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India and Japan: News and Discussion

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby zoverian » 11 Nov 2016 16:25

India-Japan ink landmark civil nuclear agreement

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 344335.cms


TOKYO: India and Japan on Friday signed a landmark civil nuclear cooperation deal after talks between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his counterpart Shinzo Abe, a move that will boost bilateral economic and security ties and facilitate US-based players to set up atomic plants in India.

The two countries had reached a broad agreement for cooperation in civil nuclear energy sector during Abe's visit to India in December last year, but the deal was yet to be signed as some issues were yet to be worked out.

"A landmark deal for a cleaner, greener world! PM @narendramodi and PM @AbeShinzo witness exchange of the landmark Civil Nuclear Agreement," External Affairs Ministry spokesman Vikas Swarup tweeted today.


The deal would allow Japan to export nuclear technology to India, making it the first non-NPT signatory to have such a deal with Tokyo. It would also cement the bilateral economic and security ties as the two countries warm up to counter an assertive China.


There was political resistance in Japan - the only country to suffer atomic bombings during World War II - against a nuclear deal with India, particularly after the disaster at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in 2011

Japan is a major player in the nuclear energy market and an atomic deal with it will make it easier for US-based nuclear plant makers Westinghouse Electric Corporation and GE Energy Inc to set up atomic plants in India as both these conglomerates have Japanese investments.

Other nations who have signed civil nuclear deal with India include the US, Russia, South Korea, Mangolia, France, Namibia, Argentina, Canada, Kazakhstan and Australia.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Karthik S » 12 Nov 2016 00:52

Indrani Bagchi ‏@IBagchiTOI
Japan to train 30,000 Indians in Japan-style manufacturing skills and practices at new Japan institute of Manufacturing


Waiting for any news about additional shinkansen projects apart from Mumbai Ah'bad line.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 12 Nov 2016 06:56

India, Japan stand together on South China Sea; discuss partnership on Chabahar - Sachin Parashar, ToI

It is time that India extracted similar statement from Japan on Pakistani terrorrism against India. This is not merely a one-way street.

Despite China warning India and Japan against any dalliance over South China Sea (SCS) Indo-China Sea (ICS), the two countries brought up the issue again in the summit meeting between PM Narendra Modi and his counterpart Shinzo Abe as they stressed the significance of United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) in resolving SCS ICS disputes.

In another significant development which will be watched closely in Beijing, Modi and Abe also discussed the possibility of working together on the strategic Chabahar port in Iran which will help India access Afghanistan and central Asia by bypassing Pakistan. The port is seen as a counter to China's Gwadar port in Pakistan's Balochistan province.

For the second successive year, India and Japan specifically mentioned SCS ICS in their joint statement issued after the summit, even though there was no direct reference to the international tribunal order which dismissed China's 'historic' rights over SCS ICS waters in July this year.

"Regarding the South China Sea Indo-China Sea (ICS), the two Prime Ministers stressed the importance of resolving the disputes by peaceful means, in accordance with universally recognised principles of international law including the UNCLOS," said the joint statement, reiterating the view that all parties should show utmost respect to the UNCLOS as it established the international legal order of the seas and oceans.

The international tribunal set up under UNCLOS dismissed China's 9-dash-line which claims sovereignty over almost the entire SCS ICS. Earlier this week, China's Global Times had warned India that it may suffer "great losses" in terms of business and trade if it got embroiled in SCS ICS disputes.

On Chabahar, the 2 PMs directed their officials to expeditiously work out details for cooperation.

"The two Prime Ministers welcomed the prospects of cooperation between the two countries for promoting peace and prosperity in South Asia and neighboring region, such as Iran and Afghanistan, through both bilateral and trilateral cooperation, inter-alia, in the development of infrastructure and connectivity for Chabahar," said the joint statement.

TOI had first reported on May 15 this year, and then again on September 8, that Japan was interested in working with India on the Chabahar port project.

In an exclusive interaction with TOI in September, Japan foreign ministry had said that while it was already helping India improve road connectivity in the northeastern region, Japan would also positively consider any proposal to extend such cooperation beyond India's western border. India signed a tripartite agreement this year with Iran and Afghanistan hoping to develop the Chabahar port into a transit hub which would help them bypass Pakistan. India has committed $500 million for development of the port.

The India-Japan December 2015 joint statement had said that the 2 countries had decided to develop and strengthen "reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructures that augment connectivity within India and between India and other countries in the region".

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby g.sarkar » 12 Nov 2016 07:02

http://www.firstpost.com/world/india-an ... 01146.html
Indo-Japan nuclear deal: Narendra Modi, Shinzo Abe warmth likely to irk China
PTI Updated: Nov 11, 2016 17:05 IST
Tokyo: India and Japan on Friday signed a landmark civil nuclear cooperation deal after talks between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his counterpart Shinzo Abe, a move that will boost bilateral economic and security ties and facilitate US-based players to set up atomic plants in India.
The two countries had reached a broad agreement for cooperation in civil nuclear energy sector during Abe's visit to India in December last year, but the deal was yet to be signed as some issues were yet to be worked out.
"A landmark deal for a cleaner, greener world! PM @narendramodi and PM @AbeShinzo witness exchange of the landmark Civil Nuclear Agreement," External Affairs Ministry spokesman Vikas Swarup tweeted on Friday.
The deal would allow Japan to export nuclear technology to India, making it the first non-NPT signatory to have such a deal with Tokyo. It would also cement the bilateral economic and security ties as the two countries warm up to counter an assertive China.
There was political resistance in Japan - the only country to suffer atomic bombings during World War II - against a nuclear deal with India, particularly after the disaster at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in 2011.
.....

Gautam

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby uddu » 12 Nov 2016 07:26

We have CCP newspapers in India. So if you want to know what's the CCP saying or telling the Indians including their threats that reach Indians through such CCP newspapers. Last month the threat from CCP to Indians for boycotting Chinese goods were prominently published by such newspapers in India. So what they write is the CCP view anything regard to China if appearing in those CCP papers. Once can just :rotfl: at those articles.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 12 Nov 2016 08:36

Japan has option to scrap N-deal - Kallol Bhattacherjee, The Hindu
Both sides also signed nine agreements including one on cooperation between ISRO and JAXA in outer space. Another MoU that was signed covered investment in infrastructure projects in railways and transport terminals.


Japanesee investment in DMIC and the upcoming Chennai-Bengaluru corridor (which in recent years has become dormant) are proof of their strategy to invest in infrastructure before attracting Japanese investments. It is doubtful if we are moving with alacrity at all in making use of the opportunity. During Man Mohan Singh’s May 2013 visit to Tokyo, Japan announced ¥71 billion ($699 million) loan for the Mumbai metro line. India and Japan also reached an agreement on using the Japanese bullet train technology for a high-speed connection between Mumbai and Ahmedabad. Japan also offered around 17.7 billion yen to India to build a conference hall and other facilities at the Indian Institute of Technology in Hyderabad, along with around 13 billion yen for the Tamil Nadu state government.

