Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23771
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby SSridhar » 20 Jun 2009 07:38

This thread will discuss all water issues among countries in the Indian subcontinent, excluding those related to India and Pakistan which will continue to be discussed in the Indus Water Treaty thread.

Post away.

Stan_Savljevic
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3522
Joined: 21 Apr 2006 15:40

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Stan_Savljevic » 20 Jun 2009 11:45

Tipaimukh data received from India ---- Says foreign minister

India has sent information to water resources ministry about the 'controversial' Tipaimukh Dam responding to requests from Bangladesh, said Foreign Minister Dipu Moni yesterday. “The Indian government has provided data to the water resources ministry and Joint Rivers Commission (JRC)," she told journalists after inaugurating a fair at state guesthouse Padma organised by the Foreign Office Wives' Association (FOWA). She said a parliamentary delegation would soon visit the project site in the Indian state of Monipur and submit a report to the government.

“We will scrutinise the data and report of the parliamentary delegation. The government will do whatever is good for the country,” said the foreign minister. She was confident that the Indian government would not do anything harmful to Bangladesh but said government would do everything possible if the dam proves to be a threat to Bangladesh's environment. India started the construction of Tipaimukh Dam on river Barak in 2003 to generate electricity. The construction halted due to national and international uproar and resistance against probable environmental degradation inside and outside Indian territory. It resumed the construction late last year.

Environmentalists, politicians and conscious section in Bangladesh are protesting against the construction of the dam fearing that India would unilaterally use water of the river, which may turn Bangladesh's north-eastern lush-green fertile soil into a dry waste land during dry season. Since the river Barak-Surma-Kushyara is an international river, Bangladesh as a lower riparian country should have an equitable share of water. The Barak River enters into Bangladesh as Kushiyara and travels further downstream by the name Surma.

http://www.thedailystar.net/newDesign/n ... ?nid=93334
Resolve problems with int'l rivers thru' joint initiatives ---- Muhith tells Tipaimukh dam confce

Finance Minister AMA Muhith yesterday urged all to be aware of any movement against the Tipaimukh dam by a certain quarter to gain its political interest. Addressing the National Tipaimukh Dam Conference 2009 at the seminar hall of the Institution of Engineers Bangladesh in the city, he said public opinions could be taken about implementation of the project. The finance minister also criticised the past BNP-Jamaat government as it did not protest against the Tipaimukh project though India had completed the detailed studies and design of the project and floated an international tender during their rule.

Earlier on June 16, BNP Secretary General Khandaker Delwar Hossain called upon the countrymen to raise their voices against the government as it is mum about the Indian plan to build Tipaimukh dam. He said the caretaker government had helped advance Tipaimukh dam and Asian Highway projects, and the present government is now trying to help complete them. "We had been protesting the construction of Tipaimukh Dam for a long time but at that time we did not get them who are now screaming against the project," said Muhith.

He proposed that the problems with international rivers could be solved through joint initiative of Bangladesh, India, Bhutan, Nepal and China. Speaking at the conference Dr RK Ranjan, an Indian expert and representative of Citizens Concern for Dam and Development in Manipur, said there would be huge losses of fisheries and degradation of environment if the dam is built. "We will get only 30-40 MW of electricity from the hydroelectric project that would be built by constructing the dam. So why should we put our fish resources and environment at stake for such small amount of electricity," he posed a question.

Dr Ranjan sought the help of the people of Bangladesh to stop the Tipaimukh project. Communist Party of Bangladesh, General Secretary Mujahidul Islam Selim said the dam will not only bring environmental catastrophe for Bangladesh and Indian state of Manipur but also destroy the bilateral relations between Bangladesh and India. "India would be responsible if the relationship gets cold," he added. Presided over by Prof Dr ABM Faruk of Dhaka University, the conference was also addressed by Rashed Khan Menon MP, Fazle Hossain Badsha MP, and Country Director of ActionAid Farah Kabir.

http://www.thedailystar.net/newDesign/n ... ?nid=93386

Saving Dhaka's polluted rivers: Drawing on recent experiences
http://www.thedailystar.net/newDesign/n ... ?nid=93344
Greater Dhaka has been a major engine of growth and prosperity in Bangladesh, representing more than 40% of Bangladesh's national GDP. This rapidly growing city of 12 million inhabitants has also emerged as a major hub for over 7000 small and medium scale industries. Yet, Dhaka's sustainability is increasingly under threat due to the severe pollution of its rivers, khals, and aquifers. The pollution of Dhaka's water sources has reached alarming levels, threatening public health, ecosystems and economic growth.

Although industries account for over 60 percent of the pollution in the Dhaka watershed, industrial growth is not the principle culprit. Instead, the underlying pollution problems stem from unplanned, un-serviced urbanization, lack of enforcement, disincentives for environmental conservation and governance constraints. In sum, there is an institutional vacuum where everybody -- and nobody -- is responsible for protecting the Dhaka watershed. As a result, most industries do not have the right incentives to treat their wastewater and invest in cleaner technologies and processes.

On the positive side, the tide seems to be turning as widespread concern for the pollution of the Dhaka watershed is mounting. Over the past few months, the Daily Star-Channel I 'Save Dhaka Save River' campaign has been at the forefront of a national civil movement resulting in widespread calls from both the public and parliament for pragmatic solutions to save Dhaka's dying rivers. Growing public awareness of the seriousness of the pollution threat will help push for greater accountability from both the government and private sector in addressing these concerns. Moreover, pressure for change is also emerging from within, as industries themselves particularly in the export driven textiles and tannery sectors--are starting to face increased pressure from international buyers to comply with basic environmental standards.

There is thus a real opportunity to change the status quo. The challenge is now to channel these calls for change into concrete actions, starting at the highest level. This requires a coordinated, sequenced approach.
........

