People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

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Jarita
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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Jarita » 25 Aug 2011 23:04

I am going to start calling them Peoples Rethuglic of China

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Prem » 25 Aug 2011 23:15

Jarita wrote:I am going to start calling them Peoples Rethuglic of China

:lol:

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby svinayak » 25 Aug 2011 23:58

SSridhar wrote:Stapled Visa: India-China trying for solution
I do not understand what is there to try. China simply has to reverse its policy, express regrets for the wrong step and assure that it won't happen in future. The Chinese are arrogant and won't understand anything less than an Indian display of danda and usage of it if the situation so demands.

What they are saying is that PRC has stopped accepting that India is one country and the Indian people are one.

PRC say that Indian are not one people and not from one country

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Jarita » 26 Aug 2011 01:27

Acharya wrote:
SSridhar wrote:Stapled Visa: India-China trying for solution
I do not understand what is there to try. China simply has to reverse its policy, express regrets for the wrong step and assure that it won't happen in future. The Chinese are arrogant and won't understand anything less than an Indian display of danda and usage of it if the situation so demands.

What they are saying is that PRC has stopped accepting that India is one country and the Indian people are one.

PRC say that Indian are not one people and not from one country



Is it relevant what PRC thinks and does? They have been trying these tactics for the last 50+ years. If not PRC then someone else will get on to the bandwagon. Indian civilization is too much of a presence to not have naysayers and those who mean ill-will.
What is important is for India to not get into an outright pissing match with China - yes I know that there are many who believe that India should respond in the same way with Tibet & Turkmenistan. That would actually be hurting ourselves because J&K and AP are Indian territory and Tibet and Turkmen are not Chinese territories. Doing an equal-equal just gives credence to Chinas territorial claims.
Chankiyan nationalists need to send the message to China in other ways.


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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 26 Aug 2011 07:25

China has strengthened nuclear missiles as a deterrent against India: US
China has substituted liquid-fuelled, nuclear-capable missiles with “more advanced and survivable solid-fuelled” rocket systems, and this has been explicitly aimed at “[strengthening] its deterrent posture relative to India,” according to an annual report on the developments within the Chinese military, authored by the United States Pentagon.

In its report to the U.S. Congress, the Pentagon warned that the People's Liberation Army had replaced the CSS-2 Intermediate Range Ballistic Missiles with its CSS-5 Medium Range Ballistic Missile systems. It also emphasised that China was further investing in road development along the Sino-Indian border that could “support PLA border defence operations.”

While the report was principally focused on the rapid step-up in Chinese military investments in recent years, including its aircraft carrier programme, cyber-warfare capabilities, anti-satellite missiles and the top-secret J-20 next-generation stealth fighter, the report also commented on India's concern at some of these regional developments.

Pointing out that India was also improving its infrastructure along its north-eastern border, the report said: “New Delhi remains concerned by China's close military relationship with Pakistan and Beijing's growing footprint in the Indian Ocean, Central Asia, and Africa.”

The report also warned of maritime implications for regional powers like India.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Klaus » 27 Aug 2011 09:16

China's top search engine Baidu issues an apology on state television

CCTV's business channel also aired footage of an undercover journalist receiving coaching from a man who appeared to be a Baidu staff member on how to get approval for pharmaceutical ads using a fake business licence.

In a live broadcast late on Thursday, Wang Zhan, vice president of sales for Baidu - which accounts for more than three quarters of China's Internet search market - apologised "to users affected by the fraudulent information."


Analysts said the latest round of criticism could have hidden motives, such as government worries over the company's near-monopoly on internet search in China, or attempts by competitors to erode its market share.

Besides Baidu, CCTV has also previously targeted "weibo" - Twitter-like microblogs - for spreading rumours after a deadly train accident last month, according to Jeremy Goldkorn, founder of a Beijing-based web research firm.

"There certainly is a strategic aim behind it and sometimes a political aim," said Goldkorn.

"The context is CCTV and all the central government news and propaganda services are threatened by newer internet services, particularly ones that are not run by the state,"
he said.

Baidu might become the focus of future government regulations to ensure it properly reviews the business licences of its advertisers, but there was a limit to the firm's responsibility, she said.

"Even if Baidu does properly review business licences, can it ensure advertisers are doing business legitimately and selling products in the interest of consumers? This is open to dispute," Li said

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Agnimitra » 29 Aug 2011 18:46

China plays Dalai Lama succession card
China arranged for the 11th Panchen Lama to visit Labrang monastery, the home to the largest number of monks outside of the Tibet Autonomous Region, as it prepares its choice for leader in the fight against the Dalai Lama over the succession of Tibet's foremost religious leader.

Beijing will use the visit to Labrang in Gansu province earlier this month to boost the image of its handpicked Panchen Lama, the second-highest ranking Tibetan religious leader, and raise his influence among Tibetans as part of the succession struggle.

[...]

China's state-run media said during the trip the Panchen Lama was impressed by the great amount of religious freedom enjoyed by Tibetan Buddhists. "During his stay he gave cash to poor local families, toured government-built houses for nomads and told locals to uphold national unity and obey the law," Xinhua reported on August 23.

[...]

However, exiled Tibetan groups said that local Tibetans showed resentment to the Panchen Lama's presence in Labrang, where deadly ethnic riots which broke out when monks staged protests against Chinese rule in 2008.

