters most(national security) is russia.

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21060
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 11 Jan 2018 14:33

The foll. article reflects only the inability of Moscow to convince India to join China's OBOR. Here,Moscow is ignoring the continuous Chinese support to Pak,both military and economic,Chinese open attempts at encircling India in the IOR and for decades,attempting to intrude and squat on Indian territory in the Himalayas,now going even further describing Ar.Pradesh as S.Tibet! Stapled viasa,etc. In fact,what the F..k is our own govt. doing about it ? Zero. These insults must be recirprocated as well as curbs/duties on Chin goods reducing/exterminating the $50B+ trade deficit.The spirit of Doklam should permeate the MEA as well.

Frankly,Mr.Modi should tell Pres. Putin that if the Chinese continue with this assault upon India,India's membership of BRICS could be swiftly flushed down the toilet.


Putin unable to win India over as Russia's staunch ally to counter USA's dominance
World » Asia
Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin has recently paid a one-day visit to India. India is considered to be one of three largest buyers of Russian arms in the world. The portfolio of Russia's military contracts with India is evaluated at over 35 billion dollars. Yet, India has been a capricious partner for Moscow. Prior to Rogozin's visit, the Indian side rejected Russia's insistent appeals to join China's global transport project "One Belt On Road."

Full cycle of arms exports
Even though Dmitry Rogozin, has not signed any final agreements in New Delhi, he has held talks with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi about the need to expand cooperation on the whole range of issues - from nuclear power to high technologies. Rogozin also met with Indian Defense Minister Nirmala Sitharaman.

In the future, Moscow and New Delhi are going to switch to "full life cycle" contracts that are to stay in effect during the entire period of the existence of arms and military equipment. "This means that Russia is going to switch from "sold and forgot it" principle to joint interaction with our Indian partners - from the time of sale to after-sales service, up to utilization," Rogozin specified.

"With the new defense minister of India, we have agreed to turn military industrial conferences, which we have already held this year, into a process of permanent harmonization of remarks that always arise in the exploitation of weapons and military equipment," Dmitry Rogozin said after his return to Moscow from India.

During the talks with the head of the defense ministry of India, Rogozin discussed such topics as exports of arms and spare parts to India, holding joint military exercises, expanding joint high-tech industries and developing military equipment and spare parts.

Breakthrough in defense cooperation
Experts note that a real breakthrough in the defense cooperation between the two countries took place in the autumn of 2016, when Russia and India concluded a number of agreements on the sidelines of the BRICS summit. The most important of those agreements was the document about the supplies of S-400 surface-to-air missile systems to India.

Defense export giant Rosoboronexport, Helicopters of Russia and Indian company Hindustan Aeronautics Limited signed an agreement on the establishment of a joint venture to manufacture Ka-226T helicopters. Under the terms of the contract, India will purchase first 60 helicopters from Helicopters of Russia, before 140 rotorcraft are assembled under license in the Indian city of Bangalore.

In addition, India agreed to purchase four Project 11356 frigates from Russia ("Admiral Grigorovich" class). In particular, the parties agreed that one ship would be built at Russia's Yantar shipyard, and three other frigates - in India. The agreement totaled about $3 billion.

Russia also agreed to let India lease multi-purpose nuclear submarine of Project 971 (class "Akula") from the Russian Navy. India had leased a submarine of this type in the past ("Chakra", known as "Nerpa").

The United States tries to draw India into orbit of influence
In November, it transpired that New Delhi violated contract terms with Russia and allowed representatives of the Pentagon on board the Chakra submarine. Russian officials were annoyed about the appearance of US servicemen onboard a Russian-made submarine. Nevertheless, Moscow decided not to discuss the incident in public not to damage ties with New Delhi.

The visit of US servicemen to the Russian submarine was made possible thanks to the joint Indian-American defense cooperation program. In June, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi paid an official visit to Washington, where he had a meeting with President Donald Trump and agreed on deepening cooperation in the defense sphere. The White House is trying to draw India into the sphere of its influence to prevent the creation of a military and political alliance between Russia and India.

India renounces Chinese projects
Meanwhile, Russia seeks to win India's participation in important regional transport projects. In particular, it goes about a project of "North-South" International Transport Corridor with a total length of 7,200 km. This route provides for the transit of goods from the Indian Ocean to the Persian Gulf. The project, if implemented, will create a strategic triangle Moscow-New Delhi-Tehran.

At the same time, India's participation in another major transport project - China's "One Belt One Road" - initiative remains questionable.

On December 21, Ravish Kumar, spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of India, said that such initiatives must be implemented on the basis of internationally recognized norms, in cooperation with effective leadership, under the conditions of the rule of law, openness and transparency not to violate territorial integrity and sovereignty of any countries.

Vladimir Putin, who acts as a supporter of "One Belt, One Road" project, has not been able to convince the Indian administration to join China's project, which serves as an indication of tensions in India's relationship with the Celestial Empire.

Aidyn Mehtiyev
Pravda.Ru
See more at http://www.pravdareport.com/world/asia/ ... _russia-0/

rsingh
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3439
Joined: 19 Jan 2005 01:05
Location: Pindi
Contact:

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby rsingh » 11 Jan 2018 17:00

ArjunPandit wrote:^^with all their mind games, We as a nation should never forget that they were besides/behind us in '71, the high point of modern Indian state(wont say the highest, as it is yet to come). I have heard very similar stories from my colleagues thanking indians for their friendship and treating as friends. In spite of being thankful to americans for my nation's and my own little prosperity, I will never trust them. Based on history, the only nation I will trust when it matters most(national security) is russia.

At the same time we were their best clients for arms for long time. Even in post-perestroika times when Russia was at knees.

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3059
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 11 Jan 2018 18:07

Keep in mind, that once the majority of countries in West Asia and also East Asia allied with the US and with further normalization of ties between US and China, India was the only major country left that Russia (wanted) and could count as its ally during the cold war. We must take a dispassionate view of things as they were and view the ties in practical terms. Nobody did a favor to the other. It was all Geo Politics in the end.

