West Asia News and Discussions

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UlanBatori
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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby UlanBatori » 20 Jun 2014 21:32

This is all now Cognitive Dissonance, except for the familiar sight of Green on Green-White-Saffron-EveryoneElse.

Nowhere except here have I seen the idea that the ISIS is supported (I mean actively/knowingly, not through usual idiocy) by DupleeCity. If that is true and US ppl realize it, that would be a hanging offense in the US, hain? The Eyeraki govt is at least advertised in the US as the Great Victory of Western Democracy. The fact that the govt refused to allow US soldiers to be immune to Eyeraki law is seen as an even greater Moral Victory, besides being a cool excuse to withdraw forces.

Now if it comes out that the US govt has been actively supporting the Sunni (meaning Al Qaeda-in-Eyerak) to overthrow the Lawfully Elected Govt of a Friendly Puppet Nation, isn't that straight impeachment material plus a treason trial?

Try explaining to the families of 4500+KIA, 45000+ seriously wounded/disabled, and 250000+ PTSD (why do u think the VA hospitals are having to cover up their appointment backlogs?) that hey, we went in to take out Sad-Am because he insulted Dubya's Poppa, but now we are bringing Sad-Am's Baathists back into power in Bag-daddy, along with Al Qaeda-II, and Oh! that's great for us!

I would say that the impeachment aspect is the best proof that BO is NOT behind this. The 'publicans would leap with joy at the prospect of finding something to impeach him.

Funding from Qatar is presented as "ISIS trying to raise funds in Qatar". It's pretty evident that as long as the ISIS was fighting the Assad regime, KSA might have wink-winked at funding the Sunnis, but now? If ISIS gets any foothold at all, KSA regime is next on their hit-list.

The most probable outcome now seems to be Independent Kurdistan (best thing to happen - those poor ppl have been enslaved for centuries!), an AQ-dominated Anbar province (Isn't that where Fallujah is located? Wonderful! :roll: ), and a shia-militia-run rest of Eyerak, puppeteered by Eyeran, extending in one swath from the Baluchistan border to the Golan Heights. Hopefully they will look at the plight of Shias in Baluchistan and Sindh, and liberate them too? :mrgreen: Leaving Pakjab to the mercies of the ISIAAP (Islamic Iraq,Arabia, Afghanistan and Pakistan). Unless the Russians help Dostum's Northern Alliance keep Kabul and all points north.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby ramana » 20 Jun 2014 22:23

UB get real. Why will US reveal they support ISIS when the end game is what they want?

The End Game will be ISlamist Levant, Arabia & Mediterranean (ISLAM).
Roll back to pre-Colonial era.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby KLNMurthy » 20 Jun 2014 23:29

SSridhar wrote:Saudi Arabia is ecstatic at the success of ISIS but they are going to be consumed by this fire too. They are foolishly confident that they could contain the upsurge if it ever touches their land just as they did in 2004-2006 timeframe. It will be a different ballgame now.


Seems to me Saudis are the original Pakis but with oil money: they have an inflated view of themselves, they think they are born to rule the world, but they can't really do any actual fighting on their own.

So, what you are saying makes sense--if fat rich oiseules hire tough goondas to fight and kill and die for them, sooner or later goondas will realize that they can knock over the oiseule masters and take what they have. Happened in old AP with Rayalaseema "factionists", happening in Pakistan with the TTP, and will happen in Saudi with ISIS or some other goondas.

Orwell's Animal Farm dogs will take over sooner or later if what you are running is an animal kingdom.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby ramana » 21 Jun 2014 01:27

KLNMurthy wrote:
SSridhar wrote:Saudi Arabia is ecstatic at the success of ISIS but they are going to be consumed by this fire too. They are foolishly confident that they could contain the upsurge if it ever touches their land just as they did in 2004-2006 timeframe. It will be a different ballgame now.


Seems to me Saudis are the original Pakis but with oil money: they have an inflated view of themselves, they think they are born to rule the world, but they can't really do any actual fighting on their own.

So, what you are saying makes sense--if fat rich oiseules hire tough goondas to fight and kill and die for them, sooner or later goondas will realize that they can knock over the oiseule masters and take what they have. Happened in old AP with Rayalaseema "factionists", happening in Pakistan with the TTP, and will happen in Saudi with ISIS or some other goondas.

Orwell's Animal Farm dogs will take over sooner or later if what you are running is an animal kingdom.


Actually this already happened to the Abbasiad Caliphs of Baghdad in around late 800s AD. Distrusting the Arabs and Persians they hired Turks to man and lead their armies and soon enough the Turks took over. They were called the Seljuk Turks. The Ottomans defeated the Seljuks and established the Ottoman Empire.


But the KSA Saudis are tribals and have no memory.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Philip » 21 Jun 2014 02:20

Iraq crisis: Isis militants release video to recruit foreign fighters

Militants behind the jihadist advance in Iraq launched a fresh attempt to attract foreign recruits on Thursday with a polished video featuring British fighters urging their compatriots to join them.

The film posted by the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIS), which showed five men claiming to be British and Australian jihadis calling for western Muslims to leave for Syria and Iraq, was part of a co-ordinated social media campaign launched by the extremist group to capitalise on its territorial gains.

In a sign of the growing sophistication of its propaganda operation, ISIS said it was aiming to get one billion Muslims to post messages of support for a hardline Islamist state on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Instagram.

The public relations operation followed a warning this week from Prime Minister David Cameron that ISIS was also planning attacks in Britain. According to Kurdish intelligence sources in Iraq, up to 450 British nationals have joined ISIS in Iraq.

Mr Cameron said on Friday: “We should recognise the danger to Britain of this situation where you have got Islamist extremists and terrorists in control of part of Iraq.”

The 13-minute video, entitled “There is no life without jihad”, showed a group of foreign ISIS recruits - including three claimed Britons - explaining their motivation for travelling to Iraq and Syria and seeking to persuade British Muslims to give up “the fat job…. the big car” to follow them.

Intercut with images of groups of fighters socialising together and set to a soundtrack of Koranic singing, the film eschews the imagery of atrocities committed by ISIS fighters used in other propaganda films and presents instead a call to leave behind the west and join a “purist” Islamic warrior state.

One apparently British fighter, speaking with an educated English accent and named as “Abu Muthanna al Yemeni - from Britain”, named Bangladesh, Cambodia, Australia and the UK as sources for ISIS recruits and said his group was ready to fight in Iraq.

Quoting from the Koran, he claimed ISIS fighters were able to enter “Jordan and Lebanon with no problems” and had set their sights on reconquering “Muslim” lands in Israel and “Al Andalus” - Spain.

Another alleged Briton, named as “Abu Bara al Hindi”, who wore sunglasses in an apparent attempt to disguise his identity, seeks to appeal to persuade westernised Muslims that “jihad” represents fulfillment.

Sat alongside other speakers in a sunny glade, the man said: “Are you willing to sacrifice the fat job you’ve got? The big car you’ve got? The family you have? Are you willing to sacrifice this for the sake of Allah? Definitely, if you sacrifice for Allah, Allah will give you 700 times more than this.”

