India and Japan: News and Discussion

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member_19686
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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby member_19686 » 11 Jul 2014 16:16

Very good to see that Japanese are still resisting immigration and would like to keep Japan, actually Japanese.

They have done themselves a massive favor by not importing a permanent problem for a temporary one.

And "Indians" will of course include the massive numbers of One God followers. They don't need Owaisi's & John Dayal's in Japan, they already have enough MacArthur putra's.

Recent benefit of immigration:
2ch netizens have been shocked by the news that a Saudi Arabian man who is a graduate student at one of Japan’s most prestigious universities had been arrested for smashing Buddhist statues after he was reported to police for doing so at one of Tokyo’s major temples.

The man, a student at Keio University, admitted the smashing Buddhas at Sensoji Temple and hinted that he had been responsible for other, similar crimes.

The story, filed under “crimes by foreigners” by Sankei MSN, has prompted some responses that relate to fears of an increasing foreign presence in Japan, while others have pointed out that idolatry in all forms is forbidden in Islam, and might therefore have prompted the man’s behavior.

At around 1:10am on June 11, there was a call to a police box of the Asakusa division of the Metropolitan Police that stated “a foreign man has smashed a statue of Buddha” at Sensoji Temple, Taito ward, Tokyo. In the grounds of the temple, police also discovered four other statues of Buddha that had cracks in them. When the man, who had been close to Sensoji’s main hall, was voluntarily questioned by police, he admitted damaging the statues of Buddha. Therefore, he was arrested on suspicion of criminal damage.

The arrested man is Saudi Arabian national Mohammad Abdullah Saad (31), a graduate student at Keio University resident in Minamikase, Saiwai ward, Kawasaki City. The man is said to have hinted that he “has smashed Buddhas at other temples”, and police are in the process of confirming this.

In the small hours of June 11, the suspect allegedly smashed three stone Jizo bosatsu and one bronze statue of Kannon.

According to police, the statues of Buddha that were damaged were those in small wayside shrines without doors and those in the open air.

Comments from 2ch.net:

エルボードロップ(WiMAX)@\(^o^)/:

This is an Islamic jihad.

ミッドナイトエクスプレス(京都府)@\(^o^)/:

Islam, huh? If you’re going to be an iconoclast, do it in your own country, scum.

ブラディサンデー(東京都)@\(^o^)/:

So another Islamic native trying to destroy culture in another country, huh.

断崖式ニードロップ(広島県)@\(^o^)/:

Why did he do it?

シャイニングウィザード(沖縄県)@\(^o^)/: [in response to above]

In Islam, idols are forbidden because statues and pictures of people are pretending to be God.
There are also examples of historical cultural treasures being destroyed by fundamentalists.

超竜ボム(神奈川県)@\(^o^)/:

It’s because of stuff like this that monotheistic religions are scum.

ドラゴンスープレックス(愛知県)@\(^o^)/:

Damn…

張り手(静岡県)@\(^o^)/:

What the ******!!

ショルダーアームブリーカー(東京都)@\(^o^)/:

Go home!
Don’t come over here and break things that are precious to Japanese people!


稲妻レッグラリアット(やわらか銀行)@\(^o^)/:

Muslims, don’t come to Japan.

ジャーマンスープレックス(dion軍)@\(^o^)/:

He’s supposed to be so clever, why did he do something that would get him punished?

ムーンサルトプレス(京都府)@\(^o^)/:

What the hell did scum like him come to Japan to learn?
If you can’t escape your native roots, then quit being a student.

メンマ(東京都)@\(^o^)/:

Banish him from the country.

キドクラッチ(dion軍)@\(^o^)/:

I bet that he’s an Islamic fundamentalist terrorist, or maybe a wannabe.
I suppose Japan is going to be full of guys like him one day.

エメラルドフロウジョン(大阪府)@\(^o^)/:

If this had been in an Islamic country, he’d get the death sentence.
Japanese are too tolerant.


http://www.japancrush.com/2014/stories/ ... nsoji.html

One more benefit:


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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 15 Jul 2014 12:06

Japan slides to a distant date in Modi's calendar - Suhasini Haider, The Hindu
After postponing his trip to Japan scheduled for July 3, Prime Minister Narendra Modi is zeroing in on a date two months later, in early September, The Hindu has learnt. Sources said the visit had to be delayed because of difficulties in matching Mr. Modi’s schedule and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s schedule, pushing back the proposed “paradigm shift” in ties when the two leaders meet.

Expected much earlier

Mr. Modi’s visit to Japan had been expected to come much earlier, given the warm personal ties he reportedly shares with Mr. Abe. India and Japan are on the verge of a civil nuclear cooperation agreement, major naval exercises, as well as a slew of infrastructural joint ventures, and Mr. Abe had set the ball rolling for an intense period of engagement when he came to India as the chief guest for the Republic Day this year.

Mr. Abe was also one of the first leaders to call Mr. Modi when he won the election in May, and during the conversation via teleconferencing,

Mr. Modi is understood to have promised that he would make Japan his first bilateral visit, a visit scheduled for the first week of July. The schedule was first reported in the Japanese media, and picked up widely in Japan and China.

When Mr. Modi decided to visit Bhutan first, as a mark of his commitment to sub-continental neighbours, Japan was still expected to be his first big international foray.

However, on June 18, after a pre-budget Cabinet meeting, Mr. Modi wrote to Mr. Abe, apologising for having to put off his Japan visit, owing to parliamentary commitments.

The decision didn’t go down well in Tokyo, given that preparations for the trip were already under way and news of the postponement had reached the Japanese Foreign Ministry not through official channels, but via news agency reports.


