The Red Menace

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Aditya_V
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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Aditya_V » 24 Oct 2016 14:27

I strongly believe that there was a tactic to make Maoists "India's no.1 challenge" to take away focus from our neighbors so that concessions and accommodation of Western neighbors wishes were being planned. Only God saved us from such a situation.

I wonder whoc gave orders to 76 CRPF men who died at the hands of Maoists in Chattisgarh?

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Sonugn » 25 Oct 2016 09:23

Apparently, the dispatching of 24 leftist terrorists to mao jannat has not gone down well with varavar rao who has demanded an inquiry & that the concerned security forces be booked for murder. Cheers

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Agnimitra » 27 Oct 2016 00:47

When will India begin to link "social justice" with the "Pakistan problem"? In doing so, we can redirect one threat to target the other.

Indian discourse should predicate Pakistan's inherent belligerence on the feudal structure of Pakistani society, and not just on the military's footprint there. The "civil-military" dichotomy is the snake oil sold as the problem within Pakistan, but the fact is that the "civil" part of that is also democratic feudalism (at best). Religion serves as the intermediary between this oligarchy and the oppressed masses there.

On the wisdom of "If you want peace, work for justice", the discourse across India should be that the solution to Pakistan's problem is to break down the feudal structure of Pakistan's society by 'encouraging' the oligarchy there to do 'bhudaan' before they leave for their nests in Canada. 'Encouragement' can come in the form of the uncontrolled spread of Naxalism and its anti-feudal and religion-averse work to Pakistan at the grassroots level.

Even in Balochistan, it is people of some Marxist persuasion who are at the forefront of the freedom struggle there. Many other Islamized Baloch actually join the ranks of the Taliban - which is symptomatic of how the Islamist intermediaries have hooked into popular discontent and search for justice. The introduction of Naxalism there (after its decades-long "success" in India's reform of feudalism) will deprive Islamism of a primary hook, and also turn it against the ashrafiya.

The useful redirection of Naxalism and its vast network within India (at the levels of 'intelligentsia' and 'proletariat') towards the Pakistan problem will also reorient its seditious nature to a patriotic one. Of course, this should be accompanied with continuing empowerment, reform and justice as part of 'sab ka saath, sab ka vikaas' development.

A New Left is needed in India.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Rudradev » 26 Apr 2017 10:08

Reviving this thread to focus on Maovadi terrorism snd COIN strategy in the aftermath of the Bastar attack.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Philip » 26 Apr 2017 10:36

It is past time that more expert hands and minds take over the problem of military prosecution of the Naxal menace. The MHA ios clearly at sea,timefor the big boys to enter. Some time ago,we had reports about how the IAF was refusing to get involved in what was perceived as an internal problem,not external and use of IAF firepower would against our own people. While their is some merit in that assumption,when things go down the tube-and they have been for some time,such internal conflicts take on external dimensions,as we definitely know that China and P{ak are supporting in many forms our internal separatist threats. The time has therefore come for a holistic solution militaire,to the Naxal menace. Needless to say the sweet end of the stick is political ,a political solution must eventually be found .Nevertheless,the nation cannot afford to suffer repeated losses as is being experienced. It is time for the "elephant" to crush the hyena.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/opinion/t ... wuzwJ.html
The Naxal attack in Sukma is proof the CRPF has not learnt the lessons of the past
OPINION Updated: Apr 25, 2017 15:13 IST
Ajai Sahni

Naxal Attack
A candle light vigil to pray for CRPF jawans who lost their lives in a Naxal attack in Chhattisgarh's Sukma district, in Patna. (PTI)
While sufficient details of the April 24 attack in Sukma that has resulted in the loss of the lives of at least 25 Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) personnel are not yet available to make any definitive assessment of the circumstances that led to this latest debacle, there is no doubt that a sequence of negligence and neglect of the basic lessons of the past, as well as, possibly, established standard operating procedures (SOPs), will have afflicted the deployment and actions of this unit, as was found to be the case in the March 11 incident in which 12 CRPF jawans were killed in the same district. In both incidents, the target units were deployed to protect road building parties, and were following a predictable routine in an area of significant and enduring vulnerability.

Such recurrent losses of valuable lives of security personnel are completely unacceptable and, one may add, unaffordable. Apart from their impact on morale and the objective circumstances prevailing in the theatres of conflict, their financial cost far outweighs any projected costs of the necessary means and measures that would be required to demonstrably diminish the risks of such attacks. Process, technical and technological solutions are available, and have succeeded in other theatres, including areas where the terrain and challenges were even greater than those prevailing in the areas around Sukma.

