Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 03 Mar 2012 20:52

A group of independent United Nations human rights experts today urged the Government of Pakistan to take decisive measures to end sectarian violence and protect religious minorities ………………………. :

UN rights experts urge Pakistan to end sectarian violence, protect minorities

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 04 Mar 2012 09:29

In the Islamic Republic of Pakistan even a “liberal” media outlet like the International Herald Tribune affiliate Express Tribune errs on the side of discretion rather than valour and uses the term “worship centre” rather than the term “mosque” to describe a place of worship used by fellow Mohammaddens of the Ahmadi Ahmadiyya sect.

The threat of being declared Wajib ul Qatal is indeed powerful!:

Police bar Ahmadis from entering worship centre

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby Roperia » 05 Mar 2012 11:53

'Forced conversion': Hindu community demands release of 'kidnapped' girl

This opinion piece is a nice summary of state of affairs of each of the minorities in Porkistan Run for your life

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby anupmisra » 06 Mar 2012 18:47

Pakistani Hindus seek safety in India

Hindus make up 2.5 per cent of the 174 million people living in the nuclear-armed Muslim nation. Over 90 per cent live in Sindh, where they are generally wealthy and enterprising, making them easy prey for criminal gangs.
An official at the ministry of external affairs in New Delhi who declined to be named said: “Every month about eight to 10 Hindu families migrate from Pakistan. Most of them are well-off.”
Hindu community groups in Pakistan say more people are leaving because of kidnappings, killings and even forced conversions of girls to Islam.
“Lots of violent incidents are happening daily. Most go unreported, which shows vested interests are trying to force Hindus to leave Pakistan.”
“Hindu migration is a brain-drain for Pakistan as most of them are doctors, engineers, agriculturists, businessmen and intellectuals,” Jafri said.


Two points. One; I didn't realize that even the wealthy Hindus from urban areas are starting to leave. For me, it was always the rural poor Hindus that were leaving in droves. Well, you learn something new every day. Two; I think that the alarming situation in pureland is due to a combination of several factors: greed (money, land), ignorance (we are all arabs and therefore...) and religion (hatred for and intolerance of others - pure and simple). Paki Hindus, who have always lived in fear after 1947, are not an organized force and thus can not actively resist the humilation (forced conversions, looting, kidnapping) that is being subjected on them. Even the so-called Hindu lawmakers in pakiland are stooges. I wonder if there's a Hindu version of SIMI or Indian mujaheddin in pa'astan?

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby BijuShet » 06 Mar 2012 20:54

From "Tribune" (posting in full). It begins with a trickle. Adding one more article to support Anupsaars report.
Insecure minorities: Pakistani Hindus seek safety in India
An Indian foreign ministry official says every month, 8 to 10 families move from Pakistan.
By AFP - Published: March 6, 2012
KARACHI: Preetam Das is a good doctor with a hospital job and a thriving private clinic, yet all he thinks about is leaving Pakistan, terrified about a rise in killings and kidnappings targeting Hindus.

A successful professional, he lives in megacity Karachi with his wife and two children, but comes from Kashmore, a district in the north of Pakistan’s southern province of Sindh.

His family has lived there for centuries and in 1947 when the sub-continent split between India and Pakistan, Das’ grandparents chose to stay with the Muslims.

They fervently believed the promise of Pakistan’s founder Muhammad Ali Jinnah that religious minorities would be protected. Sixty years later, their grandson says life in Kashmore has become unbearable.

“The situation is getting worse every day,” he says.

Two of his uncles have been kidnapped and affluent Hindus are at particular risk from abduction gangs looking for ransom, he says.

Rights activists say the climate is indicative of progressive Islamisation over the last 30 years that has fuelled an increasing lack of tolerance to religious minorities, too often considered second class citizens.

Das says the only thing keeping him in Pakistan is his mother.

“She has flatly refused to migrate, which hinders my plans. I can’t go without her,” he said.

Hindus make up 2.5% of the 174 million people living in Pakistan. Over 90% live in Sindh, where they are generally wealthy and enterprising, making them easy prey for criminal gangs.

An official at the ministry of external affairs in New Delhi who declined to be named said: “Every month about eight to 10 Hindu families migrate from Pakistan. Most of them are well-off.”

He had no comment on whether the number was on the rise, but Hindu community groups in Pakistan say more people are leaving because of kidnappings, killings and even forced conversions of girls to Islam.

“Two of my brothers have migrated to India and an uncle to the UAE,” said Jay Ram, a farmer in Sindh’s northern district of Ghotki. “It’s becoming too difficult to live here. Sindhis are the most tolerant community in the country vis-a-vis religious harmony, but deteriorating law and order is forcing them to move unwillingly,” he added.