He added: “The cure for depression is jihad… Feel the honour we are feeling, feel the happiness we are feeling.”

Professionally produced with the badge of ISIS’s in-house “Al Hayat Media Center”, the video represents a growing confidence in the senior ISIS ranks following its advances across a Sunni-majority swathe of Iraq, according to analysts.

Charles Lister, a terrorism expert at the Brookings Doha Centre, told The Independent: “The latest gains made and catalysed by ISIS in Iraq have lent the group a massive opportunity to capitalise on their ‘front page’ status and gain an even further expanded following around the world.

“Videos like this are but one facet of an all-encompassing strategy aimed at encouraging recruitment of foreign fighters. ISIS has proved remarkably adept at managing a slick - sometimes decentralised - media operation, which always stays loyal to the group’s central objective, which is to remain and expand.”

Charlie Cooper, a researcher at the Quilliam Foundation, said: “This is further proof that ISIS is able to run a very, very sophisticated propaganda operation. What is interesting with this video is the different tone to push the idea of itself as a brotherhood and away from the idea of victimhood. If you are a young Muslim, perhaps slightly lost in the world and you come into contact with this type of material, they know what effect it can have.”

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby IndraD » 21 Jun 2014 02:35

Via hashtag & SM use terror group using tweetter to maximum advantage

scroll down link, several images include one showing Cardiff medical student fighting for terror group


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -Iraq.html

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Kakkaji » 21 Jun 2014 05:48

Singha wrote:+has mobility - access to vehicles, spares and fuel. with no clear frontlines, good roads and vast deserts, its going to be a war that can be won by mobile light units, perhaps armed with good intel , and air support.

ie the US army can win it as they are trained and equipped for it with air cover interop also.

the Iraqi army or shia militias might have some stomach to defend their own shrines and towns but are NOT capable of this ISIS mode of warfare honed for years in syria on ksa and western funds.

I doubt the iranians are equipped for this either, and in any case have no 24x7 dynamic intel from drones and air assets on call.

unless khan chacha commits to atleast a afghan type SF + B52 + drone campaign, I am afraid Iraq is totally lost inside of 6 months.

the next to fall will be the remnant shia sultanates on the rim of the persian gulf and the KSA takeover will be complete and all land upto the turkish border as a sunni neo-TSP of sorts with KSA backing from the rear for plausible deniability.

turkey will be ok behind its powerful army and nato supply chain.

syria will have tremendous pressure as every jihadi worth his shalwar will make a beeline to kill the remnant shia regime.

iran will be under tremendous pressure and might have to wage a limited war to depopulate and create a buffer zone upto some favourable border like a river or deep canal.

I am not sure if this outcome is part of the american "plan" for the region, in which case they will do nothing now and throw the shias under the bus.


The US military can defeat ISIL, but then what? The US cannot commit tens of thousands of soldiers indefinitely that will be required to hold the ground.

I think the Sunni Triangle is lost. The fight now is to save the Shia areas starting from north of Baghdad. US airstrikes will help, but this job primarily will have to be done by the Iraqi army and Shia militias with help from Iran. Air assets and high tech will help but are not essential. What is essential is large number of committed, trained, motivated, and well-led foot soldiers who are ready to mix it up close with ISIL, street by street.

Don't discount the capability of Iran in this kind of fight. They can pour in tens of thousands of revolutionary guards who would fight very, very hard to prevent ISIL from occupying the Shia areas of Iraq. Both sides will take heavy casualties but the Shia will win with Iranian support. But even Iranians will not pursue ISIL into the Sunni areas.

The 'Sunni Triangle' borders on Saudi Arabia, and will become a Saudi client state boxed in from every other side.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby RoyG » 21 Jun 2014 06:20

US airstrikes won't do sh*t. Did it help in Afghanistan? ISIS has support from gulf royals. Saudis will make sure that for every jihadi killed they will him/her with 4. This is the reality. This is proxy war. They will take half the country. Iranians will of course make sure the other half is under their control. Even then expect Israel to up the ante on Iran now that their is a huge Sunni threat next door. We are seeing the purist islamic state being formed and it will chew up everything around it.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby chanakyaa » 21 Jun 2014 06:27

The Hidden impact of Eyeraki manufactured crisis on developing countries like India is huge...

Since the beginning of the Eyerak crisis, the cost of oil has gone up by $10/barrel. That is equivalent to $26 million/day based on 2.6m barrel per day consumption by India. Or, Rs.1.5bn per day going away from Indian economy and development projects, and into to coffers of Sheikhs. (**In reality these increases are hedged, but we will keep the financial complexity aside). So in a way KSA and Katari, or East India company 2.0 dreams are funded by countries like India at the expense of underinvestment in its citizens. Who said India was not involved!!

https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/future-indian-rupee-tied-oil-imports/

About 30% of India’s energy needs are met by petroleum. But some 80% of this oil is imported — the major factor behind the country’s ballooning trade and current account deficits. In the fiscal year ending March 2013, India’s net oil import was 2.6 million barrels per day (bpd), at Brent crude prices averaging $110 per barrel. Over the past decade, the more than five-fold rise in India’s net oil import bill to $109 billion last year enlarged its trade deficit to $196 billion, causing a current account deficit of $88 billion or 4.8% of its $1.8 trillion GDP. It is this data that hurt the rupee last summer and led some nervous foreign investors to pull their money out of the country....

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Prem » 21 Jun 2014 06:52

http://news.oneindia.in/feature/mayhem- ... 69004.html

Mayhem in Middle East: Shocking silence of Indian Seculars
Are Indian Muslim leaders reluctant to take a strong stand against the atrocities happening in Middle East and Africa? Are they defensive about what is happening there? Is it that sectarian feelings and extremist viewpoints such as that of Wahabism has silent supporters in India as well? Is the dark shadow of sectarian hatred of Middle East looming large over India? Do the so called intellectual Indians and the champions of secularism consider it politically incorrect to condemn the killing of one Muslim by another Muslim in Middle East? These are the few questions that need answers now. The Shocking Saga in Iraq...and the silence of Indian Seculars. The situation in Iraq as a result of the ruthless advances of the dreaded Al Qaida offshoot ISIS has sent shivers across the world. It is not that terrorism is a new concept and that the world is new to brutality of the Wahabism or Salafism inspired radical terror groups.The internet is filled with shocking videos of brutality committed by ISIS terrorists who capture the retreating or surrendered Iraqi soldiers and then go on to decapitate, dismember or crucify them or just shoot them en masse and then post the videos of the same on the internet. India's otherwise vocal secular champions and Muslim leaders however remain conspicuous by their silence on this issue. The Brutality of Boko Haram...and the shocking silence of Indian Seculars
Yet such rabid hatred and mindless killings or atrocities are not just restricted to Iraq only. Only a couple of months back it was reported about how Boko Haram, another Al Qaida affiliated radical terror group operating in Nigeria, abducted more than 270 girl students. The only folly of the abducted girls was that they were students in an English medium school which according to Boko Haram is anti-Islam. Apart from the brutal killing of hundreds of people, Boko Haram has stated about its intentions to sell the girls. Like the rest of the world, India's otherwise vocal secular champions and Muslim clerics remained silent on this issue as well.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby AnimeshP » 21 Jun 2014 07:00

A very interesting article on ISIS ... apologies if posted earlier.

http://pando.com/2014/06/16/the-war-ner ... a-i-s-i-s/

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Philip » 21 Jun 2014 09:25

To Indian NGOs,etc.,etc,criticism and activisim about atrocities that happen outside India and duplicity in the foreign policies of their patrons is "haram'!