During PM Shinzo Abe’s January 2014 visit, several economic and infrastructure-related deals were made. India invited Japan to invest in infrastructure development in the seven North eastern states which are generally out-of-bound for foreign government investments because of their sensitivity. The opportunity is for Japanese companies to especially build roads, and aid agriculture, forestry and water supply and sewerage in these states. Japanese companies have also been invited to help develop a new port in Chennai, which would be used to improve India's sea-route connectivity. Japanese assistance for Chennai port is also aimed at giving teeth to a new sea-based route that would start in Chennai, and end in Dawei port in Myanmar's Tanintharyi region. The development of a new port in Chennai would serve to connect the industrial centres of southern and western India with southeast Asia. In addition, Japan's investment in the Bangalore-Chennai industrial corridor would find easy outlet from Chennai.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby arshyam » 12 Nov 2016 10:02

Sort of OT, but Chennai already has 3 large ports, not counting Krishnapatnam just within AP. Do we need yet another port here itself?

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 12 Nov 2016 10:56

arshyam, it is not a new port built from scratch. May be just a new terminal in one of the ports.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Bart S » 12 Nov 2016 18:30

Plus the road infrastructure leading up to the port. Due to the road project that Amma stalled due to her ego, much of the traffic to the port has to wait till night time and wind it's way slowly through city roads. No use having ports if you can't access them from inland.

The Japanese have complained about this in the past as well, however it should be basic common sense that we should have taken care of ourselves.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby arun » 12 Nov 2016 19:22

SSridhar wrote:India, Japan stand together on South China Sea; discuss partnership on Chabahar - Sachin Parashar, ToI

It is time that India extracted similar statement from Japan on Pakistani terrorrism against India. This is not merely a one-way street.





That seems to be the case. Point 49 of the India-Japan Joint Statement which is Terrorism related, explicitly mentions the Mohammadden Terrorist fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan and also mentions terrorist incidents at Uri, Mumbai and Pathankot which have the Islamic Republic’s pug marks:

The two Prime Ministers condemned terrorism in strongest terms in all its forms and manifestations in the spirit of "zero tolerance.” They noted with great concern the growing menace of terrorism and violent extremism and its universal reach. They expressed their condolences to the bereaved families of the victims of both countries in the recent terrorist attacks including in Dhaka and Uri. They called upon all countries to implement the UNSC Resolution 1267 and other relevant resolutions designating terrorist entities. They called upon all countries to work towards eliminating terrorist safe havens and infrastructure, in disrupting terrorist networks and financing channels, and stopping cross-border movement of terrorists. They underlined the need for all countries to effectively deal with trans-national terrorism emanating from their territory. They emphasised that the evolving character of terrorism called for stronger international partnership in countering terrorism and violent extremism, including through increased sharing of information and intelligence. The two Prime Ministers noted the ongoing bilateral dialogue on counter-terrorism and called for enhanced cooperation including through greater exchange of information and intelligence between the two sides. They also called for Pakistan to bring the perpetrators of terrorist attacks including those of November 2008 terrorist attack in Mumbai and 2016 terrorist attack in Pathankot to justice.


For the record Point 51 which calls out the Peoples Republic of China’s high handed behavior in the South China Sea (SCS) Indo-China Sea (ICS):

The two Prime Ministers reiterated their commitment to respecting freedom of navigation and over flight, and unimpeded lawful commerce, based on the principles of international law, as reflected notably in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). In this context, they urged all parties to resolve disputes through peaceful means without resorting to threat or use of force and exercise self-restraint in the conduct of activities, and avoid unilateral actions that raise tensions. As the leaders of the State Parties to the UNCLOS, the two Prime Ministers reiterated their view that all parties should show utmost respect to the UNCLOS, which establishes the international legal order of the seas and oceans. Regarding the South China Sea, the two Prime Ministers stressed the importance of resolving the disputes by peaceful means, in accordance with universally recognised principles of international law including the UNCLOS.


Nov 11 Press Release by Government of India’s Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) via the “Official” Press Information Bureau’s (PIB) website:

India-Japan Joint Statement during the visit of Prime Minister to Japan

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 12 Nov 2016 20:12

arun, thanks.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby arun » 12 Nov 2016 22:31

The survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki aka “hibakusha” have opted to live under the protection of the nuclear umbrella of the very country that atom bombed them ie: the United States of America for some 70 years. It is thus only expected that Japanese now politely shut their mouths and cease fulminating about the civilian nuclear deal with India.

For too long Japan and her people have used their being atomic bombed, and justifiably so given the imposition of war by Japan on such a wide swath of Asia, as a burka/burqua to cover up the horrors unleashed by them in the run up to the second world war and during that war even while hypocritically taking shelter under the nuclear umbrella of the very nation that atom bombed them after the war :roll: . :

From the Asahi Shimbun:

Nuclear accord with India draws fire from A-bomb survivors, others

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby g.sarkar » 12 Nov 2016 23:23

http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201611120028.html
EDITORIAL: Japan’s nuclear deal with India undermines its key principles
November 12, 2016 at 14:20 JST
Given the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki caused by the 1945 atomic bombings of these cities, many Japanese harbor a profound desire to see the world rid itself of nuclear weapons.
Yet, the Abe administration is behaving as if it has forgotten Japan’s fundamental principles concerning these weapons of mass destruction based on its status as the only nation that has ever sustained nuclear attacks.
The government signed an agreement Nov. 11 that opens the door to nuclear trade with India.
India has developed and now possesses nuclear arms. It has not joined the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT).
Signing a nuclear trade deal with a country that has shunned the treaty designed to stop the spread of nuclear weapons is itself a big mistake. Besides, the agreement contains many questionable and worrisome elements.
The pact allows Japan to provide nuclear technology to India without sufficient guarantee that New Delhi will not conduct nuclear arms tests.
New Delhi has imposed a voluntary moratorium on nuclear tests. The focus of the negotiations between the two countries over the agreement was what kind of action Japan can take in case India resumes testing nuclear arms.
A clause that allows Tokyo to suspend and revoke the agreement if India conducts a nuclear test has not been inserted into the main body of the agreement. Instead, it has been relegated to a related document.
Not only that, a separate clause suggests that when India detonates a nuclear device as a test, Japan will consider whether the test is a countermeasure against actions by countries like archrival Pakistan.
There is even a provision to keep the door open to India’s production of highly enriched uranium, a key ingredient for an atomic bomb.
.......