Read more

An insider speaks on Sukma Maoist attack: Why CRPF personnel are sitting ducks

300-400 Maoists ambushed securitymen in Sukma, CRPF claims ‘considerable’ damage in retaliation
Permanent road opening processes, for instance, have been well established and have succeeded in very difficult terrain, including the densely forested hills of Tripura – topography that is far more difficult than the forests of Bastar. Unfortunately, our governments and forces have no core institutions for documentation and dissemination of, or learning from, such valuable experiences, which pass out of use with the retirement or movement of the officers who have commanded remarkably successful counter-insurgency campaigns. Indeed, the lessons of the dramatic successes of neighbouring Andhra Pradesh are yet to be adequately understood by forces operating in Chhattisgarh.

The issue of micro or mini UAVs or small drones to such exposed parties would have worked. These devices are no longer expensive, and can be used for scouting and limited area surveillance, without any intervening intelligence or mediating establishment, could adequately equip such exposed and relatively isolated units to maintain permanent surveillance over an area of a few square kilometers – enough to ensure that no surprise attack could be mounted at any significant scale. This is certainly a possibility that needs to be evaluated. Indeed, in locations where fForce presence is permanent or recurrent, even cheaper alternatives would be available, including movable cameras to be located at a sufficient height to provide a 360 degree view of the immediate surroundings.

Read more

CRPF without regular chief for nearly two months

2017 deadliest year, April 2017 deadliest month for security forces in Chhattisgarh in 7 years
Crucially, while it is likely that any future inquiry into the present tragedy will either seek to disperse blame, or to focus it on the hapless commander of the target unit (who is reportedly among the dead), the senior leadership of the CRPF and the policy establishment must be squarely held to account for the persistent and predictable vulnerabilities of deployed Forces. Tactical errors, particularly where they are recurrent, are usually the consequence of strategic vulnerabilities: structural weaknesses, the result of poor planning, inadequate numbers, bad training and processes, and insufficient technical, technological and intelligence backup.

The practice of parachuting often uncommitted Indian Police Service (IPS) deputationists into almost every senior position in the CRPF has a great deal to do with existing structural deficits and deficiencies, despite the decades of experience within the Force. Moreover, while details are only fitfully available, it is also clear that equally indifferent ‘generalist’ Indian Administrative Service (IAS) officers in the policy establishment contribute to the unaddressed susceptibilities of the force. Firefighting measures cannot meet these challenges; only an experienced, specialised and competent leadership can successfully confront and resolve these.

Ajai Sahni is executive director, Institute for Conflict Management

The views expressed are personal

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Mort Walker » 26 Apr 2017 10:45

ToI reports suggests that 1500KM of roads being built in Chattishgarh is causing major takleef to Maoist as they will lose their grip on power with better roads and access to everyone.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Yagnasri » 26 Apr 2017 11:42

http://www.financialexpress.com/india-n ... ts/641240/

See the figures in the news report. The highest number of terrorist were killed last year.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Kashi » 17 May 2017 09:35

Chhattisgarh: 20 Naxals killed in Bijapur encounter

The IG said that around 350 paramilitary personnel were part of the operation. He said that they have witnessed Maoists wearing uniform of COBRA for the first time.

New Delhi : At least 20 naxals were killed in an encounter operation in Bijapur, the Inspector General of Central Reserve Police force informed on Tuesday.

The IG said that around 350 paramilitary personnel were part of the operation. He said that they have witnessed Maoists wearing uniform of COBRA for the first time.

On the other hand, eight Naxals, allegedly involved in the deadly attack on CRPF personnel last month, were today arrested from two places in Chhattisgarh’s Sukma district, police said.

