Iran News and Discussions

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schinnas
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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby schinnas » 09 Mar 2020 21:17

India should amed CAA to include persecuted minorites of Iran as well. Show these imbeciles who is the boss in this part of the world. This is mostly a PR exercise and H&D issue than any real immigration as CAA stops at those who migrated to India before 2014.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby RKumar » 09 Mar 2020 22:21

we should stop giving visas to a damned nation especially the relative of who in power must be denied. Zero visas to the clerics or religious scholars, so giving them no chance to brainwash our people.

There should be an export duty on medicines, food, and medical devices.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby chetak » 10 Mar 2020 00:03

schinnas wrote:India should amed CAA to include persecuted minorites of Iran as well. Show these imbeciles who is the boss in this part of the world. This is mostly a PR exercise and H&D issue than any real immigration as CAA stops at those who migrated to India before 2014.


what if these malsi guys prevented their minorities from leaving their country.

how would those persecuted minorities reach India or the Indian border to ask for refuge.

recently the paki abduls slaughtered two pak Hindu brothers who had valid Indian visas just days before they were to leave for India

what would India do if all these minorities were forcibly prevented from leaving for India.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby schinnas » 10 Mar 2020 00:23

CAA is not for future refugees. It would be merely a PR exercise as I called out to insult Iran.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby chetak » 10 Mar 2020 21:18

schinnas wrote:CAA is not for future refugees. It would be merely a PR exercise as I called out to insult Iran.


this is just the trailer

no one wants these desert hordes from seeking "refuge", causing demographic changes and capturing political power.

Only poland seems to have learned from other's mistakes and look at the stand that they have taken.

The desert hordes know what it is all about and the ugly new reality of rejection that is just now beginning to take shape in europe, uk and the us is staring them in their faces. This is one of the things that they now fear in India, that they will not be allowed in.

do you really think that the right wing and nationalist govts coming to power almost everywhere is a mere coincidence or a consequence of past failed experiments in secularism.

BTW, how is it that almost all of the "refugees" who are clamouring to get into many countries are fighting age males

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby RKumar » 10 Mar 2020 22:40

schinnas wrote:CAA is not for future refugees. It would be merely a PR exercise as I called out to insult Iran.

Sorry mate, they have no shame, ethos, principles or value of words. It is good time that we as nation understand this. I feel sorry 1000 years of oppression did not teach us anything. But on the other side, we are living to fight another day. Every coin has two sides, Bhagwan aap Ka danyawad!!

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Suraj » 10 Mar 2020 22:48

schinnas wrote:India should amed CAA to include persecuted minorites of Iran as well.

CAA only addresses minorities from India's perspective who are from areas affected by the Partition. Iran has nothing to do with the Partition.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby schinnas » 11 Mar 2020 01:53

Nobody even in India appreciates that self imposed partition rationale. Why include Afghanistan if it's related to partition. We can extend it to cover persecuted religious minorities in the neighborhood including Malaysia, Turkey and Iran.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Suraj » 11 Mar 2020 02:12

schinnas wrote:Nobody even in India appreciates that self imposed partition rationale. Why include Afghanistan if it's related to partition. We can extend it to cover persecuted religious minorities in the neighborhood including Malaysia, Turkey and Iran.

CAA was the implementation of Jan Sanghs original desire for a transfer of populations post partition . That’s why Hindus in Burma or the Malay archipelago don’t benefit from it. The CAA is very specific in its wording : 3 current political entities (AfPak and BD) and all non Muslims including Christians.

Afghanistan was a protectorate of the Empire of India - it’s foreign affairs were conducted from London via Calcutta and then Delhi . Significant numbers of Indian civil servants lived and worked in the Khyber agency. From an Indian perspective, they’re a modern state that was just a frontier province of the empire once, with a lot of Indian influence.

Iran on the other hand was never part of British Indian administration. If anything, Burma was, but Burmese Hindus are not part of CAA because the Partition does not involve Burma , even though a large number of TN/AP trader class folk settled there and were persecuted as well.

Please see what the Sangh calls Akhand Bharat - it includes Afghanistan and Burma but not - and never ever - Iran. Despite that, neither Burma nor Iran fall under CAAs purview, just the ones affected by Partition.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby rsingh » 11 Mar 2020 03:04

Cross post from Wuhan thread
We have invested in Chabhar route to Afganistan. Let's not waste all those efforts. This is the way to flame the Bakistani salwar. Good diplomacy is to focus goal ultimate and manage small incidents. Iranians will come to senses very soon. I can predict a high level visit to Delhi by Iranians.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby nandakumar » 11 Mar 2020 05:57

Suraj wrote:
schinnas wrote:Nobody even in India appreciates that self imposed partition rationale. Why include Afghanistan if it's related to partition. We can extend it to cover persecuted religious minorities in the neighborhood including Malaysia, Turkey and Iran.

CAA was the implementation of Jan Sanghs original desire for a transfer of populations post partition . That’s why Hindus in Burma or the Malay archipelago don’t benefit from it. The CAA is very specific in its wording : 3 current political entities (AfPak and BD) and all non Muslims including Christians.

Afghanistan was a protectorate of the Empire of India - it’s foreign affairs were conducted from London via Calcutta and then Delhi . Significant numbers of Indian civil servants lived and worked in the Khyber agency. From an Indian perspective, they’re a modern state that was just a frontier province of the empire once, with a lot of Indian influence.