The undercurrent of high-level meetings with Japan’s rival China, including their Foreign Minister Wang Yi’s visit to New Delhi, and Mr. Modi’s big-ticket meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Brazil, have also been commented in the Japanese media.

Shortly after Mr. Modi’s decision, Japan called off the Indo-U.S.-Japan trilateral meeting scheduled for June 23 in New Delhi, although officials maintained it was an unconnected event.

Mr. Modi’s letter to Mr. Abe went some way in smoothing ruffled feelings and came with the promise of making the visit shortly after the Budget session of Parliament ends. However, Mr. Abe has a crowded schedule as he will be touring Australia and New Zealand this week. He will be heading to South America in July end, early August for a marathon five-nation tour there.

The Hindu has learnt that Mr. Modi had also considered visiting Japan around August 6, and paying respects at the Peace Memorial Park at Hiroshima on the anniversary of the bombing. However, after many back and forth negotiations between diplomats, it seems Mr. Modi will only make the trip in early September.

By that time, he would have met more than a dozen other world leaders, including SAARC and BRICS leaders and South American heads of State, not including the near-meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel that was put off due to the football World Cup.


On the whole, Modi has handled the Japan trip shabbily.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 19 Jul 2014 19:13

Japanese Ship Kojima arrives in Kochi - S. Anandan, The Hindu
Japanese Coast Guard’s training ship Kojima arrived at the port here on Friday for a two-day visit.

The vessel, which is on an around-the-world oceanic training cruise with 39 post-graduate trainees from its Coast Guard Academy at Kure, has a complement of 89 personnel. Captain Tetsushi Mitsuya, commanding officer of Kojima, called on Deputy Inspector General T.K.S. Chandran, District Commander of the Indian Coast Guard.

The Indian Coast Guard, in a press release, said personnel of both Coast Guards would exchange views and methods on anti-piracy, search and rescue, and pollution response during the vessel’s stay in Kochi. They had a game of volleyball on Friday. Trainees at the Indian Coast Guard Training Centre at Kochi would have an opportunity to interact with their counterparts in the Japanese Coast Guard.

Indian Coast Guard trainees would visit Kojima and trainees of the Japanese Coast Guard would go on board Indian Coast Guard vessel Samar. Japanese Coast Guard personnel are slated to meet city Mayor Tony Chammany and Cochin Port Trust chairman Paul Antony.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 20 Jul 2014 15:57

Few biting so far on sweet visa deal by Japan - Japan Times
Desperate to reinvigorate the long-stalled economy, the government has spent the past two years cozying up to highly skilled foreign workers through a batch of visa perks. There’s just one problem: few have been wooed.

Hoping to change that, the government passed a bill through the Diet in June to revise the Immigration Law, giving skilled foreigners a new visa status that allows them to stay indefinitely and with a broadened roster of privileges.

“Launching a new visa specifically designed for them means a lot, because that shows the world Japan is becoming more serious than ever about accepting those skilled foreigners,” said Immigration Bureau official Nobuko Fukuhara.

Questions remain, however, over whether creating the new visa alone will encourage more foreigners to move to Japan. Experts say little will change unless Japan brings its corporate culture more in line with global standards and reinvents itself as a place more foreigners would want to live in.

Under the current system, foreigners who earn more than 70 points in a government-designated evaluation system, based on criteria such as annual income, academic background and language skills, can stay in Japan under a “designated activities” visa status for five years.

During that time, they are granted a series of perks, including a fast track to permanent residency, working visa status for their spouses and the right to bring along their parents and housekeepers.

At the end of five years, they can switch to permanent residency, but would lose all the visa privileges they have enjoyed up to that point.

Since its launch in May 2012, the government-sponsored initiative to attract so-called highly skilled foreigners has trodden a rocky road. It kicked off with a grand goal of 2,000 registrants per year, but as of April 30, almost two years after its start, only 1,276 people were deemed eligible.

Of them, only 59 ended up using the program to enter the country as of the end of March, according to the Justice Ministry’s Immigration Bureau, which oversees the program.

Meanwhile, under the revised law, which will take effect next April, foreigners who qualify for the points-based program could get a quasi-permanent residency visa status after three years, instead of the current five. Tentatively titled “highly skilled professionals,” people with this new visa could not only to stay in Japan indefinitely like permanent residents, but remain eligible for the perks for as long as they live here.

But there’s a catch. While permanent residents can do as they like, including nothing, those designated highly skilled professionals would have to keep working. In other words, they can’t stay if they get fired or retire. They will lose their privileged visa if they remain inactive for more than six months.

What’s more, Eriko Suzuki, an associate professor at Kokushikan University, says the visa perks themselves are restrictive. For example, while guaranteed the right to bring along their parents, the way the rule stands they must be the baby sitters of their grandchildren, up to age 7. This means they’ll have to leave once their child-rearing duties have ended.

“The implication is that the government doesn’t want those foreign parents to burden its social welfare system,” she said.

The bigger problem, Suzuki points out, is the overall unattractiveness of Japan’s corporate climate. Gender inequality, a deeply ingrained “organization-first” mindset and a tendency to overwork employees are all hallmarks of Japan’s corporations that repel most foreigners.

Wage systems are also different. However talented those foreigners might be, Suzuki predicts few employers would dare to pay them any better than long-term Japanese employees.

Making the working environment more foreigner-friendly is also high on the government’s agenda.

Several government ministries will work together to “identify problems regarding Japan’s lifestyles and working environments” and hash out solutions by the end of this fiscal year, the government’s growth strategies released in June said of the highly skilled foreigner program.