With this, the number of ultras arrested for the April 24 attack has risen to 17, officials said.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby chetak » 17 May 2017 11:11

Philip wrote:It is past time that more expert hands and minds take over the problem of military prosecution of the Naxal menace. The MHA ios clearly at sea,timefor the big boys to enter. Some time ago,we had reports about how the IAF was refusing to get involved in what was perceived as an internal problem,not external and use of IAF firepower would against our own people. While their is some merit in that assumption,when things go down the tube-and they have been for some time,such internal conflicts take on external dimensions,as we definitely know that China and P{ak are supporting in many forms our internal separatist threats. The time has therefore come for a holistic solution militaire,to the Naxal menace. Needless to say the sweet end of the stick is political ,a political solution must eventually be found .Nevertheless,the nation cannot afford to suffer repeated losses as is being experienced. It is time for the "elephant" to crush the hyena.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/opinion/t ... wuzwJ.html
The Naxal attack in Sukma is proof the CRPF has not learnt the lessons of the past
OPINION Updated: Apr 25, 2017 15:13 IST
Ajai Sahni

Naxal Attack
A candle light vigil to pray for CRPF jawans who lost their lives in a Naxal attack in Chhattisgarh's Sukma district, in Patna. (PTI)
While sufficient details of the April 24 attack in Sukma that has resulted in the loss of the lives of at least 25 Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) personnel are not yet available to make any definitive assessment of the circumstances that led to this latest debacle, there is no doubt that a sequence of negligence and neglect of the basic lessons of the past, as well as, possibly, established standard operating procedures (SOPs), will have afflicted the deployment and actions of this unit, as was found to be the case in the March 11 incident in which 12 CRPF jawans were killed in the same district. In both incidents, the target units were deployed to protect road building parties, and were following a predictable routine in an area of significant and enduring vulnerability.

Such recurrent losses of valuable lives of security personnel are completely unacceptable and, one may add, unaffordable. Apart from their impact on morale and the objective circumstances prevailing in the theatres of conflict, their financial cost far outweighs any projected costs of the necessary means and measures that would be required to demonstrably diminish the risks of such attacks. Process, technical and technological solutions are available, and have succeeded in other theatres, including areas where the terrain and challenges were even greater than those prevailing in the areas around Sukma.

Read more

An insider speaks on Sukma Maoist attack: Why CRPF personnel are sitting ducks

300-400 Maoists ambushed securitymen in Sukma, CRPF claims ‘considerable’ damage in retaliation
Permanent road opening processes, for instance, have been well established and have succeeded in very difficult terrain, including the densely forested hills of Tripura – topography that is far more difficult than the forests of Bastar. Unfortunately, our governments and forces have no core institutions for documentation and dissemination of, or learning from, such valuable experiences, which pass out of use with the retirement or movement of the officers who have commanded remarkably successful counter-insurgency campaigns. Indeed, the lessons of the dramatic successes of neighbouring Andhra Pradesh are yet to be adequately understood by forces operating in Chhattisgarh.

The issue of micro or mini UAVs or small drones to such exposed parties would have worked. These devices are no longer expensive, and can be used for scouting and limited area surveillance, without any intervening intelligence or mediating establishment, could adequately equip such exposed and relatively isolated units to maintain permanent surveillance over an area of a few square kilometers – enough to ensure that no surprise attack could be mounted at any significant scale. This is certainly a possibility that needs to be evaluated. Indeed, in locations where fForce presence is permanent or recurrent, even cheaper alternatives would be available, including movable cameras to be located at a sufficient height to provide a 360 degree view of the immediate surroundings.

Read more

CRPF without regular chief for nearly two months

2017 deadliest year, April 2017 deadliest month for security forces in Chhattisgarh in 7 years
Crucially, while it is likely that any future inquiry into the present tragedy will either seek to disperse blame, or to focus it on the hapless commander of the target unit (who is reportedly among the dead), the senior leadership of the CRPF and the policy establishment must be squarely held to account for the persistent and predictable vulnerabilities of deployed Forces. Tactical errors, particularly where they are recurrent, are usually the consequence of strategic vulnerabilities: structural weaknesses, the result of poor planning, inadequate numbers, bad training and processes, and insufficient technical, technological and intelligence backup.

The practice of parachuting often uncommitted Indian Police Service (IPS) deputationists into almost every senior position in the CRPF has a great deal to do with existing structural deficits and deficiencies, despite the decades of experience within the Force. Moreover, while details are only fitfully available, it is also clear that equally indifferent ‘generalist’ Indian Administrative Service (IAS) officers in the policy establishment contribute to the unaddressed susceptibilities of the force. Firefighting measures cannot meet these challenges; only an experienced, specialised and competent leadership can successfully confront and resolve these.

Ajai Sahni is executive director, Institute for Conflict Management

The views expressed are personal


Without raking up any controversy, it would be beneficial if the CRPF was officered by IA officers for some time to come.