It is India that must be "cleansed" first since the firangis who pay us must know best.For them,"the West is always best".
It is long past time for the East to set up its own human rights outfits,"Blue Peace",whatever to show the globe who the world's worst polluters are,warmongers are,war criminals are,robber bankers are...you get the picture. A simple truth.The workers in the sweatshops of the east ,producing garments for the global brands at rockbottom prices,still use child labour and protest indignantly only when caught out!

UKistan sending terrorists to the MEast!
Jihadi recruitment video for Islamist terror group Isis features three Britons

Militant named Abu Muthana al-Yemeni in video is identified in various reports as 20-year-old medical student from Cardiff.
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/j ... es-britons

The Guardian, Saturday 21 June 2014

An Islamist fighter, identified as Abu Muthanna al-Yemeni from Britain, speaks in the Isis video
An Islamist fighter, centre, identified as Abu Muthana al-Yemeni from Britain, speaks from an unknown location in the Isis video. Photograph: Reuters TV

Three men who claim to be British have appeared in a recruitment video for the terrorist group Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Isis), in which they directly appeal for other westerners to join them fighting jihad and state their intention to join the war in Iraq, where the army is struggling to repel the Sunni insurgents.

The video – entitled There's No Life Without Jihad – features three men with distinctly English accents, along with two Australians, holding guns and surrounded by greenery as they implore others to join them. Captions state their nationality and noms de guerre.

A man identified as Abu Bara' al-Hindi says: "Are you willing to sacrifice the fat job you have got, the big car you have got, the family you have? Are you willing to sacrifice this for the sake of Allah?

"To all my brothers living in the west, I know how you feel [from] when I used to live there. In the heart you feel depressed. The cure for the depression is jihad … all my brothers, come to jihad and feel the honour we are feeling, feel the happiness we are feeling."

Going to Iraq or Syria to fight could constitute a crime under UK terrorism legislation.

The 13-minute video, which was apparently filmed in Syria, features clips of the seated men speaking in English, littered with Arabic phrases and words – including some quotations from the Qur'an – interspersed with footage of Isis fighters on the march.

Isis has been using its control of territory and oilfields in north-eastern Syria, where a number of jihadist groups have joined the civil war that has been raging for more than three years, to capture land in Iraq, and they are now believed to be crossing the border between the two countries with ease.

Another man, identified as Abu Muthana al-Yemeni, says the men are getting ready to fight in Iraq, where the beleaguered government has been petitioning the US to carry out air strikes to quell the insurgency. "We have participated in battles in Sham [the Arabic name for the Levant or Greater Syria] and we will go to Iraq in a few days and fight there and come back and we will even go to Jordan and Lebanon with no problems," he boasts.

He was identified in various reports as a 20-year-old medical student from Cardiff. His father, Ahmed Muthana, told ITV News that watching footage of his son had made him cry. "I wish I could hold him, hold his hand, ask him to come back," he said. "As a father, I give a message, not only to Nasser, to all the people that go from Britain to Syria to fight: please stop. Come back home."

He told the Daily Telegraph that his son had been accepted at four universities to study medicine but did not go, and that he had not heard from him since November.

In February, the younger brother also disappeared after it is thought he applied for a second passport. "To be honest, I don't agree with him, but I don't know what he has been taught in his mind," he said. "Of course I fear he will be injured or die fighting but I can do nothing. They are conservative Muslim, they don't have girlfriends, they don't talk to girls."

The Press Association reported that police visited the family two weeks ago and that is when they found out that the brothers had left.

A spokesman for the family said: "They are not happy with Nasser going. We didn't know he was going. We wouldn't let him go if we knew. My family were more devastated that Aseel went. It is heartbreaking because we don't know if we will see them again. Currently, we don't know where they are and we don't have contact with them."

"Nasser and Aseel went because they feel guilty about Syria but we were surprised they were talking about those things we saw on YouTube. Both were pious and religious and interested in the faith."

About 400 British nationals are thought to be fighting in Syria, with a majority likely to be involved with Isis or its affiliated factions, according to Charles Lister, a Middle East analyst at the Brookings Doha Centre. "This latest focus on British and Australian fighters symbolises Isis's continued determination to recruit further western, and especially English-speaking, fighters to their cause," he said.


The third Briton– and final speaker – in the video, identified as Abu Dujana al-Hindi, describes his monologue as a "message to the brothers who stayed behind".

He says: "You can be here in these golden times, fighting, or you can be on the sidelines fighting. It's your choice."

After he finishes speaking, the video concludes with slow-motion shots of the men smiling, with one apparently picking something out of his fellow fighter's beard.

David Cameron has vowed to address the threat posed to Britain by the return of foreign fighters, warning that the Sunni insurgents in Iraq were "also planning to attack us here at home in the United Kingdom".

Britain has said it will provide humanitarian assistance and counter-terrorism expertise in Iraq but will not carry out military action.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby anmol » 21 Jun 2014 10:11

:shock:
Image

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby anmol » 21 Jun 2014 10:19

:rotfl:
17.09 Chemical weapons produced at the Al Muthanna facility, which Isistoday seized, are believed to have included mustard gas, Sarin, Tabun, andVX.

Here is theCIA's file on the complex.Stockpiles of chemical munitions are still stored there.

The most dangerousones have been declared to the UN and are sealed in bunkers. Although declared, the bunkers contents have yet to be confirmed.

These areas of the compound pose a hazard to civilians and potentialblackmarketers. Numerous bunkers, including eleven cruciform shaped bunkers were exploited.Some of the bunkers were empty.

Some of the bunkers contained largequantitiesof unfilled chemical munitions, conventional munitions, one-tonshipping containers, old disabled production equipment (presumed disabledunder UNSCOM supervision), and other hazardous industrial chemicals.

17.05 The Chemical Weapons Convention, which Iraq joined in 2009,requires it to dispose of the material at Al Muthanna, even though it wasdeclared unusable and "does not pose a significant security risk"

However, the UKgoverment has acknowledgeded that the nature of the materialcontained in the two bunkers would make the destruction process difficultand technically challenging.

Under an agreement signed in Baghdad in July 2012, experts from the MOD’sDefence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) were due to providetraining to Iraqi personnel in order to help them to dispose of the chemicalmunitions and agents.

ImageThe Al Mutannah chemical weapons complex (CIA)

16.52 The remaining chemical weapons from Saddam Hussein's regime arestored in two sealed bunkers, both located at the Al Muthanna ChemicalsWeapons Complex, a large site in the western desert some 80km north west ofBaghdad.

This was the principal manufacturing plant for both chemical agents andmunitions during Saddam Hussein’s rule.