The Japanese government aims to lure 5,000 highly skilled foreigners by 2017.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 23 Jul 2014 19:50

Malabar Exercise to start from tomorrow - ToI
Warships, submarines, aircraft and helicopters of India, US and Japan have gathered in the north-western Pacific as the three nations get ready to kick off their trilateral Malabar naval exercise from Thursday.

"Malabar is a complex, high-end exercise designed to enhance maritime cooperation and interoperability among the participating navies," said a senior officer on Wednesday.

This is the third time that Japan is taking part in the Malabar naval manoeuvers, which India and the US have been holding regularly every year since 1992 except for a brief interregnum after the 1998 Pokhran II nuclear tests.

As reported by TOI earlier, India had invited Japan to participate in this year's Malabar war games, which have ruffled the feathers of a prickly China in the past, during PM Shinzo Abe's visit to New Delhiin January.

India has largely restricted the Malabar exercise to a bilateral one with the US after China protested against its 2007 edition in the Bay of Bengal, since they were expanded to include the Australian, Japanese and Singaporean navies as well.

Both India and Japan are wary of China's growing military might and increasing assertive behavior in the Asia Pacific. Given his keenness to further bolster the bilateral strategic partnership with Japan, Prime Minister Narendra Modi is likely to visit Tokyo soon. India, however, does not want to be dragged into the escalating power play between the US, Japan and others on one side and China on the other in the region.

Three Indian warships, guided-missile destroyer INS Ranvijay, stealth frigate INS Shivalik and tanker INS Shakti, along with their Kamov-28 and Chetak helicopters, entered the Japanese Sasebo port on Wednesday.

The "harbour phase" of the exercise will be undertaken from July 24 to July 26, while the "sea phase" from July 27 to July 30.

The US is being represented by its nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS George Washington, Ticonderoga-class destroyer USS Shiloh, Arleigh Burke-class destroyer John S McCain and nuclear submarine USS Columbus, apart from P-3 Orion aircraft and MH-60R helicopters, in the war games.

Japan, in turn, has fielded its destroyers, JS Kurama and JS Ashigara, as well as the US-2i ShinMaywa amphibious aircraft, which it is keen to sell to India.

"This is the 18th edition of the Malabar exercise, which will include carrier strike operations, surface and anti-submarine warfare, as also VBSS (visit, board, search and seizure) operations.Japan has earlier taken part in the 2007 and 2009 editions," said the officer.

The Indian warships, on a long overseas deployment under the command of fleet commander Rear Admiral Atul Kumar Jain, had taken part in the 'Indra' exercise with Russia off Vladivostok earlier this month.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 24 Jul 2014 10:07

Modi's bilateral meetings to focus on nuclear deals - Suhasini Haider, The Hindu
Prime Minister Narendra Modi will have a blitz of bilateral talks come September, with focus on nuclear energy in each of the crucial meetings planned. Sources have confirmed to The Hindu that Mr. Modi is expected to travel to Japan on August 31 . . . . At each of these meetings, The Hindu has learnt, nuclear issues will be prominent on the agenda and key to India’s pitch for membership of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), that the 48-member NSG has so far not accepted.

India renewed its bid for the NSG membership when the board met in June and ratified an additional protocol with the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) for oversight of two more reactors.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby rajrang » 29 Jul 2014 18:06

SSridhar wrote:
On the whole, Modi has handled the Japan trip shabbily.


I agree. I hope this is not a harbinger of poor judgment on foreign policy by the new government. However, it is too early to entertain such a worry.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby RoyG » 29 Jul 2014 20:10

Japan is a buddhist nation, faces a common security threat, and can give India high technology. He wants to get it right. Postponing is critical because it will give him more time to better gauge what he needs and what he can bring to the table. He didn't goof up.


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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 30 Jul 2014 20:22

RoyG wrote: He didn't goof up.

Then the MEA need not have announced the visit.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby ramana » 30 Jul 2014 20:30

SS, Maybe NaMo is seeing the non-independence of Japan in the geo-politics and making up his mind.
We dont know what transpired in the BRICS meetings.
BRICS are there with India while Japan maybe one day.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Avarachan » 30 Jul 2014 23:01

ramana wrote:SS, Maybe NaMo is seeing the non-independence of Japan in the geo-politics and making up his mind.
We dont know what transpired in the BRICS meetings.
BRICS are there with India while Japan maybe one day.


+1. I've heard that Japan doesn't really want to go along with the Western sanctions against Russia, but it has no choice. In this way, dealing with Japan isn't essentially different from dealing with Germany. Neither of them is free to chart a truly independent course. I imagine that both of their establishments have been thoroughly penetrated at the highest levels.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Cosmo_R » 31 Jul 2014 00:20

The Japan trip was postponed mainly because there is work to be done on the desired outcomes: Nukes, the industrial corridors etc. They want big announcements on actionable items. Note Modi still goes to Japan before Li Xinping comes to India and it is still before meeting with Obama.

The Japanese are eager and we should not be overeager.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Rony » 31 Jul 2014 05:11


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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 31 Jul 2014 06:01

ramana & Avarachan, that's all fine. Nobody wants anything to be rushed up, even though BRICS meeting came much later and it didn't happen suddenly either. Modi can take his time though I believe that that was not the case. Foreign policy decisions are made well ahead of time and do not change dramatically and do not change much with change of regime either. The babus are well versed and would have quickly updated him. Upcoming BRICS, Japan's non-independence etc were all well known. These are not the concern, anyway. All I was saying was that expectations were raised of the first visit being to Japan, the MEA announced the visit, and then it did not take place. Not only that, it wasn't communicated to them also properly. That, in my book, is certainly a goof up, unless it was very chankyan for unknown reasons.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Prem » 31 Jul 2014 06:11

Its good that Indians are taking their time to calculate and inform their friends the price of India's Non Alignment. The offer from Russia China need to be weighed against the offer from US and Japan. Let each of these put up 250-300 Billion Dollar investment in next decade to help India make up her mind.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby KrishnaK » 31 Jul 2014 10:35

ramana wrote:SS, Maybe NaMo is seeing the non-independence of Japan in the geo-politics and making up his mind.
We dont know what transpired in the BRICS meetings.
BRICS are there with India while Japan maybe one day.
Must be BRICS that's investing billions in India's economy while Japan's not ?

