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India-Myanmar news and discussion

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
jamwal
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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby jamwal » 07 May 2013 23:57

Only thing they'll do is cross the border and get fat on our money.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby RamaY » 08 May 2013 03:47

jamwal wrote:Only thing they'll do is cross the border and get fat on our money.


It is oK for it only creates a Buddhist majority Bharat.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby Prem » 08 May 2013 06:28

RamaY wrote:
jamwal wrote:Only thing they'll do is cross the border and get fat on our money.

It is oK for it only creates a Buddhist majority Bharat.

:rotfl:
Read the Paki thread . Lets have 2 Burmese Corps in IA and post them on the Attari and K Border,

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby RamaY » 15 May 2013 02:30

By the way is there any overt or covert proposal for Burmese Muslims to revert to Buddhism in return for formal citizenship?

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby Paul » 25 May 2013 04:18

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwryAkvKjYk

Uploaded on Dec 15, 2011


Burmas Open Road explores the lives of every day Burmese intertwined with the
fortunes of Asias last great wilderness. Guided by the insights of a Buddhist monk, the film offers unprecedented access into Myanmar and the plight of opium growers, soldiers, villagers, poachers and prospectors, each connected by the reconstruction of an ancient road and is impact on their environment. Hope you guys like it xoxo


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jR6dSGr-C9w

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby Paul » 25 May 2013 04:51

Major campaign undrway to rehabilitate Mynmar image across the media. If Myanmar becomes a more open state What does this mean for the ULFA and insurgency ridden NE India.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby Vipul » 30 May 2013 08:17

Suu Kyi opposes 2-child limit for Myanmar minority.

Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and Islamic leaders expressed dismay over decisions by authorities in western Myanmar to restore a two-child limit on a Muslim minority group, a policy that does not apply to Buddhists and follows accusations of "ethnic cleansing."

The order makes Myanmar perhaps the only country in the world to level such a restriction against a particular religious group, and is likely to bring further criticism that Muslims are being discriminated against in the Buddhist-majority country. Some Buddhists, however, welcomed the plan for addressing their fear of a population explosion among the Muslim minority known as Rohingya.

Authorities in strife-torn Rakhine state said this past weekend that they were restoring a measure imposed during past military rule that banned Rohingya families from having more than two children. Details about the policy and how it will be enforced have not been released, sparking calls for clarity and concerns of more discrimination against a group the U.N. calls one of the world's most persecuted people.

"If true, this is against the law," said Suu Kyi, the opposition leader and Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Suu Kyi has faced criticism for failing to defend the Rohingya following two waves of deadly sectarian violence last year. She told reporters Monday that she had not heard details of the latest measure but, if it exists, "It is discriminatory and also violates human rights."

The policy applies to two Rakhine townships that border Bangladesh and have the highest Muslim populations in the state. The townships, Buthidaung and Maungdaw, are about 95 percent Muslim. Nationwide, Muslims account for only about 4 percent of Myanmar's roughly 60 million people.

The central government has not made any statement about the two-child policy since Rakhine state authorities quietly enacted the measure a week ago. Calls seeking comment from government spokesmen were not returned.

The U.S. government also registered deep concern. In Washington, State Department spokesman Patrick Ventrell said Tuesday the U.S. opposes coercive birth limitation policies and urges Myanmar "to eliminate all such policies without delay."

Those comments come just a week after President Thein Sein visited the White House and President Barack Obama called for an end to violence against the Muslim group and for their rights and dignity to be recognized.

Longstanding antipathy toward the Rohingya erupted last year into mob violence in which Rakhine Buddhists armed with machetes razed thousands of Muslim homes, leaving hundreds of people dead and forcing 125,000 to flee, mostly Muslims. The New York-based group Human Rights Watch has accused the government and security forces in Rakhine of fomenting an organized campaign of "ethnic cleansing" against the Rohingya, who are regarded as aliens.

Since the violence, the religious unrest has expanded into a campaign against Muslim communities in other areas, posing a serious challenge to President Thein Sein's reformist government as it attempts to implement democratic reforms after nearly half a century of harsh military rule.

Myanmar's government does not include the Rohingya as one of its 135 recognized ethnic minorities. It considers them to be illegal immigrants from Bangladesh and denies them citizenship. Bangladesh says the Rohingya have been living in Myanmar for centuries and should be recognized there as citizens.

Rakhine state spokesman Win Myaing said over the weekend the policy was meant to stem population growth in the Muslim community, which a government-appointed commission last month identified as one of the causes of the sectarian violence. He said authorities have not determined how the measure will be enforced, but it will be mandatory.

"This is the best way to control the population explosion which is a threat to our national identity. If no measure is taken to control the population, there is a danger of losing our own identity," said National Affairs Minister for the Yangon Region Zaw Aye Maung, an ethnic Rakhine member of parliament. He said restricting the number of children in the poorer Muslim community will benefit them because smaller families are better able to feed, clothe and educate their children.

A Buddhist monk in Maungdaw township was also enthusiastic.

"It's a good idea. If the government can really control the Bengali population in the area, the other communities will feel more secure and there will be less violence like what happened in the past," said monk Manithara from the Aungmyay Bawdi monastery, using the name "Bengali" that most Buddhists prefer to "Rohingya." ''It's also a good step to develop the living standards of the people in the region. China also has this kind of policy."

China has a one-child policy, but it is not based on religion and exceptions apply to minority ethnic groups.

"This restriction violates human rights," said Nyunt Maung Shein, head of Myanmar's Islamic Religious Affairs Council. "Even if it existed under the military regime, it should be considered inappropriate under the democratic system."

"The authorities should be very cautious," he said. "If this is a step to ease tension between the communities, it will not produce the desired effect."

Others echoed that concern, including Muslim lawmaker Shwe Maung, who represents Buthidaung, where the measure will be applied.

"Many people from my constituency have expressed concern about the new policy, and complained that this is discrimination," Shwe Maung told the AP. "This order might ease tension among the Rakhine (Buddhist) community but it will increase the tension felt by Muslims."

For years, the Rohingya in Myanmar have faced a variety of heavy-handed restrictions. They needed permission to travel outside their villages, couples were required to have permission to marry, and were then limited to having two children. Any offspring that exceeded the regulation were "blacklisted" and refused birth registrations, and denied the right to attend school, travel and marry, according to a report by the Arakan Project, a Thailand-based advocacy group for the Rohingya. The report said that by 2012 Myanmar officials had taken some steps to allow blacklisted children to be registered.