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21060
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 11 Jan 2018 21:42

Russia should tell China to relent on its superiority complex and wish to dominate Asia like the Nazis in WW2.XI Gins may want to be Asia's "Fuhrer", but he will come a cropper eventually.Funny how events in Asia seem to be repeating the pre-WW2 build up.There too Russia and Germany were first pals until Germany attacked Russia.Who will be the equiv. of France and the Benelux nations this time though?

Russia must tell China that " it is better to have India p*ssing out of the tent than p*sing in" ( JFK about LBJ as Veep), if it wants OBOR, etc. to succeed.First it has to be a pan-Asian venture with equal benefits for all participants, not a Chin hegemonistic venture with dangerous military overtures.In its current design it is a master plan for a new Chinese empire.India will never subject itself to Chinese imperialism.

Austin
BRF Oldie
Posts: 23387
Joined: 23 Jul 2000 11:31

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 09 Feb 2018 09:33

Russian military relations with Pakistan very minimal, says Russian envoy Nikolay Kudashev

Russia’s new Ambassador to India Nikolay Kudashev takes over at a tough time for bilateral ties. In his first interview since taking over, Mr. Kudashev told The Hindu that the priority for New Delhi and Moscow would be sealing several defence agreements this year, but the bigger priority would be reaching out to the next generation of Indians and Russians to broaden cooperation.

Where are India-Russia ties today, given all the changes in the world, and how will both countries address the reports of a “drift” between them?

Our relations have reached unprecedented level of maturity. In the past year 2017, all Indian ministers of the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) have visited Russia. It is unprecedented, and we have had reciprocal visits. Our leaders met five times in the last three years. I am not even mentioning the telephone conversations between them. So it is fair to say that President Putin and Prime Minister Modi have established very special relationship. They personally manage our bilateral ties and international cooperation.

On the drift, it is not that we are running apart from each other. There are new opportunities coming up our way and sometimes we are lagging behind them. New mechanism and platforms for cooperation are emerging, but the key to our new successes may lie to the extent of our interest of our young generation in contributing to our joint projects and bilateral relations.

Is India-Russia military cooperation keeping pace, given India’s move to diversify its hardware procurement?


This is one of the pillars of our strategic cooperation both sides are deservedly proud of. This year we expect the nodal points of our defence cooperation to be the signing of contractual obligations of anti-aircraft systems S-400, Ka-226T helicopters, and joint manufacture of frigates. The issue of joint development and manufacture of the Sukhoi/HAL Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA) is also on the agenda, as is the supply of Mi-17 helicopters and upgrade of Mig-29 fighters. So we have very ambitious plans.

Can you elaborate on the status of FGFA, which has been repeatedly delayed?

This issue was raised during our recent high level contacts, and the project remains on the agenda. The FGFA project will define the future image of the Indian Air Force for at least 50 years including the armament system of such aircraft. We are convinced on the merits and advantages of our aircraft. If you ask me what defines the quality of our cooperation, it is that the Russian side is a pioneer of ‘Make in India’. Almost all new projects envisage a very high level of localisation. Of course it not only concerns new deals but old ones like Su-30 aircraft, T-90 tanks and BrahMos missiles. To be honest it’s hard to tell what is it that we are not making in India and not making with India!

How do you see India-Russia cooperation in nuclear energy growing, with U.S. and French competitors in the market?


This is one of the defining dimensions of our cooperation. Works on Kudankulam site are advancing successfully. Units 1 and 2 are already operational, Unit 3 and 4 are progressing according to the time schedule. Important agreements have been reached on Units 5 and 6. We are now expecting a signal from our Indian partners on the second site, where we believe a decision on its location is almost in the final stage.

Do you worry about competition from other foreign collaborations in nuclear sector?

Speaking about U.S. and French companies, we are not afraid of normal, fair competition. We are confident in the merits of our technologies. And in any case, despite all the talk, the Russian side and the Russian company Rosatom is the only enterprise has been doing business in India for decades, producing energy for India.

The only thing which is unacceptable to us is the language of sanctions and discrimination, the language which our partners (U.S.) are increasingly using against us. This is nothing but an attempt to undermine our strategic partnership with India including in such strategically important sectors like military and technical cooperation, energy and nuclear energy.

On Afghanistan, is there any common ground between India and Russia today, given Indian opposition to Taliban talks, and Russia-U.S. differences on the way forward?


Many talk of the contradictions in the Afghanistan policy of India and Russia. To my mind this is artificial. Both Indian and Russia need a peaceful and democratic Afghanistan free from terrorism, crime and drug trafficking. India, like Russia, believes there is and cannot be any military solution to the Afghanistan problem. So priority goes to the political dialogue which means that reconciliation of the parties and we think such dialogue should not be secretive or selective. It should be an open dialogue with multilateral fora, with priority participation of regional countries, like the Moscow process and the SCO-Afghanistan contact group where India is also participating.
But there is a basic contraction in that when U.S. made its South Asia policy statement on Afghanistan, India welcomed it and Russia criticised it…

The U.S. policy is not limited to South Asia. According to the U.S. policy, Russia stands as a revisionist state and a threat for U.S. and its allies. I hope that you won’t connect Indian policy with such views of the U.S. leadership. We may have certain nuances in our (India-Russia) approaches but I wouldn’t exaggerate the differences. From our point of view the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan has stretched itself and has no future prospects as a tool of reconciliation. We need another mechanism of settlement. We, together with India are looking for them.

India has also been keen to explore Russian support for supplying weapons, helicopters to Afghanistan. Has there been any progress on Indian requests?


As far as I know this issue is on our agenda. If you are talking of helicopters, it is a matter of commercial negotiations. There could be other proposals but we are talking of three helicopters at the beginning.

Not just Afghanistan, India is also negotiating on military supplies of Russian-origin hardware to third countries like Vietnam or Malaysia. Are there plans for a bilateral mechanism for this?


This is an important issue that will showcase our transition from a seller-buyer relationship to the joint manufacturing of equipment. Naturally we will face problems of after sale support and repairs as well. This issue should be addressed on a precise contractual basis without any misunderstanding. Our work in this direction is ongoing, and the ministries will have more information on this.