Gautam

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby g.sarkar » 13 Nov 2016 02:13

http://www.firstpost.com/india/indo-jap ... 02588.html
Indo-Japan civil nuclear deal: Despite the anti-nuclear test stance, it's a win-win for all
India and Japan, at last, signed an agreement for cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Both countries took several rounds of negotiations, which helped resolve several sticky issues. Though only limited information has been released by the two governments, a media briefing of the Indian foreign secretary made several issues clear. The joint document signed by the two countries lays down a roadmap for bilateral cooperation in the field of nuclear energy. "This would provide for the development of nuclear power projects in India and thus strengthening of energy security of the country. The present agreement would open up the door for collaboration between Indian and Japanese industries in our Civil Nuclear programme,” it says.
But cutting the deal wasn't easy. There were several questions and concerns raised in the past that delayed the agreement. Some of those concerns remain afloat in both the countries, though they aren't necessarily of the same nature.
Some in Japan argued that a nuclear agreement with India, a non-signatory to the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT) and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), will undermine the nuclear regime. The reality is that India received a clean exemption in the guidelines of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) in 2008 and the CTBT is in a coma. Instead, India has been extending a moratorium on its nuclear test, and this is far more relevant than merely signing a non-existent treaty. Besides, India has an impeccable record, and all of its nuclear cooperation agreements are accompanied by the relevant safeguard practices. So, there is no question of diversion of any item supplied for peaceful purposes to a military programme. The point that a victim of the nuclear attack would find it difficult to sign a peaceful nuclear programme was intriguing. More so, the fact that idea came from a country, which is enjoying nuclear protective umbrella (and till the Fukushima Accident had used nuclear energy to generate about 30% of the country's total electricity production), was definitely bizarre. Even the serious section of the Japanese policy making community found it non-serious and basically a deal-delaying ploy. The argument that for a country that has stopped using nuclear energy and operating nuclear reactors, it is unethical to export them did have some merit. But the moment Japan started operating some of its reactors and decided to eventually operate its non-operational reactors and add a few more, even this ethical resistance evaporated. However, a section that opposes nuclear energy all over the world kept clinging to this argument. Other than the ethical and non-proliferation concerns, there were some practical commercial concerns of the Japanese nuclear industry, a major driver for the India-Japan nuclear deal. As the Indian nuclear establishment was basically interested in Japanese technology, not in its reactors, Japanese industry did not find it commercially lucrative to enter into the Indian nuclear market. It was only when India agreed to buy reactors that the Japanese nuclear industry started seriously working on the deal. Now, it will have to partner with one of the Indian operators like the Nuclear Power Corporation India Limited. A Japanese company, however, will still have less than 50 percent ownership in a nuclear venture. For a short period, Japanese industry also wanted a solution to the nuclear liability issue.
Moreover, Japanese officials wanted proper assurance regarding export control enforcement and outreach for the Indian companies receiving the Japanese goods. India has completely harmonised its export control system along the NSG guidelines and annexes. Besides, India increased its outreach activities for its companies. Some Japanese companies have also started giving export control training to employees of the Indian companies, which are receiving its goods.
In India, too, there were some concerns, and to a certain extent, they exist even now as the two governments have not provided details of the agreement. The India-US 123 agreement is a somewhat detailed document available in the public domain. However, the press briefing of the foreign secretary, Jai Shankar sought to clear the air after the signature ceremony. He informed that all the stages of India-US agreements for civil nuclear energy were compressed in one document for the India-Japan deal.
Implicitly, the foreign secretary conveyed that the template of the 123 agreement had been taken for drafting the India-Japan agreement. Administrative arrangements for India-Japan specific would be worked out later, although the technical annexure attached to the agreement may already have some of the arrangements. But the basic parameters of the agreement would not be different.
The termination clause, one of the concerns in India, exists in the agreement. As the Indian foreign secretary rightly pointed out, it exists in most of the agreements. So, is the concern in India, that in the event of a nuclear test, the deal will be nullified, true?
Theoretically, it is possible. A termination clause exists in the India-US 123 agreement as well, though a nuclear test is not explicitly mentioned. The agreement with the US has provisions for consultation between the two countries and remedial action for India in the case of a termination. The agreement with Japan is not radically different from that. India will continue to have its right to conduct nuclear tests if the strategic environment changes dramatically and adversely affect India’s security. In such a situation, in reality, both the US and Japan may appreciate the Indian situation. India’s security interests are fast converging with both the countries. Quite importantly, by all the assessments, the next round of nuclear tests in the world will start either with the US or China. So, India may not have much difficulty in managing the situation after its own nuclear tests, which may follow after the tests of these countries.
.........

Gautam

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Bhurishravas » 13 Nov 2016 02:48

arun wrote: It is thus only expected that Japanese now shut their mouths and cease fulminating about the civilian nuclear deal with India.


It is rather odd that you arent happy about the signing of the deal but would rather rant about some internal opposition to such deals in Japan. There will always be opposition in a democracy. So what is the big deal about it.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Bhurishravas » 13 Nov 2016 02:50

It may not be evident how Japan benefits from closer ties with India. If anything, Japanese firms have struggled in India’s difficult business environment. India’s contribution lies in legitimacy. Mr Abe is determined to “normalise” Japan, in other words make it shed its post-war pacificism and become an autonomous diplomatic and military power in Asia.

However, Tokyo faces strong opposition from China and other victims of Japan’s imperial aggression. He sees an Indian acceptance of this new Japanese role as a crucial source of international legitimacy for his nationalist agenda. While there has been much written about the personal chemistry between Mr Modi and Mr Abe, what really binds them is a common determination to change the path and future of their respective nations.


http://www.hindustantimes.com/editorial ... Mn7SI.html

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 13 Nov 2016 09:07

India, Japan differ on nuclear tests - Suhasini Haidar, The Hindu
In signing the civil nuclear agreement with India, Japan made a major exception for a non-signatory to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), based on India’s impeccable nuclear record.

But sources say India, too, may have given exceptional commitments on its nuclear sovereignty and right to conduct nuclear tests in order to bag the deal.


According to officials, while the Nuclear Cooperation Agreement (NCA) signed in the presence of Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Friday followed the template set in the India-U.S. civilian nuclear agreement of 2008, a text signed in addition to it is a departure from the past.

In the additional document, called the “Note on Views and Understanding” signed by Indian and Japanese nuclear negotiators after the meeting, Article I (iii) says: “The representative of the Japanese delegation stated that an Indian action in violation of the September 5 statement could be viewed as a serious departure from the prevailing situation. In that situation, reprocessing of nuclear material subject to the Agreement will be suspended in accordance with paragraph 9 of Article 14 of the Agreement,” invoking a section on emergency suspension of nuclear parts or fuel supply. (The reference to the ‘September 5’ statement was India’s voluntary moratorium on nuclear testing made for the Nuclear Suppliers Group in 2008.)