Stan_Savljevic
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3522
Joined: 21 Apr 2006 15:40

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Stan_Savljevic » 22 Jun 2009 07:07

BNP for 'neutral' water experts ----- Won't join Tipai team without them

Opposition Chief Whip Zainul Abdin Farrouque yesterday said if neutral water experts are not included BNP will not join the all-party parliamentary team to visit Tipaimukh dam area. "We are ready to propose BNP lawmakers' name for the committee if the government sends a team of neutral experts with it," the opposition chief whip said at a press briefing at the Jatiya Sangsad Media Centre. BNP proposed five names of national level water experts -- Dr Ainun Nishat, former water secretary Asafuddowla, Dr Torofder, MA Rab and Dr Asif Nazrul - to incorporate into the team, he said.

"If the government does not do this, the visit to the dam will be meaningless," he added. Earlier on June 16, the parliamentary standing committee on water resources ministry formed a nine-member team comprised of lawmakers and experts to visit the Tipaimukh dam area to assess its impact on Bangladesh. But no BNP lawmaker was incorporated into the committee, as the party does not have any representatives in the parliamentary standing committee on water resources ministry.

The chairman of the parliamentary body, however, later urged the BNP to send a representative's name to include in the delegation. Zainul hoped the government would consider their proposal to face a national crisis like Tipaimukh issue and urged the government to include those five experts in the committee. BNP lawmakers Mahbubuddin Khokon, Nazrul Islam Manju and Shahid Uddin Chowdhury Anee, among others, were present at the press briefing.

http://www.thedailystar.net/newDesign/n ... ?nid=93652
India 'consulted' Tipai construction ----- Claims Pinak Ranjan at seminar; says no int'l river treaty exists; Dipu Moni feels need for greater connectivity

Indian High Commissioner Pinak Ranjan Chakravarty yesterday said India has "consulted" construction of Tipaimukh dam with Bangladesh after having the matter examined by their experts. "The perception that India has not consulted Bangladesh about building of the Tipaimukh dam is wrong and out of line," said Pinak Ranjan at a seminar. "The proposal of the project has been provided for Bangladesh," he added. "Feasibility and design of the dam has been examined by Indian experts," he told the seminar titled "South Asian Connectivity: Bangladesh Perspective," organised by Bangladesh-India Friendship Society at Hotel Sonargaon.

He however said informing Bangladesh about the dam was delayed as examination about it required much time. But he did not mention exactly when India consulted with Bangladesh in this regard. "Fear of earthquake or environmental hazard are hypothetical and never been substantiated by any scientific data. There is no scientific data," he added. "There is a perception and speculation that India is breaking international treaty. There is no international treaty in this regard. There is a UN convention in which at least 35 countries need to sign to turn the convention into a law.

"As of today only 17 countries signed this and it has not become a law yet. And interestingly, India and Bangladesh also did not sign," added Pinak Ranjan. Calling the dam a "death trap" is nothing but "scale mongering" and inciting people against India, he said, adding India has invited a team from Bangladesh to visit India and the site. Foreign Minister Dipu Moni, chief guest at the seminar, said, "We need to build network and greater connectivity. Even the Saarc could not be made effective in all the years in the region due to lack of integration."

Three papers were submitted at the seminar. Prof Abul Barkat presented a paper titled "Economic implications of South Asian connectivity," while Qazi Kholiquzzaman Ahmad presented his paper titled "Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna regional cooperation in water and energy development and sharing". Adviser of Planning Commission Dr M Rahmatullah presented another paper, while former secretary Syed Margub Morshed and Dr Amena Hossain, among others, spoke. Former vice-chancellor of Dhaka University Prof AK Azad presided over the seminar conducted by Dr Selina Akter Jahan.

http://www.thedailystar.net/newDesign/n ... ?nid=93654
Reduce dependency on ground water ----- Speakers say at roundtable

Speakers at a roundtable yesterday underscored the need for taking immediate steps to reduce dependency on the ground water to save the country from environmental disaster. Suggesting for optimal use of surface water, they said a national consensus has to be built to save the sources of water - rivers, canals and wetlands - from pollution and encroachment. The speakers also said proper and strict enforcement of laws is a must to save the rivers and other water bodies. Media Forum for Human Rights and Environmental Development (MHED) and WBB Trust jointly organised the roundtable titled 'Source of safe drinking water: task to save rivers, canals and wetland' at the National Press Club.

Speaking as the chief guest, Abdur Razzak, chairman of the standing committee on the Ministry of Water Resources, said the condition of the country's environment reached such a level that it has become a great threat for the next generation. Branding Rajdhani Unnayan Katripakhha (Rajuk) as the most crime zone, he said there are many laws to protect the environment but those are not being enforced properly. "Almost all the wetlands surrounded by Dhaka city have been filled up," he said urging all to create massive awareness and resistance to save the wetlands and water bodies for the sake of the next generation.

Razzak lauded the ongoing campaign of The Daily Star and Channel i and said apart from this people will have to come forward to save the rivers, canals and other water bodies from pollution and encroachment. ASM Abdur Rob, former shipping minister, Abu Naser Khan, chairman of Paribesh Bachhao Andolan, Syed Mahbubul Alam, programme manager of WBB Trust and Rafiqul Islam Sabuj, executive director of MHED, also spoke. Sabuj in his keynote paper recommended formulating strict laws to save sources of safe drinking water. He also recommended formulating necessary policy to reduce the dependency on ground water.

http://www.thedailystar.net/newDesign/n ... ?nid=93676
Tipaimukh Dam ------ Dhaka won't accept anything that threatens environment ----- Says Abdur Razzak

Abdur Razzak, chairman of the standing committee on the Ministry of Water Resources, yesterday said that the government would do everything possible if the Tipaimukh dam proves to be a threat to Bangladesh's environment. Discussions would be the main process to realise the demands and the government will not accept anything that might have a negative impact on the country's environment, he told the reporters after a roundtable. Media Forum for Human Rights and Environmental Development (MHED) and WBB Trust jointly organised the roundtable titled 'Source of safe drinking water: task to save rivers, canals and wetland' at the National Press Club.