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby merlin » 31 Jul 2014 18:44

SSridhar wrote:Foreign policy decisions are made well ahead of time and do not change dramatically and do not change much with change of regime either. The babus are well versed and would have quickly updated him.


According to NVS, the babus are the problem here - Modi and the West

The Indian Foreign Service is scornful about Modi’s efforts to attract investments from Japan, South Korea, etc. and obsesses towards the United States to bail out India.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby rajrang » 31 Jul 2014 19:22

ramana wrote:SS, Maybe NaMo is seeing the non-independence of Japan in the geo-politics and making up his mind.
We dont know what transpired in the BRICS meetings.
BRICS are there with India while Japan maybe one day.



Japan (and the US?) may have been seriously troubled by the "coincidence" here. NaMo meets Xi and shortly thereafter postpones the Japan visit. That may be why Abe postponed the trilateral meeting (US, India, Japan) in retaliation. This would be personal for Abe since he had gone out of the way to attend the Republic Day celebration in India earlier this year. This would be like the US President meets Xi and a few days later postpones a planned visit to India.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 31 Jul 2014 20:43

merlin wrote:According to NVS, the babus are the problem here - Modi and the West

The Indian Foreign Service is scornful about Modi’s efforts to attract investments from Japan, South Korea, etc. and obsesses towards the United States to bail out India.

Of course, NVS is a well respected analyst and has access to information more than we would have. However, if we are worried about Japan not having a foreign policy independent of the US and therefore we are going to the US directly, then something is not adding up.

Besides, past history is not proof of this bureaucratic antipathy to Japan.

During PM Man Mohan Singh’s May 2013 visit to Tokyo, Japan announced ¥71 billion ($699 million) loan for the Mumbai metro line. India and Japan also reached an agreement on using the Japanese bullet train technology for a high-speed connection between Mumbai and Ahmedabad. Japan also offered around 17.7 billion yen to India to build a conference hall and other facilities at the Indian Institute of Technology in Hyderabad, along with around 13 billion yen for the Tamil Nadu state government. During PM Shinzo Abe’s January 2014 visit, several economic and infrastructure-related deals were made. India invited Japan to invest in infrastructure development in the seven North eastern states which are generally out-of-bound for foreign government investments because of their sensitivity. The opportunity is for Japanese companies to especially build roads, and aid agriculture, forestry and water supply and sewerage in these states. Japanese companies have also been invited to help develop a new port in Chennai, which would be used to improve India's sea-route connectivity. Japanese assistance for Chennai port is also aimed at giving teeth to a new sea-based route that would start in Chennai, and end in Dawei port in Myanmar's Tanintharyi region. The development of a new port in Chennai would serve to connect the industrial centres of southern and western India with southeast Asia. In addition, Japan's investment in the Bangalore-Chennai industrial corridor would find easy outlet from Chennai. As part of the trilateral dialogue between India, US and Japan, a trilateral highway linking India, Myanmar and Thailand (the ambitious draw it further to Hanoi, Vietnam) is likely to see more Japanese and US interest. This is an India-led project due for completion in 2016, but by itself, India is unlikely to make the target. India has invited Japan to help her in setting up a huge thermal power plant in Trincomalee, Sri Lanka. India and Japan could also jointly develop the strategically crucial oil terminals in Trincomalee. Joint development is a good approach to resolving the Sri Lankan threat of taking these away from Indian hands after India voted against it in the human rights issue. Japan's JICA also promised to help India's Export-Import Bank develop more attractive funding packages for Indian projects in regional countries.

All these spade work were done in the previous government especially in the latter half of its second term. To me, this belies the antipathy.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 04 Aug 2014 12:45


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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby ramana » 06 Aug 2014 22:23

KrishnaK wrote:
ramana wrote:SS, Maybe NaMo is seeing the non-independence of Japan in the geo-politics and making up his mind.
We dont know what transpired in the BRICS meetings.
BRICS are there with India while Japan maybe one day.
Must be BRICS that's investing billions in India's economy while Japan's not ?



Someone on twitter also took offence to my above post and posted abuse to me.
While BRICS looks like an economic front its more political.
Think in those terms and you might find some gnan.

But if you are Macaulyte cola you wont find any.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 07 Aug 2014 15:51

India’s political, economic potential - Japan Times
The general election in India in May was groundbreaking in many aspects.

It was the world’s largest election, with 550 million out of 830 million eligible voters taking part for a turnout of 66.4 percent, a record high in India, the world’s second most populous country. The election process lasted more than a month, running from April 7 to May 12.

The election saw the National Democratic Alliance, or NDA, led by the Indian Peoples Party, or BJP, win 62 percent of the seats, taking 336 lower house seats out of a possible 543. The BJP alone grabbed more than half the seats, winning 282, a historic victory for the BJP.

Business-focused Narendra Modi of the BJP, known for his strong leadership, became prime minister on May 26, after the party marked its landslide victory when the results were declared on May 16.

What will happen to India and Japan-India diplomacy? Three Japanese academics and an Indian company president delivered presentations and discussed these issues, at a symposium titled “Outline of the Indian General Election and the Prospect of the New Administration: Influence on Japan-India Diplomacy,” organized by the Keizai Koho Center in Tokyo on June 19.