Iran on the other hand was never part of British Indian administration. If anything, Burma was, but Burmese Hindus are not part of CAA because the Partition does not involve Burma , even though a large number of TN/AP trader class folk settled there and were persecuted as well.

Please see what the Sangh calls Akhand Bharat - it includes Afghanistan and Burma but not - and never ever - Iran. Despite that, neither Burma nor Iran fall under CAAs purview, just the ones affected by Partition.

Realistically speaking, is a transfer of population at all feasible? Let us say we do an NRC pan India and come up with a figure of 5 million non-minority (a very conservative number) non legal residents, will we be able to deport them to the country of presumed origin? The original transfer of population idea which would have covered Indian muslims. That is even more unthinkable.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Suraj » 11 Mar 2020 06:34

CAA only seeks to regularize the status of a group of people in India who are currently illegally present . It does not legislate a process of outward deportation . It is also not even close to any kind of right of return law .

It is important to separate some idea of complete transfer of pop from a political implementation . It took 70 years just to legalize inbound remnants of the Partition .

The reason Partition is so important in this context is the detail of citizenship law - it has explicitly formalized discrimination on the basis of partition - and not religion . For example , OCI is refused to anyone who had an ancestor who took TSP or BD nationality . Indian citizenship law generally makes it REALLY hard for anyone with a TSP/BD ancestor - OCI is impossible and visas are hard. This applies even for Canadian/UK born to TSP parents.

CAA is clever in that regard - probably one of Jaitley’s last efforts - by sticking to the framework of existing citizenship law restrictions, it made it possible to finally pass something on this, through both houses of Parliament and all judicial interventions so far. By focusing on place of origin, it maintains the strength of law while simultaneously addressing a long standing Sangh Parivar concern regarding these so far illegal migrants from Partition-affected areas. It doesn't address Muslims simply because that's how Partition worked - Inbound Muslims had no risk of statelessness as a country had been created specifically for their faith.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Yagnasri » 11 Mar 2020 10:04

They consider themselves as part of Umma. Not children of the Kafirs and not part of anything non islamic.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby chetak » 11 Mar 2020 11:13

Yagnasri wrote:They consider themselves as part of Umma. Not children of the Kafirs and not part of anything non islamic.


very true.

expecting anything from these jehadis is pointless.

they are simply leveraging our own foolishness and the need for wider acceptance.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Vikas » 11 Mar 2020 11:49

Bringing discussion back to Iran..
Why hasn't GoI yet banned travel to Iran knowing that it is become regional epicenter of Coronavirus ?

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby chetak » 13 Mar 2020 14:18

Image

New satellite images of mass graves dug in the city of Qom have sparked concern about Iran’s growing number of coronavirus cases.


India has airlifted and gifted and set up an entire virus testing lab to iran.

the jehadis have not even mentioned it so far.





Satellite images show mass graves dug in Iran ‘for coronavirus victims’

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Vikas » 13 Mar 2020 14:35

chetak wrote:
New satellite images of mass graves dug in the city of Qom have sparked concern about Iran’s growing number of coronavirus cases.


India has airlifted and gifted and set up an entire virus testing lab to iran.

the jehadis have not even mentioned it so far.

Satellite images show mass graves dug in Iran ‘for coronavirus victims’


Are we too nice with the world for our own peril ?

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby chetak » 13 Mar 2020 14:46

Vikas wrote:
chetak wrote:
New satellite images of mass graves dug in the city of Qom have sparked concern about Iran’s growing number of coronavirus cases.


India has airlifted and gifted and set up an entire virus testing lab to iran.

the jehadis have not even mentioned it so far.


Satellite images show mass graves dug in Iran ‘for coronavirus victims’


Are we too nice with the world for our own peril ?


allow me to rephrase the question, saar : do we have an inferiority complex, after centuries of colonialism, the constant need for approval and validation :mrgreen:

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Vikas » 13 Mar 2020 16:54

chetak wrote:
Vikas wrote:
Are we too nice with the world for our own peril ?


allow me to rephrase the question, saar : do we have an inferiority complex, after centuries of colonialism, the constant need for approval and validation :mrgreen:


Very nicely put Sir.
I can understand complex viz-a-viz white man but what baffles me is the same complex with Iranians & Chinese who are no better or worse than us ?
Meanwhile Iran is now begging IMF for loan to fight coronavirus.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby schinnas » 13 Mar 2020 21:04

Don't worry. Neither Doval nor Jaishankar suffer from any complex nor are they stupid. They will extract an IOU at the appropriate time.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby rsingh » 14 Mar 2020 00:23

chetak wrote:Image

New satellite images of mass graves dug in the city of Qom have sparked concern about Iran’s growing number of coronavirus cases.


India has airlifted and gifted and set up an entire virus testing lab to iran.

the jehadis have not even mentioned it so far.






Satellite images show mass graves dug in Iran ‘for coronavirus victims’


Does't look like graves. It is more like covering of white sheets as in strawberry farming.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby chetak » 14 Mar 2020 01:06

rsingh wrote:
chetak wrote:Image

New satellite images of mass graves dug in the city of Qom have sparked concern about Iran’s growing number of coronavirus cases.