Binding provisions

When contacted by The Hindu , Indian and Japanese officials seemed to differ on how binding the additional note actually was. A senior MEA official privy to the negotiations said that the only “binding provisions are in the bilateral agreement (NCA).” However, in written replies to The Hindu , Japan’s Foreign Ministry Press secretary Yasuhisa Kawamura said Japan had made its intentions clear. “[If India conducts a nuclear test] Japan will give notice notify India of its intension of termination of the treaty and will cease its cooperation based on the treaty.

India also understands this, which is confirmed in the official document, “Note on Views and Understanding”, attached to the Treaty,” he said.

According to officials present at the bilateral meetings in Tokyo, Mr. Abe went further, saying frankly that Japan’s cooperation with India was “on the premise that India maintains its commitment to the unilateral and voluntary moratorium on nuclear test,” and urged India to sign the Non- Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), that India has resisted for decades.

Striking similarities

At a press conference in Tokyo on Friday, Foreign Secretary S.Jaishankar said there were “striking similiarities” in the Japan deal with those of other countries.

However, former nuclear envoys say the text signifies India has gone “much further” in commitments to Japan than ever before. In the past, India had rejected direct references to nuclear tests as a trigger for cancelling the deal from the U.S., Canada, and Australia, amongst a dozen countries India has signed nuclear agreements with.

Next, India has allowed Japan to include the “emergency suspension” clause, which could mean a major shutdown of its nuclear power capabilities given that Japanese companies and spare parts are expected to be a crucial part of all future reactors in India. With the exception of Russian reactors, all the suppliers in negotiation with India at present: GE, Westinghouse and Areva have considerable ownership by Japanese companies Hitachi, Toshiba and Mitsubishi.

Finally, the additional note states that Japan can contest the claims by India for compensation if it suspends its nuclear cooperation with India. “Japan reserves the right to contest India’s claim of compensation for the adverse impact on the Indian economy due to disruption in electricity generation and loss on account of disruption of contractual obligations through the consultations provided for in paragraph 9 of Article 14 of the Agreement,” reads Article I(iv) of the document, available on the Japanese Foreign Ministry website.

The difference in perceptions between the MEA and Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Japan will be significant, given that the Japanese Parliament, Diet, is yet to approve the Nuclear cooperation Agreement. In India, the debate over nuclear sovereignty will be key.


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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby g.sarkar » 13 Nov 2016 09:31

http://scroll.in/article/821141/as-modi ... n-the-tale
As Modi prepares to meet Abe in Tokyo, there's already a Trump in the tale Nov 09, 2016 · 05:00 pm
Any regional alliance for Japan and India in dealing with China is dependent on their important security relationship with the US.
The significance of the victory of Donald Trump in the US presidential election will be felt in real time in South Block.
The countdown has begun for Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Japan. The startling news from Washington radically reframes the regional context in which the meeting between Modi and his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe will be taking place in Tokyo on Friday.
No country is going to be as profoundly affected by the Trump presidency as Japan is. The future of the United States’ rebalance strategy in the Asia-Pacific region hangs in the abyss.
The worst fears are coming true for Abe, who was hoping to be one of the first world statesmen to visit Washington as early as February to congratulate Hillary Clinton and to jointly choreograph the future trajectory of the US’ pivot to Asia.
On the contrary, Turmp has made no bones about the fact that he intends to bury the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, which the Barack Obama administration had conceived as the flagship of the rebalance strategy aimed at isolating China.
Japan had pinned high hopes on the Agreement as the last train leaving the station before China’s Bullet train races through the track overtaking all else. The abandonment of the Agreement means that Japan has to come to terms with the reality of a Chinese economic locomotive that outpaces it comprehensively. The Agreement was supposed to be the underpinning to rally the Association of Southeast Asian Nations region behind US-Japanese leadership. Japan and the US, on the other hand, are already watching with great unease that the ASEAN countries prefer to come to terms with China’s rise in their own way without tutelage by third parties. The leaderships in the Philippines and Malaysia have begun dealing with the Chinese leaders directly. Thailand also is moving away from the US orbit toward China and is hoping to purchase Chinese submarines. Chinese warships docked at Cam Ranh Bay naval base in Vietnam two weeks ago.
In short, the Trump presidency is appearing in regional politics at a juncture when the entire US-led alliance system in the Asia-Pacific is beginning to look wobbly.
.......

This is very interesting, but it is written by Bhadrakumar. It is slightly old, so apologies if already posted.
Gautam

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby arun » 13 Nov 2016 17:34

Bhurishravas wrote:
arun wrote: It is thus only expected that Japanese now shut their mouths and cease fulminating about the civilian nuclear deal with India.


It is rather odd that you arent happy about the signing of the deal but would rather rant about some internal opposition to such deals in Japan. There will always be opposition in a democracy. So what is the big deal about it.


It is rather odd that you have deduced from what I have written in my post that I am not happy with the signing of the nuclear deal. It is also rather discourteous to bandy a term like ”rant” without the minimum courtesy of explaining why you think so by refuting what I have said in my post about Japanese sanctimonious hypocrisy of using the fact of being atomic bombed as a burka to hide the horrors Japan inflicted during WW II and thereafter sheltering under the nuclear umbrella of the US. Finally existence of opposition in democracy does not mean that such opposition should not be called out for what it is.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Bhurishravas » 14 Nov 2016 01:51

arun wrote:
Bhurishravas wrote:
It is rather odd that you arent happy about the signing of the deal but would rather rant about some internal opposition to such deals in Japan. There will always be opposition in a democracy. So what is the big deal about it.


It is rather odd that you have deduced from what I have written in my post that I am not happy with the signing of the nuclear deal. It is also rather discourteous to bandy a term like ”rant” without the minimum courtesy of explaining why you think so by refuting what I have said in my post about Japanese sanctimonious hypocrisy of using the fact of being atomic bombed as a burka to hide the horrors Japan inflicted during WW II and thereafter sheltering under the nuclear umbrella of the US. Finally existence of opposition in democracy does not mean that such opposition should not be called out for what it is.

You might be one very angry person because I did fail to see any joy in your posts. That is my bad.
Japan does not have to feel guilty forever for having done anything. And if japan is using `being atomic bombed` as burka then so are the countries who have used japan inflicted horrors for their own reasons too. Wait, you also justified nuclear attack on Japan.
There will always be opposition in democratic countries. If you think opposition is not ideology and opinion based but only `hypocrisy clad in burka`, which needs to be called, then suit yourself.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 14 Nov 2016 04:54

India made no extra commitment on civil nuclear deal with Japan - Indrani Bagchi, ToI
Taking Tokyo's sensitivities about nuclear non-proliferation into account, India and Japan signed a note in addition to the civil nuclear agreement reflecting both countries' positions, Japan's reaffirmation of its national positions and India reiterating the non-proliferation commitment made on September 5, 2008 on the eve of the NSG plenary.