Foreign Ministry’s position

Prior to the discussion, Makita Shimokawa, deputy director-general of the Asian and Oceanian Affairs Bureau at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, spoke about the election and how Japan will deal with the new India.

“Modi (the former chief minister of Gujarat state) has worked on establishing a partnership with Japan in the area of economic development in India. With Modi in the top position, we will accelerate a strategic partnership with India. We would like to help build infrastructure and deregulate in India,” Shimokawa said.

The two countries have already been holding discussions at the high ministerial level and will put even more focus on them, he said. In an example of security collaboration, Japan, India and the U.S. have talked about potential joint military exercises.

Also, India has decided to buy US-2 amphibious aircraft from Japan and the two countries will develop the planes together, he said. Japan will also discuss an alliance on nuclear power generation with India.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs hopes to have Modi visit Japan, with some media reporting that a visit may come in August.


Interpretation of Modi’s manifesto

The first speaker, Hiroshi Sato, a researcher on South Asia, delivered a presentation “Challenges faced by the new administration and domestic politics — interpretation of the Modi manifesto.”

Modi’s manifesto shows his political philosophy has three elements: “Economic Growth,” “One India, Excellent India” and “India First.”

“It’s rare for an Indian prime minister candidate to push economic growth as a campaign pledge,” Sato said, calling Modi’s policy “Neo Hinduism.” Usually, a prime minister candidate opts to appeal to voters by narrowing the wealth-poverty gap, he said.

The manifesto also shows Modi’s appointment of BJP members junior to him as Cabinet members. While he puts the members senior to him at the top right corner on the front page of his manifesto, they are not Cabinet members. That means Modi has established his leadership in the administration, Sato said.

Also, Modi gives the Prime Minister’s Office a great deal of autonomy on political decision making, which also implies he will exercise strong leadership.

He also tries to give individual states, rather than the national government, the authority to undertake economic reforms, Sato said. Such a relationship between the national and state governments is known as “Team India.”

Sato is watching how Modi handles the National Volunteer Organization, or RSS, a charitable, educational, right-wing and volunteer Hindu nationalist group, which helped the BJP with the election.

Some Indians feel that Modi will not have to toe the RSS line because the BJP commands a majority of congress by itself, Sato said.

Where’s Indian diplomacy going?

Takenori Horimoto, who researches contemporary South Asian studies and teaches at Kyoto University and The Open University of Japan, made a presentation titled “What is Indian diplomacy aiming for?”

“In short, I can see from its diplomacy that India wants to be a superpower,” he said.

Horimoto began his presentation by reviewing India’s past diplomatic policy. He said India wanted to be a superpower in the 1990s but its strategy was unclear. In 1993, India began a “Look East” diplomacy policy, a strategy aimed at establishing amicable relationships with Southeast Asia amid the emergence of China as a major regional player. In 1998, India conducted nuclear weapons tests.

“Then, from 2000, it has become clear that India aims to become a superpower through economic growth,” Horimoto said.

He then explained his interpretation of India’s diplomatic goals from three different perspectives: global, regional and subregional.

Globally, India will formulate its diplomatic approach under the assumption that Europe and the U.S. no longer play a central role in international politics, he said.

India wants to increase its diplomatic might to create international order, amid the nonexistence of clear superpowers in the world. Concretely, India will want to strengthen cooperation with China and Russia and do other things to enhance diplomatic infrastructure, such as strengthening its military, he said.

“Becoming a member of U.N. Security Council is one of India’s biggest goals,” he added.

Regionally, in Asia and the Western Pacific, India wants to maintain a “relatively strong position,” he said. He expects India to work toward becoming a large maritime power, he said.

To achieve the goal, India will probably cooperate with the U.S. more and strengthen its Look East policy, politically and economically, especially with Vietnam and Singapore, he said.

Subregionally, in South Asia and around the Indian Ocean, India wants to establish an “absolute power” status. For that, India will carefully monitor Pakistan and China’s moves, as well as those of the Middle East and Africa, he added.

Because Modi has little experience in diplomacy and his BJP has majority of the lower house, he is free to conduct his style of diplomacy, instead of sticking to past practices, Horimoto said.

“A paradigm shift in India’s diplomacy is about to take place,” he said.

New India will try to form an amicable relationship with the U.S. and Japan, meaning the “Japan-India relationship will definitely be better,” he said.

“India will keep a good relationship with China and Russia for Eurasian security and the U.S. and Japan for maritime security,” he said.


Modi’s reform

The third speaker, Masanori Kondo, who teaches at International Christian University, discussed Modi’s various reform plans in his presentation “Review of India’s general election and the direction the new administration takes — influence on the Japan-India relationship.”

Kondo’s presentation first explained why Modi saw such a landslide victory. One of the reasons was that the economy was in bad shape following the global recession that started in 2008, a hike in oil prices, a current account deficit, a weakening rupee and the reduced impact of quantitative easing. People were looking for an economy-savvy leader, he said.

Modi chose the right issues for his election campaign, which were development, anti-corruption and leadership, Kondo said. People gradually began losing faith in the Gandhi family in favor of Modi, he added.

Modi’s media use was also another factor in his landslide victory.

“He was very good at using the media. He frequently used social media such as Youtube,” he said.

Now, Modi is trying to strengthen governance by reducing the number of Cabinet members and increasing the authority of the Prime Minister’s Office, Kondo said.

Rather than increasing taxes, Modi wants to reduce government debt and subsidies, while abolishing or reducing income tax, Kondo said.