India has airlifted and gifted and set up an entire virus testing lab to iran.

the jehadis have not even mentioned it so far.






Satellite images show mass graves dug in Iran ‘for coronavirus victims’


Does't look like graves. It is more like covering of white sheets as in strawberry farming.


the images are linked to a newspaper report quoted in the post .

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby chetak » 16 Mar 2020 12:36

shameless, hypocritical, taqiya filled and devious eeyeranian mullahs.


Iran goes from threatening ‘isolation from Islam world’ to requesting India’s help to fight Coronavirus


President Hassan Rouhani, in his letter, emphasised that the fight against the coronavirus requires bolstering joint and coordinated regional and international measures, adopting serious strategies, and sustaining huge medical and care costs.

The pleading for help from the Islamic Republic of Iran comes at a time when Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei had stoked a controversy by threatening India of isolation in the Muslim world. He had asked the Indian government to confront what he called “extremist Hindus and their parties”, saying the hearts of Muslims all over the world are “grieving” over the recent communal violence in Delhi.


Image

Despite the anti-India and anti-Hindu stand, Iran has now approached India to fight the global epidemic in the country. Iran has emerged as the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic in West Asia, with more than 12,700 confirmed infections – including several senior government officials testing positive. According to the Iranian health officials, more than 610 have died due to the outbreak.

Following the health emergency, Iran President has written a letter seeking India’s help in tackling the global pandemic. “This virus knows no boundary and claims, victims, without political, religious, ethnic, and racial considerations,” he wrote to the world leaders including PM Modi.

Calling the act of continued sanctions when the world is fighting the coronavirus pandemic, as “immoral”, Iran’s foreign minister Javad Zarif in a tweet wrote, “In a letter to counterparts Hassan Rouhani informs how efforts to fight COVID-19 pandemic in Iran have been severely hampered by US sanctions, urging them to cease observing them: It is IMMORAL to let a bully kill innocents. Viruses recognize no politics or geography. Nor should we.”

In another tweet, Zarif had highlighted the severe shortage of medicine and equipment that Iran is now facing.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Vikas » 16 Mar 2020 17:03

chetak wrote:shameless, hypocritical, taqiya filled and devious eeyeranian mullahs.


Iran and Malaysia are down on the knees. Now waiting for Erdogan to sing the song of peace and love with Modi ji.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Neilz » 16 Mar 2020 22:52

Vikas wrote:Iran and Malaysia are down on the knees. Now waiting for Erdogan to sing the song of peace and love with Modi ji.


To me it really does not matter. When they will be back from knee, they will bite again.
It is better to get either a permanent vice to catch hold them to control { which we cant at this stage }, or just keep it baniya way transaction give-n-take, extract the pound of flesh and little more on the spot bargain.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Cain Marko » 17 Mar 2020 13:05

Vikas wrote:
chetak wrote:shameless, hypocritical, taqiya filled and devious eeyeranian mullahs.


Iran and Malaysia are down on the knees. Now waiting for Erdogan to sing the song of peace and love with Modi ji.

If an enemy is down on his knees, it's the right time to kick him in his teeth! Have them sign a binding agreement that recognizes all of Kashmir as internal to India. If tsp comes begging, get pok back from them. Permanently.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Vips » 17 Mar 2020 17:40

Vikas wrote:
chetak wrote:shameless, hypocritical, taqiya filled and devious eeyeranian mullahs.


Iran and Malaysia are down on the knees. Now waiting for Erdogan to sing the song of peace and love with Modi ji.


Make no mistake they will come after you again once their situation is normal. The virus inside every peacefool stays till they meet their 72 sex starved mullahs in hell.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Vikas » 17 Mar 2020 19:54

Vips wrote:
Vikas wrote:
Iran and Malaysia are down on the knees. Now waiting for Erdogan to sing the song of peace and love with Modi ji.


Make no mistake they will come after you again once their situation is normal. The virus inside every peacefool stays till they meet their 72 sex starved mullahs in hell.


True but everyone finds his/her own timing.
If we can show them there place, They will be more careful next time.
Malaysia I think is still a moderate Islamic state with no natural animosity against Bharat but Iran and Turkey are old foes. There is hardly a case of becoming BFF with them anytime soon.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby chetak » 19 Mar 2020 14:37

Vips wrote:
Vikas wrote:
Iran and Malaysia are down on the knees. Now waiting for Erdogan to sing the song of peace and love with Modi ji.


Make no mistake they will come after you again once their situation is normal. The virus inside every peacefool stays till they meet their 72 sex starved mullahs in hell.


none of them have even referred to what they have done, forget the blatant interference in our internal affairs.

one joker wants to sell us things and the other joker, apart from getting us to plead his case with the US, wants us to help him with the corona virus.

and in both cases, we are supposed to forgive and forget (like good Hindus always do) :mrgreen:

whatever happened to their common great friend, the smiling, crafty cheeni with the rusty knife

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Vikas » 19 Mar 2020 16:14

With Oil prices crashing & improving relationship with Gulf monarchies, Iran has lesser leverage over India than ever and the only play they have is Chabahar port which has serious Indian money invested. Unless USA decides to make Iran its mistress, Iranians are staring into becoming a failed state in next 5-7 years. Covid-19 may just speed up the process.
A public slap & kick between the legs is needed to be delivered to Crazy Mullah ruling the Iranians by Indian state.