Tibetan support groups said the Panchen Lama was received under fear and massive security in the area prior to his arrival, while Chinese tourism officials had barred foreigners from travelling to the county until the trip was over. Washington-based activist group International Campaign for Tibet said "that monks in the area feared the visit could trigger more repression and patriotic education".

[...]

China's picked monk now holds top positions in the communist regime; groomed perfectly to Beijing's commands as he sings Beijing's tone with his efforts to counter separatist sentiments in Tibet. At the age of 22, he has been appointed as deputy to the country's top advisory body, the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) and vice president of the Buddhist Association of China.

[...]

"About my reincarnation, I have the only right to decide, and no one [else] has the authority to decide about that," the Dalai Lama said in France. "Today, communist China considers religion is a poison and they consider me as a demon. So, I would be a demon reincarnation. This is nonsense," he said. "So the Chinese communists should not accept rebirth."

The Dalai Lama went on: "If Chinese government believes in rebirth and religion, then they should start it from the reincarnation of Mao and Deng Xioping's reincarnation." :mrgreen:

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby asprinzl » 30 Aug 2011 06:48

In my recent trip to China, I made befriended a Desi businessman. He was into textiles and has invested in a garment factory there. It got me thinking. Why is he investing in China when the same money could be invested in a garment factory in India? I see so many Desi business folks doing the same thing. One dude actually has a saree manufacturing plant in China!! Whats wrong with this picture? Once I came across Reliance honcho in China sourcing for machine parts which Israeli businessmen were sourcing from India!!

Yeah...its a global village now but some form of nationalism is needed or otherwise you will not survive a few generation down the road. The fact that India imports sarees manufactured in China is a lesson. Anybody know of any cheongsam manufacturer in India exporting to China?
Avram

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby PratikDas » 31 Aug 2011 02:35

WAToday: Chinese general's spy talk leaked onto YouTube

Among those Jin discussed was that of former Ambassador to South Korea Li Bin, who was sentenced to seven years for corruption. Jin said Li had actually been discovered passing secrets to South Korea that compromised China's position in North Korean nuclear disarmament talks, but the allegations were too embarrassing to make public and graft charges were brought instead.

"In all the world, what nation's ambassador serves as another country's spy?" Jin said.

Similar treatment was handed out to the former head of China's nuclear power program, Kang Rixin, who was sentenced to life in prison last November on charges of corruption. Jin said Kang had in fact peddled secrets about China's civilian nuclear program to a foreign nation that he did not identify, but that was considered too sensitive to bring up in court.

Kang, a member of the ruling Communist Party's powerful Central Committee as well as its disciplinary arm, was one of the highest-ranking officials ever to be involved in spying, Jin said. His arrest dealt a major shock to the party leadership, Jin said.

"The party centre was extremely nervous. They ordered top-to-bottom inspections and spared no individual," he said.


Jin's presentation, complete with explanatory slides, was typical of how such cases are discussed at private sessions as a warning to Communist Party cadres not to be lured into espionage or corruption. The leaked video appeared to have been from an official recording rather than filmed by a member of the audience.


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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Manny » 01 Sep 2011 07:25

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/883003ec ... ab49a.html


China confronts Indian navy vessel


By Ben Bland in Hanoi and Girija Shivakumar in New Delhi

A Chinese warship confronted an Indian navy vessel shortly after it left Vietnamese waters in late July in the first such reported encounter between the two countries’ navies in the South China Sea.

The unidentified Chinese warship demanded that India’s INS Airavat, an amphibious assault vessel, identify itself and explain its presence in international waters shortly after it completed a scheduled port call in Vietnam, five people familiar with the incident told the Financial Times.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 01 Sep 2011 09:08

There is no doubt that contours of an inescapable confrontation between India and China are getting delineated, notwithstanding the burgeoning trade. Indian defence planners must accelerate their acquisition and development strategies while the diplomats do their best. Among all the countries that China has inimical relationship with, starting in that wide arc from Mongolia to India, we are the only source of worry that China takes very seriously. It is critical that the creation of the mountain strike corps and the upgradation of infrastructure along the LAC are accelerated from the sluggish pace they are currently in. More Su-30s, Brahmos air-launched version, A-IIP, A-5, ABM, naval assets are some that must be acquired/developed very rapidly.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 03 Sep 2011 08:26

India-China seek to remove LAC wrinkles
Even as the media focus on last month's alleged confrontation between Chinese and Indian naval ships, dismissed by diplomats here as a non-event, both governments are quietly working on removing the occasional wrinkles that affect the largely tranquil Line of Actual Control (LAC), which serves as the boundary.

China and India have an agreement ensuring that heavy military equipment stay away from the border. Also in place in a pact prohibiting military exercises very close to the LAC to avoid misinterpretation of the actual intentions in case a large body of troops suddenly descends there for war games.

India and China will soon open talks on a mechanism that would solve issues arising out of military patrols coming face to face on the LAC. The negotiating brief will be taken up by the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) before the two sides get down to hammering out an agreement on a “Working Mechanism for Consultation and Coordination on Border Affairs.” This will be one of the few occasions when the draft of the negotiating text is first sent to the CCS for approval, say official sources.

Increased patrols

Explaining the need for such an agreement, officials pointed out that when patrols came face to face on a piece of territory claimed by both sides, the issue would be resolved by border commanders. But there was no solution to resolve “trends” that appeared in certain pockets of the LAC. Giving the example of a lake in Ladakh, the sources said increased patrols by either side increased the possibility of their coming face to face. Such a trend stepped up the possibility of confrontation as also of the situation taking an ugly turn.