Thousands of tonnes of chemical weapons were produced, stored and deployed bythe Saddam Hussein regime. Iraq used these weapons during the Iran - IraqWar (1980 to 1988) and against the Kurds in Halabja in 1988.

16.32 Isis jihadists have seized a chemical weapons facility built bySaddam Hussein which contains a stockpile of old weapons, State Departmentofficials havetold the Wall Street Journal:

U.S. officials don't believe the Sunni militants will be able to create afunctional chemical weapon from the material. The weapons stockpiled at theAl Muthanna complex are old, contaminated and hard to move, officials said.

Nonetheless, the capture of the chemical-weapon stockpile by the forces ofthe Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham, known as ISIS or ISIL, the militantgroup that is seizing territory in the country, has grabbed the attention ofthe U.S. "We remain concerned about the seizure of any military site by theISIL," Jen Psaki, the State Department spokeswoman, said in a writtenstatement.

"We do not believe that the complex contains CW materials ofmilitary value and it would be very difficult, if not impossible, to safelymove the materials."


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... -live.html

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Singha » 21 Jun 2014 11:23

dailymail.co.uk

US officials issue dire warning over Iraqi oil refinery: Security experts say surrounded troops are hopelessly outgunned by ISIS
The estimated 270 soldiers on the Baiji refinery are outnumbered and trapped as the battle raged on for a fourth day with up to 500 ISIS militants
The terrorists plan to keep the soldiers isolated until the run out of food and ammunition
U.S. official source said: 'There is very little the Iraqi government can do to save or liberate those guys'


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z35FjVxKXw

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Pratyush » 21 Jun 2014 12:19

Aren't the terrorists who are besieging the refinery a static target.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby A_Gupta » 21 Jun 2014 17:11

The NY Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/21/world ... ml?hp&_r=0
When Qaeda-style insurgents overran the northern city of Mosul, among the war booty they seized were what they claimed were five American-made helicopters.

Noting that they were still nearly new, the group said in a posting on Twitter, “We’ll expect the Americans to honor the warranty and service them for us.”

“Not only are they effective jihadists but they have a sense of humor,” said Toby Dodge, director of the Middle East Centre at the London School of Economics, who related that anecdote.

Behind the image of savagery that the extremists of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria present to the world, as casual executioners who kill helpless prisoners and behead even rival jihadis, lies a disciplined organization that employs social media and sophisticated financial strategies in the funding and governance of the areas it has conquered.


In a bloody see-saw battle for control of Iraq’s biggest oil refinery at Baiji, halfway between Baghdad and Mosul, the insurgents worked with the families of employees there to broker a cease-fire — so the workers could be safely evacuated.

It was no humanitarian gesture. “They want them to run the refinery when the fighting is over,” one local official said, who spoke on the condition of anonymity out of fear ISIS would kill him.


Their extortion rackets in Mosul netted as much as $8 million a month, according to Gen. Mahdi Gharawi, until recently the Nineveh Province police commander, in an interview with Niqash, an Arabic language news website. And that was even before they took over. Once in charge, they typically levy “taxes,” which are just as lucrative. So-called road taxes of $200 on trucks are collected all over northern Iraq to allow them safe passage. The Iraqi government claims the insurgents are now levying a “tax” on Christians in Mosul, who were a significant minority there, to avoid being crucified.


PS: we have to see jaziya in a similar way - it is money extorted from conquered non-Muslims to finance further wars.

Even a cellphone app that helped ISIS propel its Twitter feed to the top of the jihadi charts, had advertising embedded in it. All of that, in turn, was part of a savvy social media campaign to convince well-heeled supporters in Saudi Arabia and Gulf nations to donate to their operations.


“ISIS gets some money from outside donors, but that pales in comparison to their self-funding,” said an American counterterrorism official. “The overwhelming majority of its money comes from criminal activities like extortion, kidnapping, robberies and smuggling.


ISIS started amassing a bankroll in Syria last year after it took over the eastern Syrian oil fields, near Raqqa. It operates primitive refineries to make products for local use by ISIS’s own fighters, but sells much of the crude to its enemy — the Syrian government. In Minbij, it runs a local cement factory, and in Raqqa merchants even pay the militants a trash collection fee.

Invading Iraq has just expanded the revenue base.


According to J. M. Berger of Intelwire.com, who has studied the jihadis’ use of social media, ISIS distributed a cellphone app to its followers called Dawn of Glad Tidings. The Google Android app even had advertising embedded in it, he said, and also was a sophisticated spam generator turning each ISIS tweet into thousands of additional tweets while evading Twitter’s spam defenses.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby A_Gupta » 21 Jun 2014 17:34

anmol wrote:16.32 Isis jihadists have seized a chemical weapons facility built bySaddam Hussein which contains a stockpile of old weapons, State Department officials havetold the Wall Street Journal:


The US was there for more than a decade and did not bother to destroy them? This is just scare-mongering; the neo-con faction in the US greatly wants to go to war.

PS: The Wall Street Journal is now Murdoch-media, and has ceased being a serious newspaper. To paraphrase, Murdoch-media is a propaganda organization that happens to employ some journalists.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Austin » 21 Jun 2014 19:31

PM Maliki's aide thanks Russia for balanced stance on Iraqi crisis

"We have great respect for Russia’s policy [on Iraq], which is clearer and more responsible than that of a few other counties, Mr. Mosawi said in an exclusive interview with the International News Agency Rossiya Segodnya. The Iraqi official urged other nations to follow in Moscow’s steps and condemn terrorism. Iraq has been swept by a wave of violence in recent weeks, with jihadi insurgents from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) seizing control of large territories and plenty of resources in the country’s northern and central provinces."

"I’d like to get this message across to all governments: by helping Iraq to combat terrorism you are helping yourselves. ISIS has people from many different countries fighting in its ranks, including militants from Chechnya, Afghanistan, Arab countries, Europe and the US, so the international community must take measures to curb activities of this international terrorist network," Mr. Mosawi said, RIA Novosti reports.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby ramana » 21 Jun 2014 19:52

UB note the above news item.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby A_Gupta » 21 Jun 2014 19:53

Shashi Tharoor on India-Iraq:
http://www.firstpost.com/world/india-ir ... 81885.html

A tiny example of why Indians need to write more and publish more. The Indian experience of the world needs to carry weight; and it won't without the masses of written words (and documentaries and youtubes and etc. etc.)

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby RoyG » 21 Jun 2014 22:08

ramana wrote:UB get real. Why will US reveal they support ISIS when the end game is what they want?

The End Game will be ISlamist Levant, Arabia & Mediterranean (ISLAM).
Roll back to pre-Colonial era.