Relationship with Malaysia are of different nature and though you dont expect them to seek forgiveness in public domain, They still will have to rectify the mistakes of Old coot by diplomatic actions. I don't know how though.
Having lived in Malaysia for sometime, I find Malaysians generally to be very nice, gentle and accommodating people with no snobbish or racist attitude.

#NeverForgetNeverForgive

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Rony » 11 May 2020 18:27

Iran's currency is set to get a new name — and lose four zeros

The head of Iran's Central Bank announced Monday that the nation's currency was set to be re-named and re-valued. Long called the rial, Iran's money will soon likely be called the Toman, and an impressive four zeros will be shaved off all denominations. What was previously 10,000 rials will become one Toman under the plans, which were approved Monday by the Iranian parliament.


"The bill to remove four zeros from the national currency was approved by lawmakers," reported Iran's semi-official students news agency ISNA. The plan still needs to be approved by powerful clerics, but according to the central bank chief, Iran will take two years to "pave the way for the change."

Whatever it's called, it probably won't be worth much. On April 5, you needed about 42,050 rials to buy a single U.S. dollar.

The devaluation of the rial has been marked by four key turning points:

1. The Islamic Revolution of 1979. When the government of the Western-allied Shah collapsed and an ideological cadre of mullahs took over, many entrepreneurs and business moguls left the country for fear of persecution, and they took their wealth with them.

2. The end of the Iran-Iraq war in 1989. It took Iran almost eight years to rebuild its shattered economy, during which time the rial lost almost 100% of its value compared to the US dollar thanks to rampant inflation and the unchecked printing of cash.

3. The third and worst devaluation came during the last years of hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's tenure. Before he left power in 2013, Iran was slammed with severe international sanctions that saw the rial hemorrhage almost 400% more of its value on global currency markets.

The Iranian economy was on the edge of collapse. Even Iranians lucky enough to still have income amid massive unemployment struggled to carry enough of the virtually worthless currency to shops to buy basic goods.

The economic crisis forced Iran's leaders to reconsider their stubborn refusal to negotiate limits to their nuclear program. In 2015, under intense pressure, Iran agreed to the now-defunct nuclear pact with the U.S., Europe, China and Russia.

4. The last major turning point, which is still playing out, came when President Donald Trump pulled the U.S. out of the nuclear deal. It was like an electric shock that sizzled through every aspect of Iran's already beleaguered economy. The rial's plunge has continued, leaving it almost 600% weaker against the US dollar than it was before the Revolution.

Iran has faced a litany of financial disasters since 1979, including international sanctions that have severely limited its ability to sell oil, which in turn have all but dried up its primary source of revenue.

The government has also implemented strict rules on access to foreign currency, leading to a flourishing black market for non-Iranian cash inside the country and further eroding the value of the national currency.

The global pandemic has piled even more stress onto the lives of people already bludgeoned by a White House bent on ramping up maximum pressure on Iran. Lopping four zeros off a 10,000 rial note and calling it a Toman won't do much to ease Iranian minds.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Rony » 11 May 2020 18:38

Iranian Missile Accidentally Hits One of Its Own Ships, Killing 19 Sailors and wounding 15

An Iranian missile fired during a training exercise in the Gulf of Oman struck a support vessel near its target, killing 19 Iranian sailors and wounding 15, Iran’s military and state media said Monday, amid heightened tensions between Tehran and Washington.

The statement significantly raised the death toll in Sunday’s incident from what was reported just hours earlier, when Iran’s state media said at least one sailor was killed.

The Konarak, a Hendijan-class support ship, which was taking part in the exercise, was too close to a target during an exercise on Sunday when the incident happened, the reports said. The vessel had been putting targets out for other ships to target. The media said the missile struck the vessel accidentally.

The friendly fire incident took place near the port of Jask, some 1,270 kilometers (790 miles) southeast of Tehran, in the Gulf of Oman, state TV said.

Iranian media said the Konarak had been overhauled in 2018 and was able to launch sea and anti-ship missiles. The Dutch-made, 47-meter (155-foot) vessel was in service since 1988 and had capacity of 40 tons. It usually carries a crew of 20 sailors.

Iran towed the Konarak into a nearby naval base after the strike.

Iran regularly holds exercises in the region, which is close to the strategic Strait of Hormuz, the narrow mouth of the Persian Gulf through which 20% of the world’s oil passes.

Iranian media rarely report on mishaps during exercises by the country’s armed forces, signaling the severity of the incident.

It marks the second serious incident involving a misfired missile by Iran’s armed forces this year. In January, after attacking U.S. forces in Iraq with ballistic missiles, Iran’s paramilitary Revolutionary Guard accidentally shot down a Ukrainian jetliner, killing all 176 people on board.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Aditya_V » 12 May 2020 10:46

There a similarity between Iran and Turkey, like Pakistan they are Big into H&D, they repaint a lot of imported system and claim miracle developments. A lot of posters see these claims and berate Or self flagalate against India.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Lisa » 12 May 2020 18:23

Rony wrote:Iranian Missile Accidentally Hits One of Its Own Ships, Killing 19 Sailors and wounding 15

Iranian media said the Konarak had been overhauled in 2018 and was able to launch sea and anti-ship missiles. The Dutch-made, 47-meter (155-foot) vessel was in service since 1988 and had capacity of 40 tons. It usually carries a crew of 20 sailors.