The repeated incidents and their recurring patterns point directly at inadequate officer level leadership.

The IPS guys are law and order guys, not jungle warfare specialists. The difference is like that between a home grown domestic pussycat and a jungle prowling big fanged feral cat.

It doesn't matter a whit what effing IAS qualifying exam these IPS guys have allegedly passed. They are simply and singularly unqualified to lead troops in battle, which is exactly what the naxal operations are all about.

CRPF guys in the middle of the jungle wearing battle fatigues for camouflage and many jawans sporting scarves, some red colored, which defeat the very purpose of jungle/battle fatigues. Who is leading these poor guys and where is the required discipline??

BPJs??

Don't ask.

Image


Image

Aditya_V
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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Aditya_V » 18 May 2017 11:12

As suspected it seems, JNU Lutyens gang along with soem secular Industralists are linked with Maoists

Drove DU prof activist to meet Maoists
Podiyam Panda told reporters that he was the "only link" for meetings between senior Maoists and Sundar and Bhatia in South Bastar. Panda said he used to drive activists from Delhi — including Sundar and Bhatia — on a motorbike deep into forests of Sukma for meetings with top Maoists like Ramanna, Hidma (alleged mastermind of this year's deadly ambushes), Paparao Aaytu, Arjun and others. He said he also acted as a courier for them.



In a habeas corpus filed in the Chhatisgarh high court, Panda's wife alleged that Podiyam was taken into "forced captivity" by a joint team of CRPF and district police on May 3 and was assaulted by the security personnel and demanded his "immediate production" in the court.
"He has not surrendered but has been illegally detained," sources said.


Waah Paki type entitlement.

In his statement to police, he said he was part of recent Burkapal incident and had fired upon CRPF jawans with an Insas rifle. Panda was also part of the deadly Tadmetla attack that killed 75 CRPF jawans in 2010."


From him, police have got vital inputs about the urban network of Maoists, along with proof of bank transactions to Maoist accounts from "influential people in Delhi"

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Kashi » 31 May 2017 11:02

ANI‏Verified @ANI_news
Chhattisgarh: Encounter underway between naxals and security forces in Dhanora, in Narayanpura district

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Kashi » 26 Jun 2017 06:06

Apparently a big operation under way in the heart of Maoist stronghold.

ANI‏@ANI_news
Getting ground inputs of 20 naxals killed in #Tondamarka encounter;forces bravely confronted them in naxals' stronghold:DIG Bastar Sundarraj.


ANI‏@ANI_news
Operation in this core area had never taken place, ops were planned based on inputs by security forces & intelligence agencies: Sukma SP


http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/more-tha ... ma-1716812

Raipur: More than 12 Maoists have been killed in a massive anti-Maoist operation launched jointly by the Chhattisgarh Police and CRPF (Central Reserved Police Force) in Sukma district today. Three jawans have also died in Operation Prahar, said DM Awasthi, a senior officer connected with the anti-Maoist operations in the state. The exchange of fire had gone on for 12 hours.

Operation Prahar is one of the biggest operations aimed at flushing out the Maoists hiding in forests of Tondamarka, an area located in the Maoist stronghold of the state's Sukma, where a Maoist attack had claimed the lives of 25 securitymen in April.

The 56-hour long operation had started on Saturday. More than 1,500 security personnel took part in the operation.

"More than a dozen Naxals have died in this operation. All the bodies could not be recovered due to heavy firing, which lasted for approximately 12 hours. It was the first initiative of its kind," Mr Awasthi said.
...
Reports said the Maoist casualties included Korsa Mahesh, a senior operative who would disguise himself as a police officer. A self-loading rifle was recovered from his possession.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Rudradev » 24 Jan 2018 03:53

ramana wrote:Red corridor shrinks

Muppalla:
https://m.timesofindia.com/india/red-co ... 626621.cms


Definitely many congratulations are in order, for the brave security forces as well as local and central administrations.

However one must ask: what happened to all the money that used to finance the Red Corridor Naxals? Has it stopped coming in mostly, or only partially?

If only partially, has the rest now been allocated to developing other resources, such as stirring up urban unrest and caste-based violence, and manufacturing "activists" allied to certain political parties (backing them with massive PR campaigns, legal support, etc.)?

