Geopolitical thread

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby skher » 24 Mar 2009 23:21

abhischekcc wrote:What's more is that India is expected to become self sufficient (or even surplus) by 2012 in NG. As years progress, there will be a strong push to convert our energy base to NG from oil and coal, with oil giving way first since we have plenty of coal available internally.

This will make Indian energy needs less dependant on West Asia. However, this DOES NOT preclude cooperation with Iran. Remember that Shia Iran does not support any terror groups in India; Sunni Pakistan, KSA, and UAE do. Changing our energy supplier to Iran would help in making our domestic policy less terrorist friendly.


True. But with Gwadar and Northern Areas with the TSPA, how do we get to Iran?

Also,Yamri-khan loves petrol,dollars and petrodollars - so its bestest buds forever - UAE,KSA and TSPA cannot afford to be disappointed.All of them are not very far from the Iran-India naval routes.

Playing Shia-Sunni game is a tad dangerous - considering our own demographics,at best restricted to 'AphGhanIesTan'.Not another Kashmir pogrom.

India, Iran, Russia mull ways to take on Taliban

It's still part of conversations, but old partners, India, Iran and Russia, are dusting out an old mechanism to take on the Taliban in Afghanistan.


Old mechanism?How old? The 1900's Great Game old? Did the these old friends also co-operate from 1979-1989?
History suggests that the old mechanism is a 'civilized' way of carving out niches and spheres of influence in a foreign land - usually without the host land's permission.If so,where do we stand on these snake oil deals?

Hopefully,post-partition India will not repeat foreign policy debacles of pre-partition India & does involve the Afghani leaders..

How are we in a position to take out the Taliban? IMVVVHO,a Para (SF) man made the supreme sacrifice in Kupwara instead of Kandahar.

I wish our political leaders had the vision and strategic insight to give him and his ilk the right GPS co-ordinates and be applied wisely.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Philip » 26 Mar 2009 15:56

China in "fury" against accurate US report! This after China's "aggro" aginst a US survey vessel acting well within international waters,where China has its own sisniter version of the "International Law of the Sea",,where it want all navies to stay outside its economic territorial zone!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... eport.html

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Tilak » 28 Mar 2009 20:27

Obama, Medvedev to sign declaration on START April 1
Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:37pm IST
MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and his U.S. counterpart Barack Obama will sign a declaration on a new nuclear arms reduction treaty on April 1, a top Kremlin aide said on Saturday, Russian media reported.

At the meeting in London, Medvedev and Obama will also sign a general declaration on U.S.-Russian relations, Medvedev aide Sergei Prikhodko said.

Russian officials have said that signing a successor to the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START 1) is a priority in relations with the new U.S. administration, which has pledged to "reset" ties with Russia after they reached post-Cold War lows under former President George W. Bush.


-------------------

Myanmar junta open to talks after U.S. diplomat visit
Fri Mar 27, 2009 5:30am EDT

NAYPYIDAW, Myanmar (Reuters) - Myanmar's military junta is open to talks with the United States, its information minister said after a rare visit by a top U.S. diplomat amid a review of Washington's policy toward the regime.

"President Obama has pledged to make changes. I think that visit was just the beginning of the change," Brigadier General Kyaw Hsan told local reporters summoned to the new capital for Friday's annual Armed Forces Day parade.

Washington insisted this week's visit by Stephen Blake, director of the Office for Mainland Southeast Asia at the State Department, did not reflect any shift in policy toward a regime the former Bush administration labeled an "outpost of tyranny."


Blake met with Foreign Minister Nyan Win, representatives of ethnic minority groups and members of detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi's party during his visit, part of a five-country tour of the region.

The trip, which U.S. officials confirmed after it was reported by Myanmar's state-run newspaper, came a month after Hillary Clinton announced the policy review during her first tour of Asia as U.S. Secretary of State.

Over the years Washington has tightened sanctions on the military, which has ruled for more than four decades, to try to force a political rapprochement with Nobel laureate Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy (NLD).

Western governments have criticized the forthcoming poll as a sham aimed at entrenching rule by the military, which refused to recognize the last election in 1990, won by Suu Kyi's party.