Are there any talks for an India-Russia logistics support agreement on the lines of the Indo-U.S. LEMOA to enable the use of each other’s bases?


I believe for us with 60-year-old history of military exchanges, the issue of logistical agreement is a long past idea. We have moved beyond that a long time ago. For a very long time we have been training and conducting drills. We have started tri-service drills. We have been cooperating for a long time on military infrastructure construction. So we have qualitatively new tasks and goals not quite comparable to the issues India is trying to settle with its new partners.

Recently the Russian Foreign Minister seemed to suggest that India should give up its opposition to China’s Belt and Road Initiative (B&RI)…what sort of alternative resolution do you expect for India’s sovereignty concerns?


We have never tried to rope in, or engage India in the Chinese project, of which we ourselves are not a participant. When we talk about B&RI, we are talking about the integration of the Russian vision of Eurasian integration and the Chinese project. We have never asked India to make concessions in terms of its sovereignty. But there are interests of a larger Eurasia, of a continent which we belong to, and of Eurasian connectivity. Without solving these issues, we won’t be able to implement our plans— Russian plans, Indian plans, Chinese plans, whatever. Mr. Lavrov was talking about creative solutions, about not being absolutist on our contradictions, but finding creative approaches without limiting ourselves.

Given that, how do you see the push for Indian participation in the Indo-Pacific?


As for Indo-Pacific connectivity, it is India’s sovereign choice. You are in the Indo-Pacific region and it seems logical to engage in connectivity in this regard. What would be illogical is if you see your region as split or fragmented (South Asia and Indo-Pacific). This bigger picture was mentioned by Mr. Lavrov, but there were no other ways this topic was raised in other negotiations, either public or private.

India has asked for Russia’s support on entering the Nuclear Suppliers Group, and also for assistance with clearing the hurdles to the NSG. How do you see India’s chances?


The issue of the NSG was discussed during the meetings of the Deputy Foreign Minister Ryabkov (in December). Our position is very simple. We support Indian membership at the NSG. But obviously not all members of this group share our approach. For us, consensus within the group is very important, it underlines the very existence of the NSG. And we proceed from the understanding that our Indian colleagues will also work with those who have certain doubts in this regard. From our side, we always voice our support for the Indian candidacy.

We now see regular exercises and a growing Russian military cooperation with Pakistan. Why has Russia shifted its stand on not dealing with Pakistan in the past?


This issue has been very much exaggerated. Recently several Russian leaders, including Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov have touched upon the issue of Russian ties with Pakistan. Our relations with Pakistan in the military sphere are of a very minimum nature, and are strictly limited to anti-terrorism operations, and are not comparable in any way to the scope of our relations with India. Most importantly, our ties with Pakistan cannot be viewed as an attempt to change the regional strategic balance. We strive to have normal relations with Pakistan, which I understand is the intention of India as well. We want to support those forces in Pakistan who have the same intentions as us, to fight terrorism in all of its manifestations.

If countering terrorism is the objective, will Russia give India its support at the U.N.’s Financial Action Task Force later this month? India and several other countries have been keen to corner Pakistan on the support to terrorist groups in its country, especially groups that target India (Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammed), and some have even spoken of sanctions against certain entities there.


Eventually our decision will depend on how weighty and substantiated the proof for Pakistan’s involvement in financing terrorism will be. We are honest people, and base ourselves not only on biased opinions, but on the basis of facts. To corner Pakistan is not our policy.

We believe that the settlement of all issues with Pakistan depends on political dialogue. I will even take the risk to suggest that this comes from the Indian idea of a comprehensive dialogue with Pakistan. But it is not my intention to comment on issues that are of Indian sovereignty.

Let’s turn to neighbouring Iran. What is the future of the India-Iran-Russia International North South Trade Corridor (INSTC) given the possibility of more sanctions by the United States on Iran?


This is a very promising area of cooperation. First of all, in terms of energy and signing of a memorandum which would enable us to construct a gas pipeline from Iran to India, with Pakistan’s participation (IPI pipeline). The talks on this issue are underway, and we are now speaking of four separate memorandums related to the IPI project, with preference for a possible maritime route for this pipeline. It would seem to me that any agreement on this issue would be a very good example of regional connectivity. The INSTC corridor has been brought to life with or without American sanctions. Our countries have peacefully coexisted for thousands of years before the formations of the United States, and I am confident that the relations between our countries cannot be interpreted in the context of U.S. policy or sanctions. Indian public opinion tends to overestimate the weight of American policy in the region.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10248
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby arun » 10 Feb 2018 09:30

^^^ Regards the above interview of Russian Ambassador to India, Nikolay Kudashev, by the Hindu’s Suhasini Haider and Dinakar Peri; the message that comes across to me is that Russia has taken the conscious decision to kow tow to the Peoples Republic of China when it comes to the Indian Sub-Continent and on many issues of interest to India such as NSG membership, Cross Border Terrorism emanating from the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan, role of Pakistani terrorist proxies in Afghanistan and Russian military relations with the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan, Russian support for India is at best luke warm equivocation if not based on an expectation that India will sacrifice her sovereignty to keep the PRC happy as in the case of OBOR / BRI / CPEC.

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3059
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 10 Feb 2018 20:36

There have been comments from Russian higher ups from time to time giving us unsolicited advise to tow the Chinese line on OBOR, Afghanistan etc. The Russians seem to be in a hurry to forget the lessons of late 60's with respect to China and early to late 80's to Pakistan. Good, let them snuggle up and rot with them. Birds of a feather flock together so an autocratic Russia will gell well with a communist China and an Islamic Pakistan.(They are all essentially anti-democracy and deny basic freedom to the people)

Just yesterday the Vodka guzzlers had the gall to ask us to buy more MIG29K's (inspite of their shortcomings which are now coming to light) in the upcoming Naval twin engine jet order.

It is clear that the Russians think that india can be taken for granted and advised/forced to do anything which will be even against their long term interests.