Phil Robertson of Human Rights Watch called the latest development "outrageous," noting that the commission's report stated that any form of population control must be "voluntary" and conform to human rights standards.

"This is a step precisely in the wrong direction — going exactly the wrong direction from reconciliation and respect for human rights," he said.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby member_19686 » 01 Jun 2013 05:45

Right-wing Buddhist leading the campaign to force Muslims out of Burma says he wants his group 'to be like the English Defence League'

The English Defence League might be the last place you would expect a devout Buddhist monk to turn for inspiration.
But a right-wing spiritual leader in Burma has revealed how he wants to copy the EDL in his bid to rid his country of its Muslim minority.
The Venerable Ashin Wirathu, who was jailed for nine years in 2003 for inciting anti-Muslim violence, says the hardline nationalist party should be applauded for 'not carrying out violence, but protecting the public'.
His comments come a week after more than 1,000 EDL members marched on Downing Street in a protest over the killing of Drummer Lee Rigby in nearby Woolwich, swilling beer, chanting anti-Muslim slogans and clashing with anti-fascist activists. Thirteen people were arrested.
Now, orange-robed Wirathu, who leads Burma's so-called '969' campaign to boycott Islamic businesses and bring an end to inter-marriage with Buddhists, says he wants his gang members to be more like the EDL.
According to The Times, Wirathu said: 'People give me various names: The Burmese bin Laden, the bald neo-Nazi.
'[But] do you know the English Defence League? We would like to be like the EDL. Not carrying out violence, but protecting the public.'
The '969' group was behind last month's riots that saw intense clashes between its members and Muslims that left 43 people dead in the city of Meiktila.
And only yesterday, hundreds of Buddhist men on motorcycles waved iron rods in a northeastern town in Burma before setting fire to a Muslim-owned cinema in the latest incident to spill over from simmering religious tensions in the country.
The intimidating display in Lashio came a day after a mosque and a Muslim orphanage were torched after reports that a Muslim man set fire to a Buddhist woman.
Residents said a cinema was burned as the mob sped around the town as part of a new wave of violence targeting the religious minority.
Ashin Wirathu is a firmly anti-Islamic monk who was jailed in 2003 for inciting anti-Muslim violence, but was released last year as part of the broader amnesty for prisoners and admitted being at Meiktila, although insists he played no part in the violence.
'We Buddhist Burmese are too soft," he told the BBC in a recent interview. 'We lack patriotic pride.
He urges Buddhists all over the country to boycott Muslim businesses and hands out stickers printed with the number '969', which symbolise elements of Buddhism.
Wirathu accuses Muslim men of repeatedly raping Buddhist women, of using their wealth to lure Buddhist women into marriage, then imprisoning them in the home.

But it seems a fear of Muslim success is driving the discrimination.
'They - the Muslims - are good at business, they control transport, construction. Now they are taking over our political parties. If this goes on, we will end up like Afghanistan or Indonesia,' he said.
Burma is a mainly Buddhist country, but nine per cent of its 60 million people are Muslim.
However, there is an open resentment of Muslims, openly expressed and they are referred to with the derogatory term 'kala.'..

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z2Uv7o1rOI

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby SSridhar » 06 Jun 2013 09:45

India looking at big ticket investments in Myanmar's energy, telecom sectors - Business Line
India will push for greater participation in the abundant oil and gas sector in Myanmar, so far dominated by China, with majors like ONGC Videsh Ltd and Oil India Ltd already in the race for on-shore blocks in the country.

Commerce and Industry Minister Anand Sharma, who is leading an official and business delegation to Myanmar this week, is scheduled to meet Myanmar’s Energy Minister U Than Htay and extensively discuss the country’s interest in the energy sector.

India is likely to request for positive consideration to be given to Indian companies for allocation of some of the blocks.

Sharma will also meet Myanmar’s Industry Minister, Foreign Affairs Minister and Minister for Information and Technology to discuss ways to intensify cooperation in bilateral trade and economy.

India, which had mostly distanced itself from the country during the military rule despite strong economic interests, has now jumped in to make the most of its geographical proximity.

Reflecting the changed political situation in the country, the Minister will start his series of meetings with Chairperson of the National League for Democracy Aung San Su Kyi who was a political prisoner under house arrest less than three years ago.

India has strong interests in the energy sector, IT and telecom, agriculture and manufactured items.

“China has maintained business relations with the country for a long time now and has a head start in most areas, especially energy. But we plan to catch up soon,” an official said.

Myanmar’s largely untapped economic potential makes it an attractive destination for other countries. According to a report released recently by global management consultancy firm McKinsey, “managed well, Myanmar could conceivably quadruple the size of its economy, from $45 billion in 2010 to more than $200 billion in 2030s.’’

Recently, Myanmar put on offer 30 offshore oil and gas blocks, on a production-sharing basis, and there are seven Indian companies that are reported to be in the short list that includes OIL, OVL, Cairn India and Jubilant Energy.

In the telecom sector, India’s Bharti Airtel, along with its consortium partners, is one of the 11 final bidders for a telecom licence in Myanmar.

Border trade

India is also in talks with Myanmar to open more border trade points to increase trade through the land route.

India’s imports from Myanmar stood at $1.4 billion in 2012 while its exports to the country were just $542 million.

“The turnaround in Myanmar is one big positive message from the region. We are seriously looking at the country. The fact that the World Economic Forum is taking place in Myanmar is in itself a statement of global interest in the country,” Sharma told Business Line.

The Minister will address the World Economic Forum for East Asia on Thursday in NayPyiTaw that will be attended by leaders from other East Asian countries as well.

With the recent spate of political and economic reforms in the country that started in 2010 when the military declared elections after 20 years, its isolation from the world is slowly coming to an end.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby member_19686 » 01 Jul 2013 09:32

Hyderabad’s Rohingya refugees fight language barriers
ASIF YAR KHAN

Image

Hundreds of Rohingya Muslims who came to the city escaping persecution in their native Burma, continue to face bad times. With knowledge of neither Urdu nor Telugu, they lose out on jobs here

They came all the way to Hyderabad to escape persecution back home and for a better livelihood. But a year later, most of them have failed to land jobs.

Reason: they couldn’t pick up local languages. Hundreds of Rohingya Muslims who came to the city in hope of better days continue to face bad times as job opportunities elude them as they do not know either Urdu or Telugu.

Rohingyas from different provinces of Myanmar entered India sometime ago to escape violence in that country. Many of them live in small tenements in Hafeezbabanagar, Pahadeshareef, Balapur, Mir Momim Pahadi and Kishanbagh.