The NLD has insisted on a list of preconditions before it will negotiate with the regime, including the release of all political prisoners, a review of the new constitution and the honoring of the 1990 election results.

The junta has ignored those demands as it pushes ahead with its seven-step "roadmap" to democracy.

In his address to the troops, junta leader Senior General Than Shwe, 76, warned politicians to "refrain from inciting unrest, to avoid personal attacks and smear campaigns against other parties" during next year's campaign.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Tilak » 28 Mar 2009 20:46

Interesting Documentary On : Myannmar , China , Taiwan, Pakistan , Afghanistan , Drug Trade , CIA

From Australian TV : An Unholy Alliance
This 1996 documentary examines the CIA's connection to the global drug trade, with a focus on opium and heroin. Posted with the permission of Director Chris Hilton, who now makes his home at Essential Media and Entertainment: http://www.essential-media.com/index.php More info on the documentary here: http://www.oneworldmagazine.org/seek/deamon/epis2.html


-- Full Screen URL -- (**If the Embedded Video doesn't Work**)

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Gerard » 29 Mar 2009 05:57

Office of the Secretary of Defense
ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS
Military Power of the People’s Republic of China 2009

http://www.defenselink.mil/pubs/pdfs/Ch ... t_2009.pdf

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Sanjay M » 29 Mar 2009 11:52

http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=09/03/28/2134218

UN Attacks Free Speech

newsblaze writes "The UN Human Rights Council assaulted free expression today, in a 23-11 vote that urges member states to adopt laws outlawing criticism of religions. The proposal came to the UN from Pakistan on behalf of the Organization for the Islamic Conference. There were 13 abstentions. South Korea, Japan, India, Mexico and Brazil, all strong democracies, allowed this to pass by abrogating their responsibility. While the resolution doesn't mention the online world, where does this subject get mentioned most, if not online?"

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Philip » 29 Mar 2009 11:57

Webmasters,please check in we have been atatcked by "GhostNet".

PRC scumpigs!
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/ma ... -computing

Massive Chinese computer espionage network uncovered

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Ameet » 30 Mar 2009 02:52

Indian Ocean Island votes to become fully French

http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2009/03/ ... yotte.html

Highlights:

Voters on Mayotte, a tiny island in the Indian Ocean, chose by referendum Sunday to become a fully fledged part of France -- a change of status that will end local traditions such as polygamy and Islamic courts.

However, residents will see their tax bills increase and have to abandon certain customs to conform to French law.

For now, men can have several wives whom they can repudiate unilaterally, and women do not have equal inheritance rights. The island has a traditional Islamic justice system with "qadis" or religious scholars who act as judges.

Mayotte will have to ban polygamy, raise the minimum age of marriage to 18 from 15 years old, and give women equal rights.

The Islamic justice system will be replaced by secular courts, though qadis will retain a consultative role.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Philip » 30 Mar 2009 17:24

China wants to rule the world.

'Unhappy China' bestseller claims Beijing should 'lead the world'
A new book claiming that China is a victim of Western bullying and "should rise up and lead the world" has soared to the top of the country's bestseller list.

By Malcolm Moore in Shanghai
Last Updated: 2:49PM BST 29 Mar 2009

On the eve of the G20 summit in London, "Unhappy China" has stirred debate about whether China should have a greater role on the world stage. Although the country will soon overtake Japan as the world's second-largest economy, China is not included in the G8 and is a second tier member of the G20. Beijing has little influence in the World Bank or the International Monetary Fund and is highly vulnerable to changes in the value of the dollar.

"We still feel suppressed because we are sometimes condemned or criticised by the western world," said Zhang Xiaobo, the book's publisher.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/fina ... world.html


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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby vsudhir » 30 Mar 2009 20:39

There's no doubt China propagates a huge 'victim' mentality to keep nationalist fires burning within its educated class. And the chinis are more jingo and more nationalist than even die hard khans.