Abdur Razzak, also a presidium member of ruling Awami League (AL) and former water resources minister, urged all to be positive and work unitedly to this end. “Nothing can be achieved by showing warlike attitude. We have to be positive and be united for the greater interest of the country,” he said, adding, “We have to solve the problem through discussion.” He said a parliamentary delegation will soon visit the project site in Indian state of Monipur and representatives of all party will be there in the visiting team. Asked whether there is any BNP lawmaker in the delegation, he said they have asked BNP to propose a name and they are hopeful BNP will suggest a name soon.

Moudud demands team of experts

BNP leader Barrister Moudud Ahmed yesterday demanded forming a team of experts for visiting the Tipaimukh dam site and said his party would join the team only if it is a team of experts rather than a parliamentary one. He also suggested the government to go to international forums with the issue if needed. Moudud said this at a roundtable on 'Indo-Bangladesh Relations: Recent Developments' organised by Centre for Strategic and Peace Studies (CSPS) at Cirdap auditorium in the city. He also said the team that is formed to visit the Tipaimukh site would only legitimise the dam nothing else.

Former vice chancellor of Dhaka University Prof Emajuddin Ahmed said there should be political division in certain issues but when it is a national issue the country needs to get united. Manarat University Vice Chancellor and former Red Crescent Society Chairman Prof Mohammad Abdur Rob presented the keynote paper at the roundtable while former secretary and Chairman of CSPS Shah Abdul Hannan moderated the discussion. Former state minister for foreign affairs Abul Hasan Chowdhury, journalist Sadek Khan and Jamaat-e-Islami Joint Secretary General Md Kamaruzzaman also spoke.

Gono Forum

Gono Forum leaders have urged the government to take effective steps to resolve Tipaimukh dam issue through bilateral discussions by giving national interest the highest priority. They made the call at a party meeting at its office in the city on Saturday where they also demanded the government ensure immediate trial of war criminals. Gono Forum President Dr Kamal Hossain, Abdur Rouf, Mofizul Islam Khan Kamal and Subrata Chowdhury spoke at the meeting with Pankaj Bhattacharya in the chair. Expressing concern over the law and order situation, they demanded amendment is some important laws like the one that reduced the power and activities of local government and the one that proposed provision in the budget to whiten undisclosed money.

http://www.thedailystar.net/newDesign/n ... ?nid=93678

Stan_Savljevic
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3522
Joined: 21 Apr 2006 15:40

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Stan_Savljevic » 23 Jun 2009 00:47

Padma Bridge ---- Choose Dohar-Bhadrasan site to save Tk 10,000cr ----- Speakers urge govt

Speakers at a roundtable yesterday called on the government to construct Padma Bridge at Dohar-Char Bhadrasan site instead of Mawa-Jajira site to save at least Tk 10,000 crore. “The government should reconsider its decision of constructing the Padma Bridge at Mawa-Jajira site, because it will cost more Tk 10,000 than Dohar-Char Bhadrasan site,” they said. The speakers said this at the roundtable on 'Government planning for construction of Padma Bridge and national interest' organised by Centre for Studies in Social Transmission at the National Press Club in the city.

Presenting a keynote paper, engineer Md Enamul Haque, former director general of Water Development Board and coordination of the centre, said, “If the bridge is constructed at Dohar-Char Bhadrasan site, it will require 35 kilometre highway from Hemayetpur to Dhaka and 15 kilometre highway from Talma of Faridpur to be linked with the bridge which may cost an additional amount of $75 million. But it will save Tk 10,000 crore during total construction process.” According to a study of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the length of the bridge at Mawa-Jajira site would be 6.2 kilometre and it would cost $1,074 million, he said, adding that on the other hand, the length would be at 5.5 kilometre, costing $966 million at the Char Bhadrasan site.

Preferring the Char Bhadrasan site, he said hard soil of the left side and hard point, constructed by Water Development Board, on right side of the site would really be suitable for construction of the bridge, which is absent at Mawa-Jajira point. He also opined for constructing another two kilometre hard point in Dulshara area, the left part of the site, and strengthening the existing hard point of Haziganj at Char Bhadrasan, the right part of the site, to make the site perfect. Enamul also viewed for constructing 1.5-kilometre guide embankment on both sides of the bridge.

He presented some positive aspects of the bridge at this site, including ensuring more security of the bridge by controlling the course of the river, avoiding the Mawa-Jajira, the most erosion-hit site, and resolving disputes between the people of south and south-western parts of the country. The former WDB director general criticised some studies of JICA regarding the site selection process and blamed the company for unveiling some incorrect and inadequate information to the government and the countrymen 'intentionally'. Prof Sirajul Islam, president of the centre, chaired the meeting, while Ahmed Kamal of Dhaka University, Anwar Parvez, former chief engineer of Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority (BIWTA), and engineers Shahidullah and Anisur Rahman were present at the roundtable.

'Consultation' over Tipaimukh dam ----- Clear the air of all confusion

THE remark of the Indian High Commissioner Pinak Ranjan Chakravarty at a seminar titled "South Asian Connectivity: Bangladesh Perspective" that India had consulted Bangladesh on the issue of construction of Tipaimukh dam has helped little to clear the ambiguities that hang around the vital issue. The Indian diplomat reportedly maintained that the matter was discussed between the two countries in 1972 {under sh.'s regime of course making it uncomfortable for bal} and 1978. {under Zia's regime of course, which is uncomfortable for bnp} On our side, the chairman of the parliamentary standing committee on water resources ministry Abdur Razzak, MP, said that the issue came up for discussion at JRC meeting in Delhi in 2003. {under the four party rule of which the whiners j-e-i and bnp were a part of....}

We, however, wonder whether the mere act of informing can be regarded as consultation having taken place between the two governments before India went ahead with the construction work of the dam. We are indeed in the dark if Bangladesh's viewpoints were taken due note of and the perceived consultations fully incorporated these to allay all our concerns. {if bangladesh's suggestions were not taken care of then, they had six long years to bring this topic to the attention of India. Unfortunately, most folks were just happy to sit on their asses for this long, having time only to plot to assassinate sh. hasina or helping ulfa get their arms or blocking the asian highway project because India proposed this and that.. and now since they are out of this job, of course, due to their ineptness and lack of creativity in corruption and swindling money, now they have to find a ruse to protest. And of course, this very same daily star was sitting and proferring advise to India to be generous. My foot, time for generosity is long gone. Its time India did what is in its best interests and bullshit whines will be treated just as that.}