This missile could not sink a 40 ton boat! And we have had posters on this forum comparing Iranian defence industry with Indian, wow.

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Rony » 12 May 2020 18:55

That missile is either Chinese C-802 anti-ship cruise missile which china exported to Iran or it could be the Iranian Noor missile which is the reverse engineered Chinese C-802.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noor_(missile)

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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Rony » 13 May 2020 02:11

'They Were Laughing': Iranian Border Guards Accused Of Torturing, Drowning Afghan Migrants

To escape war and poverty, Shah Wali left his village in northwestern Afghanistan in search of a better life in neighboring Iran.

As the 28-year-old set off on his journey, he was gripped by fear.

Iranian border guards beat, shot at, and even killed Afghan migrants who illegally crossed the border. And even if he reached Iran, he would be subjected to the violence and injustice suffered by many members of Iran’s sizable Afghan community.

But for Wali, it was worth the risk.

Even if he earned a meager living, he would be able to send money back home to his impoverished family in Afghanistan’s Faryab Province, a poor, remote region that has long been the scene of intense fighting between the Islamic extremist Taliban group and Afghan government forces.

Soon after crossing into Iran last week, Wali’s fears were realized.

He was among dozens of Afghan migrants who were illegally smuggled into Iran from the Gulran district in Afghanistan’s Herat Province, located along the border with Iran. But after crossing the 900-kilometer border on May 1, he said the group of around 50 Afghans were stopped and detained by Iranian border guards.

For the next several hours, they were questioned, repeatedly beaten, and then tortured. The guards, he said, then transported the group by bus to the banks of the Harirud, a 1,100-kilometer-long river shared by Afghanistan, Iran, and Turkmenistan.

"After torturing us, Iranian border guards fired their guns and ordered all of us to jump into the river,” Wali told RFE/RL.

"While we were struggling for our lives and drowning in the river, they were laughing," he said.

The river took them downstream toward Afghanistan.

Wali said he and 11 others swam to safety. He said 23 others drowned. He helped retrieve the bodies of seven of them.

Afghan authorities on May 2 launched an investigation into the claims and started a hunt to retrieve the bodies of the many still missing. Officials said there were 70 Afghans in the group.

Afghan health officials said they had so far received the bodies of 12 Afghan migrants, saying most had drowned.

On May 3, Abbas Musavi, a spokesman for Iran's Foreign Ministry, denied the "incident" took place on Iranian soil, although he added that Tehran had launched an investigation into the claims.

But Afghan officials pointed the finger at Iran, with which Afghanistan has deep cultural, linguistic, and historical ties.

Abdul Ghani Noori, governor of Herat's Gulran district, accused Iranian security forces of beating the Afghan migrants with shovels before sending them into the river.

Herat Governor Sayed Wahid Qatali blamed Iranian security forces in a tweet on May 3.

"Our people, who you put in the river, were not Osama [bin Laden]. One day we will settle this."

Ambar
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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Ambar » 13 May 2020 04:11

See the difference ? The barbarity meted out from one ummah nation and sect on members of another ummah nation and sect barely makes the news, where as India passing a constitutionally approved legislation to its nationality laws to help minorities in distress makes international news for days ! The Chinese learned this in the early days of communism and have an iron grip on media, where as in India it is free for all while comically and preposterously the yellow media slanderously maligns India while crying "free media in danger! freedom in danger" at the same time !

sanjaykumar
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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby sanjaykumar » 13 May 2020 05:05

Relax, until Indian media learns to ask the pertinent questions, why get excited?

Questions such as:


Which Islamic country should India model its minority legislation on?

Why should Kashmir not be as free as Texas, California are from the Spanish? Michael Kugelman of the Wilson Center can answer this question.

Can India treat its Daleeets with impunity as is the case for 'jogging whilst black?' If not why not?

Can Hindus issue a requerimiento on its own territory? If not do the foreign lands that were free of the Pope have the right to correct that historical experience?

I do not expect answers until the Indian GDP is 10 times larger than today. It's merely third world fatuous postulations at the moment.

Rony
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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Rony » 22 May 2020 05:14

Iranian opposition Mujahedin-e Khalq reporting over 43,300 covid deaths across Iran. The official death count declared by the mullah govt is 7,249.

Iran coronavirus update : Over 43,300 deaths, 10,000 medical staff members infected


Iranian MP: We gave $20-30 billion to Syria

“When I went to Syria, some complained that I had caused expenses, but I will say this again: We may have given $20-30 billion to Syria. The money of this people was spent there,” Falahatpisheh said.

When Falahatpisheh was the chairman of the Security Commission, he led a parliamentary delegation to Syria, where he met with Emad Khamis, the Prime Minister of the Assad regime.

The Iranian regime has been entrenched in the Syrian war since it broke out in 2011. In addition to financial support, Tehran has been sending a constant flow of weapons and armed forces to the country to prevent the overthrow of its ally Bashar al-Assad. According to the estimates made by the Iranian Resistance, the mullahs’ regime may have spent up to $100 billion on the Syrian war.