Parasu
BRFite
Posts: 317
Joined: 04 Dec 2017 14:18

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Parasu » 10 Feb 2018 23:06

There is nothing wrong in what Russia is doing. Russian economy is in doldrums. It can get money from China. So it is kowtowing to PRC. No surprise there.
We are also improving ties with US of A. Big deal.
It is all the more important that we put our Point of View across in Moscow rather than simply giving up and saying - Russia is lost. Modi discussed Maldives with Trump. DId he discuss it with Putin?
Autocrats like him need ego massage. With little effort, Erdogan has managed to make a deal with Moscow, even as it continues in NATO and even after murdering a Russian pilot. We have good image in Russia. Over the course of time, it will atrophy if we do not stay engaged.

Shanmukh
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2971
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Shanmukh » 11 Feb 2018 00:24

The major problem we have with Russia is that there is not much ordinary citizen engagement with Russians. Most of the engagement is in defence or via public sector companies like Oil & Gas, etc. Probably because most Indians don't speak/read Russian, but also Russia is out of favour with many Amerika-pasand-Indians these days. To give an example, Polish authors were brought in during the Jaipur Litter Fest, but no Russians. I don't for a moment believe that the Poles are any better at English than the Russians, but Russia is not in favour in Indian babudom these days.

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3059
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 11 Feb 2018 17:51

Parasu wrote:There is nothing wrong in what Russia is doing. Russian economy is in doldrums. It can get money from China. So it is kowtowing to PRC. No surprise there.
We are also improving ties with US of A. Big deal.
It is all the more important that we put our Point of View across in Moscow rather than simply giving up and saying - Russia is lost. Modi discussed Maldives with Trump. DId he discuss it with Putin?
Autocrats like him need ego massage. With little effort, Erdogan has managed to make a deal with Moscow, even as it continues in NATO and even after murdering a Russian pilot. We have good image in Russia. Over the course of time, it will atrophy if we do not stay engaged.


It take two hands to clap. Why should it be our efforts only to curry favor with the Russians? Did they discuss with us before siding with China and Pakistan in taking an anti India and pro Taliban stance? Mind you the activities in Maldives is no skin of Putin's nose whereas the one in Afghanistan affects the very security of India.

The Russians in 10 years time frame after losing the majority of the low to medium range arms market to China will realize that India is the only major country in the world it can rely on to maintain its credible power and status.In the long term only oil & commodity prices and India are the lifelines for Russia or otherwise with a rapidly decreasing population and GDP it will be left as nothing more than a glorified Chinese stooge. An emperor who is naked under his shiny gown.

Shanmukh wrote:The major problem we have with Russia is that there is not much ordinary citizen engagement with Russians. Most of the engagement is in defence or via public sector companies like Oil & Gas, etc. Probably because most Indians don't speak/read Russian, but also Russia is out of favour with many Amerika-pasand-Indians these days. To give an example, Polish authors were brought in during the Jaipur Litter Fest, but no Russians. I don't for a moment believe that the Poles are any better at English than the Russians, but Russia is not in favour in Indian babudom these days.


Developing People to People contacts in trying to get the Russians to see our point of view? With all due respects sir that is a joke. Lets not even go there. We were as anti-US and as pro Russia under the non aligned garb as possible and had plenty of rosy eyed contacts and relations with them and remember what Yelstin did to us?

Parasu
BRFite
Posts: 317
Joined: 04 Dec 2017 14:18

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Parasu » 12 Feb 2018 02:44

^^
Are you trying to suggest that we shouldnt be talking to the Russians because our ego gets hurt?!
I am only saying that we should remain engaged with Russia. And not just say "We give up. Russia is lost".

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3059
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 12 Feb 2018 06:38

All i am saying is no matter how much you stay engaged, they will take a position which will not be in our interest.

Vivek K
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2491
Joined: 15 Mar 2002 12:31

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vivek K » 12 Feb 2018 07:26

We always expect a favor from the world! Why? No one does anyone any favors. Russia does not see a future with India - probably never did. It needed a buyer and now it can see that the writing on the wall - India will want to develop its own tech in the future. Outright buys will not go on for too much more. They have milked India enough in the Gorshkov and the Mig-29k. Dal nahi gal rahi in the FGFA any more. Perhaps the Rafale is an insurance policy to prevent over dependence on the Sukhois.

Of course India should remain engaged as much as possible with "every power" in the world - BUT work on its own agenda and not become a lap dog for anyone else.

Some eminent posters show the classical colonial fancy for one power or the other. These Mir Qasims should be banished so that they can never have a voice to cloud Indian sovereignty. Remember there are no friendships - only interests between nations.

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21060
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 12 Feb 2018 08:31

Ckd a Dec.2015 report about the R deal.$10B"! Offsets to be only for the aerospace industry, not for any R&D.Ambani, SAMTEL and BEL mentioned as poss. offset work.

This is around $275M a pop for a Raffy. far greater "milking" than any deal with Russia.We bought the VikA for around $2-2.5B and 29Ks at approx. $32M an aircraft.I' m not sure whether the $2.5B fig. included the approx 48 birds too.Even if is didn't, it makes just under $4B for the carrier plus 29Ks and I think 10 KA-31ASW/AEW helos too.

This huge cost, even if it is a little less than $10B, explained why the GOI is so reticent about revealing the full cost of the Raffy deal for just 36 dircraft. All costs for major deals have in the past been in the open and escalation in CAG reports. No reason why the Raffy deal must be an exception, though the Cong. is trying to politicise the issue.It had enough time to seal the deal in its period in office.
Last edited by Philip on 12 Feb 2018 09:22, edited 2 times in total.

Vivek K
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2491
Joined: 15 Mar 2002 12:31

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vivek K » 12 Feb 2018 09:17

Some never learn or read!

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21060
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 12 Feb 2018 09:26

I would say the the MKIs are better insurance than the Raffys. Why MP said that we could order more MKIs if the Raffy cost didn't reduce. Look at how the M2K upgrades are stalled over costs, less than a dozen finished, while all 67/69 29UGs have been delivered at 1/4th the cost of an M2K upgrade!

Parasu
BRFite
Posts: 317
Joined: 04 Dec 2017 14:18

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Parasu » 12 Feb 2018 16:08

Vips wrote:All i am saying is no matter how much you stay engaged, they will take a position which will not be in our interest.