You are absolutely right. This is purity. This is Islam. It will get a lot worse before it gets any better. As long as the Saudis have oil coming out of the ground they will be able to pull the strings for a while until the purer than pure (PTP virus) creeps in slowly. They haven't learned from the Pakistan experiment. It will fail in the long run. Expect the SCO to give the Gulf royals security guarantees. Once this happens, the fireworks will go up. They will all coordinate their actions and destroy the dollar. This will send the US back 15 years coupled with the fiscal and debt mess it is in. US is nothing without its allies. No bases. No force projection.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby TSJones » 21 Jun 2014 23:11

Still no agreement with Iraq to send in the 300. Obama says Iraq has a limited amount of time to make changes for US help. He says they must help themselves because ultimately there is no military solution w/o political chages being made.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby RoyG » 21 Jun 2014 23:58

Singha wrote:dailymail.co.uk

US officials issue dire warning over Iraqi oil refinery: Security experts say surrounded troops are hopelessly outgunned by ISIS
The estimated 270 soldiers on the Baiji refinery are outnumbered and trapped as the battle raged on for a fourth day with up to 500 ISIS militants
The terrorists plan to keep the soldiers isolated until the run out of food and ammunition
U.S. official source said: 'There is very little the Iraqi government can do to save or liberate those guys'


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z35FjVxKXw


They will be beheaded, mutilated, tortured, etc. Poor guys especially the Shia ones. They will have it the worst.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Gerard » 22 Jun 2014 01:12

Iraq crisis: Shia militia show of force raises tensions
Thousands of Shia militia loyal to the powerful cleric Moqtada al-Sadr have paraded through the streets of Baghdad, raising sectarian tensions amid continued fighting in areas of Iraq.
But the BBC's Jim Muir, in northern Iraq, says the impressive-looking parade of men in battle fatigues accompanied by serious military hardware will only raise sectarian tensions at at time when the government is under pressure to rally the country together against the extremists.

Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani's call for a new government to be quickly formed aiming for "broad national acceptance" and to "remedy past mistakes" is being seen as less-than-veiled criticism of the Iraqi PM, correspondents say.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Philip » 22 Jun 2014 05:30


Tony Blair's 'untruths' on chemical weapons must be challenged

Tony Blair says he did not know the Assad regime had chemical weapons, but British intelligence 'had provided details to successive governments for years'

The Observer, Saturday 21 June 2014
Tony Blair says he was not aware Syria had chemical weapons until they were used. Photograph: Rex

You quoted Tony Blair last week as saying: "What we now know from Syria is that Assad, without any detection from the west, was manufacturing chemical weapons. We only discovered this when he used them." ("Angry Blair rejects 'bizarre' claims invasion of Iraq caused crisis", News) He adds: "We also know, from the final weapons inspectors' reports, that though it is true that Saddam got rid of the physical weapons, he retained the expertise and capability to manufacture them."

I was deputy chief of defence intelligence 1994-99, head of the defence intelligence analysis staff and a member of the joint intelligence committee. I can assure Mr Blair that for at least a decade before the second Gulf war we assessed Syria as possessing chemical weapons, a recurring theme in JIC reports. The issue was not whether he had them but when and how he might use them. And ever since the first Gulf war we assessed that Saddam had a "breakout capability" to regenerate his weapons of mass destruction programmes – nothing to do with "the final weapons inspectors' reports".

One wonders whether Mr Blair read the intelligence assessments we provided him, is consciously trying to rewrite history to his benefit, or is suffering from some sort of prime ministerial false memory syndrome. Whatever, he should not be allowed to get away with untruths.

John NL Morrison
Canterbury

Prime minister Tony Blair rejected claims that the 2003 US-UK invasion of Iraq was to blame for the current crisis in Iraq. While admitting that no weapons of mass destructions were found in Iraq, he is quoted as stating that in Syria: "Assad, without any detection from the west, was manufacturing chemical weapons. We only discovered this when he used them." Yet a March 1995 US intelligence assessment entitled The Weapons Proliferation Threat concluded that: "Syria has had a chemical warfare programme since the mid-1980s." This was updated in a 1997 US Department of Defence report entitled Proliferation: Threat and Response, stating that the Syrian chemical weapons programme began in the 1970s. It is not credible that Mr Blair was not aware of these and multiple other reports on Syrian chemical weapons. Mr Blair argues that "the jihadist groups are never going to leave us alone" and that "this is, in part, our struggle". He seems to have forgotten that "we" – that is the west – helped provide the foundation roots for these jihadists by supporting the mujahedeen against the Soviet Union in Afghanistan. The misguided crusading zeal of Mr Blair and Mr Bush was surely a factor in the current Iraq crisis.

Dr Edward Horgan
Limerick
Ireland

It seems that Tony Blair will be pilloried to the end of his days for the invasion of Iraq in 2003. Certainly, it does not seem fair to blame him and George Bush for the current mess in Iraq.

We did, after all, invade Libya with the Americans and hounded Gaddafi unmercifully until he was killed by his own people. There may be differences relating to that invasion but it is, in essence, similar. I remember with what joy Tony Blair was welcomed into office in 1997. Surely we must give the man some credit.

Annette Howe
Wool
Dorset

Blair's capacity for self-justification and denial knows no bounds. It is astonishing that he insists that the illegal invasion of Iraq has nothing to do with the present mayhem. The shadowy Sunni Iraqi leader of Isis was an early recruit to "al-Qaida in Iraq". Under Saddam Hussein, whatever our view of his tyranny, there was no Islamist jihadist insurgency; post-invasion, it has gathered momentum and further sharpened the lethal Sunni/Shia divide. I would have thought that our foreign policy disasters throughout the Muslim world would have impelled Blair to learn the lesson of the unintended consequences of military action. It is Blair and his potty, faith-driven, apocalyptic world view that is "bizarre". He should be in The Hague on trial for war crimes.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Kakkaji » 22 Jun 2014 09:27

Centre mulls Iraq rescue in batches

New Delhi, June 21: India will evacuate its citizens in Iraq in batches, as they reach Baghdad, and will not employ mass evacuation strategies used three years ago when New Delhi plucked out 18,000 nationals trapped in the middle of Libya’s civil war.

Top government officials confirmed to The Telegraph that India has concluded that the tactics used in Libya would not work in Iraq, where just over 100 nationals are trapped in regions witnessing the worst violence.

“It (mass evacuation) is simply not going to work here,” an official said. “We have no option but to get our citizens out of the conflict zone, batch by batch, group by group, and then fly them back to India.”

The foreign ministry, which today confirmed that India’s interlocutors in Baghdad had for the first time managed to contact 40 construction workers abducted last weekend by militants, as this newspaper had first reported yesterday, reaffirmed that the men were safe.

But officials warned that the ongoing battle between Iraqi forces and militants of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria made any evacuation impossible.

However, Indian airplanes cannot airlift citizens from central Iraq, the theatre of the most bitter and violent conflicts, because of a lack of any safe landing strip, officials said.

Instead, India is waiting for the violence around Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city where the abducted men are being held, to cease before it ventures any evacuation by road.

“Till then, we are just going to keep in regular touch with the men to ensure we know at all times where they are and that they are fine,” another official said.

India is also focusing on evacuating citizens not in the worst conflict zones but keen to return and those in the conflict zone who manage to reach either Kurdistan in the north or Baghdad in the south.

“I would request all Indians in the conflict zone of Iraq to stay indoors and not try to escape anywhere,” Iraq’s ambassador to India Tahseen Ahmad Berwari said today.