It seems only now, on the eve of the visit of a parliamentary committee delegation to Tipaimukh that India has sent data and information concerning the Tipaimukh dam. {What was daily star doing so long never bringing this topic to attention of Bangladeshis?} In the light of this latest development and in order to clear the air of ambiguities pertaining to 'consultation' our government should state its position publicly on the matter. {And maybe ds should get their ears checked again cos what the GoBD says falls on deaf ears}

Centring around the issue of sending a parliamentary delegation to India, BNP has taken the stance that a 5-member expert team of its own choice {after getting beaten black and blue in the elections, does nt this demand sound a bit too idiotic? And how come this demand finds favor with anyone in BD? Did bnp and j-e-i offer any non-partisan initiatives during their misrule?!} should first make a trip to Tipaimukh before the visit of the official delegation takes place. This is in response to the government's invitation to BNP to send the name of its representative to the parliamentary delegation. We fail to understand why BNP took such a negative approach when, if included, the BNP delegate could make his independent assessment of the situation and share it with the public, if necessary. We believe the tendency to play politics with an issue of vital national interest should be shunned by all concerned. {Repeat it a 1008 times to yourselves, daily star}

IndraD
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7072
Joined: 26 Dec 2008 15:38
Location: भारत का निश्चेत गगन

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby IndraD » 23 Jun 2009 01:07

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Mons ... 689655.cms
Monsoon fading: El Nino may hit UPA growth curve

Monsoon may fail this year..!

Rahul M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 16859
Joined: 17 Aug 2005 21:09
Location: Skies over BRFATA
Contact:

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Rahul M » 24 Jun 2009 09:45

Stan garu, would you mind giving the links to the articles too ?
thanks.

in all this discussion about the proposed tipaimukh dam we have to keep in mind that BD does a lot of cribbing about farakka barrage too.
I'll try and add on that topic to understand the truth behind it but request members to keep it in mind too.

secondly, I'm a novice when it comes to these issues, is there any reliable source on the net where I can get myself up to speed ?
World Commision of Dams report on India(old one from 2000)

Rahul M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 16859
Joined: 17 Aug 2005 21:09
Location: Skies over BRFATA
Contact:

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Rahul M » 24 Jun 2009 10:20

here is a reasonably balanced article covering the main issues of the tipaimukh project.

http://horizonspeaks.wordpress.com/2009 ... imukh-faq/

the author is an Indian with a bangladeshi wife.

Why are there so many protests in Bangladesh against this dam?

I saw protests has basically two categories. The first one is by environmentalists – who always protest any dam construction as they oppose damage to ecology. These people are in India as well as in Bangladesh, and their voice is the same. Whereas a lot of Bangladesh based authors have emphasized on lower riparian effects (such as damages to haors), the environmentalists based in India mostly have protested the loss of forest and biodiversity.

Protest in Bangladesh against Tipaimukh

Protest in Bangladesh against Tipaimukh

The other section of protest in Bangladesh is alarmist in nature. They project Tipaimukh to be another Farakka. They also claim that dry season flow would be significantly down after the Tipaimukh project is completed. These people mostly also attack the current Bangladesh Govt. for their alleged inaction against the dam as they clearly have political motive. I found they are similar to one launched by a lot of Pakistanis during Baghlihar dam. Later, it was cleared by International experts and one major Pakistani newspaper wrote about “Lower Riparian Alarmism.”. It discusses that any dam in upper-riparian upsets their lower counterpart with a lot of speculation about the water security. Politics actually latches on this insecurity. The ruling party does the opposite. They try to defend the dam by merely saying it would do good for Bangladesh. That’s another extreme position and it seriously dilutes country’s ability to bargain a deal. I saw it in Pakistan and Bangladesh is merely repeating the same. Even a graduate knows that any dam can cause problems downstream. They should get all the information required and take necessary action downstream to prevent problems caused by the dam. The internal politics damages every cause of the downstream nation. I am hopeful that I won’t see it when China would dam Brahmaputra. They should get the data and take necessary action to build water-store or barrages to hold excess water of monsoon.

pgbhat
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4081
Joined: 16 Dec 2008 21:47
Location: Hayden's Ferry

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby pgbhat » 25 Jun 2009 04:58

BNP seeks Indian envoy’s removal
DHAKA: In an unusual move, the Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) has demanded the “immediate withdrawal” of Indian High Commissioner Pinak Ranjan Chakravarty for “meddling in the nation’s internal affairs.”

The BNP found Mr. Chakravarty’s remarks on the Tipaimukh dam “audacious” and claimed they amounted to “violating diplomatic norms and interfering in the country’s internal affairs.”

The envoy, speaking at a seminar here on June 21, defended New Delhi’s position amid a barrage of anti-Indian criticism over the construction of the dam, and claimed India had consulted Bangladesh at all relevant levels on the issue.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23771
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby SSridhar » 27 Jun 2009 08:18

Dhaka, New Delhi should settle Tipai row: US Envoy
U.S. Ambassador in Dhaka James F. Moriarty has urged Bangladesh and India to sit across the table and settle disputes over India’s Tipaimukh Dam Project. He, however, ruled out his country’s mediation in the water row.

He made the comment even as some members in the audience drew his attention to the controversial Tipaimukh Dam being constructed on the Barak river in Manipur.

“I urge the people of Bangladesh, the government of Bangladesh to negotiate with India to settle this [Tipaimukh dispute].”

However, he said he did not have data on the flow of water coming from upstream in India and the possible impact of the Tipaimukh dam on the hydro-electric project.

Meanwhile, Ms. Hasina suggested that the main Opposition party, the Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP), send its own team of experts to visit the proposed Tipaimukh Dam site in India and report to the government.