The India-Japan nuclear deal, released by the Japanese foreign ministry on Sunday, will soon be up on the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) website.

"Given Japan is the only nation to have suffered a nuclear attack, it was felt their views should be recorded in a separate note," an Indian official said.

The additional note, titled 'Note on Views and Understanding', records the September 2008 commitment by then foreign minister Pranab Mukherjee as the basis for the agreement.

The note also talks about the terms of cessation of cooperation. The template is similar to the US deal, a year's notice has to be given for cessation of cooperation.

Japan would have to give a formal reason for suspending the nuclear agreement, for instance national security, or whether other countries have also done it.

This would lead to consultations between the two countries before Japan pulls the plug. India has reserved the right to ask for compensation, but Japan has stressed that it would reserve the right to contest that demand. The processes involved are the same as in the US agreement.


There is a contest about whether this additional note is legally binding on both sides. Japanese officials said the note reflected accurately the views of both countries.

"It is clear from Article 14 that Japan has the right to terminate its cooperation and other engagements stipulated under the treaty. It has also been clearly confirmed between the two governments that Japan could do this in case India conducts a nuclear test. The above point is critically important in implementation of the treaty. Therefore, both countries agreed to establish the separate note and signed the document together with the nuclear treaty itself," a Japanese official said.

Indian officials insisted the government has not taken any extra commitment to those already taken. "The termination clause is there in other NCAs (nuclear cooperation agreements) we have signed, including with the US (Article 14). However, the circumstances triggering a possible termination are never sharply defined. Consideration also has to be given to mitigating factors," a source here said.

The note, the source said, "is a record by the negotiators of respective views on certain issues. It states, on the one hand, what could be Japan's view in advance on what is a hypothetical situation, that is their national prerogative. At the same time, it also records India's position on the same issue, which is a reiteration of the September 2008 commitments. No change is envisaged from those commitments and no additional commitments have been made by India."

Like the US, Japan will not do a national tracking of nuclear materials that flow through its components in any nuclear reactor in India.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby g.sarkar » 15 Nov 2016 04:06

http://www.rediff.com/news/column/war-o ... 161113.htm
War on cash, India-Japan n-deal: Modi bends like Beckham
We are living in extraordinary times when every word uttered by the leadership must be carefully studied. No Indian government since Independence made a fine art of manipulating public opinion. Thus, Prime Minister Narendra Modi's warning that more measures against black money can be expected after December gives a new twist to the tornado of 'demonetisation' sweeping the country.
Will Modi now put aside all pretence and specifically target the political class, who is, arguably, one of the single biggest beneficiaries of 'black money'? It is a proven fact that only politicians keep black money in cash in such bulk.
The middle class and the corporate guys put away black money in Bahamas or Canary Islands, and in benami holdings or through the stockmarket.
In the normal course, the months of January and February would have presented a carnival of black money when Uttar Pradesh goes to the polls.
Now, what if the tornado triggered by Modi reaches the doorsteps of Mayawati or Mulayam Singh Yadav by then?
Modi says he is the ultimate truth digger who will go right back to Independence. The Congress party, too, must worry.
Conceivably, the BJP is the only major party in the upcoming UP election that wouldn't have to look over the shoulder to lavishly fund its campaign.
On the other hand, just as development agenda was Modi's main plank in the 2014 poll, he will find it expedient to make a new cocktail mix of 'surgical strikes' in Uttar Pradesh.
Beware the Ides of March! Therefore, when Modi or his senior colleagues say something, weigh it carefully. Why they said something is invariably more important than what they said.
......
Shubhajit Roy of the Indian Express, who travelled to Kobe -- disregarding Modi's nyet to people of his profession accompanying him -- has unearthed (external link) that the much-vaunted India-Japan nuclear deal, which was supposed to be the icing on the cake of Modi's Japan visit, had an important sub-text to it, and that this could be one of those startling moments in international diplomacy when the sub-text dominated the main text. Of course, the government nicely hid the sub-text from public view, because it shows Modi in unflattering light as having negotiated the nuclear deal on Japan's terms, finally. No doubt, Modi bent delightfully low, as that iconic British soccer star David Beckham used to do in his halcyon days, to get his way to the goal post. (And, to my mind, he did future generations a great favour by tying down all future governments in India to the commitment not to test nuclear weapons except at the cost of an unaffordable price.)
However, Modi's abject capitulation will play out badly in his 'core constituency.'
.....

It is Bhadrakumar again.
Gautam

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Bheeshma » 15 Nov 2016 04:53

The idiot doesn't have the slightest clue what he is talking about. Japan needs a face saving side note to appease the hiroshima survivors, pissful activists and opposition. The deal is same as India-US deal and couldn't have got any better without full fledged NPT member as a nuclear member.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby tandav » 15 Nov 2016 08:54

With the USA electing Trump and his promise to make both Japan and South Korea take greater charge of their own security, it may be necessary for Japan to test Nuclear weapons shortly. Has this aspect been taken in account?

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 15 Nov 2016 11:26

tandav wrote:With the USA electing Trump and his promise to make both Japan and South Korea take greater charge of their own security, it may be necessary for Japan to test Nuclear weapons shortly. Has this aspect been taken in account?

And, Japan possesses a large stockpile of separated Pu.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby g.sarkar » 15 Nov 2016 13:15

http://www.asianage.com/opinion/columni ... llies.html
Asia’s natural allies?
Published : Nov 14, 2016, 6:33 am IST
In today’s multipolar world stamped by an asymmetrical power distribution, Tokyo and New Delhi figure on every analyst’s list of major power centres. The relationship between the two nations impacts the Asian power balance, in the backdrop of China’s economic and military rise and a marked tendency to assert itself. Hence, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Japan, November 11-12, was imbued with considerable significance.
The visit was the occasion for the third India-Japan annual summit during the Modi government’s two and a half-year-long tenure so far. With the two Prime Ministers having met for the eighth time, the relationship has advanced noticeably in this period. The question to ponder is as to what additionality was achieved in Tokyo last week.
It has produced tangible results. The most salient gain is the conclusion of the agreement for cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. This was pending for several years, causing much uncertainty. It now opens the way for cooperation involving Indian, American and Japanese companies in the field of civil nuclear cooperation. Both India and Japan seem to have shown flexibility to ensure a positive outcome. Besides, nine other agreements and MoUs were signed covering diverse fields. The future of Japan-India partnership, Mr Modi stated, is “rich and robust”.
Another notable feature is the progress registered on one of the mega projects, namely the Mumbai-Ahmedabad high-speed rail project. Consultancy work is set to begin next month; construction will commence in end 2018, and the operation starts in 2023.
The 58-para joint statement, issued on November 11, is significant for its several elements. It highlights the synergy between India’s “Act East Policy” and Japan’s “Free and Open Indo-Pacific Strategy”. The partnership between India and Japan brings “peace, stability and balance in the region”. The para on countering terrorism is very strong and explicit, with India and Japan calling on Pakistan to bring to justice the perpetrators of terrorist attacks in Mumbai in November 2008 and in Pathankot in 2016. India reciprocated this by showing ample sensitivity to Japan’s need for security in its neighbourhood. It joined the Japanese government in condemning “in the strongest terms” North Korea’s continuing development of nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programmes.
With the right protocol followed, the “C” word does not figure anywhere in the joint statement, but many of its paragraphs will be of special interest to Beijing. One in particular is directly addressed to it where India and Japan speak clearly about the commitment to respecting freedom of navigation etc., based on the principles of international law. Specifically, on the South China Sea, the two countries have called on “all parties” to show “utmost respect” to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) and to resolve the disputes by “peaceful means”.
.......