The proposed mechanism will examine these trends after the other side has lodged a strong protest and suggest toning down patrol frequency by one of the militaries. The option of complaining to the embassies has been tried in the past but has not been found workable in the absence of a specialised mechanism, which the proposed agreement seeks to put in place.

Explaining the mechanism, the officials said: “If India sees a pattern behind the patrols, it will strongly protest. Both sides need a specialised mechanism, where the other side's protest can be handled and examined. One example is Pangong Tso in Ladakh, where this issue occurs frequently. In such a case, the working mechanism can be activated and India can tell them, without prejudice to the perception of the LAC, [about] the need to reduce their patrols. The danger is without such a mechanism, patrols coming face to face too frequently could lead to an escalation.''

India and China have already activated a hotline between the Prime Ministers. However, it has not been used much because there has hardly been any issue that has necessitated their holding immediate consultations. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has used the hotline only once when he spoke to his counterpart Wen Jiabao just before the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, Indian, China and South Africa) summit at the Chinese sea resort of Sanya in April this year. “After that, there has been no occasion for them to speak on an urgent basis,'' maintained the officials.

Once the CCS clears the negotiating brief, it is expected, an agreement could be signed at the next summit meeting between leaders of both countries.


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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby menon s » 03 Sep 2011 19:23

Im not sure if this article has been posted before. Once The chinese acquire necessary skills, etc, they are no way going to let us Indians live in peace. They talk about racial supriority, like how the Nazis were talking in the last century.
Sample this . written, by Mr. Chi Haotian, Minster of Defense and vice-chairman of China’s Central Military Commission.
i cannot verify the authenticity of this artcle, or speech, but the PLA has done more research on the Nazis than even the Middle east did. Talking about Lebansaraum and superiority of the Chinese race etc.

Would the United States allow us to go out to gain new living space? First, if the United States is firm in blocking us, it is hard for us to do anything significant to Taiwan and some other countries! Second, even if we could snatch some land from Taiwan, Vietnam, India, or even Japan, how much more living space can we get? Very trivial! Only countries like the United States, Canada and Australia have the vast land to serve our need for mass colonization.


Only by using special means to “clean up” America will we be able to lead the Chinese people there. This is the only choice left for us. This is not a matter of whether we are willing to do it or not. What kind of special means is there available for us to “clean up” America? Conventional weapons such as fighters, canons, missiles and battleships won’t do; neither will highly destructive weapons such as nuclear weapons. We are not as foolish as to want to perish together with America by using nuclear weapons, despite the fact that we have been exclaiming that we will have the Taiwan issue resolved at whatever cost. Only by using non-destructive weapons that can kill many people will we be able to reserve America for ourselves. There has been rapid development of modern biological technology, and new bio weapons have been invented one after another. Of course we have not been idle; in the past years we have seized the opportunity to master weapons of this kind. We are capable of achieving our purpose of “cleaning up” America all of a sudden. When Comrade Xiaoping was still with us, the Party Central Committee had the perspicacity to make the right decision not to develop aircraft carrier groups and focus instead on developing lethal weapons that can eliminate mass populations of the enemy country.


Old comrades like us cannot afford to wait that long, for we don’t have that much time to live. Old soldiers of my age may be able to wait for five or ten more years, but those from the period of the Anti-Japanese War or the few old Red Army soldiers cannot wait any longer. Therefore we have to give up our expectations about genetic weapons. Of course, from another perspective, the majority of those Chinese living in the United States have become our burden, because they have been corrupted by the bourgeois liberal values for a long time and it would be difficult for them to accept our Party’s leadership. If they survived the war, we would have to launch campaigns in the future to deal with them, to reform them. Do you still remember that when we had just defeated the Koumintang (KMT) and liberated Mainland China, so many people from the bourgeois class and intellectuals welcomed us so very warmly, but later we had to launch campaigns such as the “suppression of the reactionaries” and “Anti-Rightist Movement” to clean them up and reform them?


Marxism pointed out that violence is the midwife for the birth of the new society. Therefore war is the midwife for the birth of China’s century. As war approaches, I am full of hope for our next generation.


http://www.theepochtimes.com/news/5-8-8/31055.html

Im still not sure about the veracity of the article, but then, like how the Chinese go about, might be this article is just trying to test waters!

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Samudragupta » 03 Sep 2011 21:07

menon s wrote:Im still not sure about the veracity of the article, but then, like how the Chinese go about, might be this article is just trying to test waters!


The doctrine about use of American NBC weapon from certain influntial sections of US admin is that "If our way of life is challenged or destroyed America stands out the right to use NBC weapons against the opponent"....The chinese knows this and here we are talking of Biological weapons....

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 04 Sep 2011 16:35

China forced ADB to acknowledge the funding of Arunachal project as a 'mistake'
Although the Asian Development Bank's (ADB) member countries had backed a document which included a flood-management project in Arunachal Pradesh, pressure from China forced the bank to withdraw the project in 2009 and acknowledge it was “a mistake,” according to newly released cables from the United States Embassy in Beijing by Wikileaks.