She told Parliament on Thursday that a Parliamentary team would visit the site soon and that her government would work for the country’s best interest.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23771
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby SSridhar » 30 Jun 2009 12:13

We will solve Tipaimukh through talks: Sheikh Hasina
Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has expressed confidence over resolving the controversy over the Tipaimukh dam project in India's northeast through talks with New Delhi.

She reminded parliament Monday that she had resolved the dispute over the Ganga water by signing a bilateral treaty with India during her earlier tenure in 1997.

"Do they want to solve the problem or to create an issue?" she asked of opposition leader Begum Khaleda Zia who had a few hours earlier sent a letter asking for 'help' to send a separate team to India.

India is proposing to construct a dam at Tipaimukh that is at the confluence of Barak and Tuivai rivers, some 200 km upstream of Bangladesh's north-eastern border.

It will also construct a dam at Phulertal, which is 100 km downstream from Tipaimukh.

Abhi_G
BRFite
Posts: 686
Joined: 13 Aug 2008 21:42

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Abhi_G » 30 Jun 2009 21:01

http://www.dailypioneer.com/185591/Are- ... t-sea.html

That brings me to the second point. India’s food and water crisis is essentially man-made in the sense that faulty or inadequate planning lies at its root. As a people Indians are incapable of strategic planning tending to go along with the dominant trend of the times without focusing on the country’s specifics or likely demands of the future. True, the Green Revolution of the late 60s significantly altered the agricultural map of India, made Punjab/Haryana the country’s granary, while the Rice Revolution a decade later enabled Eastern India to eliminate chronic hunger. But I do not recall any significant innovations having been made since; in fact, we are continuously coping with problems created by imported models and merely tinkering with foreign seeds or strands of food crops originating in Mexico, Argentina or Taiwan. Irrigation projects have been built assuming sustained and unvarying availability of water — an assumption that never factored in poor rain or snowfall, leave alone anticipate climate change or retreating Himalayan glaciers.


I am no expert, but I nurse a mounting fear that India will be among the biggest victims of climate change among major economies of the world. Our dependence of the monsoon is far greater than that of other Asian countries and that dependence is not confined to agriculture. India’s economy and culture revolves on this annual phenomenon because nearly nine months out of every 12 are dry in most parts of the country. Although the grand vision to link India’s rivers, resurrected by Atal Bihari Vajpayee, has been churlishly scrapped by the UPA, I doubt if that alone can offer a permanent solution. With even rivers in the North-East no longer brimming over with surplus water and China’s scary plan to divert the flow of Brahmaputra to its dry northern region, the basic assumption underlying the river-linking project could become questionable.


It may be time to give a serious look at Israel’s success in harnessing seawater for agricultural use. Agreed, desalination is a hugely expensive proposition, which is why it has not been widely employed worldwide. But Israel has shown it is possible to use desalinated seawater to turn barren deserts into agriculturally prosperous regions by combining water-conservation techniques with appropriate cropping patterns. India is too vast a country for this to become a panacea for water shortage. But given that we will be the worst affected by climate change, it is essential that human and material resources are pledged to discover cheaper and more practical methods of desalination.


When I visited Lakshadweep some years ago, officials told me about an indigenously developed process to desalinate seawater, which had been commissioned by the Government as a pilot project. Apparently the experiment was successful, resulting in conversion of seawater into potable water at 10 percent of the prevailing cost. Being a pilot project, its scale was small, but I wonder whether the Government has since given approval for trials on a larger scale. If this or similar methods can be successfully evolved, carrying desalinated seawater into the interiors through pipelines may not remain a pipedream. After all, if crude and gas can be transported through underground pipes across thousands of kilometers why can’t a basic necessity like water?


Sanjay M
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4892
Joined: 02 Nov 2005 14:57

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Sanjay M » 13 Aug 2009 08:33

BBC:

India's water use 'unsustainable'


Parts of India are on track for severe water shortages. according to results from Nasa's gravity satellites.

The Grace mission discovered that in the country's northwest - including Delhi - the water table is falling by about 4cm (1.6 inches) per year.

Sanjay M
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4892
Joined: 02 Nov 2005 14:57

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Sanjay M » 13 Aug 2009 08:48

More on this:

http://news.mongabay.com/2009/0812-hanc ... water.html

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/6e064724-879f ... abdc0.html

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid= ... a8oN8Jx5EA

“That part of northern India is really experiencing rapid groundwater decline that’s mostly human-driven,” said co-author Jay Famiglietti, associate professor of earth system science at the University of California, Irvine, in a telephone interview yesterday. “What they are doing is not sustainable.”


Tanaji
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3266
Joined: 21 Jun 2000 11:31

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Tanaji » 13 Aug 2009 14:02

At least for the coastal cities, massive reverse osmosis projects that perform desalination of the sea water are needed. These projects require massive electricity, so hopefully the nook deal will improve the power situation in the country. The cities are only going to grow in the future and current water sources are simply not enough.

Imagine a ring of desalination plants from Mumbai to Kolkotta...

Adrija
BRFite
Posts: 285
Joined: 13 Mar 2007 19:42

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Adrija » 13 Aug 2009 14:47

Is there any place where one could get a holistic picture of the water availability in India- how much (per capita) water do we have from various sources? Have tried googling in the past but no luck

Would be helpful to understand the root situation- do e have enough water to begin with- if yes, then the issue is of capture and storage (check dams/ rainwater harvesting/ baolis etc etc); if not, then we need to look at fresh sources and dams/ desalination become unavoidable.......

Am I on the right track?

RajeshA
BRF Oldie
Posts: 15995
Joined: 28 Dec 2007 19:30

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby RajeshA » 13 Aug 2009 16:09

There will be no water problem in India if look upon it in a particular way.

Fresh water is being constantly brought into India from the Himalayan glaciers and melting snows through the rivers, through monsoons, through normal rains. This water is being consumed and this water gets evaporated in Indian heat.

All we have to ensure is that this fresh water never leaves Indian land, well as far as possible - increase catchment area, do rainwater harvesting, increase ground water table, recycle all sewage water, build water reservoirs, plant trees on the banks of streams to lessen evaporation. In addition we can go for desalination plants.