And this sort of 'take-no-prisoners' nationalism based on a victimization complex scares the conomist and its paymasters sh1tless. Which is why we've had sermons in India on why its fruitless to seek vengeance for past wrongs and why a victim mentality is oh-so-bad onlee. I don't agree 100% with that sermon for various reasons. A nationalist narrative that seeks to keep alive memories of past wrongs helps forge a stronger nation, if handled properly.

India needs to get back its own unapologetic nationalist narrative the way the chinis have theirs. Of course, in India we can;t overboard the way the chinis have simply because of our diversity. And thats a good thing, I guess.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby skher » 31 Mar 2009 19:13

vsudhir wrote:There's no doubt China propagates a huge 'victim' mentality to keep nationalist fires burning within its educated class. And the chinis are more jingo and more nationalist than even die hard khans.

And this sort of 'take-no-prisoners' nationalism based on a victimization complex scares the conomist and its paymasters sh1tless. Which is why we've had sermons in India on why its fruitless to seek vengeance for past wrongs and why a victim mentality is oh-so-bad onlee. I don't agree 100% with that sermon for various reasons. A nationalist narrative that seeks to keep alive memories of past wrongs helps forge a stronger nation, if handled properly.


So do the Kangress, BJP, VHP, RSS, SAd, etc.etc.It does not enjoy a lasting influence, i'm afraid.

Instead of past wrongs like pre-Gandhi freedom struggle,remembering past rights and promise of a new unified nation works for a longer time.....India was a democratically elected one-party state for 40 years.
The rule ended when that party started organizing guerrillas on the lines of PLA in the '80s.

India needs to get back its own unapologetic nationalist narrative the way the chinis have theirs. Of course, in India we can;t overboard the way the chinis have simply because of our diversity. And thats a good thing, I guess.


Unfortunately,nationalism is now regularly confused solely with Bajrang Dal activism,Mandal/Mandir and 'Moditva'.Hence,the state of feeling apologetically nationalist.

Sadly;in the present scenario, only Modi as PM has the potential to give India its pre-independence nationalist fervour back....that exactly what he did for Gujarat...give back its pride.

Nationalism,imho, is based on making a point & letting it resonate as loudly as possible.
IG had a point to prove being a woman leader of third world:-so many things like Maruti,Bangladesh Liberation,bank nationalization,declaring India socialist,etc. were started.

Similarily,Thatcher and ABV too had another point to prove :- that their ideology of the Right was right for the country & the economy.

'Enlightened despot' China too has a point to prove - one can be absolutist & negate the need for democracy if one's people is economically free and can purchase freely. It is currently scouting for friends and markets,especially the erstwhile and surviving communist parties.

The question for India is that in the coalition era, are the freedom struggle based goals of nationalism feasible anymore? What is nationalism in the face of bijli-sadak-pani IOW the economists/paymasters perceptive?

JMT

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Amber G. » 01 Apr 2009 03:00

There is a picture slide show for husbands and wives of G20 in Times story. Click at the picture for more pictures and story.
Image

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby RamaY » 01 Apr 2009 03:27

Funny

Image

The Chinese are coming.... http://www.southparkstudios.com/episodes/187260 :rotfl:

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby renukb » 01 Apr 2009 10:11

India should learn the carrot & stick policy from the west...

Polish minister wants to see Russia in NATO
http://www.reuters.com/article/latestCr ... USLV235643

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Johann » 01 Apr 2009 23:00

Cross-posting from the US and the World thread on Ramana's request;



- Parag Khanna served as a consultant to SOCOM and CENTCOM. This is more than Mark Steyn can say for himself, and neither organisation is known for its airy-fairy nature.

- The EU's greatest weakness in foreign and defence policy has nothing to do with hard power vs. soft power. It is the difficulty in creating a unified foreign policy and military force when you have 27 sovereign states.