ADB China's country director Robert Wihtol told U.S. officials in September 2009 that the project in Arunachal which China had objected to, had “caused problems for the ADB in China.” And, even as Indian diplomats in Beijing told U.S. officials the same month they believed the project was “still alive” with “modalities” being worked out by the ADB, bank officials in Manila had assured Beijing the project “would not materialise,” Mr. Wihtol was quoted as saying.

China had raised objections in June 2009 after the ADB's board of directors and member countries had endorsed a Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) for 2009-12, which included the Arunachal project.

Mr. Wihtol told the U.S. officials the ADB had acknowledged to Chinese officials that the cause of the dispute was “a mistake” stemming from the ADB's lack of a policy on disputed territories, according to the September 2009 cable (Reference ID: 09BEIJING2615), part of the last batch of Embassy cables released on August 30.

His comments also show the ADB was concerned that the Arunachal project would derail a visit by bank president Haruhiko Kuroda to Beijing in October that year, with the bank's China director quoted as saying the bank “hoped to garner positive publicity” for the visit “without touching sensitive nerves” in China.

India, however, had believed the ADB would go ahead with the project in spite of Chinese concerns, in keeping with the bank's non-political charter.

External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna had told the Rajya Sabha in a statement in July 2009 that he believed the ADB “had gone with India's point of view” that the CPS was not a political document, and Chinese objections were in violation of the ADB's charter which bars the bank from evaluating a project on non-economic criteria.

India's position had appeared to have been supported by the U.S., Japan and other member-countries which had endorsed the CPS, Mr. Krishna had said.

Explaining the ADB's decision, Mr. Wihtol said the Arunachal project's inclusion in the CPS was only “illustrative of possible ADB activities,” and the board's approval of the CPS “does not mean that it endorses the individual prospective projects.”

Last year, however, the Indian government said it would fund projects in sensitive areas with its own resources, and indicated it would not apply for funding from international agencies such as the ADB and the World Bank.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Christopher Sidor » 04 Sep 2011 23:54

^^^^
This is a biggest issue that is facing India-China relationship currently. Not the so called "stapled-visa" issue. But this. Today it is Arunachal. Tomorrow it is going to be for whole of India. This is why China is a threat to India. Maybe time has come for India to quietly reopen the Tibet and Xianjing issue. No more saying that we believe in one-china principle.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Rony » 05 Sep 2011 01:41

Debate on Times Now about INS Airavat incident in South China Sea. There was a Chinese analyst as well.

http://www.timesnow.tv/Debate-Open-Chin ... 382838.cms

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Jarita » 05 Sep 2011 01:59

SSridhar wrote:India-China seek to remove LAC wrinkles
Even as the media focus on last month's alleged confrontation between Chinese and Indian naval ships, dismissed by diplomats here as a non-event, both governments are quietly working on removing the occasional wrinkles that affect the largely tranquil Line of Actual Control (LAC), which serves as the boundary.

China and India have an agreement ensuring that heavy military equipment stay away from the border. Also in place in a pact prohibiting military exercises very close to the LAC to avoid misinterpretation of the actual intentions in case a large body of troops suddenly descends there for war games.

India and China will soon open talks on a mechanism that would solve issues arising out of military patrols coming face to face on the LAC. The negotiating brief will be taken up by the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) before the two sides get down to hammering out an agreement on a “Working Mechanism for Consultation and Coordination on Border Affairs.” This will be one of the few occasions when the draft of the negotiating text is first sent to the CCS for approval, say official sources.

Increased patrols

Explaining the need for such an agreement, officials pointed out that when patrols came face to face on a piece of territory claimed by both sides, the issue would be resolved by border commanders. But there was no solution to resolve “trends” that appeared in certain pockets of the LAC. Giving the example of a lake in Ladakh, the sources said increased patrols by either side increased the possibility of their coming face to face. Such a trend stepped up the possibility of confrontation as also of the situation taking an ugly turn.

The proposed mechanism will examine these trends after the other side has lodged a strong protest and suggest toning down patrol frequency by one of the militaries. The option of complaining to the embassies has been tried in the past but has not been found workable in the absence of a specialised mechanism, which the proposed agreement seeks to put in place.

Explaining the mechanism, the officials said: “If India sees a pattern behind the patrols, it will strongly protest. Both sides need a specialised mechanism, where the other side's protest can be handled and examined. One example is Pangong Tso in Ladakh, where this issue occurs frequently. In such a case, the working mechanism can be activated and India can tell them, without prejudice to the perception of the LAC, [about] the need to reduce their patrols. The danger is without such a mechanism, patrols coming face to face too frequently could lead to an escalation.''

India and China have already activated a hotline between the Prime Ministers. However, it has not been used much because there has hardly been any issue that has necessitated their holding immediate consultations. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has used the hotline only once when he spoke to his counterpart Wen Jiabao just before the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, Indian, China and South Africa) summit at the Chinese sea resort of Sanya in April this year. “After that, there has been no occasion for them to speak on an urgent basis,'' maintained the officials.

Once the CCS clears the negotiating brief, it is expected, an agreement could be signed at the next summit meeting between leaders of both countries.




This kind of stuff under auspices of UPA government may mean heavy losses for India


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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 05 Sep 2011 09:15


From the above, look at the dhimmi Indian behaviour.
The only issue which the Chinese side raised was the “strong” possibility of the Tibetan movement turning violent in the near future and they wanted India to take extra measures for security of Chinese assets. The Indian side gave details of the government going the extra mile to ensure the same.