Of those who can be evacuated, several hundred are in Najaf in southern Iraq, where Amnesty International today claimed they were stranded because their employers refused to return their passports.

“I have been working here for over two years and my employer is withholding more than $1,500 of my salary,” PTI quoted one worker as saying. “Most of my colleagues are in the same situation.”

But the foreign office has said it is willing to provide emergency travel documents to any Indian national in Iraq keen to return. “No Indian national need to worry about that,” foreign ministry spokesperson Syed Akbaruddin said on Friday

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Kakkaji » 22 Jun 2014 09:59


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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby SwamyG » 22 Jun 2014 21:05

India Iraq a love story : http://www.firstpost.com/world/iraq-and ... ITORSPICKS

The freedom the women enjoyed was, in a way, ironical, living as they did under the authoritarian regime of Saddam Hussein. But his rule wasn’t just about keeping people under a tight rein. His Ba’ath party espoused secularism, or strict neutrality towards religion, and undertook the project of building a modern nation-state. Revenues gushing from oil wells helped finance this modernist project. For instance, college education was free, including even textbooks, subject to the proviso that irrespective of the socio-economic status of the student, he had to join the army as an ordinary soldier in case he failed to clear the annual college examination in two successive years.


Perhaps their respect for Indians was because of the common sensibilities ancient civilisations are said to spawn. It was this sharing of sensibilities which perhaps explains the popularity of Hindi films in Iraq. They were a rage, a new release drawing packed halls. My most enduring image of their love for Hindi cinema was the audience response to a scene in Sholay. It was that dramatic shot in which Gabbar Singh, after mowing down Thakur’s family, points the gun to his grandson, trembling in fear. The audience burst out shouting, “No, no,” and took to hurling coke bottle caps at the screen. You would have thought the Iraqis were incapable of fighting one bloody war after another.

However, it was on the pavements of Mosul I grasped the roots of Iraqi’s respect for India. It had this curious tradition of students spreading their bedrolls on pavements and studying in the bright glow of city lights. Presumably the students belonged to lower socio-economic strata, their home perhaps too overcrowded to prepare for examinations diligently. On such nights they would communicate to me through a smattering of English words and sign language that while Iraq had exceptional wealth, the Indians possessed knowledge and brain-power.

The more articulate among them would ask me what it was to live in a democracy, to vote and choose leaders, to enjoy the freedom of expression. It was brave of those students to speak on politics. An Iraqi friend of my father’s confessed that they refrained from discussing politics in extended family gatherings, suspicious as they were of cousins working as Saddam’s spies. One night an anguished cry rent our neighbourhood. I was later told it was of a man whom the secret police had whisked away for engaging in clandestine political activity. Such men, it was said, never returned.

To my childish eyes, Saddam didn’t seem a brutal dictator on the day we were out on a picnic in the rugged mountains of the Kurdish area. We heard the clatter of choppers as they hovered over us, descending slowly, their tails swaying. From one of them stepped out Saddam, briskly walking around shaking hands. He joined a circle of Kurds, their arms interlocked, taking two steps forward and kicking their right legs high, and then two steps backward to toss their lefts legs in the air. The dictator stood so close I could have even touched him. In hindsight, I guess it was a show mounted for television.
Nevertheless, I was impressed. Till then, the closest I had ever been to a political leader was around 100 meters from Indira Gandhi, who had driven down the roads of Patna, where I was schooled, in a convertible. Later in the evening, I saw Saddam address a crowd from the balcony of the governor’s residence. They cheered him uproariously every now and then. I thought he was Iraq’s Indira, boasting an indomitable will and enjoying tremendous popularity.
Last edited by SwamyG on 23 Jun 2014 09:55, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Philip » 23 Jun 2014 00:24

Years ago I met an elderly doc. in BLR around the time of GW1,an academic who had taught in the Baghdad Univ.Saddam regularly visited the Univ. where he was very popular with the students.He was v. fond of the doc. and said that there more Indian academics would be very welcome.He even offered him citizenship ,which the doc politely declined as his family was back in India.Saddam was particularly liked by the women who had great freedom.The emancipation of women by him was one of the plus points of his regime.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby TSJones » 23 Jun 2014 01:53

top Iranian cleric says US should stay out of Iran

http://www.nbcnews.com/#/storyline/iraq ... aq-n137841

the ayatolla says this is not a struggle between sunni and shia but leftover saddam's men causing the problem. :D

At any rate still no agreement between Iraq and the US concerning the 300. which is fine by most of the people in the US it appears.

I do love it when religious fanatics kill each other and the US doesn't even have to lift a finger.

Anyway Obama says we're not playing the whack-a-mole game when a political solution is required not just military.


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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Philip » 23 Jun 2014 06:08

Poetic justice! The kangaroo court president has himself received "rough justice".Saddam must've "warmly" greeted him in the afterlife! How true is the saying that "the mills of God grind slowly,but grind exceedingly well" !

More news from UKistan.

Father of Isis volunteer: 'My son has betrayed Britain'

Ahmed Muthana reveals heartbreak at video of son and two others calling for more British Muslims to join fighting in Syria

Steven Morris and Matthew Taylor
The Guardian, Sunday 22 June 2014

Isis recruitment video
"Abu Muthanna al-Yemeni" (centre), believed to be Nasser Muthana, a 20-year-old from Cardiff. Photograph: Al Hayat Media Centre/AFP/Getty Images

The father of one of the British men who appeared in a video urging westerners to join him and his colleagues to fight in Syria has spoken of his devastation after seeing the film and said that his son had betrayed Britain.


Ahmed Muthana, a retired electrical engineer, said he felt as if a bomb had hit his neat, modest Cardiff home when he saw the video. "I was shocked, I was sad, I cried," he told the Guardian on Sunday. "My wife collapsed. It feels as if the ground under my feet has disappeared."

The video showed Nasser, a talented, sports-mad 20-year-old born and bred in the Welsh capital who not long ago planned to go to medical school, urging other Muslims to join the fighting. "He looked skinny and tough," said Muthana. "He wasn't tough at all when he was here. I think he has been forced to talk in that way. He has been told what to say."

Nevertheless, Muthana, 57, said his son had let down his family and his country. "This is my country. I came here aged 13 from Aden when I was orphaned. It is his country. He was born here in the hospital down the road. He has been educated here. He has betrayed Great Britain."

Another young man from Cardiff also appears in the video, a recruitment tool for the terrorist group Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Isis): Reyaad Khan, 20, who went to secondary school with Nasser. "I used to have him in my car," Muthana said. "I'd take them to the mosque. He seemed fine. Like all of them."

Muthana's pain is not confined to Nasser and his friend. Though he did not appear in the video Nasser's younger brother, Aseel, 17, is also believed to be in Syria. He vanished after telling his parents he was going to a friend's house to revise for a maths exam, and has not been seen since. "They tell me he is in Syria helping injured people. I don't know what to believe," Muthana said.