And you know this how?!

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3059
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 12 Feb 2018 19:37

Have you checked the clear chinese line the Russian higher ups are touting? They are brazen enough to ask us to ignore our stand on Kashmir / ignore our security and accept the OBOR in its present form and also participate in it. Wake up and smell the coffee. The Russian goose has been cooked as far as India is concerned.

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3059
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Vips » 12 Feb 2018 19:58

Philip wrote:I would say the the MKIs are better insurance than the Raffys. Why MP said that we could order more MKIs if the Raffy cost didn't reduce. Look at how the M2K upgrades are stalled over costs, less than a dozen finished, while all 67/69 29UGs have been delivered at 1/4th the cost of an M2K upgrade!


What is the effectiveness and availability rate of the Upgraded 29's? If the new 29k's are lemons, who is going to trust the old/upgraded birds? If something is inexpensive or cheap there is a clear reason for it. :)

If they have something which is top of the line and gold plated they will not offer it to us cheap. Check the Price of S400 offered to us vs the sale to China. There is a 50% (ofcourse Upwards) price difference.

Austin
BRF Oldie
Posts: 23387
Joined: 23 Jul 2000 11:31

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Austin » 12 Feb 2018 22:47

On the occasion of its 10th Anniversary Sergey Viktorovich Chemezov CEO of Rostec Corporation interacts with India Strategic in an exclusive interview from Moscow

Russia Continues to View India as a Privileged Strategic Partner
India Strategic: Rostec recently celebrated the 10th anniversary. What do you consider the main achievements of the company and what direction of development is indicated for the next 10 years?

Chemezov: The most important event was the very creation of Rostec 10 years ago. If this decision was not made, it is difficult to imagine in what position we would now find ourselves. Ten years ago we received hundreds of scattered defence assets. A third of enterprises were in a pre-crisis and crisis stage, 28 in the stage of bankruptcy. On the basis of these enterprises, we created a number of holding companies separating them in terms of various industries. For ten years we have carried out a wide reorganisation, eliminated corruption, developed and implemented a single very demanding strategy, introduced new production sites.

One of the achievements in recent years has been the success of Rosoboronexport in foreign arms markets. Today, Rosoboronexport’s portfolio of orders exceeds $40 billion.

By 2025 Rostec plans to achieve parity by revenue of military and civil products of 50/50 (currently it is about 70/30).In the new 2025 Development Strategy, we set a target for revenues at an average annual growth rate of at least 17 per cent and we are working hard to implement it. According to our forecasts, its growth in 2017 will be about 22 per cent.

India Strategic: How do you see the role of India in the development strategy of Rostec State Corporation?


Chemezov:I would like to emphasise that India is Russia’s privileged strategic partner. In a tough international competition environment, by practice we prove that Russian-Indian military-technical cooperation is not only steadily developing, but also deepening. Our strategy is to further expand cooperation with Indian producers in accordance with the policy of “Make in India”, proclaimed by the Government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Only Russia transfers 100 per cent of technologies to India, which allows Indian defenсe companies to develop their own military production in full. For example, in India, through Russian licenses, production of Su-30MKI aircraft is underway, as also major overhaul of RD-33 aircraft engines. A striking example of Russian-Indian cooperation is the creation of a unique supersonic cruise missile BrahMos. Similar Russian technologies have not been transferred to any other country.

Today, Rosoboronexport’s portfolio of orders in India exceeds $4 billion and the current planning of the Russian-Indian military-technical cooperation is carried out on a long-term basis.

India Strategic: What is the status of the Indo-Russian FGFA programme? There were reports that the program was stuck in connection with costing issues.

Chemezov:As for the project of joint development of a fifth-generation fighter (FGFA), work is underway. The first stage of the project is completed, now the second stage is under discussion. I think that the contract documents in the very near future will be signed. The project is very complex, but the work continues, although not so quickly.

India Strategic: What is the contract stage for the delivery of S-400 Triumf systems in India? When will the delivery begin? Apart from the missile system, what are the other features of the deal, and is there any particular reason for the delay?


Chemezov:The intergovernmental agreement on this project was signed in Goa just one year ago. This agreement is on the supply of the most modern equipment for strategic purposes. Now it is important not to rush things and give both parties time for contract negotiations.

Discussion of this contract is at a profoundly advanced stage. Currently, the technical details of the contract are being discussed. This is a very complex contract with many technical specifications and variables, as well as pricing conditions, production and delivery schedules; everything must be carefully coordinated. I am confident that as soon as the negotiations are completed, the contract will be signed. The work is proceeding according to plan and this pace fully meets our expectations.

India Strategic: What is the status of the supply of additional 48 Mi-17 V5 helicopters to India? When do you expect the signing of the contract?


Chemezov:Negotiations with the Indian side on the delivery of 48 Mi-17 V5 helicopters have been completed; we expect to sign the corresponding contract in the first quarter of 2018.

India is the largest foreign operator of Mi-8/17 helicopters, and they have proven themselves through decades of use. One of its most competitive advantages is the cost of an hour of flight, which is unmatched by any of the competitors. The increase in the fleet of these helicopters is a very logical step.

In addition, the serious modernisation potential of the Mi-8/17 is confirmed by the development of the Mi-171A2 model, which includes more than 80 changes and improvements to the platform. The very first contract to export a Mi-171A2 was signed with an Indian company during the Dubai Airshow recently.

India Strategic: India is interested in creating a single-engine fighter inside the country in the framework of a new model of strategic partnership. Is Rostec interested in taking part in this?


Chemezov: Russia is very strong in the production of various types of twin-engine aircraft, but at present we do not produce single-engine fighters. And our main twin-engine aircraft, both MiGs and Sukhois, are used by the Indian air force.

But if India wants to develop its own single-engine aircraft, and if India is interested in international cooperation to develop this aircraft, Russia and Rostec will be open to cooperation. Thus, if we are invited to participate in the joint development of a single-engine aircraft, we are ready to do this, as it was done in the past with other Russian-Indian projects. The BrahMos supersonic missile is a good example of such cooperation between the two countries.