Modi is also working to deregulate many industries to revitalize them. This includes making it easy for small companies and foreign companies to enter new markets. Such industries include power generation, transportation, information technology, manufacturing, financing, agriculture, education and others.

Kondo also echoed other speakers in saying the Japan-India relationship will improve.

However, there are some concerns whether Modi’s reforms will be successful. These include potential BJP or RSS opposition; overly high expectations for Modi, which may cause severe backlash over minor setbacks; and bad weather caused by El-Nino may hurt agriculture.

External risks include terrorism, a potential worsening of the situation in Iraq, oil price fluctuations and changes in U.S. financial policy.

Regarding differences between “Abenomics” and “Modinomics,” the former focuses on macroeconomics and the financial industry, while the latter concentrates on microeconomics and governance, he said.

Elephant in the dark

The fourth speaker, Sun and Sands Group President Sanjeev Sinha, delivered a presentation titled “Evolution of Democratic Elements in India: Leading to Current Government.”

“India is like an elephant in the dark. You have a different image of India when you touch different parts of it. India has many religions and regions. It’s very diverse,” Sinha said. Sun and Sands Group is engaged in consulting with respect to overall financial strategy and management in cross-border business between Japan and India.

Indians are also very philosophical. Wealthy or poor, people like discussing God, diplomacy and other topics, he said, adding that the country was successful accepting democracy in 1951 even with just an 18 percent literacy rate.

“Education and media are important for democracy and the two have been strengthened in recent years,” he said.

“In the election, people paid more attention to the economy than to the caste system. Many people now have mobile phones and literacy has gone up quite a bit. The voice of the voter has also become stronger,” he said.

Through the election, the Indian people showed they have become less tolerant of corruption, more aware of other developed countries’ success stories and more proud of their culture. Additionally, they strengthened social values and teamwork, while showing higher awareness of equality and developing higher expectations of the government, he said.

Q&A

The Japan-India Association President Hiroshi Hirabayashi moderated the question and answer session after the presentations.

Hirabayashi asked what will happen to India-Japan diplomacy and India-China diplomacy under Modi’s administration.

Horimoto said it is still unclear, but he thinks Modi will be prudent of diplomacy and treat Japan and China equally.

He added that China is also being prudent with how it deals with India under Modi, as China did not express displeasure with representatives of the exiled Tibetan government at Modi’s inauguration.

Regarding how direct investment in India will change under Modi’s administration, Kondo said the difficulty in doing business in India will not change regardless of Modi’s administration. Sanjeev said Modi has a strong business connection with the U.S. as he cemented it as the chief minister of Gujarat state.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby satya » 07 Aug 2014 16:29

^^^^ Very grounded & realistic assessment of Indian Foreign & Economic Policy under PM Shri. Narendra Modi by Japanese.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby member_19686 » 11 Aug 2014 01:08

A bit of old news but important:
The Japanese monk who is against the BJP
http://rediff.com/news/slide-show/slide ... 140409.htm

New Komeito which stalled Abe's efforts @ constitutional revision for a while also has many members from the Buddhist group Soka Gakkai.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 11 Aug 2014 06:19

Ahead of Modi's visit, India pushes Japan for nuclear deal - Sachin Parashar, ToI
Taking up the issue of delay in signing a civil nuclear agreement with Japan, foreign minister Sushma Swaraj on Sunday told her Japanese counterpart Fumio Kishida that it was time the deal was concluded.

In a bilateral meeting on the side lines of the Asean Regional Forum (ARF) meet in Myanmar's capital Naypyitaw, Swaraj also told Kishida that India wanted PM Narendra Modi's upcoming visit to Tokyo to be "substantive". Even if the agreement can't be signed during Modi's visit, India is looking for an early conclusion of negotiations.

Despite Japan being a top priority country for Modi and the warmth of his personal ties with Shinzo Abe, his Japanese counterpart, he had postponed his visit to Tokyo in the first week of July because of the then upcoming budget session of Parliament, and apparently also because the two countries were not ready for any big-ticket announcement.

In her meeting with Kishida, Swaraj emphasized on "the need to bring talks on civil nuclear agreement to their logical conclusion".

According to sources, the two countries will review the negotiations for the civil nuclear agreement ahead of Modi's visit which is expected in the first week of September. Kishida told Swaraj that Japan is keen on ensuring a "substantive and successful" visit by Modi.

Official sources mentioned Swaraj's meeting with South Korea's foreign minister Yun Byung-se — shortly after her meeting with Kishida — in which the two countries discussed civil nuclear cooperation. South Korea competes with Japan in the field of civil nuclear technology and had expeditiously signed an agreement for cooperation with India for cooperation in the same even as India's talks with Japan have dragged for four years.

The Koreans are now keenly awaiting allotment of a site by the government for building a nuclear reactor.

In his meeting with Swaraj, Kishida, who is from Hiroshima, said he was deeply touched by Indian Parliament observing silence on August 6 for those who died in the Hiroshima bombing. The fact that Modi had also participated in it had impressed all in Japan, he told Swaraj.

Civil nuclear talks were hit badly by the Fukushima disaster in 2011 but Japan agreed to resume negotiations last year as it said it wanted to contribute to nuclear safety worldwide by sharing with the world its experience and lessons derived from the nuclear accident.

Talks though are yet to be concluded despite Japan determining that civil nuclear cooperation with India was mutually beneficial.

In a statement to TOI last year, the Japanese government said such a cooperation was significant considering such factors as the strong wish for such cooperation expressed from the Indian side even after the accident in 2011, bilateral relationship between the two countries including fortification of the Japan-India Strategic and Global Partnership, and the need for measures against climate change and global warming.