In fact we should stop using ground water to an extent that the table goes down. It should remain stable.

AjitK
BRFite
Posts: 141
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:19

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby AjitK » 14 Aug 2009 10:18

In Gujarat, villagers find happiness in living at home

Don't know if this report has been discussed here before.This project by the Gujarat govt. has resulted in good income for the farmers.

In 1999, the state government began an initiative that has fuelled a lot of this change: It began to build check dams on rivers flowing through Gujarat. “A check dam is a small barrier built across the direction of water flow on shallow rivers and streams to harvest water,” explains Raval. These structures capture excess water during the monsoon in a small catchment area behind them and force the impounded water to seep into the ground, he says.

The initiative that began about 10 years ago gained currency in the Modi administration, when about 35,000 check dams were constructed in Saurashtra and about 100,000 in the rest of the state. In addition, about 130,000 farm ponds were created and a huge sandbag initiative was undertaken to stop soil erosion and salination.

As a result of the multi-pronged strategy, groundwater levels began to rise quickly, says Rajubhai Ashoter, a farmer near Amreli. “Earlier we used to get water at 400, sometimes 500ft underground. Now, we get it at 80-90ft.”

A survey of the region by the Geological Survey of India has found that the average water table has risen by about 4m in Saurashtra, says Raval. “And as a result, agricultural production has undergone a huge transformation.”

Farmers say they are now able to grow three crops in a year. “Earlier we used to be happy if we could get a winter crop after the monsoon produce. Now, I grow something or the other in the summer as well. We used to have drought for seven years out of 10. Now, see this,” says Ashoter, looking at his field where he has planted a winter crop of Bt (or genetically modified) cotton and wheat.

“The average area under cultivation has gone up by about 10,00,000ha on an average,” says Raval. “The agricultural sales policy has been streamlined as well, so of course the farmers are prospering now.”

SwamyG
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16102
Joined: 11 Apr 2007 09:22

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby SwamyG » 14 Aug 2009 17:28

Rajesh: I disagree :cry: Looking at our population and growing cities and irrigation needs if we don't take enough steps water shortage will severly affect the Indians. I am perplexed at how we are even getting water for this size of population. While we comment on the unsustainable lifestyle of Amirkhans we also need to look at our populationn and water needs. City dwellers are buying water like crazy - be it in bottles or by tankers.

RajeshA
BRF Oldie
Posts: 15995
Joined: 28 Dec 2007 19:30

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby RajeshA » 14 Aug 2009 17:38

SwamyG ji,
I am not quite sure, where we disagree. I am fully in favor of taking all the steps necessary to collect, manage, conserve, recycle as much water as possible.

We have to start thinking on the lines of how one manages the water on a space ship. All water that is or was fresh water and has not yet reached the seas needs to be recycled and reused. All water that comes down from the river basins has to be used very deliberately including for replenishing our ground water table. All rain water needs to be collected.

SwamyG
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16102
Joined: 11 Apr 2007 09:22

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby SwamyG » 14 Aug 2009 17:57

I am sorry, I thought you had implied India will not face or is not facing water problems. The real estate construction industry is extracting enormous quanitities of water just for their construction needs alone. With the cities getting more crowded, I don't understand where they are going to get the water from. Is melting glaciers the answer?

An effect of shrinking globe and India is that now water can be transported in bottles across the country in a relative ease compared to what was possible a decade or two ago.


harbans
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4883
Joined: 29 Sep 2007 05:01
Location: Dehradun

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby harbans » 14 Aug 2009 20:27

Do the math. 200 million-plus people are engaged in a high-risk economic activity where the average size of the business is tiny, where output per head (what economists call productivity) is stagnant or decreasing, where marketing opportunities are limited and where god and government largely determine income outcomes. This is a recipe for keeping 200 million-plus people in a state of permanent, acute vulnerability. Especially the 100 million-odd who are not just workers but have some capital. In the first decade of the 21st century, in a democracy that’s called a major economy, is this normal? Tolerable? Socially, economically and politically acceptable? Put like this, the answers are “no” in every case. Put in the context of India’s political economy, and recognising that we are talking about Indian agriculture, the answer seems to be “yes”.

As the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) and the government abandon their month and a half long fantasy that monsoon will be normal, as drought management meetings begin in earnest, ..


http://www.indianexpress.com/news/capit ... an/501511/

rohiths
BRFite
Posts: 399
Joined: 26 Jun 2009 21:51

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby rohiths » 14 Aug 2009 20:51

On an average India receives rainfall of 1m.
The area of India is 3million square kilometers.
The total annual rainfall in India is a whopping 3000 trillion litres.
i.e. 6800 litres of water per person per day.
If we use all that water efficiently, there will absolutely be no problems.

We must find ways of using the water efficiently

SwamyG
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16102
Joined: 11 Apr 2007 09:22

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby SwamyG » 14 Aug 2009 21:27

^^^^
How is the rainfall distribution? I agree we need to use modern technology and logistics to share the water more efficiently. Unless we plan and execute a scheme people are not going to benefit.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10248
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby arun » 13 Sep 2009 12:43

Part 1 of a two part article from Canada's The Star:

India: Dying of thirst

Pollution and an exploding population are drying the subcontinent as never before. Experts warn the problem may only have just begun

Sep 12, 2009 04:30 AM
Rick Westhead
South Asia bureau

The Star

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10248
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby arun » 30 Nov 2009 13:16

X Posted.

George Galloway, MP of the British Parliament, indulges in a spot of vote bank politics in Bangladesh and opposes the construction by India of the Tipaimukh dam in Manipur :

UK MP leads march against Tipai dam

Neshant
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4846
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Neshant » 30 Nov 2009 14:24

UK MP leads march against Tipai dam


good lord. you'd think he'd have more to deal with given UK's economic problems.