Abdul Mabud, 24, who hails from Maungdaw in Myanmar, owned a shop in his hometown until he crossed over to India to escape clashes in his country sometime ago.

“I ran away to escape mobs and crossed over to India. But I am not getting any work as I do not know the local language, and I am forced to live on donations made by philanthropists,” says Mabud. Kifayathullah, 26. In fact, Kifayathullah, who knows Urdu, helps his fellow countrymen convey their problems to locals.

It is a similar story for Abdul Malik, 65. The elderly man is now dependent on his son for food.

“Age and language barriers are posing a lot of problems for me,” says Malik. His son works in a factory and earns about Rs. 6,000 a month.

Moved by the refugees’ plight, scores of people are coming forward with donations to help them survive. But the tribe is unsure about its continuation here.

Scores of Rohingyas gathered at the inaugural function of Burmese Refugees Relief and Rehabilitation Committee (BRRRC) here on Sunday. Many attended it in the hope of finding a solution to their problems. Nearly 1,500 Rohingyas have settled down in the city.

Nazimuddin Farooqui, chairman, Salamah Trust, who set up BRRRC, said his organisation planned to help Rohingyas by providing necessary basic education to their children by enrolling them in schools and providing them hostel facilities, besides taking up issues including refugee status.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Hyd ... epage=true

Just what India needs, the glories of secularism and diversity continue...

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby pralay » 01 Jul 2013 12:42

Hyderabad’s Rohingya refugees fight language barriers:
Hundreds of Rohingya Muslims who came to the city escaping persecution in their native Burma, continue to face bad times.

Someone need to check if these people are here with proper indian visa, if not, we should stop calling them refugees, they are more like Bangladeshi Intruders and should be sent back to burma. India is not a Dharmshala.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby Victor » 21 Jul 2013 04:19

LeT, IM busy opening terror front along Bangla-Myanmar border, intel inputs say
The Arakan/Rakhine area of Myanmar is next to the Chittagong Hills Tract in BD which used to be overwhelmingly Buddhist about 20 years ago but is now Muslim majority. The LeT type bnggers will likely meet more than their match in the ruthless Myanmar military and government that are not handicapped by vote bank and "secularism" considerations and the Buddhist Chakmas and others may very well be targeted instead in true Islamic fashion as payback for the anti-Muslim violence in Myanmar.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby abhik » 21 Jul 2013 10:54

^^^We should engineer a full scale war, at least proxy if not conventional between Bangladesh(+uhmma braithers) and Myanmar.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby SSridhar » 04 Aug 2013 04:25

Political Parties Demand Re-Survey of Indo-Myanmar Border - Business Line
All major political parties and various social organisations today demanded immediate halt of the ongoing construction of fencing along the Indo-Myanmar border in Manipur until a proper re-survey of the borderline is done.

Spokesman of the ‘Committee on Protection of Land in Border Fencing’ (CPLBF) Brojendra Ningombam said they had submitted a memorandum to Chief Minister Okram Ibobi Singh yesterday demanding immediate intervention of the State Government in the present construction of border fencing as it would affect more than forty villages in state’s Chandel and Ukhrul district.

Ningombam demanded a joint re-survey of the borderline particularly near the border town of Moreh in Chandel district by Indian and Myanmar authorities and fix the boundary of Manipur and Myanmar based on historical documents adding that representatives of the committee who included village Chiefs of the border areas should be invited to join the demarcation of the international borderline.

Reports from the border town of Moreh and surrounding villages said if the ongoing construction of fencing by Border Roads Organisation was not stopped, not only parts of Manipur territory be ceded to Myanmar but not less than forty villages would be included in the neighbouring country.

Major political parties including Manipur People’s Party (MPP), CPI, JD (U), Trinamool Congress who had sent their representatives to the border villages to check the fencing demanded immediate halt of construction of border fencing until the settlement of the issue by both countries.

A spokesman of MPP said they would launch agitations till the border fencing issue is settled.

Social organisations and political parties alleged that village chiefs were being lured huge sum of money if they did not disturb the construction of border fencing.

Chief Minister Ibobi Singh had earlier said the State Government had written to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Union Home Minister Sushil Kumar Shinde to initiate steps for joint re-survey of the Indo-Myanmar borderline in Manipur with Myanmar authorities at the earliest.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby Rony » 24 Aug 2013 04:51

Myanmar army enters Manipur

After China, it is the turn of Myanmar to give India the blushes. Myanmarese troops crossed the border in Moreh on Thursday and are now prepared to set up a temporary camp at Holenphai village in Manipur's Chandel district, claiming the area lies within their country.

The Assam Rifles, which is guarding the India-Myanmar border, is yet to issue any official statement on the stunning development, but its jawans are said to have intensified patrolling in the Holenphai area. A source said the state government has informed the Centre.

The intrusion comes at a time when the Manipur government has decided to set up a committee to review the India-Myanmar border-fencing work in Chandel district, considering the public furore over it. The 10-km border fencing work taken up in Chandel has kicked up a storm with various social organizations and opposition parties saying a large chunk of land will fall in neighbouring Myanmar as a result of the exercise.

Manipur shares a 398-km border with Myanmar.

The Myanmarese army has initiated the ground work for setting up a temporary platoon base camp at Holenphai village, 3 km south of Moreh police station close to international border pillar number 76, said village authorities. The state government has already planned to develop a new township at Holenphei to boost Indo-Myanmarese commercial activities.

Taking into account the report made by Lalkholun Haokip, chief of Holenphai, Moreh additional deputy commissioner (ADC) Robert Singh Kshetrimayum, along with two police officers, went to inspect the site on Thursday.

The Myanmarese troops were found clearing the ground for setting up their temporary base camp, a source said, adding that Manipur officials called the CO of Myanmar Army's 87 Light Infantry to get his response. The ADC then pursued the Myanmarese CO with a request to halt the work until a final settlement is reached by the higher authorities of the two countries. Pointing out that the area is 10 metres away from the border pillar, the ADC urged the Myanmarese officer to meet his Assam Rifles counterpart stationed in Moreh town.

The Myanmarese CO told the Moreh ADC that Holenphai falls within Myanmar territory, for which they are setting up a camp. He said unless instructed otherwise by his higher authorities, he will not halt work.