Here is a China that vetoed thrice UNSC Resolution on including LeT and Hafeez Saeed in the Sanctions List. Here is a China that bluntly rejected Indian evidence on JeM & Maulana Masood Azhar as 'insufficient'. Here is a China that refuses to look into arms supply for the Naga insurgents. And, it demands that India take efforts to stem Tibetan movement becoming violent and dhimmi officials detail all the measures that they have taken against such an eventuality. India should have simply said that they do not see any evidence of the Tibetan movement going violent and asked the Chinese to present evidence. And, if thy did present such an evidence, reject it as 'insufficient' and 'not upto the standards' expected by India.

For how long are we going to pretend that such cowardly Indian behaviour is indeed chanakyan ?

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Jarita » 06 Sep 2011 07:04

Bangladesh purchases two F22-B frigates from China

Bangladesh is buying two the Chinese Jiangwei II (053H3) frigates. The export versions are called the F-22. The 342 foot long Jiangwei II displaces 2,500 tons, and carries an eight cell short range (8.6 kilometers) surface-to-air missile system, two, four cell anti-ship missile systems (200 kilometers range C-803s), one four cell launcher for rocket launched anti-submarine torpedoes, a 76.2mm gun, two 30mm anti-missiles auto-cannon, and a helicopter. Top speed is 50 kilometers an hour, crew size is 170 sailors, and each ship will cost about $200 million.

Bangladesh is expected to get a large discount, in order to improve diplomatic relations with China. The F-22 has proved to be a popular export item, as it provides a lot of warship for the money.


http://www.indiandefence.com/forums/f12 ... ina-10709/


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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 06 Sep 2011 13:29


China will simply ignore. Nevertheless, we have done the right thing by registering our protest. What we have to do is to find out which companies are involved in the slew of projects in POK and if ever these companies send personnel to India, give them stapled visas. Or, better still, black list them and exclude them from Indian projects.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby AdityaM » 06 Sep 2011 13:43

a relation who went holidaying/business in china was prevented from visiting the 3 gorges because he was Indian.
He used his business partners contact to be able to visit the dam which is off-limits to indians

Thats a smart chinese move.. Wonder if india also reciprocates around similar mega projects

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Lisa » 06 Sep 2011 13:52

SSridhar wrote:

China will simply ignore. Nevertheless, we have done the right thing by registering our protest. What we have to do is to find out which companies are involved in the slew of projects in POK and if ever these companies send personnel to India, give them stapled visas. Or, better still, black list them and exclude them from Indian projects.


One needs to do one more thing, sanction any participating chinese
company from doing any business in India - publicly announce their
names!

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby RajeshA » 06 Sep 2011 15:42

SSridhar wrote:

China will simply ignore. Nevertheless, we have done the right thing by registering our protest. What we have to do is to find out which companies are involved in the slew of projects in POK and if ever these companies send personnel to India, give them stapled visas. Or, better still, black list them and exclude them from Indian projects.

The trade surplus is in their favor. How about doing some real punishment?

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Victor » 06 Sep 2011 19:09


This is the 2nd time in as many years that netas have bleated so pathetically. At best, this is a token verbalization by Dilli that the whole of J&K is ours' including PoK. Better than nothing but still pretty close to nothing.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Victor » 06 Sep 2011 19:14

SSridhar wrote:India-China seek to remove LAC wrinkles
...China and India have an agreement ensuring that heavy military equipment stay away from the border...

This clearly favors china since they have 4-laned blacktop roads leading from barracks to border while we have mule tracks.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 07 Sep 2011 08:36


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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby anishns » 07 Sep 2011 08:53


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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby BijuShet » 07 Sep 2011 19:12

From Yahoo News (AP report) (posting in full). Chinese may growing wealthy but like rats everywhere know that it is better to jump a sinking ship while they still can.

Top of Chinese wealthy's wish list? To leave China
By LOUISE WATT - Associated Press

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese millionaire Su builds skyscrapers in Beijing and is one of the people powering China's economy on its path to becoming the world's biggest.

He sits at the top of a country — economy booming, influence spreading, military swelling — widely expected to dominate the 21st century.

Yet the property developer shares something surprising with many newly rich in China: he's looking forward to the day he can leave.

Su's reasons: He wants to protect his assets, he has to watch what he says in China and wants a second child, something against the law for many Chinese.

The millionaire spoke to The Associated Press on condition that only his surname was used because of fears of government reprisals that could damage his business.

China's richest are increasingly investing abroad to get a foreign passport, to make international business and travel easier but also to give them a way out of China.


The United States is the most popular destination for Chinese emigrants, with rich Chinese praising its education and healthcare systems. Last year, nearly 68,000 Chinese-born people became legal permanent residents of the U.S., seven percent of the total and second only to those born in Mexico. Canada and Australia are also popular.

It is a bothersome trend for China's communist leaders who've pinned the legitimacy of one-party rule on delivering rapid economic growth and a rising standard of living. They've succeeded in lifting tens of millions of ordinary Chinese out of poverty while also creating a new class of super rich. Yet affluence alone seems a poor bargain to those with the means to live elsewhere.

Despite more economic freedom, the communist government has kept its tight grip on many other aspects of daily life. China's leaders punish, sometimes harshly, public dissent and any perceived challenges to their power, and censor what can be read online and in print. Authoritarian rule, meanwhile, has proved ineffective in addressing long standing problems of pollution, contaminated food and a creaking health care system.