Unless America dissolves the DoD and starts giving a veto to California over where its troops get sent, and allows Texas to have one foreign policy, and New York another (ie the early situation of the American colonies), maximising the American use of soft power will never produce an EU-like situation

- Steyn's claim that Europeans were massively underspending on defence in favour of social security in the 1970s while the Americans subsidised them doesnt stand up either. German defence spending in 1975 was 3.6%, and France's was 3.4%, the US was in the region of 4.5%

The really massive bouts of US defence spending in the 1960s and early 1970s had nothing to do with defending Europe, but fighting the Vietnam war. This was a war that was not supported by European security establishments, but by US allies in Asia like South Korea, Japan, Australia, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, etc

The real gap between US and European defence spending emerges in the late 1980s and expands in the 1990s (periods during which the welfare state was in slow retreat under neoliberal pressure). That is because European defence spending was linked to deterring the USSR in Europe, but US spending is linked to a continuing global role.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Johann » 01 Apr 2009 23:01

[continued cross-posting]
ramana Post subject: Re: US and the WorldPosted: 01 Apr 2009 04:09 pm

Forum Moderator


Joined: 01 Jan 1970 12:00 am
Posts: 7569 EU's greatest weakness is the two great Civil wars they fought to dethorne Great Britain primacy. This is what led to theri financial and demogrpahic shortfall leading to present ennui.

Both the wars were really an extension of the French Revolution/Napoleonic wars interrupted by a century of peace. They ended monarchies in Europe.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Johann » 01 Apr 2009 23:03

[continued cross-posting]

Ramana,

+ The two world wars only accelarated all of those processes, which were at work well before the first shot was fired.

- The rise of American power was inevitable given its natural resources, its room, and above all its unified but free political system.

- Decolonisation was also inevitable, given the unwilingness to fully integrate the ruling classes of conquered peoples (Islam's most powerful element) in to the establishment, but integrating them enough to provide the tools of modernity.

- Europe's demographic problems are not the result of wars, when populations recovered quickly, but of plenty following the postwar economic miracles which transformed the working classes lives. Education, prosperity and greater women's rights bring down fertility rates. This has been seen worldwide from Japan to Iran to America. In America's case it has been offset through (a)the immigration of women from poorer, less educated backgrounds (b) lingering deep pockets of socio-economic inequality. The greater rights and benefits enjoyed by the working classes and women were the inevitable outcome of wider participation in the democratic process, the only way to avoid revolution.

+ In both WWI and WWII, Britain, France and Russia acted as allies, while Germany was the common main adversary.

Britain historically played a relatively small role in the balance of power in Europe - France and Russia were the chief Continental powers from the 17th century onwards.

The fundamental issue was Germany's reckless and clumsy attempts to remake the European balance of power as its economic and military power grew through industrialisation. Bismarck was able to avoid uniting other powers against Germany, but the Kaiser, Ludendorff and Hitler were driven by emotion and repeatedly overestimated German power and underestimated their rivals.

The EU and NATO were meant to solve the 'German question' and other great power rivalries by returning to the old project of European integration, while keeping the Russians from taking advantage of the vacuum, and keeping some sort of economic and technological pace with the US.

+ The idea of nationalism was born in Europe, and while the EU is meant to curb its excesses, it really hasnt died to the extent that the EU can actually take over the sovereign functions of defence and foreign policy. Until that happens the EU will always punch below its weight, caught between two systems.

The only way the EU can appeal to the various national constituencies to support such a transfer of responsibilities is to deepen the democratisation of EU structures - for example to make the EC subordinate to the European Parliament. Until that happens the EU will remain in limbo.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Johann » 01 Apr 2009 23:05

[continued cross-posting]

ramana Post subject: Re: US and the WorldPosted: 01 Apr 2009 05:24 pm

Forum Moderator


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Posts: 7569 Thanks. Can you post in the Geo-political thread too. I think this understanding should be the basis of the new world order.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby vsudhir » 02 Apr 2009 00:16

Cross-posting from the US and the World thread on Ramana's request;

vsudhir wrote:
THE EUROPEANIZATION OF AMERICA ... Mark Steyn


- Parag Khanna served as a consultant to SOCOM and CENTCOM. This is more than Mark Steyn can say for himself


IOW, Parag Khanna must be right and Steyn must be dead wrong.

and neither organisation is known for its airy-fairy nature.