Regarding the increase in price of gasoline, which caused mass protests across Iran in November, Falahatpisheh said, “How many economic problems do we have in the country? The increase in gasoline prices generates 2 trillion rials per day. This is the average revenue generated by the increase in gasoline prices and selling the surplus to other countries. We can distribute this 200 trillion rial to the provinces to solve their problems. This is just part of the revenue.”

The remarks are published at a time that the regime has lifted coronavirus quarantines and is forcing the people to go back to work, claiming that the government does not have the financial means to support continued lockdowns. The reopening of the economy has caused a sudden surge in COVID-19 cases across the country and has returned several provinces into critical conditions.

“In the budget, oil revenue equals to a fourth of the share of taxes. This means that in reality, it is the people who are paying for the country’s expenses. And this is a country that is sitting on a sea of oil,” Falahatpisheh said. “If we consider all of this, it means that we have the necessary budget to solve the country’s economic problems, that is, if the budget is not spent on other things.”

Rony
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Re: Iran News and Discussions

Postby Rony » 23 May 2020 05:36

The Twilight of the Iranian Revolution

Two days before the election, on February 19th, the Iranian government finally announced that two citizens had died of the coronavirus. In the Tehran newsroom, bitter laughter broke out. “We reported deaths before we even reported any infections,” the reporter told me. “But that’s life in the Islamic Republic.” By then, hundreds of sick patients were crowding the hospital in Gorgan. So many bodies piled up that a local cemetery hired a backhoe to dig graves. “It was worse than treating soldiers on a battlefield,” the second doctor said.

Soon, Iran became a global center of the coronavirus, with nearly seventy thousand reported cases and four thousand deaths. But the government maintained tight control over information; according to a leaked official document, the Revolutionary Guard ordered hospitals to hand over death tallies before releasing them to the public. “We were burying three to four to five times as many people as the Ministry of Health was reporting,” Azad said. “We could have dealt with this—we could have quarantined earlier, we could have taken precautions like the ones the Chinese did in Wuhan—if we had not been kept in the dark.” On February 24th, Iraj Harirchi, the deputy health minister, appeared at a press conference and denied covering up the scale of infections. He looked pale and flustered, and he repeatedly wiped sweat from his brow. The next day, he, too, tested positive.

In mid-March, the Washington Post published satellite photos of newly dug mass graves. A few weeks later, inmates rioted at prisons across the country, terrified that they were trapped with the virus, and guards opened fire, killing at least thirty-five. As the pandemic devastated an economy already weakened by sanctions, Iran asked the International Monetary Fund for an emergency loan of five billion dollars. It was the first time in nearly sixty years that the government had appealed to the I.M.F., which it has historically described as a tool of U.S. hegemony.

With the country spasming, Ali Khamenei, the Supreme Leader of Iran’s theocratic system, suggested that the United States and its allies had deployed a biological weapon. “Americans are being accused of creating this virus,” he said, during a speech in March. “There are enemies who are demons, and there are enemies who are humans, and they help one another. The intelligence services of many countries coöperate with one another against us.”

Even as Khamenei spoke, the virus was spreading to the highest levels of the regime, which is heavily populated by elderly men. At least fifty clerics and political figures were infected, and at least twenty died. The Supreme Leader was said to be closed off from most human contact, but his inner circle was still susceptible; two vice-presidents and three of his closest advisers fell ill. The virus, which seemed able to reach anyone, sharpened a sense of crisis among ordinary Iranians. Khamenei, who has led the country since 1989, is eighty years old and a prostate-cancer survivor, rumored to be in poor health. What will become of the country when he dies?

My host told me that the country has reached a decisive phase. Public confidence in the theocratic system—installed after the Iranian Revolution, in 1979—has collapsed. Soon after Khamenei took power, he promised Iranians that the revolution would “lead the country on the path of material growth and progress.” Instead, Iran’s ruling clerics have left the country economically hobbled and largely cut off from the rest of the world. The sanctions imposed by the United States in 2018, after President Trump abrogated the nuclear agreement between the two countries, have aggravated those failures and intensified the corruption of the governing élite. “I would say eighty-five per cent of the population hates the current system,” my host said. “But the system is incapable of reforming itself.”

Speculation about Khamenei’s longevity is rampant in the senior levels of government and the military. “The struggle to succeed him has already begun,” my host said. But Khamenei has spent decades placing loyalists throughout the country’s major institutions, building a system that serves and protects him. “Khamenei is like the sun, and the solar system orbits around him,” he told me. “This is my worry: What happens when you take the sun out of the solar system? Chaos.”

his February 11th, the forty-first anniversary of the revolution, a celebration was scheduled for downtown Tehran. I was at a restaurant in the city that morning, when a waitress overheard me discussing plans to attend. “You’re going?” she asked with a sneer. “They force people to be there—they blackmail them. They tell people that if they don’t go they will lose their jobs.”

As a reporter for a newspaper called Hamshahri, he wrote a series detailing how businessmen and senior government officials exploited the country’s closed market to enrich themselves. One memorable article asked why nearly all of Iran’s chadors—the head-to-toe cloaks worn by most women—were imported. “The reason for this,” he told me, “is that powerful people, in the government and out, get rich from the imports and by blocking competition.”