The BIF may have decided to shift focus based on the fact that Modinomics is actually doing wonders for rural India, but in urban centers a false narrative of "jobless growth", "economic hardship" et al can be purveyed more effectively.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby ramana » 24 Jan 2018 04:31

DeMo took out a lot.

From 75 districts to 58 in three years is quite good. And the article identifies the specific areas.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Rudradev » 24 Jan 2018 04:45

Incitement of unrest relies heavily on the *perception* of economic inequality. For a long time this was at its worst in the rural areas, and that has largely been remedied by PMJDY, massive rural electrification, and other such measures.

Today the residents of cities are also doing better than they were prior to 2014. However, the sheer numbers of people in large cities means that poverty will always be impossible to conceal, that competition for available opportunities will always be tough, that visible inequality (because of close proximity to the lifestyles of the affluent) will always be apparent. These are the ingredients used by BIF to magnify people's resentment, to convince them that the deck of opportunity is stacked against them on the basis of income, caste, religion, and other things.

The BIF has identified the cities as the new foci of vulnerability, fertile ground for Naxalite/Maoist propaganda that preys on disaffection. The "tukde tukde" demonstration by the likes of Kanhaiya Kumar and Umer Khalid in JNU was a herald of things to come. The more recent attempts by Jignesh Mevani, Umer Khalid, Shehla Rashid and others to stir up caste violence in Mumbai and Delhi are further steps along this course. That the attempts were largely rebuffed and confined to areas dominated by paid thugs bears witness to the fact that even in cities, there is enough economic optimism to resist these early attempts. But mark my words, this is where the BIF's efforts to resuscitate the Red Corridor will increasingly focus.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Kashi » 02 Mar 2018 12:09

https://twitter.com/ANI/status/969425958276141057

ANI@ANI
10 naxals have been killed in an operation by security personnel in Pujari Kanker in Bijapur district: DM Awasthi,Special DG (Naxal Operations)


http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/ ... 81034.html

Around 12 Maoists including Telangana Maoists party secretary Hari Bhushan alias Jagan have been killed on the bordering areas of Chhattisgarh and Telangana on Friday.

The operation was conducted jointly by the special Greyhounds forces of Telangana and Andhra Pradesh police and the Chhattisgarh police.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby IndraD » 14 Mar 2018 00:13

9 CRPF personnel martyred in Naxal attack in Chhattisgarh's Sukma district https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/ind ... 282963.cms

"In an ongoing operation in Sukma District, an encounter took place with Naxals around 8 am on Tuesday. Seeing the response of 208 CoBRA naxals initially fled away," said CRPF spokesperson Moses Dinakaran.
" Again at about 12:30 pm Naxals targeted another team of 212 battalion CRPF in between Kistaram and Palodi in Sukma in which a Mine Protection Vehicle was blown of by triggering IED. As per information received 9 CRPF personnel attained martyrdom and 3 are injured. Injured personnel are being evacuated by helicopter to Raipur," he added.
Today's attack comes almost 11 days after security personnel killed 10 alleged Naxalites in the state. It also comes six months after 25 CRPF jawans were slaughtered + in one of the deadliest attacks by Maoist rebels, or Naxalites. Earlier last year in March, 12 CRPF personnel of a road opening party were ambushed in Sukma.

Still, security forces have had some success deaing with such attacks. As many as 300 Naxals were reportedly killed in separate encounters with security forces in Chhattisgarh in the last two years, said state home minister Ramsewak Paikra to the state Legislative Assembly last month.
Earlier this month, the CRPF for the first time set up three permanent camps in the Maoist hotbed of Abujhmadh forests in Chhattisgarh to launch 'surgical' operations against the ultras, a year after it lost 37 personnel in two ambushes, reported PTI.
The paramilitary force, along with contingents of the state police, has set up three bases in the dense and remote jungles of the 4,000 sq km region which essentially means 'abujh' (unknown) and 'madh' (hill).
Till now, the security forces used to undertake patrols inside the Abujhmadh jungle area in the Bastar region, camp there for few days and come back as they had no support system to stay in the jungle for long.

DTo make their presence felt in the area, the first camp, identified as 'P', has been established in close vicinity of the Indravati river.
Officials privy to the development said the strength of each camp was about 100 personnel.