An Assam Rifles officer said the matter has not been brought to the notice of the paramilitary force.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby Sri » 28 Aug 2013 17:10

Myanmar intrudes into Indian territory, sets up camp in Manipur

Imphal: The Myanmar Army crossed into the Indian border and set up camps at Haolenphai in Manipur on August 22.
Manipur government has taken a serious review of the Myanmar Army's preparation to construct a temporary army camp at Haolenphai village. A high level committee has been sent to investigate the matter. The camp is located at 3 kms from the police station at the border town of Moreh.
The state government is in contact with New Delhi regarding the development. Attempts by Indian officials to defuse the crisis have so far been unsuccessful.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby SSridhar » 28 Aug 2013 17:22

Sri, I just now saw an MHA denial of the intrusion allegation. Whether it is true or not, the passivity, submission and timidity shown by various governments over the last 30 years is inviting every country on our periphery to treat us casually an take us for granted.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby Philip » 28 Aug 2013 17:54

Indo-Burmese relations,especially military have dramatically improved over the years.I do not think that this is anywhere as serious a situ as that on the Chinese border.However,in both sides' interests,a detailed joint survey of the border where there is a lack of clarity cab be organised.The same should also be done with Bangaldesh.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby RamaY » 28 Aug 2013 18:20

I think Myanmar's intrusion is a positive development for UPA Govt. Our SECULAR India can fight back Myanmar's intrusion with all its might for Myanmar is a Hindu/Indic nation, unlike our pusillanimous reaction to Abrahamic intrusions from Pak and China.

Secularism Zindabad.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby SSridhar » 29 Aug 2013 09:02

India Wants Joint Working Group - The Hindu
India has asked Myanmar to set up a Joint Border Working Group to address the issue of demarcation of the border between the two countries in the backdrop of an attempt by the Myanmarese Army to construct a defence post near an un-demarcated border pillar. After the recent incident, India has reiterated the need to set up the group, External Affairs Ministry spokesman Syed Akbaruddin said on Wednesday {28/8/2013}.


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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby SSridhar » 29 Aug 2013 10:17

Row with Myanmar on Border Demarcation - Sandeep Dikshit, The Hindu
After border-related travails with China and Pakistan, India is now engaged in sorting out differences with Myanmar over a small undemarcated portion between the two nations.

Expressing confidence about coming to an understanding over the dispute, both the Foreign Office and Union Home Ministry officials refuted media reports suggesting there had been an intrusion by Myanmarese troops.

They admitted that Assam Rifles, the designated border force of that segment, had objected to Myanmarese troops camping in the area, but this was because both sides had reached an understanding over not undertaking construction work for some distance on either side of the border.

Explaining the situation, Foreign Office spokesperson Syed Akbaruddin said there has been “some activity” on the Myanmar side near border pillar 76, although both sides have resolved not to undertake any construction on either side. To complicate matters, a small portion near this pillar is undemarcated.

“That has been the issue there. So it is not an intrusion or incursion, it is on their side of the border,’’ he observed. “We have been informed by the Ministry of Home Affairs, which oversees that part of the border, that there has not been an intrusion and it’s not fair to say this.’’

On the diplomatic front, the Indian mission in Myanmar has taken up the issue and proposed a joint border working group. While the national media remained exercised throughout the day on an alleged intrusion, the issue is quite different in Manipur. The Hindu has carried reports quoting NGOs and some political parties as saying that several border pillars are missing and also that Myanmar is staking claim to over a dozen villages and a temple built decades back by the expatriate Tamil community.

The Communist Party of India, with substantial pockets of influence in Manipur, has even asked the government to immediately stop fencing along the international border and warned of protests if it went ahead without proper demarcation of the international boundary.

The CPI has said people were angry over the Centre starting border fencing work over a distance of 10 km near Moreh town in Manipur and pointed out that Myanmar had lodged a protest about the location of zero point. Subsequently, the government decided to construct border fencing 10 km inside the Indian territory.

The CPI says the border fencing will cut across a village right in the middle and about 15 villages could be left out of Indian territory. Even this fence is being put up about 100 metres inwards from the natural boundary which means territorial loss to Manipur. {Normally, border fences may not be built exactly on the border itself but at some depth inside, for various reasons. This does not mean 'loss of territory'. Claims by Myanmar over a dozen Indian villages are another matter altogether. As I said before, India's inactions on Chinese and Pakistani border claims emboldens even tiny Myanmar to stake a claim.}

Specifically addressing the issue of pillar 76, Mr. Akabruddin said, “we are confident, given the close relations which we have with Myanmar, that this issue will be taken up and sorted out amicably.”

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby SSridhar » 04 Sep 2013 08:28

Manipuri Villages Maintain Age Old Relations Even as Protests Continue Over Border Fence - Iboyaima Laithangbom, The Hindu
Unperturbed by the rumpus over the erection of the border fence in Manipur, the Manipuri and Myanmarese villagers on either side of the international border continue to maintain their generations-old relations. For a long time, tribal villages of Manipur have been depending on Myanmar for consumer items, medicines, education, and other livelihood needs. In fact, they also prefer kyat, the currency of Myanmar for their purchases since the rupee has no use in these remote mountain villages.

These border villages are cut off from the rest of Manipur with hardly any roads leading to them. Government officials seldom visit these areas– also known to be inhabited by insurgents. There has never been any government official at Molcham, a border tribal village. The much-hyped Public Distribution System in the State has also not reached tribals in these areas.

With the erection of the fence now being proposed in these isolated areas, villagers feel they will be not be able to trade with their neighbours and their children will no longer be able to go to schools in Myanmar.


Echoing their protests, The Joint Committee on Protection of Border Areas formed by several NGOs, and the United Committee Manipur have said that the fence will affect over 15 villages. At least one village in Ukhrul district will go entirely to Myanmar once the fence is completed. {How ?} However the Union government maintains that there has been no incursion into Indian territory. Erecting the fence is important to check the movement of north-east insurgents who have camped in border areas and in the Western part of Myanmar, the government says. Further, drugs and illegal firearms are routinely smuggled through the unmanned border.

In view of the massive protesst against the controversial fence, the Manipur government had set up a committee to review the situation.

While Deputy Chief Minister Gaikhangam Gangmei has promised to look into the issues brought up by the villagers, and has also promised to send a ministerial team to the area once a report is received by the committee, the villagers continue to maintain cordial relations with their neighbours across the border.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby chaanakya » 09 Nov 2013 18:48

The Prime Minister listened most carefully and said in a resigned manner that 'General saab, ab yeh to procedural problems hain' (these are procedural problems). We are trying
In his autobiography 'Courage and Convictions', the former chief said he had briefed the Prime Minister about his visit to Myanmar and told him "in no uncertain terms as to what was happening or rather, what was not happening".