India Strategic:Recently, India has opened a tender for over 100 helicopters with naval equipment and naval multipurpose helicopters? Will Rostec participate in it?


Chemezov:Russian Helicopters has already announced its intention to participate in this tender with the Ka-226T model, where they will be represented by Rosoboronexport (both companies are part of Rostec State Corporation).

In the tender for the supply of more than 100 helicopters for the Indian Navy, the conditions for all are the same. Whether the Ka-226T is selected or not, I do not know, but our helicopter meets all the requirements presented in the tender documentation, and its technical characteristics exceeds our competitors. We already have a solution for the naval version of this helicopter with folding blades.

Joint venture Kamov Ka-226T with India is a synergetic project with additional opportunities. I would like to tell our Indian colleagues that if the Ministry of Defence of India selects the Ka-226T, India can save money significantly. Thanks to the project for joint production of helicopters, there are opportunities for joint maintenance, training of pilots and mechanics and other related costs.

It seems to me that this will be a reasonable step for the Indian authorities, because they will support the domestic manufacturer in this way, since it is HAL that has a 51 per cent stake in the Russian-Indian Ka-226T JV.

India Strategic: In what areas of industry can Rostec expect to cooperate with India next year? What promising agreements have been signed recently?


Chemezov:In the near future, we plan to move on from direct supplies to joint research, development and production, and the creation of joint ventures. This cooperation is in the high-tech industry between our countries, which was previously non-existent outside the sphere of military-technical cooperation. Rostec is building up its competencies in the field of microelectronics, optics, IT, medical equipment and pharmaceuticals, telecommunications and aerospace technologies in recent years. We are ready to develop these areas together with our Indian partners, both public and private companies

Large potential of cooperation with India exists for our subsidiary company Natsimbio. As you know, India has made great strides in pharmacology and is one of the world’s recognised leaders in the manufacture of medicines. We are ready for cooperation; in particular, in the direction of organising production of a number of Indian medicines in Russia.

The Indian company Ishvan Pharmaceutical is an investor in projects on the transfer of vaccines. Together with them, Natsimbio created the company Pharm Aid Ltd, which deals with the projects related to transfer of technology and production localisation.

In October 2017, an integrator of Russian IT solutions in the international market, RITE (part of Rostec State Corporation) and Aark Infosoft Pvt Ltd. (India) signed a memorandum on cooperation in the development of complex IT projects in India. The companies agreed on cooperation on Smart City projects in three cities of India, the development of cyber security and electronic elections in the region.

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21060
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 14 Feb 2018 11:20

They say in Russia beware when a Russian leader catches a "cold". Putin today is synonomous with Russia,as the days when "India was Indira and Indira was India". The era of Putin has seen Russia rise from its post-CW humiliations,and return to the forefront of world affairs even showing the mighty US how to kick ISIS ass-in the ME/Syria. A careful management of the economy coupled with a concerted and sustained effort at rebuilding and expanding the key elements and capabilities that make Russia a mil. superpower has seen Russia looked upon by an increasing number of nations for leadership in troublespots.A healthy Putin no doubt is required not just by Russians but by the global community as he was the only leader to bite the bullet and take on ISIS defeating them in Syria despite the west against him.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world ... 08681.html
[quote][b]
Putin cancels key appearances due to ill health for first time in years
[/b]
From the day he took over from Boris Yeltsin, the Russian President has built physical fitness into his brand

Oliver Carroll Moscow

Russian President Vladimir Putin has missed a number of scheduled meetings on his election campaign trail Getty Images
For the first time in years, Vladimir Putin has cancelled several public appearances due to illness – prompting speculation about the long-term durability of a leader feted for his virility.

On Monday, there was no visit to Sochi. Today, there was no discussion of microelectronics in the Kremlin. Tomorrow, the President will not make an appearance at the “Mentor 2018” forum in Moscow. And next week, he will not travel to the Russian Far East.

During his last public appearance, at the culmination of the Kremlin’s “Leaders of Russia” talent competition, the President showed obvious signs of illness. His voice was weak and crackly and he coughed throughout. The Independent saw a similar picture when it accompanied Mr Putin on a campaign visit in Siberia last week. The President struggled with public speeches, made mistakes and seemed unfocussed.

READ MORE
On the road with Vladimir Putin's non-existent presidential campaign
Putin and his team look to fight his only election rival – low turnout
Putin renames air force regiment after Estonian capital
US sanctions list targets all Russians, says Vladimir Putin

On Tuesday, presidential press secretary Dmitry Peskov played down the suggestion of serious illness. Mr Putin would continue to work from the Kremlin or at his suburban residence in Novo-Ogaryovo, he said.

“There is still a working schedule, but it will take into account the President’s cold – you all heard his voice,” said Mr Peskov. “It’s winter, you understand yourselves.”

On Sunday, however, the press secretary had claimed Mr Putin cancelled his engagements to concentrate on the aftermath of Sunday’s crash of Saratov Airlines Flight 703. The lack of clarity has only added to the many unverified rumours circulating around Moscow.

From the day he took over from the ailing Boris Yeltsin, Mr Putin has built physical fitness into his brand. From naked torsos to icy plunges, judo to swimming to other beautification methods, he has claimed immunity to the ageing process. The Russian people, tired of seeing their leaders at death’s door, have largely delighted in it. But now the President is 65, and any period spent on sick leave may change their opinion.

It is not the first time that Mr Putin’s health has been a matter of extended debate. In late 2012, he cancelled several foreign trips and disappeared from public view. Then, the Kremlin claimed Mr Putin was nursing an old “sports injury”. Few were convinced at the time.

Sources close to the Kremlin told The Independent that there were doubts that the President would embark on his fourth presidential campaign.

Mr Putin’s health is no inconsequential affair. The more he has ruled, the more he has made himself synonymous with the fate of the country as a whole. It is unclear how his hyper-personalised political system can survive any transition. While the image of an all-controlling leader is an exaggeration, it is also true to say Mr Putin is the only man able to balance the competing – often warring – clans of Russian government.