Neshant
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4846
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Neshant » 30 Nov 2009 14:26

It began to build check dams on rivers flowing through Gujarat. “A check dam is a small barrier built across the direction of water flow on shallow rivers and streams to harvest water,” explains Raval. These structures capture excess water during the monsoon in a small catchment area behind them and force the impounded water to seep into the ground, he says.


fantastic idea.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23771
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby SSridhar » 30 Nov 2009 15:06

neshant, check dams are common sight at many places though more need to be built. There is a big programme to construct more check dams at many palces, at least within TN that I know of. I am also aware that in places like Maharashtra and Gujarat, there is a concerted effort for the same.

sunnyP
BRFite
Posts: 1329
Joined: 27 Nov 2008 16:52

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby sunnyP » 30 Nov 2009 18:12

arun wrote:X Posted.

George Galloway, MP of the British Parliament, indulges in a spot of vote bank politics in Bangladesh and opposes the construction by India of the Tipaimukh dam in Manipur :

UK MP leads march against Tipai dam



Galloway is the MP for Bethnel Green in East London.

He is always known to pander to the Moslem community. In 2001 the census showed Bangladeshis to be the single largest ethnic group there (40+%). This figure is no doubt a lot higher now.

RamaY
BRF Oldie
Posts: 17249
Joined: 10 Aug 2006 21:11
Location: http://bharata-bhuti.blogspot.com/

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby RamaY » 30 Nov 2009 23:33

To put things in perspective

Image

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23771
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby SSridhar » 04 Jan 2010 17:16

India & Bangladesh start talks on sharing Teesta waters
The parleys, which came ahead of Premier Sheikh Hasina’s three-day visit to India from January 10, are divided in three sessions and expected to focus on the Teesta issue apart from discussing water-sharing of six other common rivers, joint dredging in Ichhamati river and initiatives for protection of common rivers.
“If it is not possible to reach a long-term agreement (on the Teesta) we may go for an interim agreement,” Bangladesh’s Water Resource Secretary Sheikh Wahid-Uz-Zaman told reporters . Officials earlier said Dhaka already submitted a draft agreement to India through Foreign Ministry in this regard.
Sharing of Teesta’s waters is a major issue in Bangladesh-India water talks for the past several years. Under a 1983 understanding, Bangladesh is supposed to get 36 per cent share of the flow and India 39 per cent allowing the rest of the water flow naturally.
Deltaic Bangladesh is criss-crossed by 230 major rivers, 54 of them originating from India.

Stan_Savljevic
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3522
Joined: 21 Apr 2006 15:40

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Stan_Savljevic » 17 Jan 2010 04:26

Dhaka meet presses declaration on water security
http://bdnews24.com/details.php?cid=2&id=151168&hb=2
The one-day conference on Himalaya Sub-Regional Cooperation for Water Security, attended by 25 experts from China, Nepal, India and Bangladesh, stressed that water has become "a crisis issue" for people of the subcontinent. Participants almost unanimously cited the need for better information sharing and scientific exchange to solve regional water issues. They also acknowledged the possibility of serious conflict over resources if prevailing water disputes are not resolved in a cooperative manner.

Participants expressed their deep concern regarding water sharing and construction of dams on trans boundary-rivers. The serious consequences of climate change for water security across the basin countries was also observed. The meeting, jointly organised by Bangladesh Institute of Peace and Security Studies (BIPSS) and India-based Strategic Foresight Group (SFG), underscored the need for securing equal interests of all basin countries, especially the lower river nations.

Sundeep Waslekar, president of SFG, an Indian geopolitical research body, in the opening session, said disputes over rivers, flowing down from the Himalayas affect millions in the sub-regional countries, especially Bangladesh and Nepal. "The problems from water-related issues are mostly affecting the poor while the decisions are coming from the policymakers at the top," he said. Waslekar said countries must ensure fair flow of information for mature solutions to water conflicts, before irreversible measures produce adverse results.

Move to improve river link in Assam
http://telegraphindia.com/1100117/jsp/n ... 992724.jsp
The Inland Waterways Authority of India (IWAI) has deployed three more dredgers on the Brahmaputra National Waterway 2 to improve the least available depth for safe movement of over-dimensional cargo to Neamati, Dibrugarh and Sadiya by next year. The move is aimed at maintaining the least available depth of 2.5 metres up to Neamati and 2 metres up to Dibrugarh and Sadiya. The least available depth is the most critical parameter for safe, smooth and timely movement of over-dimensional cargo. “A lot of importance is being given to safe movement of over-dimensional cargo and for this, measures like dredging are being given top priority,” a senior official of the IWAI said today. Of the three new dredgers, two are cutter section dredgers and one is a hydraulic section dredger.

The movement of over-dimensional cargo is a specialised activity, which entails months of preparation. Based on the weight, size and load of the cargo, operators have to design the vessels, make arrangements for loading and unloading and determine the timing of its movement on the waterway. The official said based on the draft requirements, the cargo operators could plan the movement of over-dimensional cargo. The IWAI is organising a workshop at the World Trade Centre in Mumbai on Monday to bring power project companies and cargo movers together to deliberate on the smooth movement of cargo for hydroelectric projects coming up in the Northeast. Senior officials of Union shipping ministry and experts are expected to attend the workshop. B.K. Chaturvedi, a member of the Planning Commission, will be the chief guest.

The workshop is expected to boost the IWAI’s efforts to promote inland water transport, which is an eco-friendly, fuel-efficient and cost-effective mode of transport. The official said as the IWAI had made substantial investment in developing the waterway, it had decided to levy a consolidated fee of Rs 1.50 per tonne per km for over-dimensional cargo movement from this year. Under the new arrangement, the IWAI will sign an MoU with the operators before the movement of cargo and take steps to maintain the least available depth in the entire stretch apart from providing other services.

negi
BRF Oldie
Posts: 13099
Joined: 27 Jul 2006 17:51
Location: Ban se dar nahin lagta , chootiyon se lagta hai .

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby negi » 25 Jan 2010 07:55

Guys is this the correct thread for discussing Ganges ,Yamuna ,Kaveri et al ? Where do we discuss stuff on usage and pollution of Indian rivers ?.Iirc there used to be an Indian Rivers thread could not locate it.