Ahead of PM Manmohan Singh’s reciprocal state visit to Japan in May 2013 (a visit that should have taken place in 2012 but which was cancelled by the abrupt announcement of elections in Japan), Japanese officials announced Japan’s commitment to a nuclear deal with India because of three reasons: continued Indian faith in Japanese nuclear technology even after the Fukushima disaster, a strong desire by India for such cooperation with Japan and Japan’s determination to strengthening nuclear safety worldwide by sharing with the world its experience and lessons derived from the nuclear accident. Though no deal was signed during Man Mohan Singh’s visit, the joint statement issued by the two Prime Ministers said that the two leaders have instructed their respective officials to ‘accelerate’ the nuclear deal. True to that instruction, the fourth round of discussions between India and Japan on India-Japan Agreement for Cooperation in Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy was held in Tokyo on 3 September 2013.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 11 Aug 2014 07:55

From a PTI report in The Hindu on the same issue of Modi's visit,
In a meeting, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj and her Japanese counterpart Fumio Kishida also discussed a range of key issues so that Mr. Modi’s visit to Japan has a “very, very substantive outcome.”

Envoy to be sent

In the meeting held on the sidelines of the East Asia Summit Foreign Minister’s gathering here, the Japanese Foreign Minister conveyed to Ms. Swaraj that a special envoy would be sent to New Delhi to discuss pending issues relating to the civil nuclear deal.

“The External Affairs Minister was pretty clear that it was time for India and Japan to bring to its logical conclusion the discussions we are having on civil nuclear cooperation,” External Affairs Ministry spokesperson Syed Akbaruddin said. Both the countries are holding negotiations for the deal for last four years. Asked about dates of Mr. Modi’s visit, he refused to give details. — PTI


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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 11 Aug 2014 17:01


Atrocious behaviour by the Japanese. The Japanese have a lot of countries to seek pardon from.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Shanmukh » 11 Aug 2014 18:09



The timing of the article is interesting, no? India and Japan are upgrading their relations, and suddenly, the ToI carries an article about a Japanese atrocity in WW2? Modi has a long way to go, I can see.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Rony » 11 Aug 2014 18:42

There is no doubt that the TOI article has a agenda both against the Japanese and internally against what it calls as a "nationalist narrative".

see this

The nationalist narrative has long projected the Second World War as a clash between the patriots of the Indian National Army (INA), supported by the Japanese Empire, and the evil British Empire. The soldiers of the Indian Army who fought for the British are immediately dismissed as stooges of the Raj.


The aim of the article is to hit two birds with one stone clearly keeping in mind Modi's visit to Japan and also dent INA's image and draw response like this

We Indians would like to know the following : (1) Did Netaji Subhaschandra Bose know about this inhumane attitude of the Japanese army towards the Indian soldiers who were oath bound to serve the British Raj and hence did not “defect” to the INA? (2) Was it Netaji’s order to enrol the Indian PoWs in the INA? Were the Japenese acting on the behest of Netaji?


This is not to suggest that we need to overlook the shameful behavior of world war 2 japanese army. But its clear this article has a agenda.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby ramana » 11 Aug 2014 20:19

TOIlet is a scumbag paper. Its real aim is Netaji who is slated to be awarded the Bharat Ratna.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby krithivas » 11 Aug 2014 20:25

^^Regardless of the timing, we need to know what happened and the culture of sweeping past under the carpet must be destroyed whether it was Ghazni or WWII Japan.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 12 Aug 2014 20:21

Knowing that the Japanese had committed so much atrocity in South East Asia, it is unlikely that what was reported was false. At the same time, the timing is certainly suspicious too. One need not preclude the other.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Suraj » 12 Aug 2014 21:57

I'm not holding my breath for ToI to report about the Bengal Famine in the days preceding a visit by David Cameron, or even more recently, about Saurabh Kalia before a meeting with some TSP leader. This is clearly a hatchet job.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SanjayC » 12 Aug 2014 23:24

It is Congress which is behind this report. These charlatans go into a panic whenever the profile of Patel and Subhash Bose is raised. They want the narrative to only revolve around Gandhi and Nehru. In fact, the producer of the movie Sardar Patel had stated some years ago that Congis were threatening cinema houses not to screen it.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby member_28705 » 13 Aug 2014 22:42

What do you think of this article in terms of factual correctness and completeness - regarding the immediate future prospects for India-Japan relations?

http://www.business-standard.com/articl ... 106_1.html
The final years of the United Progressive Alliance government were marked by a relative passivity and lack of focus in the conduct of foreign policy. But there was one notable exception: the deliberate and consistent pursuit of a close partnership with Shinzo Abe's Japan. The state visit of the emperor and the empress of Japan to India in November last year, followed by Prime Minister Abe's own visit as chief guest at the Republic Day in January this year, demonstrated how significant India-Japan relations have become to both countries.

The drivers behind these transformed relations are fairly obvious. China's emergence as a major power with expanding economic and military capabilities is beginning to change the contours of the economic and security architecture in the Indo-Pacific region. On the economic front, China is already a central component of a region-wide trade and investment network. On the security front, it competes with a still pre-eminent United States and would prefer to inherit the dominance that the latter has enjoyed for the past several decades.

Neither India nor Japan view the prospect of a China-centric Asia as compatible with their own long-term interests, and see merit in working together and with other concerned powers to actively shape the emerging architecture towards an open, an inclusive, a transparent and, above all, a balanced structure. The engagement with China must go hand in hand with constraining its predilection towards unilateral assertion of power.

Japanese contribution to China's spectacular economic development has been immense, with Japanese companies providing both capital and technology on a massive scale. The political and commercial environment in China has turned adverse for Japan, even as the promise of the Indian market has revived with the advent of a market-friendly Modi government.

