India-Australia News and Discussion

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
g.sarkar
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2774
Joined: 09 Jul 2005 12:22
Location: MERCED, California

Re: India-Australia News and Discussion

Postby g.sarkar » 31 Dec 2020 00:13

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... same-again
Australia's relationship with China can survive – but it won't be the same again
There can be no return to the relations of the past. The question for 2021 is how to find a new settling point
Natasha Kassam, Sun 27 Dec 2020

Australians have had a rude awakening this year. Convinced for a decade that the Asian century was theirs for the taking, the downward spiral of Australia’s relationship with China has come as a shock to many.
The highlights, or more like lowlights, of 2020 are innumerable. Australian citizens Yang Hengjun and Cheng Lei have been imprisoned in China, with little to no information about their charges. Australian journalists were spirited out of the country in dramatic scenes. Exports from meat to barley, wine to coal, are just some of the Australian industries reeling from a barrage of Chinese restrictions.
It would be easy to dismiss the China story at this point as some version of Groundhog Day. Every news cycle brings a new and not entirely unexpected blow. But this overlooks the real human consequences of this dispute.
Does Australia really have to be so strident when it comes to China?
The likelihood of the detained Yang and Cheng coming home seems more remote by the day. Farmers caught up in the bilateral crossfire seek answers – and new markets. Foreign workers have been stranded at sea for months, denied entry by Chinese authorities because their ships carry Australian coal.
Becoming desensitised to these human costs also risks forgetting the plight of many people inside China. Recent reports revealed even more chilling detail on the forced labour practices in Xinjiang, where a million Uyghurs have been interned.
It's worth remembering that this month also brought a rare win in the bilateral relationship – an Australian-Uyghur child was allowed to leave China and reunite with his father in Australia after three years of advocacy. Another reason to not look away.
Otherwise, China’s pressure on Australia has been relentless. And many in China support bringing the pain. Wolf warrior diplomacy, a term used to refer to aggressive Chinese diplomats, seems to have inspired Chinese netizens.
Chinese nationalists appeared to relish the fallout when Zhao Lijian tweeted a digitally-altered image depicting an Australian soldier murdering an Afghan child. Chinese officials unsurprisingly dismissed prime minister Scott Morrison’s demand for an apology, though his response served to change the narrative from brutal wine tariffs that had been announced a day earlier.
Vitriol fills the comments section of any Australian embassy in Beijing post on Weibo, a Chinese social media platform similar to Twitter. It turns out the advice to never read the comments applies in any language.
A dysfunctional America helps China – but hurts Australia and our region
As much as Chinese netizens feel wronged, so too is Australian outrage towards China palpable. Morrison’s ire was well-received by many Australians; the majority supported his call for an apology. Six in 10 say that Australia is an innocent victim of China’s trade restrictions. The 2020 Lowy Institute poll showed trust in China at a historic low, and almost all Australians support diversification of trade away from China.
......
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
https://www.cnbc.com/2020/12/29/trade-w ... demic.html
Australia’s growth may ‘never return’ to its pre-virus path after trade trouble with China, says economist
Weizhen Tan, Dec 29 2020

Australia’s economy has been badly hit by escalating trade tensions with China — and it’s possible growth might “never return” to its pre-virus levels even when the pandemic is over, according to research firm Capital Economics.
China is by far Australia’s largest trading partner, accounting for 39.4% of goods exports and 17.6% of services exports between 2019 and 2020, the firm said. But Beijing has for months been targeting a growing list of imported products from Down Under — putting tariffs on wine and barley, and suspending beef imports. Gross domestic product (GDP) in Australia could contract even more if Beijing continues to pile tariffs on more Australian imports, said its senior economist Marcel Thieliant in a note last week.
Goods and services that are already “in the firing line” are worth almost a quarter of Australia’s exports to China — forming 1.8% of its economic output, the research firm said. But it may not end there. “That figure could rise to around 2.8% of GDP if China targeted other products for which it isn’t hugely dependent on Australian imports,” Thieliant said.
Relations between Canberra and Beijing soured this year after Australia supported a growing call for an international inquiry into China’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic. More restrictions by Beijing could come, including exports of gold, alumina – a type of material for industrial usage – and a “vast range of smaller items,” the report said. “While Australia should be able to divert some shipments to other countries, the escalating trade war is another reason why Australia’s economy will never return to its pre-virus path even once the pandemic has been brought under control,” Thieliant said.
Overall, the country’s gross domestic product could fall short of its pre-virus trajectory by about 1.5 percentage points at the end of 2022 – and additional trade restrictions by China could widen that shortfall further, said Capital Economics.
The pain could be lessened, however, as “it’s possible that Australia will find other destinations for its exports,” said the economist.
......
Gautam

Atmavik
BRFite
Posts: 810
Joined: 24 Aug 2016 04:43

Re: India-Australia News and Discussion

Postby Atmavik » 13 Feb 2021 05:05

Australia will be using Astra Zeneca vaccine but are manufacturing it themselves. does anyone know why they haven't reached out to India to use serum Institute vaccine? i know their own effort did not go well.

Bart S
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2527
Joined: 15 Aug 2016 00:03

Re: India-Australia News and Discussion

Postby Bart S » 13 Feb 2021 05:08

Atmavik wrote:Australia will be using Astra Zeneca vaccine but are manufacturing it themselves. does anyone know why they haven't reached out to India to use serum Institute vaccine? i know their own effort did not go well.


I don't understand the question. If they are manufacturing it themselves, why would they import it from the SII. As a bonus they can export it as well. You do realize that the SII doesn't have an inhouse developed vaccine and has also licensed Astra Zeneca's vaccine, right?

Atmavik
BRFite
Posts: 810
Joined: 24 Aug 2016 04:43

Re: India-Australia News and Discussion

Postby Atmavik » 13 Feb 2021 05:16

^^ maybe i wasn't clear. i know that SII is doing license manufacture of the vaccine. from the news I have heard they are running into production problems(maybe this is wrong info). in such a case they could have asked India to supply a batch for their medical workers.

Bart S
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2527
Joined: 15 Aug 2016 00:03

Re: India-Australia News and Discussion

Postby Bart S » 13 Feb 2021 05:20

Atmavik wrote:^^ maybe i wasn't clear. i know that SII is doing license manufacture of the vaccine. from the news I have heard they are running into production problems(maybe this is wrong info). in such a case they could have asked India to supply a batch for their medical workers.

They are already manufacturing it and expect to ramp up to a million doses per week.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/202 ... g/13140104
They will probably be exporting it soon, since their own population is quite small (relatively speaking).

nvishal
BRFite
Posts: 964
Joined: 14 Aug 2010 18:03

Re: India-Australia News and Discussion

Postby nvishal » 13 Feb 2021 10:13

does anyone know why they haven't reached out to India to use serum Institute vaccine?

Because they can afford to do it

Aarvee
BRFite
Posts: 160
Joined: 14 Oct 2016 07:43

Re: India-Australia News and Discussion

Postby Aarvee » 13 Feb 2021 16:43

Australia has no local candidate! A bit of an embarrassment on its own. US has Moderna and J&J, UK has Oxford (and AZ), Europe has Pfizer (BioNTech). Australia HAD the UQ vaccine that got abandoned. They had another proposal from SA that never got funded. They need a face saver hence CSL has been roped in to make it. TBH, the OF/AZ vaccine manufacturing process is pretty straight forward to any competent vaccine manufacturer, no technological hurdles.

The marker size is too small for any of the companies themselves to show any interest in going through the TGA approval process.


Return to “Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: dsreedhar, Nsmith and 44 guests