Fwiw this is a nice detailed study on 'Ganga Action Plan' (started by late PM Rajeev Gandhi) , I guess we might want to follow developments in this area as well , even though we contribute once in a blue moon. :wink:

Ganga Action Plan-A critical analysis

“Can we not clean Ganga?”-campaign
A massive campaign “Can we not clean Ganga?”should be launched. This question
must reach every Indian.
Ganga can be cleaned, if the central leadership takes up the issue seriously with the
States of Uttarakhand, UP, Bihar and WB. UP stretch of the river is important. Now
we’ve a stable government in UP headed by a Chief Minister who can get the things
done if she so desires. Recently Uttarakhand Chief Minister held a meeting and
constituted a Committee for cleaning the river. The UP and Uttarakhand stretches can
be taken up on priority. Other stretches can be taken up later.

Recommendations
• A white Paper on the status of Ganga and GAP.
• A compliance status report of Ganga related court cases.
• The agenda notes of the NRCA should be documented and assessed.
• R&D projects should be assessed for their relevance and usefulness.
• Water quality monitoring system needs to be revamped.
• Ganga Dialogues should be held involving those who were involved in the
planning and execution of GAP, religious institutions, NGOs and others.
• A Ganga Restoration Plan with an independent institutional mechanism, a full
time Ganga Restoration Authority like National Highway Authority to carry out the
clearly defined goals in a definite time frame.
• The focus should be on visual pollution. The river should be made visually clean
and the riverfront should be beautified.
• Governments should take preventive measures first which do not require funds.
• A Ganga Restoration Fund should be constituted.
• River bed farming, poaching of turtles, dolphins and fishing should be banned.
• No more colonization of Ganga land for urbanization and industrialization should
be allowed.
• Additional resources should be generated by charging the Ganga users, through
sand mining etc.
• Army should be involved in cleaning the river in Cantonment stretches.
• River Regulation Zone on the lines of CRZ. 200 m of coastal land wherever
possible should be allocated for afforestation.
• Government sponsored pollution-Kumbha/Ardha-Kumbha should be stopped.
• Self-purifying power of the river should be ascertained. The mysterious X factor
should be isolated.
• People should be warned that the river water is not worth aachman and bathing.
• “Can we not clean Ganga” and “We demand a clean Ganga” campaigns should
be launched.


Why do too few people seem to get worked up about the sad state of Ganga? Why are
they so indifferent? What would it take to really motivate Indians to save this river?
Can we find a win-win solution, where both Man and Ganga get something positive out
of their interchange? These are some troubling questions which haunt the Ganga
crusaders.

Airavat
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2326
Joined: 29 Jul 2003 11:31
Location: dishum-bishum
Contact:

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Airavat » 08 Mar 2010 14:32

Couldn't find the Central Asia thread, but posting here to explore possibilities of cooperation between India and Central Asian countries on water issues:
Water shortage in Tajikistan
Considering that Tajikistan's glaciers feed some 50% of the rivers in Central Asia, any drop in the water supply could have severe implications across the entire region. Water resources have already been a source of disagreement between the region's upstream countries, such as Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, and downstream Uzbekistan. Dwindling water supplies could bring a rise in tensions.

There are enormous economic issues at stake. Tajikistan hopes to boost its bankrupt economy and resolve its longstanding energy crisis by drawing on its immense wealth of rivers to generate hydroelectric power. Any drop in water volumes could put the country's plans to become an energy exporter in jeopardy. It's not only people who stand to suffer from climate change.

Oghonazarov says many rare species of animals and plants could face extinction. "I can speak in concrete numbers. In the recent past, there were, on average, 10-15 wild plants per square meter. Now, that number has decreased by 20-25%," he says. "Around residential areas, the amount of grass and plants - the primary source of food for grazing animals - has decreased by up to 40% due to water shortages."

Tajikistan has stationed dozens of scientists in Badakhshan to monitor the effects of climate change to the area's flora and fauna. They keep a close eye on melting glaciers, but stopping or reducing the pace of climate change is beyond their control.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23771
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby SSridhar » 14 Mar 2010 12:55


SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23771
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby SSridhar » 21 Mar 2010 05:01

India-Bangladesh make good progress in Teesta water sharing
India and Bangladesh have made a “significant movement forward” during their two-day talks on sharing of Teesta river waters, with an understanding that they would finalise an agreement within a year.

Both sides exchanged draft documents during the ministerial-level 37th Joint River Commission (JRC) talks that concluded here on Friday.

Bangladesh proposed a draft interim agreement, while India suggested a ‘statement of principles,' including on the modalities and methodology of sharing waters during the dry season.

The next JRC would be held “at the earliest.” The Water Resources Secretaries would examine the drafts “towards an expeditious conclusion of an interim agreement on the Teesta,” a statement said.

According to officials, India has agreed to share flood projection data on a continuous basis and enhance the lead time to more than 57 hours for flood warnings. New Delhi also agreed to convene a trilateral meeting, with Dhaka and Kathmandu, on the Farakka barrage.

Ameet
BRFite
Posts: 841
Joined: 17 Nov 2006 02:49

Re: Water Issues in the Indian Subcontinent

Postby Ameet » 23 Apr 2010 23:30

SSridhar, hope you can shed some more light on this. Thanks in advance.

Chinese dam not to impact Brahmaputra: Krishna

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 845191.cms

China has assured India that a hydroelectric project it is constructing on Tsangpo river in Tibet will not impact the downstream flow to the Brahmaputra and the two countries will discuss the issue later this month, parliament was informed Thursday.

"It is a fact that when we met in Beijing, the question of the power station did come up. The Chinese foreign minister assured me that there would be no water storage at the dam and it would not in any way impact on downstream areas," External Affairs Minister S M Krishna said during question hour in Rajya Sabha.

The response came on a supplementary from Ravi Shankar Prasad of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) on the impact of the Chinese dam, since there was no water sharing treaty between the two countries.


Return to “Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: greatde, saip, vivek_v and 28 guests