"The Prime Minister listened most carefully and said in a resigned manner that 'General saab, ab yeh to procedural problems hain' (these are procedural problems). We are trying," the former chief says in the book.

"How many times I had heard this before. I lost count years ago. Here was the Prime Minister of India, expressing his helplessness in matters that should have been trivial," he says.

Giving details of his visit to Myanmar, he said the issues were related to handing over of road rollers to the Myanmar government for building roads there for which the expenditure was not more than Rs 20 crore.

Gen Singh said despite the 'Look East Policy' propagated by the Prime Minister, for 15 years, the oil exploration offered by Myanmar was "lying in someone's pending tray".

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India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby Peregrine » 24 Jan 2014 00:12

Myanmar mobs killed at least 40 Muslims : Rights group

YANGON : Buddhist mobs killed at least 40 Muslims when they stormed a village in western Myanmar last week, hunting down residents with knives, a human rights group said, citing witness testimony and a wide network of local sources.

The government has vehemently denied any deaths, except that of a police sergeant attacked by Rohingya Muslim villagers, but evidence of a massacre is mounting.

Matthew Smith, executive director of Fortify Rights, called on the government today to give humanitarian aid workers, independent observers and journalists unfettered access to Du Char Yar Tan village in Northern Rakhine state, which has been emptied and sealed off since the January 14 incident. He said as of yesterday, there were still some bodies in abandoned homes.

He also called for an end to mass arrests of Rohingya men and boys, some as young as 10.

"These arbitrary detentions broaden the scope of the human rights violations in the area and should be immediately brought to an end," Smith said. "There needs to be accountability for this wave of horrific violence ... but mass arrests of Muslim men and boys are not the way."

Myanmar, a predominantly Buddhist nation of 60 million people, has been grappling with sectarian violence for nearly two years. The reported deaths in Du Char Yar Tan would bring to more than 280 the number of people killed, most of them members of the country's long-persecuted Rohingya Muslim community. Another 250,000 people have fled their homes.

The state home to 80 per cent of the country's 1 million Rohingya runs along the Bay of Bengal and is cut off from the rest of the country by a mountain range.

It is off-limits to foreign journalists and access for humanitarian aid workers is severely restricted, adding to the difficulties of confirming details about the violence.

The numbers reported by Fortify Rights, however, appear to be gaining support.

Estimates by the United Nations, which sent investigators to the region last week, also reach in the dozens, according to embassy officials and aid workers, following briefings on the violence. They asked that they not be named, saying the UN was expected to issue its own statement on the incident.

Security forces surrounded Du Char Yar Tan on January 14 after Rohingya Muslim residents allegedly abducted and killed a police sergeant.

Fearing reprisals, most of the men fled, but rights groups and residents of neighbouring villages said revenge-seeking Buddhist mobs entered with knives and guns and started attacking women and children.

In the hours that followed, riot police started arresting all male Rohingya, including children over the age of 10, in surrounding areas, sending hundreds into hiding, Smith said

Cheers Image

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby gunjur » 24 Mar 2014 20:37

Apologies if already posted

Can India Catch Up With China in Myanmar?
A recent visit to the city of Yangon underscored the increasing economic presence of China in Myanmar. The massive investment, pipelines, and rail strategy are well known, but a drive through the city is enough to make clear the extent to which China has boosted its economic foothold in the country.

Yet, even with its numerous shortcomings, India has a number of advantages over China when it comes to building bilateral ties with Myanmar.

For one thing, there are strong historical ties. On my visit, I was heartened to see that the tomb of Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah II (exiled by the British after the Indian Rebellion of 1857) was well maintained, with significant assistance from the Indian government.

Other sites in Myanmar point to its history with India, including a large number of old South Indian Hindu temples and Sikh shrines. One of the Sikh shrines, the Guru Nanak Sikh temple near downtown Yangon, was built in 1897 by Sikhs who were part of the British army. It runs a free dispensary.

These sites are physical evidence of the impact that Indians have historically had on local ethos and culture in Myanmar.

Even today, as it takes on the challenges of political reform and institution building, there is much Myanmar can learn from India. In that regard, it is worth noting that New Delhi has begun to assist Myanmar in a number of important spheres, including agriculture, information technology and engineering. Most recently, INDEE 2014, a flagship engineering exhibition of India’s Engineering Export Promotion Council, was being held in Yangon with Indian embassy support. India needs to send a clear message that it believes in providing assistance in sectors where local capabilities can be built, rather than just milking resources to bolster its own economy.

Another area is press freedom. A conference I attended highlighted the mushrooming of electronic media channels and newspapers in Myanmar, although skeptics see the reforms as mere window dressing. India has a vibrant media, and could offer a useful example to Myanmar in this regard.

India’s admittedly imperfect yet reasonable robust experiment with a pluralist society could also provide lessons in religious tolerance, at a time when clashes between Rohingya Muslims and Buddhists pose a serious challenge to Myanmar. China’s handling of its problems with the Uighurs in Xinjiang would suggest it is a less useful model for a country attempting the transition from authoritarianism to an open society.

While China enjoys a growing dominance in Myanmar’s economy, some astute thinking by India could make it a serious competitor. To do that, though, New Delhi needs to be more assertive and aggressive in projecting its own strengths. It should make special efforts to highlight its shared history and institutional advantages, and its believe in partnership rather than creating appendages. This is important, because the ever-increasing Chinese economic presence is slowly but surely causing resentment amongst sections of the Myanmar populace.

Some of the steps India needs to take are faster implementation of projects, greater connectivity between its Northeast and Myanmar, such as the initiation of the Imphal-Mandalay bus service, an increased number of flights connecting Myanmar and India, assistance for the Indian private sector in Myanmar, and aid and assistance in education. An Indian government with a clear economic and strategic vision may well be able to deliver on all the above.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby Agnimitra » 18 Sep 2014 06:54

Ferry service to Myanmar from Chennai to start next month
Come October, a ferry service will start from Chennai to Yangon in Myanmar via Krishnapatnam (Andhra Pradesh), to facilitate passenger and freight movement.

This was announced by Road Transport, Highway and Shipping Minister Nitin Gadkari in a press conference here to present a report card on 100 days of his ministry. The proposed ferry service, to be operated by Shipping Corporation of India, will help in strengthening economic ties between the countries.

Shipping revenues
Emphasising the importance of the shipping sector, and waterways in particular, Gadkari said the sector could contribute up to 2 per cent to the country’s gross domestic product (GDP). “Transportation through waterway is much cheaper, as the cost of carrying goods per kilometre on road in ₹1.50 and ₹1 by rail, while by waterway it costs just 50 paise,” he said. Waterways have lower carbon emission, less chance of accidents and can decongest other modes of transport, he added.