In March, the Russian President will go to his electorate to ask for another six years in power. He will receive that mandate from them, but many will be wondering if he has a plan for what comes next. /quote]

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10248
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby arun » 14 Feb 2018 12:41

Shanmukh wrote:The major problem we have with Russia is that there is not much ordinary citizen engagement with Russians. Most of the engagement is in defence or via public sector companies like Oil & Gas, etc. Probably because most Indians don't speak/read Russian, but also Russia is out of favour with many Amerika-pasand-Indians these days. To give an example, Polish authors were brought in during the Jaipur Litter Fest, but no Russians. I don't for a moment believe that the Poles are any better at English than the Russians, but Russia is not in favour in Indian babudom these days.


And what little of that engagement there is seems to generate its own downside going by the comment of Goa Town and Country Planning Minister Vijai Sardesai who besides launching a vituperative attack targeting domestic North Indian / Haryanvi tourists had this less vituperative comment about tourists from Russia:

“The trick is to attract the rich tourist. That stayed with me. It has left an effect on me. I want to think in those directions. Here too, among foreigners, we have Russian tourists, we have put all our eggs in one basket. World over, international tourists leave when Russians come.”

From Indian Express:

Domestic tourists are scum of the earth: Goa minister Vijai Sardesai

Bart S
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2439
Joined: 15 Aug 2016 00:03

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Bart S » 14 Feb 2018 15:22

arun wrote:
Shanmukh wrote:The major problem we have with Russia is that there is not much ordinary citizen engagement with Russians. Most of the engagement is in defence or via public sector companies like Oil & Gas, etc. Probably because most Indians don't speak/read Russian, but also Russia is out of favour with many Amerika-pasand-Indians these days. To give an example, Polish authors were brought in during the Jaipur Litter Fest, but no Russians. I don't for a moment believe that the Poles are any better at English than the Russians, but Russia is not in favour in Indian babudom these days.


And what little of that engagement there is seems to generate its own downside going by the comment of Goa Town and Country Planning Minister Vijai Sardesai who besides launching a vituperative attack targeting domestic North Indian / Haryanvi tourists had this less vituperative comment about tourists from Russia:

“The trick is to attract the rich tourist. That stayed with me. It has left an effect on me. I want to think in those directions. Here too, among foreigners, we have Russian tourists, we have put all our eggs in one basket. World over, international tourists leave when Russians come.”

From Indian Express:

Domestic tourists are scum of the earth: Goa minister Vijai Sardesai


Russian tourists in Goa are heavily into the drug supply mafia activities, certain areas have shop names all in Russian and reportedly no-go areas for other tourists etc. Israelis tourists in Goa, while more of drug consumers rather than suppliers, are equally boorish and low-class.

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21060
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 18 Feb 2018 10:57

I've not met many Russians over the years.One used to see many of them during Sov. era days as tourists, hawking their souvenirs of medallions, badges and pencils.They were quite polite and careful about their behaviour as there were always " minders" to monitor them.

After the collapse of the USSR, Russia particularly during the Yeltsin era descended into their version of America's Wild West. The drug cartels of the Americas and ISI in Pak who control the Afghan heroin trade ,have spread their tentacles long and wide and you only have to watch " Breaking Bad " to realise how it is globally connected.Sadly, popular destinations across the world like Goa have fallen prey to such practices, but is is fundamentally the corrupt and venal Goan politicos who have allowed it to happen!

Unfortunately compulsory army life is so tough in Israel dealing with thd Palestinians and terror outfits, that their youth look for escape and freedom when they've completed their terms of service. Mystic India with its great heritage and culture and tolerance, absence of anti-Semitism, where Jews are liked, like Russians in general too, is a magnet .Goa top dog as a destination.The inevitable crooks also descend and with local protection ply their trade.There is only the fig- leaf of a crackdown on narcotics in Goa, impossible without powerful political patrons.

There are other popular tourist destinations worldwide which are clean.Try taking poppy seeds into the Gulf and you are doomed! Thailand's Bangkok Hilton is well known too.I read of a case in SL where a young Brit posted a small qty. of grass to be later picked up for his personal consumption.The last I heard he was cooling his heels in jail.

India must bring in the death penalty for drug trafficking and long severe sentences for drug use.Foreigners caught using drugs or peddling them incarcerated as in Thailand.But this will be possible only when we must first imprison the politicos , police and their cronies who are also responsible for the drug trade, particularly those in the Punjab.

Russians or Israelis or any tourist of whatever nationality found guilty of minor drug offences ( found with small qtys. for personal use) must be jailed for a period, then swiftly deported and never be allowed to enter India again on pain of being immediately arrested to serve a longer sentence.

Shanmukh
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2971
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Shanmukh » 19 Feb 2018 12:59

Vips wrote:
Shanmukh wrote:The major problem we have with Russia is that there is not much ordinary citizen engagement with Russians. Most of the engagement is in defence or via public sector companies like Oil & Gas, etc. Probably because most Indians don't speak/read Russian, but also Russia is out of favour with many Amerika-pasand-Indians these days. To give an example, Polish authors were brought in during the Jaipur Litter Fest, but no Russians. I don't for a moment believe that the Poles are any better at English than the Russians, but Russia is not in favour in Indian babudom these days.


Developing People to People contacts in trying to get the Russians to see our point of view? With all due respects sir that is a joke. Lets not even go there. We were as anti-US and as pro Russia under the non aligned garb as possible and had plenty of rosy eyed contacts and relations with them and remember what Yelstin did to us?


No, I am saying that neither side seems to care much where the other goes. Russia is running roughshod over our sensibilities in the OBOR business & India doesn't seem to particularly care where Russia goes. The only thing that is of some interest to India is the defence & oil. Otherwise, babus are very indifferent to what Russia wants or does not want or where it goes.

Parasu
BRFite
Posts: 317
Joined: 04 Dec 2017 14:18

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Parasu » 20 Feb 2018 02:43

Paki foreign minister is visiting Russia at the invitation of Lavrov it seems. For four days.

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21177
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Prem » 20 Feb 2018 03:29

Parasu wrote:Paki foreign minister is visiting Russia at the invitation of Lavrov it seems. For four days.


Russia have just opened new consulate in Peshawar .