Nor are they burdened with infalliability.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Johann » 02 Apr 2009 05:40

>>IOW, Parag Khanna must be right and Steyn must be dead wrong.
>>Nor are they burdened with infalliability.

Mark Steyn is a literary polemicist, not a military analyst, or a political scientist. It's one thing to state ideals- it's another to prescribe the means to realise them.

CENTCOM and SOCOM have a very serious full time mission, to use American forces to achieve US national interests. They dealt with realities that Steyn doesnt have to bother with.

The Neoconservative approach, which Steyn endorses in each and every case is based on the assumption that US military resources are inexhaustible, while those of rivals and opponents is finite. This is fundamentally wrong- no one, not even the US can afford to take a maximalist position against everyone all the time, as Bush acknowledged by 2006. The intelligent use of soft power can reduce the amount of hard power needed for a given situation, and expand rather than reduce your reach and staying power.

Khanna's basic advice is not particularly new - it was echoed during the Cold War at several junctures.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Sanjay M » 04 Apr 2009 04:23


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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Sanjay M » 05 Apr 2009 11:47

Rasmussen Named Head of NATO

I'm glad that they picked this guy, because he's shown he can stand up firmly to Islamists, just like Sarkozy has. If Muslim Turkey objected, tough luck for them - they're shedding their Ataturkism everyday.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Gerard » 08 Apr 2009 03:23

Look to Brasilia, Not Beijing
But a more compelling challenge to the current world order may be emerging from an unlikely trio of countries that boast both impeccable democratic credentials and serious global throw weight. They are India, Brazil and South Africa and their little-noticed experiment in foreign policy coordination since 2003 to promote subtle but potentially far-reaching changes to the international system has the potential to leave fears of a rising China in the dustbin of history.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby vsudhir » 08 Apr 2009 03:29

Sanjay M wrote:Rasmussen Named Head of NATO

I'm glad that they picked this guy, because he's shown he can stand up firmly to Islamists, just like Sarkozy has. If Muslim Turkey objected, tough luck for them - they're shedding their Ataturkism everyday.


FWIW, katest news is that Rasmussen has agreed to apologize to the islamic world.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Sanjay M » 08 Apr 2009 06:25


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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby svinayak » 08 Apr 2009 08:28

http://en.convention2008.risa.ru/paper/greatpowers/
Great Powers in World Politics (2008-2018): The Changing Pattern of Relationships

Relations between major power centers will continue to shape world politics in the coming decade. These relations unfold in a number of "traditional" domains - strategic deterrence, geopolitical rivalries as well as international trade and mutual investment. In addition to that, great powers will increasingly interact in new dimensions, such as coping with the implications of global climate change or regulating transnational migration flows. The emergence of these areas of relationships will not undermine the impact of great powers on world politics, but will rather enhance their role as providers of global public goods.

This section invites papers discussing the existing and prospective areas and patterns as well as outcomes of great power interaction. We analyze all facets of foreign relations of such players as the USA, China, Russia, Japan, India or the European Union. We encourage original forward-looking thinking about the ways in which the world's possible futures depend on the policies and mutual positioning of great powers as well as their ability for multilateral action. Specific directions of great power foreign and security policies are also of significant interest to this section.

Chair: Dr. Mikhail Troitskiy


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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Gerard » 10 Apr 2009 03:35


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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Stan_Savljevic » 10 Apr 2009 11:12

The death of Janet Jagan (1920-2009) brings to an end a glorious chapter in the anti-colonial struggle in the Caribbean and Latin America.
http://www.flonnet.com/stories/20090424260811900.htm

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What's Greater Middle East?

Postby Akshut » 10 Apr 2009 16:16

x-posting from US thread.

This is an article buy Robert D. Kaplan in NYtimes on 8 dec 2008.

Trouble in the Other Middle East

Just as solving or at least neutralizing the Israeli-Palestinian dispute is a requirement for reducing radicalism and Iranian influence throughout the Levant, the same is true of the Indian-Pakistani dispute at the other end of the Greater Middle East.