During the Green Movement, the Guard and its plainclothes militia, known as the Basij, were instrumental in crushing dissent. According to Abbas Milani, the director of the Iranian Studies program at Stanford and a former political prisoner in Iran, the uprising amounted to a political anointment. “Clearly, the regime believed it was going to lose control, and the I.R.G.C. and the Basij saved the day,” Milani said. “The result is that the I.R.G.C. now has the upper hand. Khamenei knows that without the I.R.G.C. he’d be out of a job in twenty-four hours.”

The most visible symbol of the I.R.G.C.’s strength is the Basij, whose members can be seen on street corners in every Iranian city. A less visible measure is its manipulation of the economy. When the clerics took hold, after the revolution, they secured control of large sectors of the economy, including oil production, factories, and ports. During the next two decades, an array of state-owned enterprises were privatized—but, rather than going to skilled businesspeople, many of them were acquired by the I.R.G.C. and its associates. Today, elements of the Guard are thought to own construction companies, oil refineries, and mines, along with a nineteen-story luxury mall in a posh neighborhood of Tehran. No one is entirely sure how much of the economy the group controls; credible estimates range from ten per cent to more than fifty. One indication of its wealth came in 2009, when its investment arm paid $7.8 billion for a majority stake in the Telecommunication Company of Iran; the I.R.G.C.’s total budget, on paper, was only five billion. In Iranian society, the Guard has grown into an untouchable élite. “They have their own schools, their own markets, their own neighborhoods, their own resorts,” a former senior Middle Eastern intelligence officer told me. “The neighborhoods look like a carbon copy of Beverly Hills.”

But sanctions imposed by the West had a perverse effect. Because few countries could trade with Iran, the businesses that the I.R.G.C. controlled came to exercise near-monopolies within the country. As the U.S. and its allies policed international shipping, the I.R.G.C. tightened its hold on the sea-lanes and the airports, where oil smuggling and drug trafficking were flourishing.

The Baktiyaris were sick of the revolution, even though Pouya’s father had fought in the Revolutionary Guard for five years during the Iran-Iraq War. Pouya, who was hoping to marry soon and build a life, loathed it most. “Pouya loved poetry and nature—he saw beauty in everything,” Nahid told me. “He also loved history, and he used to say these clerics have ruined our country. He used to say, ‘We’ve never had such a terrible time, ever, in our history.’ ” The protests quickly became an outlet for broader frustrations. “We can see that the government is spending our money on other countries, sending it to Hamas, to Syria and Hezbollah,” Nahid said. “The protests weren’t about gasoline. They were about protesting the same bunch of people in charge for forty years, deliberately seeking a fight with the U.S. It is these people who have turned Iran into a pariah state. We cannot have any fun—Iran is a joyless religious dictatorship. We are forced into fake identities.”

The November demonstrations were remarkably distinct from those in 2009. The earlier protests were led by the middle class and by university students, and took place largely in major cities. The more recent demonstrations were begun by workers, the regime’s traditional base, and spread rapidly throughout the country. They also turned violent; in many cities, demonstrators burned stores and trashed police stations. “The 2009 protests showed that the regime had lost the middle class,” a shop owner who witnessed protests in his Tehran suburb told me. “The protests in November show that they’ve lost the working class, too.”

The regime struck back brutally. “It happened very fast,” a Western diplomat in Tehran told me. “The government switched off the phones and the Internet and responded massively—and the whole thing was over in three days. I think the regime was genuinely afraid.” Iranian authorities confirmed that some seven thousand people had been arrested, but they have not disclosed the number of civilians killed. Amnesty International estimated the death toll at three hundred; Reuters, citing unnamed officials close to Khamenei, put the number at fifteen hundred.


In a nearly unprecedented sign of unrest, the demonstrators began to fight back. According to Iranian news accounts, at least six police officers and soldiers were killed, apparently by protesters. Four of them were shot to death, even though civilians are largely forbidden to have guns; others were stabbed. Security forces encountered resistance in such areas as Kurdistan and Khuzestan, which border neighboring countries. A YouTube video, purportedly taken in Khuzestan, shows security forces shooting civilians as they flee into a marsh. “That suggests there is some kind of organized resistance,” Ali Alfoneh, a senior fellow at the Arab Gulf States Institute, in Washington, said. “Ordinary civilians don’t hide in a marsh.”

Away from direct confrontation with the Islamic Republic, Iranians carry on a parallel existence. It is a crime for women to leave the house without a hijab, but, in the well-off sections of northern Tehran, it is not uncommon to spot women walking down the street with their hair defiantly exposed. So many areas of private life fall under the state’s purview that flouting the law is hard to avoid. In 2014, six Iranian men and women recorded themselves dancing to Pharrell Williams’s song “Happy,” and posted the video on YouTube, with the title “Happy We Are from Tehran.” The authorities arrested them for violating laws that prohibit dancing with the opposite sex. They were sentenced to a year in prison and ninety-one lashes apiece.

At times during my visit, Tehran reminded me of Eastern Europe in the eighties, when ordinary people, constrained by a sclerotic communist system, coped by living as if the state did not exist. One night, I attended a dinner party in a middle-class neighborhood of Tehran. Iranian music drifted from the stereo. Women wore skirts and leather boots, their hair uncovered. Bottles of arrack and wine, homemade but delicious, were arrayed on a table. One of the men told me that illicit parties were so common that he had been making a living as a d.j. Almost every party received a visit from a police officer, who said, usually with a wink, that the music was too loud. “I give him some money, and he goes away,” the man told me. Another man complained about the daily struggle of making his business work in an unpredictable and corrupt system, with chronic shortages of material and unruly inspectors pushing for bribes. “Plan for the next quarter?” he said. “I can’t plan for tomorrow morning.” In Iran, some of the most intense unrest comes from frustration with the regime’s intrusions into private life.