The two countries should look upon their economic relationship in the larger geopolitical context. Japan needs to take a long-term bet on India. India needs to make that wager count by easing entry into its market. As Prime Minister Abe has asserted, a strong and democratic India is in Japan's interest, just as a strong and democratic Japan is in India's. This goes beyond the preoccupation with China, and has its own logic in shared values and mutual benefit.

It is for this reason that India should welcome the recent re-interpretation of the Japanese Constitution by the Abe government, enabling Japan to participate in collective defence and to undertake defence exports. The increase in the Japanese defence Budget, though modest, is important, because it marks a departure from a posture of apologetic defensiveness that has characterised Japanese behaviour in the past. A Japan that plays an active role in shaping the security architecture in the region can only be in India's interest.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be visiting Japan shortly. He has a unique opportunity to transform the India-Japan relationship into a truly strategic and long-term partnership, building upon all the positive factors enumerated above. The personal chemistry between Mr Abe and Mr Modi is a major asset, and may prove decisive on issues where outcomes hang in delicate balance. One such issue is the still-to-be-concluded civil nuclear agreement between the two countries on the lines negotiated successfully with the United States in 2008.

Just as the Indo-US nuclear deal cleared the decks for a significant expansion in Indo-US relations, an Indo-Japanese nuclear deal will enhance our relations both in symbolic and substantive terms. The template is already there in the Indo-US civil nuclear agreement. India will not be able to depart from this template, which represents a very fine balance between India's strategic imperatives and international non-proliferation concerns.

India is deeply conscious of Japanese sensitivities on the nuclear issue, the latter having been the only victim of the use of nuclear weapons. However, when India has proposed an international convention against the use or the threat of use of nuclear weapons, Japan has been unable to support the initiative because it is a member of a military alliance and is covered by extended nuclear deterrence provided by the United States. Just as India appreciates Japanese security compulsions in this respect, so should Japan understand India's security imperatives and not insist on commitments that will undermine its security.

When the Nuclear Suppliers Group took a consensus decision to resume civil nuclear cooperation with India in September 2008, the Indian external affairs minister made a solemn declaration spelling out the country's commitment to non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament. A statement on these lines accompanying the conclusion of an India-Japan nuclear deal should assuage Japanese concerns. There could also be a joint project to formulate world-class safety features for nuclear reactors to allay post-Fukushima safety concerns. Political intervention at Mr Abe's level could ensure a successful outcome in time for the visit. Otherwise the negotiations may remain mired in technicalities.

The two countries have identified maritime security as a key area of security cooperation. While Indian naval forces are a significant presence in the Indian Ocean region, India's maritime assets lag far behind. In order to be reckoned as a significant maritime power, India needs to have shipbuilding capabilities, modern port facilities, and a large and modern shipping fleet to carry its growing external trade. Japan can be a valuable partner to India, helping the shipbuilding industry and improving and upgrading our port facilities.

In this context, it is worth recalling some significant remarks made by the Japanese deputy prime minister and finance minister, Taro Aso, in May last year at a Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry event: "Your port facilities need further investment. Your marine industries, in general, have much room to cooperate with the Japanese. I would like to bring here an across-the-board support from my country, involving both government and private sectors."

This is certainly worth following up as a key area of partnership between the two countries during the forthcoming visit.

More interestingly, Mr Aso also drew attention to the strategic importance of Andaman and Nicobar islands, which he described as confirming India's identity as a Southeast Asian power.

He saw the islands as playing a key role in the growing maritime cooperation between the two countries in the long stretch between Japan to the east and Africa to the west.

An India-Japan project to develop these island territories as an economic, a logistics and a maritime hub serving the entire Indo-Pacific region should be seriously considered as a key outcome of the forthcoming visit.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby member_28638 » 14 Aug 2014 01:46

nageshks wrote:


The timing of the article is interesting, no? India and Japan are upgrading their relations, and suddenly, the ToI carries an article about a Japanese atrocity in WW2? Modi has a long way to go, I can see.


Sound like typical English propaganda! Obviously written by those that worship the English.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby member_28705 » 14 Aug 2014 09:28

chakra wrote:
nageshks wrote:
The timing of the article is interesting, no? India and Japan are upgrading their relations, and suddenly, the ToI carries an article about a Japanese atrocity in WW2? Modi has a long way to go, I can see.


Sound like typical English propaganda! Obviously written by those that worship the English.


Japan is trying to 're-write' its war history. Japan wants to stop being an apologist and expand its 'defence sector'. That's totally understandable - especially when countries like USA and Russia who are far more guilty have done nothing to reduce their arms.

But that doesn't mean that the Japanese did not commit war atrocities. Be it the rape of nanjing, or the Bataan death march walk - they were guilty of many things. Japan wasn't the ONLY nation that was guilty, but that doesn't mean Japan wasn't guilty.

On topic, I wouldn't be surprised at all if the Japanese committed the atrocities as claimed by the ToI article. Having said that, there are no permanent friends or foes in diplomacy. India needs Japan right now - for development, technology and what not.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Yayavar » 14 Aug 2014 23:18

At Yasukini shrine there is a memorial to Justice Pal who wrote a dissenting note to the War trials against the Japanese after WW2. He noted that the trials were done with a sense of retribution and not with an intention of justice. And that America and calculatedly forced Japan to react and that eventually led to war ... dont recall more. He did not say that the Japanese were absolved of the wrong.

They are not absolved and can repent in other ways. At the same time it is a past long gone - one cant hold their feet to the fire for it either. The English and other colonialists are not for similar crimes.


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