The Minister also announced plans to convert water bodies into water ports. Also, work is on to allow Hovercraft (a vehicle that can operate on road and water) on routes such as Kochi to Andaman & Nicobar Islands. The river cruise on Ganga has kicked off between Patna and Varanasi and efforts are on to take this to other cities. Transportation of coal and food grain through waterways is also gaining momentum, he added. Gadkari said the Shipping Ministry was planning to start a roll-on-roll-off (RORO) ship service for transporting vehicles from factories to help save fuel used for transportation of goods through road. RORO ships are vessels designed to carry wheeled cargo, such as automobiles, trucks etc. that are driven on and off a ship on their own wheels or using a platform vehicle. “We have planned the expansion of the Cochin Shipyard and are working on different schemes for cargo and passengers at the shipyard. We are also planning to build three LNG (liquefied natural gas) vessels at the Cochin Shipyard,” Gadkari said. The vessels will be built at a cost of ₹1,500 crore each for which Cochin Shipyard will partner with a French company.

Ship-breaking
The Ministry is also working on a scheme for promotion of ship-breaking and building. “We have prepared a Cabinet note on the matter. The States of Gujarat, Kerala, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu have potential for this kind of industry. We want to facilitate ship-breaking and building in our country,” he said, adding that after Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust in Mumbai, a Special Economic Zone will also be set up at Kandla and Kochi.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby SSridhar » 25 Sep 2014 15:29

India's gateway to the East - G.Parthasarathy, Business Line

In the minds of New Delhi’s elite, India’s South Asian neighbourhood is made up solely of the seven members of Saarc, even though we share no land borders with three of them. We tend to forget that four of our north-eastern States — Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur and Mizoram — share a 1640 km land border with Myanmar. Not only is Myanmar a member of Bimstec, the Bay of Bengal grouping linking Saarc and Asean, it is also our gateway to the fast growing economies of East and Southeast Asia.

While successive leaders of Myanmar, who are devout Buddhists, have looked upon India predominantly in spiritual terms, as the home of Lord Buddha, they recognise that an economically vibrant India provides a balance to an increasingly assertive China. Sadly, we have not been able to take full advantage of either our shared Buddhist heritage by facilitating increased pilgrimages, or used our economic potential effectively to promote our interests.

Changing situation

Ties between India and Myanmar have quietly blossomed over the past two decades. The respective militaries and security agencies of the two countries have facilitated cooperation across the border. This has led to effective action against cross-border insurgencies and narcotics smuggling. Myanmar’s information minister recently reiterated his government’s readiness to crack down on Indian insurgent groups such as the ULFA (Assam), PLA (Manipur) and NSCN-K (Nagaland). India, in turn, has acted firmly against Myanmar insurgents entering its territory.

Myanmar has moved steadily in easing the rigours of military rule since the elections that swept President Thein Sein to power in 2011. The military still has a crucial role in national life, as negotiations are on to achieve a comprehensive ceasefire with 16 well-armed insurgent groups drawn from ethnic non-Burmese minorities. This is no easy task, but is a prelude to negotiations on the highly sensitive issue of federalism and provincial autonomy for ethnic minority areas.

After years of bonhomie during military rule, Myanmar’s relationship with its largest neighbour China is under strain. China’s Yunnan province borders the sensitive and insurgency-ridden Kachin and Shan states in Myanmar.

The China factor

China has helped significantly in building Myanmar’s infrastructure and equipping its military. India’s fears of Chinese bases in Myanmar were not borne out. But differences between China and Myanmar have grown recently, especially on large projects like the Myistone dam, which had to be junked, and a proposed railway line to connect Yunnan to the Bay of Bengal. There is growing opposition to Chinese projects in copper and nickel mining. The sentiment is that China has taken Myanmar for a ride regarding an oil pipeline linking Yunnan to the Bay of Bengal port of Kyaukphu.

There are concerns over Chinese involvement with insurgent groups such as the Kachin Independence Army and the United Wa Army. Despite this, border trade across the Yunnan-Myanmar border is booming, reaching $4.17 billion in 2013, against a mere $35 million border trade across the India-Myanmar border, though the “unofficial trade” (smuggling) across this border is estimated at around $300 million annually.

India’s former Ambassador to Myanmar VS Seshadri has authored a report spelling out how India has been tardy in building connectivity through Myanmar to Thailand and Vietnam and securing access for our landlocked north-eastern States to the Bay of Bengal. Our border trade regulations are formulated by mandarins in North Block and Udyog Bhavan who have no idea of the ground situation. They could learn a thing or two from China’s pragmatism — the manner in which it treats the markets with its neighbours not as foreign, but as extensions of its own markets. Opening up such trade will also enable our north-eastern States to meet their growing requirements of rice at very competitive rates.

Unless we learn to look at our neighbours the way China does, bearing in mind the inherent strengths of our economy, we can never match the economic influence of China on our borders in the North-East. The new minister for north-eastern affairs VK Singh has served at length in the North-East. It is hoped he will liberalise procedures and permit trade across borders with Myanmar in currencies traders mutually agree upon. Vehicles should move freely across the borders on roads through Myanmar, to Thailand and Vietnam.

Moreover, the “Kaladan multimodal corridor” linking our north-eastern States through the port of Sittwe in Myanmar will be useful only if Sittwe becomes the key port for India-Myanmar trade. India has done remarkably well in human resource development projects in Myanmar. It has played the lead role in the establishment of the Myanmar Institute of Information Technology, an advanced centre for agricultural research and education, an agricultural university and welcomed many Myanmar professionals for training in its medical and engineering institutions.

Tardy record

But we would be less than honest if we did not admit that in project and investment cooperation, our record has been tardy. After having secured exploration rights for gas in the Bay of Bengal, we conducted our project planning and diplomacy so clumsily that we did not have a strategy ready for taking the gas to India through a pipeline across Myanmar and our North-East, or for transporting it as LNG. China deftly stepped in and took away all this gas by expeditiously building a pipeline to Yunnan province.

In the mid 1990s, Myanmar offered us hydro-electric projects with a potential of over 1,000 MW across rivers near our borders. We took years to scrutinise these projects, which companies in South Korea earlier offered to construct. After nearly two decades we backed off. Our private companies too not been able to avail offers of land for plantations across Myanmar.