"In China, nothing belongs to you. Like buying a house. You buy it but it will belong to the country 70 years later," said Su, lamenting the government's land leasing system.

"But abroad, if you buy a house, it belongs to you forever," he said. "Both businessmen and government officials are like this. They worry about the security of their assets."

Leo Liu, marketing manager at Beijing emigration consultants Goldlink, said the company has noticed an increasing trend of rich Chinese wanting to emigrate, particularly to Canada, in the 15 years since it was founded.

The main reasons people want to move abroad, he said, are their children's education and for better healthcare. Some want to leave because they got their money illegally, such as corrupt government officials and businesspeople, while others are inspired by friends who have already emigrated to the U.S.

"They want to get a green card even though they may still do business here in China," Liu said. "They might have sent their wife and children abroad.

"And some of them just love life in a foreign country, the Western style," he said.

There is also a yawning gap between rich and poor in China, which feeds a resentment that makes some of the wealthy uncomfortable.
The country's uneven jump to capitalism over the last three decades has created dozens of billionaires, but China barely ranks in the top 100 on a World Bank list of countries by income per person.

Getting a foreign passport is like "taking out an insurance policy," said Rupert Hoogewerf, who compiles the Hurun Rich List, China's version of the Forbes list.

"If there is political unrest or suddenly things change in China — because it's a big country, something could go wrong — they already have a passport to go overseas. It's an additional safety net."

Among the 20,000 Chinese with at least 100 million yuan ($15 million) in individual investment assets, 27 percent have already emigrated and 47 percent are considering it, according to a report by China Merchants Bank and U.S. consultants Bain & Co. published in April.

Nearly 60 percent of the people surveyed said worries over their children's education are a reason for wanting to leave.

A millionaire who works in the coal industry, who also spoke on condition of anonymity, said the main push behind his plans to emigrate is China's test-centric school system, often criticized for producing students who can pass exams but who lack skills for the world of work.

He will take his 7-year-old to the U.S. as soon as the child graduates from junior high at an international school in Beijing where pupils are instructed in English.

"The U.S. has a good educational system and excellent health care," said the 39-year-old, who has three homes in China and assets worth $5 million. "That's why we look forward to going there."

Other top motivations cited in the Merchants Bank study are to protect assets and to prepare for retirement. Also cited as reasons for leaving: having more children and making it easier to develop an overseas business.

Alongside increased emigration there has also been a massive outflow of private money from China despite its strict currency controls. The report estimates that rich Chinese — those with assets of more than 10 million yuan — have about 3.6 trillion yuan ($564 billion) invested overseas.

"The Chinese economy now looks like a massive funnel," said Zhong Dajun, director of the non-governmental Dajun Center for Economic Observation & Studies in Beijing.


Zhong said it is mostly corrupt government officials who transfer entire fortunes overseas because they have been illegally acquired and "they have fears and feel guilty."

Wealthy Russians have also been establishing footholds abroad for the past decade, seeking a safe haven both for their money and their children. In recent years, the trend has extended to Russia's emerging middle class. They cannot afford to invest in London, a favorite destination for Russia's billionaires and millionaires, so have been setting up second homes in less expensive European countries, including those like the Czech Republic that were once part of the Soviet bloc.

Su, the property developer, intends to stay in China and continue building residential high-rises and office buildings for another 10 years because he fears it would be too difficult for him to replicate his mainland business success abroad.

His wife is already in the U.S., expecting their second child. Under China's one-child policy in place for the last three decades to control population growth, couples can be penalized for having more than one child. In Beijing, the penalty is a one-off fee 3-10 times the city's average income, a maximum of 250,000 yuan ($40,000).

"The living conditions abroad are better, like residential conditions, food safety and education," said the millionaire as he dined in the VIP room of a Beijing restaurant. Lowering his voice, he said for many rich there are worries about the authoritarian government. "This is a very sensitive topic. Everyone knows this. It's freer and more just abroad," he said.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby DavidD » 09 Sep 2011 10:29

BijuShet wrote:From Yahoo News (AP report) (posting in full). Chinese may growing wealthy but like rats everywhere know that it is better to jump a sinking ship while they still can.



Pretty sure it's similar with the richer Indians too. I'm also pretty sure that the trend is reversing by the day as China and India gets wealthier. When I first came to the U.S. in the mid '90s, going back to China was a laughable thought and only done by people who've tried everything to stay in America and failed. These days, a lot of Chinese students voluntary go back, like my cousin who recently got his masters in the U.S. and returned to China. One of my roommates in college often talked about moving back to China after he got his PhD, which is exactly what he ended up doing. To many of them, the thought of staying in the states is laughable now. Of course, everyone's different. This other Chinese guy who was my co-worker in a lab I worked in absolutely hated China and the communist government, you can't pay him enough money to go back.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby DavidD » 09 Sep 2011 10:30

http://the-diplomat.com/china-power/201 ... a-attacks/

Islamists Vow China Attacks

An Islamist militant group has claimed responsibility for a series of deadly attacks in China’s restive Xinjiang region this summer, and warned of further strikes to come.

According to the US-based SITE intelligence group, Sheikh Abdul Shakoor Damla, leader of the Turkistan Islamic Party, promised in a video statement to avenge ‘Chinese occupation’ of the region.