Gautam

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby g.sarkar » 15 Nov 2016 13:25

http://www.firstpost.com/world/india-ja ... 02426.html
India-Japan breach nuclear barrier, shift focus to geostrategic alliance
Given the weight of expectations over the civil nuclear agreement between India and Japan, it is but natural that signing of it would dominate the headlines. Yet, lopsided focus on the much-anticipated deal may undermine the depth and gamut of Indo-Japan strategic embrace that we got to witness as Narendra Modi schmoozed with Shinzo Abe in Tokyo during the annual bilateral summit.
The kumbaya on display wasn't superficial. Ever since Modi stepped onto Japanese soil in 2014 and caught Abe in a warm embrace, Indo-Japan relationship has become stronger in scope and wider in mutual interest. The atmospherics around Modi's visit this year, coupled with the revised global order following Donald Trump's rise in the US have clearly put the partnership on steroids. There has never been a shortage of mutual admiration between the two leaders, but both now evidently realise that the time is ripe to take the alliance beyond the borders of shared interest and strike a greater geostrategic understanding.
It is largely due to this compulsion that the civil nuclear agreement finally saw the light of day after breaking a six-year-old shackle of hesitancy, which Japan as the sole victim of nuclear weapons had to get over after working through a minefield of domestic ethical boundaries in inking such a deal with a non-NPT signatory country in India.
But it still happened, and came about at an opportune moment for India, which now has the ability to exploit the success of this deal and enjoy a greater moral authority in calling for a berth in the exclusive NSG club, members of which are shortly going to ponder over India's inclusion during a meeting in Vienna. Japan backed India's candidacy and ensured that four stages of the entire deal was squeezed into a single agreement unlike with the US where signing of the 123 agreement in 2007 was followed by NSG clearance in 2008, reprocessing in 2010, and inking of the administrative arrangements in 2015.
This deal will also make it more difficult for China to keep India out of the NSG club because terms of the civil nuclear deal with Japan, de facto brings India within the NPT framework. The "termination and cessation clause" built within the agreement permits signatories to stop nuclear cooperation in case India conducts nuclear tests and hence the need for NPT is much reduced.
Foreign policy isn't built on the bedrock of friendship but shared mutual interests. If Abe walked an extra mile to ensure signing of the agreement, it may have something to do with the decreased domestic demand, since the 2011 Fukushima disaster that is forcing Japan's nuclear industry to increasingly look for markets abroad. Close on the heels of Vietnam scuppering a deal, the agreement with India gives Prime Minister Abe the necessary breathing space.
It is this dovetailing of interest that came through as India and Japan jotted nine other agreements and then in the joint declaration, proceeded to address the $10 trillion gorilla in the room — China.
Right from the moment that Modi set about in his journey, the dragon's shadow loomed large. China's nervousness about a greater Indo-Japanese synergy has remained latent, but this time the gloves were off as its state-controlled media came out with a scathing series of editorials, nakedly warning India against toeing Japan's line on South China Sea and issuing an open threat that were such a thing to happen, New Delhi will stand to greatly lose by way of trade and commercial relations.
In the intriguing world of foreign policy, such naked threats are more a signal of nervousness than strength. India and Japan both understand this, and therefore Modi and Abe's joint statement pressed down hard on Beijing's South China Sea wound, making no bones about the fact any maritime or territorial disputes must be solved without the "use of force" and in accord with UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) for free and fair navigation and commerce.
......

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby svinayak » 19 Nov 2016 12:12

Japanese PM’s ‘Full Confidence’ in Trump Spooks China'

Chinese state media has deemed Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s meeting with President-elect Donald Trump a failure while warning Tokyo not to feel emboldened by the alliance in the South China Sea, a sign that Trump’s decision to grant Abe his first one-on-one visit with a foreign head of state has rattled Beijing.
In an article titled “Trump meets Abe, but fails Japan,” the state-run Global Times criticizes Abe for meeting with Trump, claiming that Abe’s “zero-sum mentality” will ultimately doom Japan’s growth as an influential power. “Abe chose to seek US support to contain China and reform Japan’s pacifist constitution out of its fear of a rising China, with an aim of making Japan a bigger political power in the world,” the Times alleges. “However, this zero-sum mentality ensures that Japan will have to take on the role of the US’ ‘little brother.'”

In addition to these semi-official remarks – the government controls these outlets, but their articles are not official government statements – the Chinese Foreign Ministry issued a statement Friday warning the Japanese government not to meddle in the South China Sea territorial disputes. Warning that the meeting with Trump has relegated Japan to a “little brother” role while fretting that Japan may now be more influential in Asia belies concerns that the Abe-Trump meeting went better than hoped for.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Bhurishravas » 20 Nov 2016 22:52

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-japan ... SKBN13F03U
Japan PM Abe: way to peace treaty with Russia coming into sight

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby g.sarkar » 21 Nov 2016 00:57