We need a second special negotiator for the Middle East, a skilled diplomat shuttling regularly among New Delhi, Islamabad and Kabul. (There has been some speculation, in fact, that Barack Obama is considering Richard Holbrooke, the former United Nations ambassador, for just such a job.)


This was just after Mumbai attacks Happened.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Sanjay M » 12 Apr 2009 10:13

Wow, Kim Jong Il is really looking scrawny and frail in his latest appearance following his stroke:

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/art ... AD97G0PCO0


Image

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby svinayak » 13 Apr 2009 12:29

http://www.paragkhanna.com/2009/02/the_ ... _ages.html
Parag Khanna is Director of the Global Governance Initiative and Senior Research Fellow in the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation.

The Coming Middle Ages
McKinsey Quarterly Special Issue | February 2009

The middle of the 21st century will resemble nothing so much as the Middle Ages of the 5th to 15th centuries, from the sacking of Rome by the Visigoths, in 410, to the fall of Constantinople, in 1453. This was a long and uncertain period and thus an ideal metaphor to characterize our times. It was an age of plagues and progress, commercial revolutions, expanding empires, crusades, city-states, merchants, and universities. It was multipolar, with expanding empires on the Eurasian landmass, and apolar, with no one global leader. The new Middle Ages—synonymous with the age of globalization—have already begun.

First let us take the empires. Charlemagne’s efforts to resurrect the Roman Empire have been succeeded, over a millennium later, by the multipronged armadas of Brussels Eurocrats steadily colonizing Europe’s periphery, in the Baltics, the Balkans, and, eventually, Anatolia and the Caucasus. The Eurocrats’ book is not the Bible but rather the acquis communautaire: the 31 chapters of the Lex Europea, which is rebuilding EU member states from the inside out. By 2040, even depopulated Russia, with any luck, will be an EU member and the West’s front line against the far more populous East.

By then, a rebranded, globalizing China will be just a decade shy of the centennial of its civil war’s end, in 1949; the Communist Party has long declared that 2050, not 2008 (the year of the Beijing Olympic Games), will mark the country’s real coming-out party as a superpower. A half century from now, China may still be the world’s most populous country, and if the exploits of its 15th-century explorer–statesman Zheng He are any guide, its demographic, commercial, and strategic presence from Africa to Latin America—to say nothing of its diplomatic and cultural dominance in East Asia—will have substantially increased.

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Ananth » 13 Apr 2009 22:29

http://www.slate.com/id/2215820/pagenum/all/

Why Israel Will Bomb Iran
The rational argument for an attack.
By David Samuels

Israel's version of a nuclear grand bargain that brings peace to the Middle East may be messier and more violent than what the Obama administration imagines can be accomplished through sanctions, blandishments, and the invocation of Barack Obama's magic middle name. But who can really argue with the idea of trading the Iranian nuclear bomb for a Palestinian state? Saudi Arabia would be happy. Egypt would be happy. Bahrain, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates would be happy. Jordan would be happy. Iraq would be happy. Two-thirds of the Lebanese would be happy. The Palestinians would go about building their state, and Israel would buy itself another 40 years as the only nuclear-armed country in the Middle East. Iran would not be happy.

But who said peace won't have a price?

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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby svinayak » 15 Apr 2009 05:41

Report warns of rise of right-wing extremists
USA Today - ‎42 minutes ago‎
In a report made public today, the Department of Homeland Security warns that the recession and the election of President Obama are "fueling resurgence" of right-wing extremist groups that are seeking new recruits, especially returning veterans. ...

Recession fueling right-wing extremism, US says

Reuters - ‎4 hours ago‎
By Jane Sutton MIAMI (Reuters) - Right-wing extremists in the United States are gaining new recruits by exploiting fears about the economy and the election of the first black US president, the Department of Homeland Security warned in a report to law ...

Homeland Security Warns of Rise in Right-Wing Extremism

FOXNews - ‎10 hours ago‎
An intelligence assessment released to law enforcement last week claims news of recession, the election of an African American president, rumors of new gun restrictions and the inability of veterans to reintegrate create fertile ground for radicalizing ...
Homeland Security: Foreclosures, credit crunch, returning vets may ...