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21060
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 20 Feb 2018 04:24

Russia's main concern in Afghanistan is that Islamic jihadism does not enter into its territory and sphere of influence through the soft underbelly of (Muslim) Central Asia.Stability in Afghanistan is essential.Pak is essential to that as it has a huge lawless border with Afg. For Pak, a hostile Kabul aligned with India will or has the potential to squeeze it and threaten it with a second front.It is why through its proxy the Taliban it is carrying on a continuous campaign against the Kabul govt.

India is still imagining that Afg. can be controlled by a fading US whose now limited presence has been unable or unwilling to square the circle for a continuous conflict from the beginning of this century.The US mollycoddling Pak for decades which has repeatedly doublecrossed it, is why the Afg. situ has remained the same and which will remain the same as long as Pak remains untouched and unpunished by deep sanctions and cut off of mil. aid etc. just as NoKo is experiencing.Thiz thd US is simply unwilling to do still imagining ghag Pak can bd "bought".It has learng nothing after decades of duplicity and will never learn as it is like a drug addict hooked to its covert relationship with Pak and its control of the Afg. drug trade.

Unfortunately we seem to be hitching our wagon to a fading superpower in the Indo- Pacific region, the US which has totally lost the plot in the ME, especially over Syria, where the Russians taught it a signal lesson in the application of military force to defeat ISIS anc humiliate UX diplomacy. We funnily see more Indian diplomatic activity with the US hoping that it will pull our chestnuts out of the fire vis a vis China and Pak despite the evidence before our eyes of US decline and appear to have forgotten or deliberately ignored Russia which stood by us for decades allowing us to dismember Pak into two.As the hostility between the US and China grows, Russo-Sino relations get warmer.

This is an inescapable fact.We must also realise that if we want to woo the US to the detriment of our relationship with Russia, viewing the security of the rdgion thriugh Yanqui made spectacles,closer ties between it and Pak are inevitable.However, these ties as one can see are limited to the Afg.theatre.Russia is still the only nation that has provided us with an array of game-changing mil. eqpt. particularly N-subs and N-sub tech.As Adm. Bhagwat recently wrote, this was a profound exercise in trust from Russia.BMos missiles, MKIs, the FGFA JV offerand S-400s .But if we cancel the FGFA deal and buy a US aircraft instead, all bets are open on Russia supplying Pak for the very first time hard core mil. eqpt. say SU-35s, etc.India which has been happy to buy US mil. eqpt.today even after Pak's massive mil.support from the US over decades cannot complain later on should this happen and the flow of Russian mil. cooperation to India could slow down.Western eqpt. is far more expensive as the Rafale costs show and as BMos and our MKIs have shown often inferior.

In the ultimate analysis we should take a good hard look at history and see how the US let down its bum-chums time and time again.From Vietnam to the Phillippines to Iran to Iraq to Panama and now to its Sunni Arab allies in the ME .The Kurds ard getting yet another lesson in betrayal from the US.Above all Pak which relied so much on the US in '71 got shafted because Nixon and Kissinger could not risk a spat with Russia which warned them against any action against us! Our current diplomacy which is trying to be all things to all nations has its limitations.What we should do is to fiercely protect those relations with old friends like Russia which have allowed us to be game changers and dominate our region.If we neglect them and offer only a skin-deep relationship we will ultimately be the loser.
It would bf ironic in the future if Pak gets an insurance policy from Russia while we get the wooden spoon from Uncle Sam!

Rudradev
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3525
Joined: 06 Apr 2003 12:31

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Rudradev » 20 Feb 2018 04:51

Philip wrote:Russia's main concern in Afghanistan is that Islamic jihadism does not enter into its territory and sphere of influence through the soft underbelly of (Muslim) Central Asia.Stability in Afghanistan is essential.Pak is essential to that as it has a huge lawless border with Afg. For Pak, a hostile Kabul aligned with India will or has the potential to squeeze it and threaten it with a second front.It is why through its proxy the Taliban it is carrying on a continuous campaign against the Kabul govt.


Correct.

Philip wrote:The US mollycoddling Pak for decades which has repeatedly doublecrossed it, is why the Afg. situ has remained the same and which will remain the same as long as Pak remains untouched and unpunished by deep sanctions and cut off of mil. aid etc.


Also correct.

So the BEST thing one can say about Russia, ardently cosying up to Pakistan, is that it is repeating precisely what the US attempted (with no success) over the last 50 years.

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21060
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: India-Russia: News & Analysis

Postby Philip » 20 Feb 2018 13:58

I wouldn't say that they will get into bed together,but Russia wants the terror route into C.Asia plugged. Secondly,the Russians aren't as forgiving as the Yanquis if duplicity is the result. The last thing that the Pakis would like to see is a joint US-Russian move to bolster the Kabul govt. with India tagging along ! And there is a 4th player now,China.Which also wants the route into "Weeger" territory also plugged. In my opinion,India's move in he current situ should be a "full court press" in Baluchistan and a side shows in Sindh/Karachi along with the Mohajirs and in the north /FATA with the tribals angered with Pak,anti-Pak entities fighting its forces. From our side too,we should begin large-scale covert actions in POK,esp. those aimed at disrupting Chin moves at establishing its OBOR masterplan.Pak should be surrounded by terror and mayhem on all sides,with dagger-like strikes in concert and in in turn.This will confuse the Pakis not knowing where the next strike will emanate from and make it divide its forces.The barbarians used the same tactics to harass the Roman Empire ,Germanic tribes in the north,Gauls,Britons,etc.not to mention the Carthaginians! It was a fantastic feat that the empire lasted for so long and was so widespread. But Baluchistan is the main key to dismember Pak and forestall the Chins at Gwadar and Jiwani. The Baluchi freedom fighters must be given as much material help as possible including SAMs as the US supplied the Afghan mujahideen with.The opening ofthe Chabahar port offers us the route with which to both assist the Kabul govt. and the Baluchis.Bringing down mil aircraft,mining harbours,raids on mil camps, esp. Chin establishments,all manner of guerilla acts should be planned. The Pakis should never get a night's sleep.


Return to “Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: dsreedhar, morem, pravula, Sagrawal and 69 guests