Several Iran experts in the U.S. told me that they believed the regime might resume negotiations after the Presidential elections this fall. Their reasons for optimism varied. Some argued that, if Trump lost, the nuclear deal could be revived; others said that, if Trump won, Khamenei would have no choice but to negotiate. Iranian officials rejected both scenarios, telling me that the Supreme Leader would never again make a deal. “The United States can’t be counted on to keep its word,” Mohammad Marandi, a professor at Tehran University, told me.

Over time, there have been hints that the regime is maintaining covert capabilities. The most recent ones surfaced in 2018, after Mossad, the Israeli intelligence agency, carried out a brazen plot to steal nuclear secrets from a secure warehouse in Tehran. Arriving in a semi truck before midnight, a team of agents broke into the facility and, using high-intensity torches, cut open safes. For six hours, they carted off documents and CDs, leaving just before an armed guard was due to begin his morning shift. According to a former senior U.S. intelligence official, the Iranian military launched an enormous dragnet operation, but the Israelis escaped across the border into Azerbaijan. Another former intelligence official told me that several members of Iran’s security forces were arrested afterward. “There was a big purge,” he said.

When reports of the raid emerged, Iranian officials said that the whole thing was a hoax, and that the documents were phony. The Israelis maintain that “the archive,” as they call it, was a history of Iran’s nuclear-weapons program until 2003, when the regime claimed to have largely suspended it. According to a Western expert, the documents detailed the existence of two nuclear sites that had been hidden from inspectors; one had produced uranium hexafluoride, a material used in the enrichment process, and the other was a facility for testing weapons components. Western officials couldn’t determine whether the sites were active, but, when international inspectors, alerted by the Israelis, asked to visit them, the Iranians refused—and razed the testing facility. “There was a rush to clean up the site,” the expert told me.

Last spring, Iran announced that it was abandoning the constraints imposed by the nuclear agreement, and stepped up its enrichment of uranium. A Western official who tracks the program told me that, at the current rate, the Iranians could have enough enriched material for a bomb in less than seven months. David Albright, the president of the Institute for Science and International Security, estimates that it could take half that long. Constructing a sophisticated weapon with the enriched uranium would likely require twelve to eighteen months more. A crude device could be ready to test much sooner, though—perhaps in the Iranian desert. Such a device probably couldn’t be launched at an enemy, and would likely use much of the enriched uranium that Iran has. But, the Western official said, “the world would suddenly look quite different.”

Thus far, Iranian leaders apparently have not begun working to weaponize a nuclear device.
Yet the uncertainty has refocussed Western intelligence analysts on a pressing question: Will Khamenei decide to build a weapon?

Most analysts I spoke to believe that he will not, unless the regime faces an existential threat from outside the country. But if he dies? “The day he’s gone, then I think all options are on the table,” the Western official said.

Khamenei’s first choice is likely to be his son, Mojtaba, a cleric in Tehran. In recent years, Khamenei has elevated Mojtaba’s profile and given him more responsibility in overseeing the government. [b]But many Iranians believe that, after Khamenei departs, the I.R.G.C. will become enmeshed in selecting a new Supreme Leader.[/b] Some expect the Guard to try to rule outright. Several former commanders have already assumed prominent political roles, aided by the institution’s ability to spend its vast resources on favored candidates. “The I.R.G.C. is not going to take over all of a sudden,” Alfoneh, of the Arab Gulf States Institute, said. “It’s a slow-motion coup that’s been in the works for years.”

Most people I spoke with believed that the Guard would maintain a façade of clerical rule. Ebrahim Raisi, Iran’s Chief Justice, is frequently mentioned as a candidate.

Still, some Iranians believe that many of the I.R.G.C.’s senior officers want to steer the country in a direction closer to that of China: strict politics, but a freer market. The reformist leader I spoke to, who is in touch with several I.R.G.C. officers, believed that one of the generals would ultimately emerge as a benevolent strongman—“our Napoleon”—to guide Iran toward greater prosperity. The government would be run by technocrats, not clerics, and the generals would loosen controls on freedom of speech and dress. “They want to reach out to the middle class,” he said. “Think about it: the moment they get the clerics out of government, they would be incredibly popular.”

That prediction struck many Western experts as overly optimistic. The reform-minded officers inside the I.R.G.C. probably make up only one of several factions, which exist in a state of internal rivalry and dissension. If those factions are unable to agree on a Supreme Leader, then the process could go out of control.
“I think the selection of a new leader needs to happen quickly—it’s a twenty-four-hour thing,” a Western diplomat in Tehran told me.

Even as Iranians speculate about who will succeed Khamenei, many believe that, whoever becomes Supreme Leader, the revolution is no longer salvageable.

Isolated and dysfunctional, the Islamic Republic had reached a dead end, she said: “The regime has lost all popular support, and yet it is incapable of change. The result is that the Iranian people have lost hope. We are hopeless now.”


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