According to Muthana, Nasser left the family's yellow-brick maisonette in Butetown – a multicultural area between the city centre and Cardiff Bay – in November. He told his family he was going to an Islamic seminar in Shrewsbury. "That was normal," explained Muthana. "He said, 'Goodbye, goodbye', and off he went. He's done that several times before. It was a public open meeting to hear a visiting cleric from Saudi or the Emirates, there was nothing radical about it. If there had been, I would not have let him go."

When Nasser didn't return, the family grew worried and contacted relatives in the Midlands. Muthana went to the police and reported Nasser missing. In due course, the news was relayed to the family – he was not in Shropshire; he was in Syria.

More heartache followed in February when Aseel, who had planned to be an English teacher, vanished. He stayed in contact with his family for a few days, telling them his maths exam had been a "piece of cake".

In fact, he had missed the exam and followed his brother to the Middle East, apparently via Cyprus. The first the family knew of this trip was when police turned up at the front door and bluntly asked where Aseel's passport was. His father was able to find it – but subsequently found that the teenager had travelled down the M4 to Newport to obtain a replacement, which he had used to travel overseas.

Since then the family have dreaded another visit from the police telling them that one, or both, of their sons was dead. "That is what will happen if they stay there – they'll be killed," said Muthana.

At the end of last week, a police officer did arrive, and asked Muthana if he had seen the video. "I said, 'What video?' They asked me to get a laptop and showed it to me."

Muthana said he had always worried that his sons might get involved in drugs – "But I did not see this coming." He used to take them to a nearby Yemeni mosque but, in more recent years, had let them attend other mosques and Islamic centres in Cardiff. "There are six or seven they would attend. I'm a moderate Muslim. Like Christians, Jews, I don't believe in killing. I still hope my sons don't either."

A few streets away, friends and relatives of Reyaad Khan were expressing the same sense of fear and disbelief. Like the Muthana boys, Khan was described as an intelligent, successful young man who had big ambitions, writing four years ago that he wanted to be the UK's first Asian prime minister.

Khan's Facebook page shows a boy with typical concerns and interests, from sport (he is a Chelsea fan) to video games (he played Call of Duty) and his mother's nagging. But in more recent entries, he referred to the plight of the Syrian people and how the conflict was being misrepresented in the west. He went on to say how people all over the world were "answering the call" to join the fighting.

One friend, Ali, said it was common knowledge among his close circle that he had gone to Syria. "He felt we were being blinded by propaganda. He's an idealist and he wanted to help. I think there are a lot of young Muslims who like the idea of a cause to fight for. But we were taken aback by the video."

Khan's mother said she had been shocked at how different he seemed in the video, which is entitled There's No Life Without Jihad and shows Khan, Nasser Muthana and three other men brandishing guns as they implore others to join them fighting in Syria. They also say they are about to cross the border to fight in Iraq.

Speaking to Sky News, she tearfully urged Khan to return: "Reyaad, please come back, I am dying for you. You are my only son. It is not good what you are doing … you are going to regret this for the rest of your life."

The woman, who asked not to be named, said Khan was a "lovely kid and son and brother … He was the most lovely boy any mother could have. He was always there for his family."

She added: "I was absolutely shocked to see how his character has changed. They are being brainwashed into thinking they are going to help people – I don't know who is doing this, but there is someone behind them. These are young innocent boys who are being brainwashed."

At the Manar centre in Glynrhondda Street, Cardiff, one of the places where the Muthana brothers worshipped, elders suggested that the men must have been radicalised via the internet.

Trustee Barak Albayaty said: "Nasser Muthana was just like any other guy. I was shocked to see him in the video. But I am sure coming here is not the source of radicalism. We're against going to Syria for the armed struggle and have spelt this out on many occasions. The boys are affected by the internet. It's not just Cardiff, it's all over the UK."

Saleem Kidwai, of the Muslim Council for Wales, said he believed many of the Welsh Muslims went out to Syria without realising who they were fighting for. "I know there are a few from Wales who have gone. I don't know them personally, but I've been given to understand there are about four or five boys who have gone to Syria. They are very unhappy about it because when they went they thought it would be an adventure. But realising what they have put themselves into, it's very difficult for them to come out of it," he said.

"They are young boys and they feel it's an adventure but, when they are thrown into the frontline, it's a different picture when you see people dying and you are killing."

Yet this is not the first time in recent years that people in these streets have wondered at the actions of young Muslims. Two years ago, Cardiff brothers Gurukanth Desai and Abdul Miah were convicted of being part of an al-Qaida-inspired gang of terrorists after they admitted to plotting attacks on the London Stock Exchange, Big Ben and Westminster Abbey.

South Wales police said they were increasingly concerned about the number of young people who had gone or were intending to travel to Syria to join the conflict. "Travelling abroad for the purpose of engaging in terrorist-related activity is an offence and we will seek to prosecute anyone engaged in this type of activity," a spokesman said.

"It is recognised that people want to offer aid and support to the Syrian people. The safest way to do so is to donate to UK-registered charities that have ongoing relief operations."

Detectives have seized computers and files from the Muthana and Khan homes to try to work out what has prompted the young men to head to the Middle East.

Back at Nasser and Aseel's home, Muthana said he kept on trying to work out why two of his four sons had left. He arrived in south Wales from Yemen in the 1950s to live with an uncle after his father died in a plane crash and his mother was killed in a car accident. He said he faced racist insults but did not believe his sons had because they grew up in one of the most racially diverse areas of Wales. Cardiff has one of the most established Yemeni and Somali communities in the UK.

Muthana talked of how, as a boy, Nasser loved to travel around Wales and the west country. "I know every back road, every village. He loved nature." Aseel, he said, was a joker and, like his brother, a sportsman.

He is convinced they were "got at" in the UK, but cannot work out why. He wondered if they were approached during their regular meetings with friends on City Road. "They would meet at restaurants, eat, chat with friends. You don't know who they met there. I kept them close, but I gave them money so they could go out with friends. What turned them around?"

For the moment, he has removed photographs of his sons. He will be making a statement to the police today officially identifying Nasser as the man in the video. "Then we will have to wait."

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby anmol » 23 Jun 2014 07:38

from ISIS's Planning Commission:

Image

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Singha » 23 Jun 2014 08:06



Saddam was hard on internal islamists. Al Qaeda had no sanctuary in his iraq. so the ISIS has no reason to kill the guy who sentenced him.
this indicates its the old Baath party elements in Sunni triangle who are in league with ISIS as a tactical plan to quickly take over north-west iraq against their common enemy the Shias.

once the dust settles on the shia graves, this Takiya will however inevitably end and a power struggle between the political baathists and the ISIS on who should get the ruling mandate . it will be the trans-national and ultra-pure ISIS vs the sunni tribal militias and chieftains. no prizes on guessing who will win the race to prove themselves more pure and undiluted and who has the more $$ and arms.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby UlanBatori » 23 Jun 2014 08:07

So these guys are the serious versions of the nutcases who used to run the Khilafa For Pakistan website out of Poodlestan circa 1999. Can't remember the organization's name, but since it keeps morphing it does not matter. I am waiting for the pictures of the basket of severed body parts to appear.