‘All the policies practised by the Chinese communist government against the Muslims in East Turkestan aim at completely maiming the identity of the Muslims and their strong traditions,’ he is quoted by Reuters as saying. ‘The jihadi operations in the provinces of Hotan and Kashgar are merely acts of revenge against the atheist communists, who fought the religion of Allah the Almighty publicly and openly.’

...............

The latest violence started on July 18 in Hotan when Chinese officials said that police had killed 14 people involved in a raid on the police station in the area. Police said that the rioters used knives and explosives to take hostages, killing two security guards in the process. However, an Uighur exile group disputed this version of events, saying instead that police had in fact fired into a crowd of peaceful protesters.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby gakakkad » 09 Sep 2011 16:19

DavidD wrote:
Pretty sure it's similar with the richer Indians too. I'm also pretty sure that the trend is reversing by the day as China and India gets wealthier. When I first came to the U.S. in the mid '90s, going back to China was a laughable thought and only done by people who've tried everything to stay in America and failed. These days, a lot of Chinese students voluntary go back, like my cousin who recently got his masters in the U.S. and returned to China. One of my roommates in college often talked about moving back to China after he got his PhD, which is exactly what he ended up doing. To many of them, the thought of staying in the states is laughable now. Of course, everyone's different. This other Chinese guy who was my co-worker in a lab I worked in absolutely hated China and the communist government, you can't pay him enough money to go back.



As far as India is concerned , the middle class are more interested in going abroad than the rich.Things have changed a good deal in the last 10 years. The rich prefer to stay back in India. Because they have access to everything in India that they would have in states at a much lower cost.Most importantly a very favourable tax structure. However most send there kids abroad for educational purposed. The middle class usually go to the US for educational purposes . Most doctors and a good number of engineers chose to return to India .For the educated and well qualified India is as good as the US. Job opportunities are immense in engineering etc . Those who have a family in the US are more likely to settle there. 2020 onwards people would only go to the US for educational purposes . And most would return .



Prior to 1990s most people with opportunity to move abroad would do so. Because back then India was a de facto communist economy . For the first 25 years of its Independence India was a de facto single party communist state much like PRC (still a lot more freer than China) . 1975 onwards other political parties became significant . So it became a democracy in truer sense. Partial economic liberalisation took place in 1991 . Further policy changes to make India a market driven economy continued through the 1990s. 3 critical areas that have yet to be reformed and are hindering India to achieve higher growth rates. Where China did better was in labour regulations and land acquisitions . Because in all countries most people are not engineers or doctors. But are semiskilled /skilled /unskilled workers. Due to the labour laws , labour intensive manufacturing has not come up in India the way it has in PRC . Thats where the difference lies.


Since you see to be a researcher of some sort I am interested in knowing the university structure in China,availability of research grants and the degree of autonomy.. Even though in my field I do occasionally get to see papers from China , but I don't get to see people from Chinese universities collaborating or attending conference too often. Of course we do see huge number of American-Chinese.

I agree with you on Chinese hating CCP. My own friends are not too fond of it , even though they emigrated to the US when they were very young..They would never even want to visit PRC again ..

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby Rony » 09 Sep 2011 22:15

Differing strengths of India and China make a quinella a smart bet

Asia's biggest rivalry is looking more and more one-sided. There's no competing with China's 9.5 per cent growth as the US sheds jobs, Europe unravels and Japan's deflation deepens.

Even though Asia's other rising superpower, India, is zooming along at 7.7 per cent, try getting anyone to pay much attention.

Spend a few days in Mumbai and the conversation is all China, China, China. How can we compete? In what way is India's economy superior? Why does our impressive post-Lehman performance get no attention?

Advertisement: Story continues below Then head to China's business centre, Shanghai, and see if India is even mentioned. Indeed, many Chinese businesspeople resent the suggestion that their economy has anything in common with India's.

China might regret this oversight for two reasons. One, its winning streak probably will run into structural hurdles in the next five years. Two, China and India have more challenges in common than Beijing might want to admit.

No matter how much the media, corporate glitterati and financial intelligentsia scrutinise China, we don't know if it can beat the system, so to speak. No industrialising nation has ever avoided a financial crisis. Not one.

For all its smarts, $US3 trillion ($2.8 trillion) of currency reserves and control over the economy, Beijing must contain inflation, reduce pollution, shift from exports and avoid social unrest as millions flock to the cites.

Can China grow almost 10 per cent year after year without a hitch? The odds don't favour it, given the state of the global economy.

It's worth noting the challenges India and China share: huge and growing gaps between rich and poor, corruption, asset bubbles, the risk that piles of loans will go bad if world markets crash anew, regional disparities, environmental degradation, huge appetites for resources, gender inequalities that mean boys outnumber girls, and angst over their places in the world.

Caveats abound, of course. Few would say China's corruption is as endemic as India's, though China's vulnerability to a Japan-style bad-debt crisis far exceeds India's.

The angst factor requires nuance. Indians are perturbed that their rapid growth and democratic institutions don't get more kudos. Chinese want a bigger say in global affairs but resent the developed world demanding too much from a developing nation.

The commonalities have revived the buzz about ''Chindia'', or the idea that as much as China and India might compete, they might well complement each other. They are the most populous nations, nuclear powers and the two fastest-growing major economies.

China has a head start when it comes to the roads, bridges, ports and power systems needed to raise living standards, and it receives the bulk of Asia's direct investment.

India has done better in creating a genuine economy with competitive companies, innovative products and world-class entrepreneurs. Imagine if they worked together?