http://thediplomat.com/2016/11/modi-in- ... e-worried/
Modi in Japan: Why China Should Be Worried
Japan and India are expected to advance defense, economic, and even nuclear cooperation.
By Varun Tomar
In August 1977, Japanese Prime Minister Takeo Fukuda emphasized on the “three main pillars” of his trip to Manila. Those “pillars” went on to become the major principles of Japan’s foreign policy toward Asia, known as the Fukuda Doctrine of “Heart to Heart Relations.” In particular, Fukuda pledged that Japan, while possessing the means and capability, would never walk the path of militarization ever again. This policy guided Japanese foreign policy toward the rest of Asia until very recently. The growing aggressive stance of China in the region and the coming to power of a revisionist prime-minister, Shinzo Abe, has marked a clear shift in Tokyo’s regional security policy.
When Indian Prime Minister Narnedra Modi visits Japan on November 11, on a 48-hour trip for the Third Annual Summit meeting, Tokyo is expected to sign its first major defense deal in the last 50 years, the sale of US-2 Amphibious aircraft to India. Sources also say that the aircraft will bear the name US-2i, which clearly indicates how serious Modi is about promoting the “Make in India” campaign. The US-2 aircraft will enable India to better surveil its Exclusive Economic Zone in the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean region. This will in turn speed up an Indian Navy response to incidents near the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, major strategic holdings from a geopolitical viewpoint.
Apart from in-depth exchanges on bilateral, regional, and global issues to further deepen the broad-based and action-oriented partnership between India and Japan, Modi’s visit will also reportedly see a civil nuclear deal. Such a deal, if concluded between New Delhi and Tokyo, would definitely antagonize Beijing. China has continuously tried to stop India’s entry into the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) citing as a reason that India is not a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). New Delhi should understand that China wants to penalize it for growing closer to the United States and engaging with Japan in the pacific region. Beijing also does not want to let down its all-weather ally Pakistan by accepting India’s global role as a responsible nuclear power. By convincing Tokyo to sign the civil nuclear deal, New Delhi has played a major trump card. Reports suggest that the deal between India and Japan would be concluded along the lines of the NPT, and Tokyo would walk out of the deal of India carries out a nuclear test, which it is highly unlikely to do considering its past record.
.......

Gautam

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 24 Dec 2016 14:24

Japan's Involvement in Infrastructure projects in Chennai - The Hindu
Image

The city’s urban infrastructure may get a boost soon with the State government seeking to accelerate approval for five significant projects to be implemented with financial assistance from the Japan International Co-operation Agency (JICA).

In a meeting held at the Secretariat here on Friday, Chief Minister O. Panneerselvam requested JICA President Shinichi Kitaoka to provide assistance for the five projects to meet the growing needs of the metropolis.

The projects in the pipeline are — the fourth desalination plant that will treat 400 million litres of water a day (mld), Phase II of the Chennai Metro Rail project, the Chennai Peripheral Ring Road Project, Phase II of the Tamil Nadu Investment Promotion Programme and the Chennai Urban Infrastructure Project.

According to officials, the Japanese side was “very receptive”
even though the meeting was taking place under “sad circumstances” after the death of former Chief Minister Jayalalithaa. Mr. Panneerselvam recollected that the last public function Jayalalithaa attended was the inauguration of the second stretch of the Metro Rail from Little Mount to Chennai airport.

JICA partly funded the Rs. 14,600-crore Phase I project of the Chennai Metro and released funds periodically. It has contributed 59 per cent for Phase I. For the current financial year, the government has already sent a proposal to JICA for a loan of Rs. 2,177 crore. The Japanese side indicated that the Metro Phase I extension was in the final stages of appraisal and approval. Phase II of the Chennai Metro Rail may require more than Rs 50,000 crore. JICA, the Centre and the State government would have to share the cost as in the first phase, officials said.

The Chennai Peripheral Road, which will connect Poonjeri on the East Coast Road near Mamallapuram with Kattupalli, will be 162 km long. This road will be yet another semi-circle hugging the city and will allow expansion. The road will require about Rs. 12,000 crore. This includes Rs. 6,000 crore for land acquisition, officials said. The project, which is being implemented by the Highways Department, will run through 78.6 km of existing roads, and decongest traffic along arterial roads on the outskirts.

Also planned is the fourth desalination plant in Perur along East Coast Road that will treat 400 mld of seawater. Financial assistance has been sought under JICA for the project, including improving the old water distribution network in the core city. The project cost has been estimated to be nearly Rs. 5,800 crore. Of this, JICA will contribute about Rs. 4,000 crore. How the Centre and the State will share the rest of the expenditure is still yet to be decided.

Chennai Corporation too has proposed to develop an integrated stormwater drain network in the Kosasthalaiyar basin, covering the zones of Tiruvottiyur, Manali and Madhavaram. The Rs. 1,800-crore project will be executed with JICA funding for a distance of 429 km. The network is coming up in the extended areas linking four river basins — the Kosasthalaiyar basin in north Chennai, the Adyar and Cooum basins in central Chennai and the Kovalam basin in south Chennai, sources said.

During the meeting, Mr. Panneerselvam also noted that the ongoing projects such as Chennai - Bengaluru industrial corridor project supported by JICA must be expedited. JICA officials told him that they were committed to the project as they saw great scope {But, there is no visible movement in that project for the last three years}, officials said.

In the course of the discussions, it was highlighted by the Japanese side that the Tamil Nadu Investment Promotion Programme Phase I was a great success and JICA was ready to move to TNPP Phase II within the current fiscal. The JICA president expressed great satisfaction with his visit to the Institute of Child Health and said Tamil Nadu was a model partner.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 24 Dec 2016 18:49

Japan drags India to WTO on steel imports issue - The Hindu
Japan has dragged India to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) against certain measures taken by New Delhi on imports of iron and steel products.

“On December 20, Japan notified the WTO Secretariat that it had requested dispute consultations with India in the dispute ‘India—Certain Measures on Imports of Iron and Steel Products’,” the WTO has said.India has imposed minimum import price (MIP) on imports of certain iron and steel products.In February, India imposed MIP of 173 products for six months, which was later extended twice for two months. Earlier this month, the government extended MIP on 19 products till February 4, 2017.According to the ministry sources, WTO-compliant measures like anti-dumping duty should be used to overcome the issue of cheap imports of commodities. — PTI

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Karthik S » 24 Dec 2016 20:04

With existing desalination plants and the above proposed one, together they can cater to the needs of around 45L people of the city. One more of such capacity and the city will not be dependent on other sources.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 03 Jan 2017 07:48

India's rupee ban smacks Japan's PVC industry
http://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Trends/ ... C-industry
TOKYO -- Japanese producers of polyvinyl chloride face an unexpected hurdle as India's ban on high-denomination rupee notes slams the brakes on exports, hampering an effort to raise prices in Japan.

Big purveyors in Japan want domestic price increases for PVC resin, often used in pipes, based on price growth abroad. India had driven the strength in exports. But the slowdown in the key South Asian market will loosen the supply-demand balance in Japan, making higher prices a tougher sell to business customers.
...
India's surprise ban on high-denomination notes in early November has forced people to exchange the nullified 500- and 1,000-rupee notes with new ones or deposit them at banks. This "crackdown on black money" in India's cash economy has hurt farmers, many of whom lack a bank account. Farmers are key consumers of PVC pipes and films, but many have refrained from purchases as they are unable to smoothly exchange old notes for new ones.