India was offered hundreds of acres of land for agriculture and for bamboo plantations for making paper pulp, close to its borders. Two private sector companies signed MoUs with Myanmar counterparts. But Myanmar officials found our private sector to be more bureaucratic than our government. India lost access to huge bamboo resources which went to a Thai company that clinched a deal in weeks — something our companies could not achieve for nearly two decades.

The writer is a former High Commissioner to Pakistan

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby member_19686 » 12 Nov 2014 03:05

While Hindus are brainwashed with family planning nonsense, India is becoming a dumping ground for the worlds Muslims & Xtians (the rohingyas, these entitled people).
Burmese refugees demand a life in Delhi
Jayashree Nandi,TNN | Oct 16, 2014, 06.32 AM IST

NEW DELHI: Chin refugees from Myanmar who have been living in Delhi for years now are protesting appalling living conditions, lack of treatment for seriously ill and dearth of jobs and safety. They have been camping in front of United Nations High Commission for Refugees office in Vasant Vihar since Monday. The chief of mission has now agreed to see them on Friday.

Delhi has over 8,000 Burmese refugees, some of whom live on subsistence allowance. The others do odd jobs for a living. The Chin, a Christian-majority group many of whose members have left Myanmar owing to persecution, claim the military continues to be powerful there. With ethnic strife and human rights violations rampant, going back for them is not an option. Many have harrowing tales of escape. They typically walk for over a week to enter India through Mizoram.

"I lost my father before we decided to leave Myanmar in 2008. He went to a place called Falam. The soldiers were already chasing him, so I'm not sure what happened to him. When soldiers started coming to our house everyday, my mother, siblings and I decided to leave. But life has been difficult. Many of us don't have jobs. I somehow managed to join a call centre. United Nations is supposed to give each of us two dollars and 10 cents daily, but most don't get that," Mawimawi (22) said.

Many protesters have faced physical abuse, assault, molestation and even threat to life. Zar Zothangi (43), who lives with her daughter in Janakpuri, moved to Delhi in 2010 after the military suspected her of trying to convert someone to Christianity. But after escaping a life in which she was unable to practice her religion freely, she was allegedly molested in Delhi. "When I came here, my purse was stolen and the thieves molested me. Even at the ice cream packaging factory where I work, some male workers tried to attack me. I don't feel safe here and worry for my daughter," she said. Zo earns Rs 2,500 per month but the rent for her house is Rs 3,000. She has been dipping into her meagre savings.

The Chin Refugee Committee claimed that 99% of Burmese refugees earn much less than Delhi's statutory minimum wage of Rs 8,554. Their average monthly earning is Rs 4,500. There are more than 30 refugees suffering from Hepatitis B who need help immediately. Most have no other licence to work other than the blue UNHCR card, which is why their small businesses are disallowed by corporations.

Lian Khan Mang (40), who used to be a farmer in Myanmar, has hepatitis but doctors at G B Pant Hospital have suggested more tests. "I can't pay for them. My wife who works in a factory is the sole breadwinner. We pay Rs 3,000 for rent," Mang said. Herhluan (70), one of the seniormost refugees in Delhi, has been here for 11 years. "I worked for a shipping company in Yangon. My pension is Rs 30 in Indian currency. I had to sell my house in Yangon to come to India. I can't hear properly and have health problems," he said.

According to Human Rights Law Network, India is not a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention and so the protection of refugees is confined to ad hoc measures taken by the Centre, leaving them with few civil, political or legal rights.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 831815.cms

We are "overpopulated" but we have to take in millions whose beliefs demand we convert to their so called religions.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby arun » 21 Feb 2015 09:20

X Posted from the "Managing Chinese Threat" thread.

The People’s Republic of China bullying Myanmar.

The Kokang ethnic group that resides in Myanmar is a Han Chinese Mandarin speaking ethnic group and Myanmar has accused P.R.China of supporting the Kokang splittists.

India should provide help to Myanmar to mitigate bullying by the People's Republic of China:

Myanmar-China Border Conflict: Officials Call On Beijing To Stop Facilitating Rebel Groups

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 13 Mar 2015 16:17

http://www.business-standard.com/articl ... 347_1.html

A road map is needed to boost trade and cultural ties between Arunachal Pradesh and Myanmar, Indian Ambassador in Myanmar Gautam Mukhopadhyay has said.

Mukhopadhyay, who met with the state Chief Minister Nabam Tuki at New Delhi yesterday, said he would lead a high level delegation from that country to the state likely in April to explore possibilities of collaboration, a communique from the CMO said here today.

Asserting the state government's priority to eradicate poverty and backwardness in different parts of Indo-Myanmar border, Tuki urged the Ambassador to initiate confidence building measures and help create meaningful synergies between the people of both the countries.

He also cited the need for making functional the Land Customs Station (LCS) at Nampong which would benefit not only Arunachal Pradesh but also the entire north eastern region.

"If one considers a catchment area with a radius of 1000 km, the region would be central to at least 10 countries. This geo-strategic concept gains eminence in the light of the country's 'Act East Policy'," he said.

He also reiterated the importance of opening Indo-Myanmar connectivity through Pangsau Pass on the historic Stilwell Road, the communique said.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 15 Mar 2015 02:48

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/ente ... 569526.cms

BENGALURU: Twenty students from the University of Mandalay, Myanmar, will attend a workshop-cum-training programme at IIM Bangalore from Sunday.

Through the programme, the Centre for Public Policy hopes to expose the students to various aspects of doing business both domestically and in the international context. A comprehensive programme of pedagogy, visits to enterprises and meetings will be a part of the 20-day workshop at the B-school. While some of the participants are working, a majority are degree holders in medicine.

The training will include aspects of entrepreneurship, management of small and medium enterprises, and sustaining and expanding the financial and human resources of an enterprise.

This is the third batch of students from the University of Mandalay that IIM-B will host. The initiative aims at enhancing India-Myanmar bilateral exchanges and contribute to Myanmar government's move to open its economy to foreign cooperation and investment in the private and public sector.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby arun » 15 Mar 2015 10:19

arun wrote:The People’s Republic of China bullying Myanmar.

The Kokang ethnic group that resides in Myanmar is a Han Chinese Mandarin speaking ethnic group and Myanmar has accused P.R.China of supporting the Kokang splittists.

India should provide help to Myanmar to mitigate bullying by the People's Republic of China:

Myanmar-China Border Conflict: Officials Call On Beijing To Stop Facilitating Rebel Groups


X Posted from the “Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)” thread.