The map is now colored totally black. Then it used to be like a quilt.
So the latest American view is a nonchalant
Hu, ME?
about leaving Iraq to be chewed up by the Al Qaeda? Wonderful. That's exactly what those 4500+ died for, plus the 45,000 disabled and the 250,000 PTSDs waiting for appointments at the VA hospitals.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Singha » 23 Jun 2014 08:08

what does the three arabic white circles say? is there going to be a western, central and eastern caliphate under separate rulers in the fashion of rome and constantinople?

it is a ambitious map....many non islamic countries like india, SL, tibet, myanmar, thailand, kenya, ethiopia, ghana are part of the map. but I guess even if one muslim exists somewhere that automatically implies all efforts be made to establish a islamic state.

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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby anmol » 23 Jun 2014 08:44

US document reveals cooperation between Washington and Brotherhood

Studies commissioned by the president concluded that the US should back ‘moderate Islamists’ in the region

Gulf News Report

Published: 19:32 June 18, 2014

Dubai: For the past decade, two successive US administrations have maintained close ties to the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Tunisia, Syria and Libya, to name just the most prominent cases.

The Obama administration conducted an assessment of the Muslim Brotherhood in 2010 and 2011, beginning even before the events known as the “Arab Spring” erupted in Tunisia and in Egypt. The President personally issued Presidential Study Directive 11 (PSD-11) in 2010, ordering an assessment of the Muslim Brotherhood and other “political Islamist” movements, including the ruling AKP in Turkey, ultimately concluding that the United States should shift from its longstanding policy of supporting “stability” in the Middle East and North Africa (that is, support for “stable regimes” even if they were authoritarian), to a policy of backing “moderate” Islamic political movements.

To this day, PSD-11 remains classified, in part because it reveals an embarrassingly naïve and uninformed view of trends in the Middle East and North Africa (Mena) region.

The revelations were made by Al Hewar centre in Washington, DC, which obtained the documents in question.

Through an ongoing Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit, thousands of pages of documentation of the US State Department’s dealings with the Muslim Brotherhood are in the process of being declassified and released to the public.

US State Department documents obtained under the FOIA confirm that the Obama administration maintained frequent contact and ties with the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood. At one point, in April 2012, US officials arranged for the public relations director of the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood, Mohammad Gaair, to come to Washington to speak at a conference on “Islamists in Power” hosted by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

A State Department Cable classified “Confidential” report says the following: “Benghazi Meeting With Libyan Muslim Brotherhood: On April 2 [2012] Mission Benghazi met with a senior member of the Muslim Brotherhood steering committee, who will speak at the April 5 Carnegie Endowment `Islamist in Power’ conference in Washington, D.C. He described the Muslim Brotherhood’s decision to form a political party as both an opportunity and an obligation in post-revolution Libya after years of operating underground. The Brotherhood’s Justice and Construction Party would likely have a strong showing in the upcoming elections, he said, based on the strength of the Brotherhood’s network in Libya, its broad support, the fact that it is a truly national party, and that 25 per cent of its members were women. He described the current relationship between the Brotherhood and the TNC (Transitional National Council) as `lukewarm.’”

Another State Department paper marked “Sensitive But Unclassified (SBU)” contained talking points for Deputy Secretary of State William Burns’ scheduled July 14, 2012 meeting with Mohammad Sawan, the Muslim Brotherhood leader who was also head of the Brotherhood’s Justice and Construction Party. The document is heavily redacted, but nevertheless provides clear indication of Washington’s sympathies for the emergence of the Muslim Brotherhood as a major political force in the post-Gaddafi Libya. The talking points recommended that Secretary Burns tell Sawan that the US government entities “share your party’s concerns in ensuring that a comprehensive transitional justice process is undertaken to address past violations so that they do not spark new discontent.”

The Burns paper described the Libyan Muslim Brotherhood: “Prior to last year’s revolution, the Muslim Brotherhood was banned for over three decades and its members were fiercely pursued by the Gaddafi regime. The Libyan Muslim Brotherhood (LMB) returned to Libya last year after years in exile in Europe and the United States, selected new leadership and immediately began to plan for an active role in Libya’s political future.” After a redacted section, the document continued, “The LMB-affiliated Justice and Construction party, led by Misratan and former political prisoner under Gaddafi Mohammad Sawan, was created in March 2012. Sawan himself was not a candidate in the elections but wields significant influence as the head of the largest political party and most influential Islamist party in Libya.”

The July 14 meeting was attended by both Secretary Burns and Ambassador Christopher Stevens. On September 11, 2012, Ambassador Stevens and three other American diplomats were killed in a premeditated terrorist attack on US mission and CIA facilities in Benghazi.

An undated State Department cable revealed further courting of the LMB and its Justice and Construction Party. “Mohammad Sawan, Chairman of Justice and Construction Party, received yesterday at his office in Tripoli, Ambassadors of US, UK, FR and IT. The Ambassadors requested the meeting to get acquainted with the party’s position on the current events in Libya, the Government, the Party’s demand to sack the Prime Minister, the Constitution, GNC lifetime arguments, dialogue initiatives and Party’s assessment of political and security situation in Libya and the region. During the meeting, which took an hour and a half and attended by Mohammad Talb, party’s International Relations officer, and Hussam Naeli, acting liaison officer, Sawan explained that the Government has not been able to achieve any success in the core files such as security and local government, which both are under the direct supervision of the Prime Minister. Such a failure resulted in the lack of security, continuous assassinations, kidnappings, crimes, smuggling and attacks on public and private property, halt oil exports and disruption of water and electricity supply. Sawan stressed that a solution is possible and the party presented a clear solution, but the Government is not in harmony. He added we are responsible only for ministries that we take part in.”

The State Department cable noted that “On their part, the Ambassadors praised the active role of the Party in the political scene and confirmed their standing with the Libyan people and Government despite its weaknesses and they are keen to stabilize the region… At the end of the meeting, Sawan thanked his guests and all stressed the need to communicate. The guests affirmed that they will assist through Libyan legitimate entities as they did during the revolution.”

abhik
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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby abhik » 23 Jun 2014 08:51

^^^
I would guess that's just the ISIS flag repeated. Though they would have to change their name which seems to limit them to just Iraq and the Levant.

Y. Kanan
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Re: West Asia News and Discussions

Postby Y. Kanan » 23 Jun 2014 10:00

TSJones wrote:Still no agreement with Iraq to send in the 300. Obama says Iraq has a limited amount of time to make changes for US help. He says they must help themselves because ultimately there is no military solution w/o political chages being made.


This is probably because the Iraqis have (wisely) decided to tell your govt to go f*ck itself. The nerve of the US to create this crisis of Sunni militancy and then blame Maliki and demand his resignation... incredible.

The Maliki govt will reject US assistance and invite the Iranians instead. And the Iranians will do a far better job of stopping ISIS than whatever half-ass airstrikes the US would have contributed. The Iranians proved really effective in Syria with limited #'s of special forces, advisors and drones.

The Maliki govt (or any Shiite Iraqi govt) would be foolish to ask for American help, because that's always a devils bargain which ends up with America stabbing you in the back. Just ask the Afghans!


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