Yet the geopolitical rivalry is growing. Look no further than tensions related to global resource access, griping among Indians that China's trade practices are undermining their manufacturing industries or Beijing's suspicions about Delhi's ties to Washington.

If ever there were a time for investors to follow the money, it's now. At the moment, China clearly is the stronger capital magnet. By 2015 its millionaires could account for about half the rich people across 10 major economies in Asia, excluding Japan, and hold more than half of the wealth, according to a study by Julius Baer Group and CLSA Asia-Pacific Markets.

It's not that simple, though. A new RAND Corporation report looks ahead to 2025 and finds that as China and India grow in prominence, each has certain advantages, but neither is primed to have a clear edge over the other.

And India's advantages - a growing working-age population, and open and flexible political and economic systems - will be good things to have during the next 15 or so years.

China's pluses over India are nothing to sneeze at. China graduates 70 per cent more engineers annually than does India - 600,000 against 350,000. Its vast investments in science and technology could dwarf India's celebrated software industry.

Yet India might be moving into a period of reforms as the anti-corruption movement led by Anna Hazare reverberates through the nation. The Morgan Stanley economist Chetan Ahya is not exaggerating when he calls India the most promising structural growth story anywhere today. What if recent events in India compel the government to get its act together?

The thing is, no one knows. That goes, too, for whether China has struck upon some new formula for growth and can avoid a crash.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby sanjaykumar » 10 Sep 2011 07:03

China is now a desired destination for people in other countries seeking a better life.

http://www.indiatoday.com.au/coming_to_oz.php

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby SSridhar » 11 Sep 2011 06:30

China wants international support for prosecuting its own 'war on terror'
Ahead of the 9/11 anniversary, Chinese officials and the State media have drawn attention to the growing domestic terror threat in the wake of recent attacks in the Xinjiang region, stressing the need for greater international cooperation.

“Often, the United States has turned a blind eye to the damage and threats caused by extremists in Russia's Chechen Republic, and opted for a double standard on the issue of the separatist forces in China's Xinjiang province, rejecting China's request to extradite members of the so-called ‘East Turkestan Islamic Movement',” (ETIM) which has a close relationship with al-Qaeda.” {Ohh. . .India remembers China's double-standards on LeT, Hafeez Sayeed, JeM and Maulana Masood Azhar}

Pan Zhiping, a terrorism expert at the Xinjiang Academy of Social Sciences, told The Hindu in a recent interview that religious extremism was on the rise in Xinjiang, and behind the recent attacks in Kashgar and Hotan which left at least 40 people dead. The Jihadist group, the Turkestan Islamic Party (TIP), which was behind the ETIM, claimed responsibility. Mr. Pan pointed to the rising influence of groups such as the Hizb ut-Tahrir. “These groups use the mosque to spread extremist ideas.” Leaflets from several groups, calling for violence against Han Chinese, had circulated in some areas in Xinjiang.

In 2003, when the war in Iraq was already under way, China's Ministry of Public Security issued a list of terror groups that China considered illegal and a threat, including the ETIM and the World Uygur Youth Congress. While the West and rights groups have accused China of inflating the terror threat to tackle dissent in Xinjiang, much of the criticism subsided after 9/11. The Xinhua commentary said there was “an urgent need to create a common standard for fighting terrorism”, pointing at the West's questioning of Russian and Chinese anti-terror efforts, even as Washington launched its ‘war against terror'.

“Fighting and eradicating terrorism, extremism and separatism should be an international responsibility and, therefore, shared by every country, rather than the sole responsibility of the United States.”

Li Wei, an anti-terrorism expert at the official China Institute of Contemporary International Relations, said the international community “still differs on definitions of terrorism and terrorist organisations,” which was one reason for the failure of effective cooperation. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, he said, had “helped shore up sympathy and support for terrorist groups”, rather than “nip terrorism in the bud”.

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Re: People's Republic of China Nov 22, 2009

Postby wig » 12 Sep 2011 18:37

Secret Bid to Arm Qaddafi Sheds Light on Tensions in China Government
excerpts:
Some believe that big state-run weapons companies, with their close ties to the military, easily make end runs around the diplomats in the Foreign Ministry, which negotiates China’s position on international sanctions.

Technically, at least, Chinese arms vendors are not required to seek permission before talking about deals with foreign customers.

On the other hand, some of the companies involved in negotiations with Colonel Qaddafi’s government have a track record of skirting sanctions, American officials say. The United States has repeatedly cited two of the firms, the China North Industries Corporation and the China National Precision Machinery Import-Export Corporation, for selling missile technology and other equipment to Iran that it says violate international sanctions.


A government agency issues arms-export licenses in consultation with China’s Defense Ministry and its Foreign Affairs Ministry. The Defense Ministry is supposed to advise whether a weapon or technology is suited to sell to others. The Foreign Affairs Ministry advises whether they should be sold at all.
But in the Chinese government, as in Chinese life, personal relationships carry huge weight. And it is widely believed by outside experts that the fraternal ties between arms makers and the military, which owned many of them before weapons-making was hived off in the 1990s, overwhelm the diplomats’ say in the process. “The state-owned enterprises have a lot more leeway with regard to whom they can trade with,” said Stephanie Lieggi, a senior researcher and an expert on China’s arms industry at the Monterey Institute of International Studies in California


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/12/world ... 2&_r=1&hpw


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