Looks like the Burman people of Myanmar have got fed up with the inaction of the People’s Republic of China regards their Han ethnic cousins, the Kokang, who are creating trouble in Myanmar.

India must give full diplomatic and moral support to Myanmar to withstand P.R.Chinese bullying, demand restraint from P.R.China and a reduction in bellicose rhetoric while pushing for talks between the two countries:

Chinese General Warns Myanmar Over Bombing ……………………..

“The top echelons in the Myanmar military must strictly control and restrain their forces, and there can be absolutely no repeat of such incidents,” General Fan told the commander in chief of Myanmar’s military, Senior Gen. Min Aung Hlaing, in a telephone call, Xinhua said. “Otherwise, the Chinese military will take resolute and decisive measures to protect Chinese people’s lives and property.”


New York Times

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 16 Mar 2015 16:49

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/worl ... 579660.cms

YANGON(MYANMAR): Buddhist monks who suffered severe burns during a police crackdown on protesters campaigning against a Chinese copper mine two years ago have launched a lawsuit against Myanmar's home affairs minister.

More than 100 Buddhist monks suffered severe burns from smoke bombs that reportedly contained white phosphorous when police forcefully dispersed the protesters at the Wanbao Mining Copper Ltd.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby member_23370 » 16 Mar 2015 19:54

http://www.mizzima.com/mizzima-news/reg ... sit-yangon

The Indian Embassy in Myanmar announced that two Indian navy ships named “Saryu” and “Batti Malv” are set to arrive in Yangon on March 16.

The ships will be in Yangon from March 16 to 18.

During the visit, senior officers and the captains of the

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 18 Mar 2015 16:48

Did the British-era law that is now 295A of the Indian Penal Code make to Burma, too?
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/worl ... 597089.cms

YANGON: A New Zealand bar manager and his two Myanmar colleagues were sentenced today to two and a half years in jail by a Yangon court for using a Buddha image to promote a cheap drinks night.

The ad posted on Facebook in December triggered outrage in the former junta-ruled country, where surging Buddhist nationalism and religious violence has sparked international concern.

Philip Blackwood, who worked at the VGastro bar in Yangon, was found guilty of insulting religion along with the bar's Myanmar owner and manager.

The trio were sentenced to two years in jail for insulting religion through written word or pictures and a further six months — both terms carrying the punishment of hard labour — for breaching local authority regulations.

They were held responsible for protests that erupted outside the bar.

Judge Ye Lwin said that although Blackwood, 32, posted an apology, he had "intentionally plotted to insult religious belief" when he uploaded the photo.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 20 Mar 2015 17:34

http://zeenews.india.com/news/south-asi ... 64917.html

Yangon: A Myanmar court convicted five people for spreading fabricated allegations that a Muslim man raped a Buddhist woman, which led to deadly riots last July, a court official said on Friday.

One Buddhist and one Muslim man were killed during two days of rioting in the central city of Mandalay, which began when a mob of about 300 Buddhists swarmed a tea shop owned by a Muslim man accused of raping a female Buddhist employee.

Among those sentenced to 21 years in prison was Phyu Phyu Min, who filed a case with police in Pyinmana, a town near Mandalay, claiming she had been raped. She later confessed that she was paid to file the false complaint.

"Their false charge of offence sparked a riot in our peaceful society, leading to the death of two, causing distrust and conflicts between two communities," said a Mandalay Region court official who asked not to be named as he was not authorised to speak to the media.

President Thein Sein`s government launched sweeping political and economic reforms after he took office in 2011 following 49 years of military rule. However, it has struggled to contain outbreaks of anti-Muslim violence in which at least 240 people have been killed since June 2012.

Most of the victims have been Muslims and riots are often preceded by claims that a Muslim man raped a Buddhist woman, as was the case in Mandalay.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 21 Mar 2015 15:59

I hadn't known, had you?
http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/m ... 016164.ece

[Naypyidaw]
This surreal city extends an estimated 4,800 sq. km, six times the size of New York City. Everything looks supersized. The streets have up to 20 lanes, there is a safari park, a zoo, and at least four golf courses. There is reliable electricity and many of the restaurants have free, fast wi-fi.

The only thing Naypyidaw doesn’t have, it seems, is people. The vast highways are completely empty. Nothing moves. Officially, the city’s population is 1 million, but many doubt this figure. On a bright Sunday afternoon, the streets are silent and hotel lobbies empty. It looks like an eerie picture of post-apocalypse suburban America.

Unveiled as Burma’s new capital in November 2005, by the then military regime, the city is rumoured to have cost up to $4bn to construct. In recent years, the city’s bizarre urban plan and strange emptiness has become something of an international curiosity.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 23 Mar 2015 16:54

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 660996.cms

BHUBANESWAR: Artists from Myanmar showcased their rich culture and tradition at a cultural show at Rabindra Mandap here yesterday. Artists of Myanmar Theatrical Association presented a dance drama, puppetry show and fold dance items on the occasion.

"India and Myanmar have a history of cultural relations and this programme would help develop the cultural ties between the people of two nations," said regional director of Indian Council for Cultural relations (ICCR), R Chatterjee The event was organized by the ICCR in association with the department of culture.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 23 Mar 2015 16:57

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news ... te-myanmar
YANGON, March 23 (Xinhua) -- The International Institute of Information Technology, Bangalore (IIIT-B) is collaborating with its counterpart in Mandalay, second largest city of Myanmar to build information technology institute in the Southeast Asian Country, according to embassy sources Monday.

The Mandalay Institute of Information Technology, which is the center of excellence for IT modeled on IIIT-B is being implemented.

For next step, the entrepreneurship development institute in Yangon is also in the process of tying-up with Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow (IIM-Lucknow).

Myanmar was sending its people for training at the Institute of Management Training, Bangalore.

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Re: India-Myanmar news and discussion

Postby A_Gupta » 24 Mar 2015 04:48

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1150324/j ... RCp-2YbgoA
It never looked like it could get this worse. The close ties that China has developed with the military junta in Myanmar since the late 1980s now appear to belong to the past. China was the only major nation that firmly supported Myanmar's military junta when it faced Western sanctions following the violent suppression of democratic movements and the long incarceration of Aung San Suu Kyi. It supplied large quantities of military hardware to the 'Tatmadaw' - the Burmese army- funded the junta's limited development programme, and invested heavily across the nation.

But Myanmar's new regime, led by President Thein Sein, appears determined to balance Myanmar's overdependence on its northern neighbour by engaging with the West, Japan , India as well as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. The latest manifestation of this growing distance from China seems to have upset Beijing enormously.


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