The camps have been created as part of the 'Operation Madh' (Abujhmadh) being carried out by the CRPF and other security forces for the last few years to target Naxal cadres who hide or move in this area.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Aditya_V » 14 Mar 2018 10:56

The question is how do these Naxals get access to such High Explosives, detonators and tactics to use them, these don't grow in forests nor can a so can tactics and training be totally developed in the forest. The other other nodes in the network must be targeted..

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby hanumadu » 26 Apr 2018 14:45


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Re: The Red Menace

Postby hanumadu » 26 Apr 2018 14:46

ANI

Verified account

@ANI
Follow Follow @ANI
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Chhattisgarh: 60 naxals surrendered before Bastar IG Vivekananda Sinha, in Abujmarh

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Vasu » 08 May 2018 16:09

Government sets up multi-disciplinary group to choke Naxal funds

Government has set up a multi-disciplinary group to initiate action to choke funding sources of Naxals and to seize assets of their leaders, officials said today.

The group comprises officers from various central agencies and the state police departments, a home ministry official said.

It is headed by an additional secretary and has representatives from the Intelligence Bureau, Enforcement Directorate, Directorate of Revenue Intelligence, NIA and the CBDT (Central Board of Direct Taxes) and the CBI, as also state intelligence departments and CID, the official added.

The home ministry has also initiated the process for creating a separate vertical in the NIA (National Intelligence Agency) for investigating important cases pertaining to the Left Wing Extremism (LWE).

The move follows information about a large part of extortion money allegedly collected by Naxals getting diverted towards personal wealth of their leaders, the officials said. It has been often alleged that the Naxal leaders' children avail best of education and their families live in comfort, while they mislead cadres toiling away in jungles.

According to officials, the LWE movement in the country is financed through a large network of dubious activities, which include illegal levy collected from private contractors including those involved in execution of government works and schemes, mining contractors, transporters and owners of small and medium industries.

Similarly, funds are said to be garnered through collections from illegal stone crushing and distribution of Naxal ideology papers.

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Re: The Red Menace

Postby Rudradev » 13 Jul 2018 22:05

http://www.governancenow.com/news/regul ... -shrinking

Red Corridor is shrinking

The NDA government has effectively curbed Maoist violence


Shishir Tripathi | July 3, 2018



As he completed the first year of his second term on May 24, 2010, the then prime minister Manmohan Singh made a statement in a press conference that became a reference point for all future discourse on left-wing extremism (LWE) or Maoism/Naxalism as it is commonly known. He said, “I have been saying for the last three years that Naxalism remains the biggest internal security challenge facing our country.”

The remark was made against the backdrop of one of the deadliest Naxal attacks on security forces by Maoists. On April 6, 2010, 76 CRPF jawans were killed in an ambush by insurgents near Chintalnar village in Dantewada, Chhattisgarh.

The former PM’s remark continued to be relevant. “By far the most powerful insurgent groupings active in India are the Naxalites,” writes Chris Ogden, senior lecturer in Asian Security at the School of International Relations, University of St Andrews, Scotland. In his ‘Indian National Security’ (2017), he notes, “Formed in 1967 around a Maoist left-wing ideology, they largely represent indigenous tribal communities (Adivasis) and the lower caste with regard to land right unemployment, and the socio-economic exclusion. Active across at least a third of Indian states via the oft referred to ‘red corridor’ stretching from the north to the south of the country, the Naxalites caused over 7,300 deaths between 2005 and 2016. Although annual deaths are below their zenith of 1,180 in 2002, Naxalite activity accounted for nearly half of all such fatalities occurring across India in 2016.”

Shrinking base of LWE

In the last four years, however, the ‘biggest internal security threat’ has gradually been diminished, thanks to a host of initiatives to ensure a strategic and perception edge over the insurgents. The ‘red corridor’ has been substantially shrunk. One of the biggest indicators of the shrinking base of LWE is the fact that in April the union government removed 44 districts from the list of 126 Naxalism-hit districts (while adding eight to it). The number of the worst-affected districts also came down from 35 to 30.

The home ministry data also highlight the positive development. In 2017, for the first time since 1989 the number of LWE-related violent incidents has been less than 1,000. Incidents of violence have seen a 20 percent decline with a 34 percent reduction in related deaths in 2017 as compared to 2013. The geographical spread of LWE violence has also shrunk from 76 districts in 2013 to just 58 districts in 2017.