"The supply chain is short, and the impact manifested quickly," said President Mamoru Kadokura of PVC maker Kaneka.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Prem » 11 Jan 2017 23:50

http://www.asianwarrior.com/2017/01/ind ... itics.html
India-Japan alliance: A Game Changer in Asian Geopolitics



The 2008 global economic crisis impacted Japan badly. Economic stagnation, ageing population, a confrontational China, and an indifferent America – all these factors lead Tokyo’s think-tank to revisit their foreign policy and forge new alliances, especially in Asia. However, political instability in Tokyo delayed the process. Between 2006 and 2012, Japan saw 6 Prime Ministers! In the elections that were held in 2012, Japan’s Liberal Democrat Party got a decisive mandate and its leader Shinzo Abe became the Prime Minister for the second time. Abe earlier served as PM between 2006 and 2007. Prime Minister Abe, known to be an astute strategist, started taking China head-on. He saw a great ally in India.
Shinzo Abe, in his earlier stint as the Prime Minister of Japan, proposed the famous “Security Diamond” concept during his historic address to the Indian Parliament in 2007. He envisioned a security alliance between India, US, Australia, and Japan to uphold the international law. The then Indian government, led by Dr. Manmohan Singh was cold to this proposal by Abe, fearing backlash from China. Also, Shinzo Abe resigned due to health grounds just two months after his address to the Indian parliament. That only meant that his pet proposal of “Security Diamond” went into a cold storage. When Abe returned to power in 2012, he didn’t waste time in pursuing his “Security Diamond” project from where he left off during his earlier stint. He made his intent clear in this article, published just 24 hours after he came to power. He appointed Nobukatsu Kanehara and Tomohiko Taniguchi as his key advisors, who not only strengthened his India-centric vision but also gave a long-term direction to Japan’s policy towards India. Abe then had a tough time convincing Manmohan Singh government in India to boldly counter China by becoming a part of the “Security Diamond” project. Here’s where Abe pulled off a masterstroke! Abe rightly predicted that India would vote for a leadership change in 2014 and he saw the then Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi as the potential next Prime Minister of India. Abe invited Gujarat CM Modi to Tokyo and developed great trade relations with Gujarat. That’s when the bonhomie between Abe and Modi began.Three months after taking oath as India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi visited Japan. When Modi landed at Kyoto, Shinzo Abe, diverting from the usual protocol, travelled from Tokyo to Kyoto to receive his friend Modi at the airport. In a strictly protocol-adhering country like Japan, this gesture was seen by many as a sign of fostering friendship between India and Japan. The message was clear – Japan became the fulcrum of Modi’s “Act East” policy and India became a sharp edge of Abe’s “Security Diamond”. “Collective defense”, “Freedom of navigation”, “Upholding international rule of law” became the buzzwords in Indo-Japan diplomatic statements.
Modi and Abe have made steadfast moves in enhancing Indo-Japan relations. India chose Japan over China for its ambitious bullet train project and Japan reciprocated by loaning One Lakh Crore Rupees at a nominal 0.1% interest and a 50-year tenure. Also, Japan is selling defense equipment to India at very competitive prices, drawing angry reactions from Beijing. Above all, Japan has over-turned its self-imposed regulation of not signing civilian nuclear agreements with non-signatories of CTBT/NPT and inked the nuclear deal with India. Japan is now a permanent participant in the annual Malabar Naval Exercises. Japan joined India in the Chabahar Port project in Iran, which will play a crucial role in boosting the Indian Ocean trade corridor. This is an impressive list of bilateral achievements in a span of just 2.5 years! Abe’s “Security Diamond” and Modi’s “Act East” policies complemented each other and cemented a formidable geopolitical alliance in Asia.
It is true that Modi and Abe have taken Indo-Japan relations to new heights. It is also true that both these countries need each other. But, is this relation just based on the China factor? No! It is not. India and Japan have so much in common. Both are ancient civilizations, linked by Buddhism. There are so many beliefs which are common between Indian and Japanese cultures. India and Japan have no contentious issues culturally, historically, economically, or geographically. Most Japanese people respect India as Buddhism was born there. For Indians, Japanese brands like Honda, (Maruti) Suzuki, Sony, Toyota, Yamaha, etc are household names. Politically, both India and Japan are democracies and are part of the “G4 Nations”, supporting each other’s membership in the United Nations Security Council. Considering these factors and also the pace at which Indo-Japan relations have strengthened in the recent years, it is only a matter of time before a formal military alliance is forged. The strengthening of Indo-Japan relations will contribute greatly to peace and stability in Asia and the World by acting as a deterrent against expansionist forces and bring economic prosperity to the region by upholding the rule of international law and freedom of navigation in the region’s high seas.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby SSridhar » 16 Jan 2017 12:36

[url=http://www.thehindu.com/business/It’s-time-to-say-‘Irasshaimase’-to-Japan/article17041353.ece?homepage=true]It is time to say "Irasshaimase" to Japan[/url] - The Hindu

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 04 Feb 2017 02:12

Fukushima nuclear reactor radiation at highest level since 2011 meltdown
https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... 1-meltdown
The facility’s operator, Tokyo Electric Power (Tepco), said atmospheric readings as high as 530 sieverts an hour had been recorded inside the containment vessel of reactor No 2, one of three reactors that experienced a meltdown when the plant was crippled by a huge tsunami that struck the north-east coast of Japan in March 2011.

The extraordinary radiation readings highlight the scale of the task confronting thousands of workers, as pressure builds on Tepco to begin decommissioning the plant – a process that is expected to take about four decades.

The recent reading, described by some experts as “unimaginable”, is far higher than the previous record of 73 sieverts an hour in that part of the reactor.

A single dose of one sievert is enough to cause radiation sickness and nausea; 5 sieverts would kill half those exposed to it within a month, and a single dose of 10 sieverts would prove fatal within weeks.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby Neshant » 07 Feb 2017 12:15

I wonder how many radio active fish are swimming around that area with millions of gallons of contaminated sea water being discharged every day into the ocean. India better setup proper monitoring & security for all its reactors. The unimaginable chaos from a reactor being blown up by religious nut cases would be disastrous.

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 08 Feb 2017 07:12

http://www.livemint.com/Industry/FsChFl ... ls-am.html
"Japan’s ‘green card’ welcome for Indian IT professionals, amid US H1B visa reforms

Japan is introducing a new law to accord permanent residency status to skilled professionals in 1-2 years, even as Donald Trump moves to tighten US visa policy".

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Re: India and Japan: News and Discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 08 Feb 2017 07:14

http://www.thehindu.com/business/Indust ... 242793.ece
Mr. Maeda {Executive Vice President of the Japan External Trade Organisation (JETRO)} said currently there is an “investment imbalance” between Japan and India. The investments by Japan in India as at the end of 2015 were $14.1 billion, while investments from India into Japan were worth only $0.074 billion. He also pointed out that FDI (2015 figures) from India to Singapore ($5.27 billion), to the U.S. ($3 billion) and to the U.K. ($779 million) were much more than to Japan (just $27 million).

He said Japan is looking to attract investments from Indian companies in sectors including IT/ITeS, pharmaceuticals and tourism.


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