Bizjournals.com - ‎37 minutes ago‎

The US Department of Homeland Security warns that the rise in foreclosures, credit crunch and election of President Barack Obama could spur threats from “right-wing extremists.” The Department's report also says returning Iraq War veterans facing ...

LokeshP
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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby LokeshP » 15 Apr 2009 11:02

expect more Indians mysteriously found dead on streets and in apartments...

Keshav
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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Keshav » 15 Apr 2009 20:30

The Europeans were saying the same thing around the time of the election, fearing that an economic depression would usher in another American era of fundamentalism, but the people still voted for Barack Obama.

Sounds like the sensationalist mainstream media doing its job for ratings. Media is having a tough time these days. Especially now, people should be wary about what they see and hear on American news channels.

svinayak
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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby svinayak » 18 Apr 2009 20:37


Paul Huth, Christopher Gelpi, and D. Scott Bennett
ESCALATION OF GREAT POWER DISPUTES: DETERRENCE VERSUS
STRUCTURAL REALISM, 1816-1984
(ICPSR 6355)
SUMMARY: The purpose of this study was to test the relative
explanatory power of two theoretical approaches--deterrence theory
and structural realism--in predicting dispute escalation among
"Great Powers" from 1816 to 1984. The Great Powers during this time
period are identified as Great Britain, France, Russia/Soviet
Union, Austria-Hungary, Prussia/Germany, Italy, the United States,
Japan, and China. A Great Power deterrence encounter is defined by
the explicit verbal threat of force or the movement and buildup of
military forces in preparation for armed conflict by a challenging
Great Power and a counterthreat by the defending Great Power.
Variables measure dispute escalation, system uncertainty, risk
propensity, balance of conventional military capabilities of
challenger and defender, defender's possession of second-strike
nuclear capability, interests at stake for challenger and defender,
past behavior of challenger and defender, and current dispute
involvement of challenger and defender.
UNIVERSE: Deterrence encounters involving Great Powers during the
period 1816-1984.


Philip
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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Philip » 20 Apr 2009 13:05

The failed assassination attempt on the Bolivian president Evo Morales,where the assassins who were killed and captured in advance by security forces,has revealed that the assassins had a rich international history as mercenaries,representing fascist right wing forces.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... rales.html

My meeting with the man accused of plotting the assassination of Evo Morales
Eduardo Rozsa Flores was one of three members of an alleged assassination plot against Bolivia's left-wing president Evo Morales who were gunned down in a police raid on their hotel last week. Philip Sherwell met him in Croatia in 1991


Check the full story for fascinating details of the plotters.

Rony
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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Rony » 20 Apr 2009 16:36

Acharya wrote:http://www.paragkhanna.com/2009/02/the_coming_middle_ages.html
Parag Khanna is Director of the Global Governance Initiative and Senior Research Fellow in the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation.
[ China may still be the world’s most populous country, and if the exploits of its 15th-century explorer–statesman Zheng He are any guide, its demographic, commercial, and strategic presence from Africa to Latin America—to say nothing of its diplomatic and cultural dominance in East Asia—will have substantially increased.


The Cholas were more imperialistic than Zheng He was.Yet people always quote Zheng He as a proff of chinese imperialistic ambitions.Throughout the chinese history the chinese never occupied any territories beyond their buffer states.Indian Empires like Mauryans who took even selecus persia and cholas who took most of south east asia were more outword looking and imperialistic than any chinese empire.Yet western analysts always say without proff that 'The chinese are returning to again dominate asia'.The chinese never dominated asia in the first place.It was India which dominated asia militarily, politically and culturally !

Aditya_V
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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby Aditya_V » 20 Apr 2009 17:22

Rony to add to your post if I am right , proof of Zheng He visit to Australia and the Atlantic coasts is based on Ganesha Statues and incriptions in Tamil, Don't know how Europeans who have no idea of Tamil interpreted these as Zheng He's visits and not Indian Travels.

svinayak
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Re: Geopolitical thread

Postby svinayak » 23 Apr 2009 03:40



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