As union home minister Rajnath Singh put it in May, “Naxalism is a challenge, but I want to say that this menace is now shrinking. Casualties among security forces have declined by 53-55 percent. The geographical expanse of LWE-affected areas has also decreased by 40-45 percent.” Speaking at the passing out parade of the CRPF’s Bastariya Battalion in Chhattisgarh, he further added, “We have also decided that all those left-wing extremism leaders who have earned money by using poor people and manipulating their innocence will be punished.”

This was a clear indication that the government was using a manifold strategy of demolishing the logistical as well as ideological edifice of Naxalite insurgency.

At a meeting of the chief ministers of the LWE-affected states in May last year, the union home minister had announced a new strategy against the Maoists: SAMADHAN. The acronym stands for Smart leadership, Aggressive strategy, Motivation and training, Actionable intelligence, Dashboard-based KPIs (key performance indicators) and KRAs (key result areas), Harnessing technology, Action plan for each theatre and No access to financing. It was projected as totally new paradigm to tackle the left-wing extremism.

Speaking about ‘No access to financing’, Rajnath Singh said that in fighting LWE groups the most important strategy should be to choke the funding, which shall prevent them from getting weapons, ammunition and basic amenities that sustains their ill-found mission.

To that end, the NDA government targeted NGOs allegedly helping LWE groups. In its first 30 months, functioning licences of around 20,000 of the total 33,000-odd functioning NGOs were cancelled, primarily for allegedly violating various provisions of the Foreign Contribution (Regulation) Act, 2010 (FCRA) and in some cases for allegedly engaging in antinational activities, thus barring them from receiving foreign funds.

Counteracting through development

Marxist intellectual Antonio Gramsci recommended how struggle against the establishment or an idea can be fought in two ways: ‘War of position’, an intellectual and cultural struggle where the ideology that perpetuates a certain social order or perception of what is right is dismantled by putting forward an alternative idea, and ‘war of manoeuvre’, direct frontal attack on the establishment.

After dealing with Maoists for decades, the home ministry seems to have become well versed in the Gramscian tactics. From direct attacks on insurgents, the ministry also, through various development initiatives in the last four years, has tried to gradually rein in through its own ‘war of position’.

Under the road requirement plan (RRP), 1,615 kilometres of roads have been constructed in last four years to improve connectivity in 38 LWE-affected districts of eight states. As many as 2,329 mobile towers have been installed for better communication connectivity. To ensure access for all to the formal banking system, 450 bank branches have been opened and 1,123 ATMs installed.

With these and other development initiatives, substantive inroads have been made in filling the gaps that insurgents exploited by evoking a sense of relative deprivation among the poor tribals.

Marking development as the most potent weapon to fight the Maoists, Rajnath Singh said in Chhattisgarh in May, “I know that
chief minister Dr Raman Singh is trying to ensure overall development of Chhattisgarh. He is focused on developing the remotest areas of the state to ensure inclusive development. However, Maoists do not want these areas to develop as they very well know that if development takes place their sinister plan will never succeed.”

He added, “We have been ensuring road connectivity, electricity and other infrastructure to every village in the state. Some villages are still deprived of electricity and the people are suffering due to hurdles created by the Naxals. But I want to assure that no obstacle can stop the development process in these areas.”

This, of course, is a continuation of the previous government’s preferred solution, which was not effectively implemented. Ogden, while referring to Manmohan Singh’s statement that termed LWE as the biggest internal security challenge, writes that the former PM also considered “economic development the best way to counteract them”. He adds, “Perception and history thus play a major role in the Naxalites being an established threat in India.”

Countering the Naxals ideologically has also been one of the key strategies of the union government. In April, speaking at a public event in Bijapur, one of the worst LWE-affected districts, prime minister Narendra Modi appealed the tribals of Bastar region to understand the fact that Naxal leaders were merely using them to achieve their own ulterior motives.

Modi said, “I would like to tell the youngsters who have deviated to the path of violence that Babasaheb Ambedkar has given us the Constitution. He has taken care of your rights in the Constitution. It is the responsibility of the government to think about your rights. You don’t have to take up arms and resort to violence.”

On a more emotional note, he added: “I would also like to tell the mothers and the fathers that some of your sons and daughters have meandered to this path. However, just think about who their leader is. Not a single leader belongs to your area. The leader was not born among you. They are outsiders. The leaders do not die. They go and hide in the forests and are safe while your children are the ones who are dying in this violence. ...Why are you giving them the rights to kill your children?”

Numbers and trends seem to show that this emotional appeal is working.





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