Ramesh Kumar Vankwani, chief of the Pakistan Hindu Council and a former lawmaker for Sindh province, said Hindus are picked on by kidnappers and that their daughters are subject to forced conversions to Islam.

“Every now and then we get reports of families migrating. It’s getting worse now. People are extremely harassed and are forced to leave their homeland but our rulers are shamelessly idle,” he told AFP.

Rights activists also say Hindus in Sindh are discriminated against.

“Recently 37 members of five Hindu families migrated to India from Thul town owing to discrimination while three Hindus, including a doctor, were murdered in Shikarpur district,” said Rubab Jafri, who heads Sindh’s Human Rights Forum. “Lots of violent incidents are happening daily. Most go unreported, which shows vested interests are trying to force Hindus to leave Pakistan.”

According to the Pakistan Hindu Seva, a community welfare organisation, at least 10 families have migrated from Sindh every month since 2008, mostly to India, but in the last 10 months, 400 families have left.

Another survey last year by the local Scheduled Caste Rights Movement said more than 80 percent of Hindu families complained that Muslims discriminated against them by using different utensils when serving them at food stalls.

“Hindu migration is a brain-drain for Pakistan as most of them are doctors, engineers, agriculturists, businessmen and intellectuals,” Jafri said.

But the provincial authorities are reluctant to recognise a problem.

“I do admit that law and order in some districts of Sindh is quite bad, but it is bad for everyone and not just my community, the Hindus,” Mukesh Kumar Chawla, provincial minister for excise and taxation, told AFP.

“Hindus do not migrate in flocks as has been claimed and those who migrate are going abroad for a better fortune,” he said.

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby BijuShet » 06 Mar 2012 21:38

From "Tribune" (posting in full). Opinion piece by Pervez Hoodbhoy who laments the partition and its full ill effects visible in TSP today.

Run for your life
In Pakistan one’s religious faith, or lack of one, has become sufficient to warrant execution and murder.
By Pervez Hoodbhoy - Published: March 4, 2012
The writer teaches physics and political science at LUMS

Eighteen bloodied bodies, shot Gestapo-style, lay by the roadside. Men in army uniforms had stopped four buses bound from Rawalpindi to Gilgit, demanding that all 117 persons on board alight.Those with Shia sounding names on their national identification cards were separated out. Minutes later it was all over; the earlier massacres of Hazara Shias in Mastung and Quetta had been repeated.

Having just learned of the fresh killings, I relayed the news on to colleagues and students at the cafeteria table. Some looked glumly at their plates but, a minute or two later, normal cheerful chatter resumed. What to do? With so many killings, taking things too seriously can be bad for one’s mental health.

In Pakistan one’s religious faith, or lack of one, has become sufficient to warrant execution and murder. The killers do their job fearlessly and frequently. The 17th century philosopher and mathematician, Blaise Pascal, once observed that “men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it for religious conviction”.

Equipped with just enough religion to hate those with another faith — but not enough to love their coreligionists — Pakistanis have mostly turned their backs on religious atrocities. Exceptionally grotesque ones, such as when 88 Ahmadis quietly praying in Lahore on a Friday were turned into corpses, have also failed to inspire public reaction. Mass executions do not interest Pakistan’s religious parties, or Imran’s Khan’s PTI. For them, only the killings by American drones matter.

The title of this essay deliberately excludes Hindus, Christians, and Parsis. The reason: these communities were never enthused about India’s partition (even though some individual members pretended to be). Indeed, they were soon slapped with the Objectives Resolution of 1949 which termed them “minorities”, hence freaks and outcasts dispatched to the margins. Some accepted their fate, keeping a low profile. Others altered their names to more Muslim sounding ones. The better off or more able ones emigrated, taking valuable skills along with them.

But with Shias and Ahmadis it was different. Whatever they might feel now, they were enthusiastic about Pakistan.
Mr Jinnah, born a Gujrati Shia Muslim, believed that Muslims and Hindus could never live together peacefully but that Muslims, of course, could. Chaudhry Zafarullah Khan, an Ahmadi leader, was commended by Jinnah for having eloquently argued the Two-Nation theory, and then appointed by him in 1947 as Pakistan’s first foreign minister. Mr Jinnah died early, but Zafarullah Khan lived long enough to see disillusionment. The inevitable had happened: once the partition was complete, the question of which version of Islam was correct became bitterly contentious.

Until recently, Pakistan’s Shias did not have the self-image of a religious minority. They had joined Sunnis in supporting Mr Bhutto’s 1974 decision to declare Ahmadis as non-Muslim. But now they are worried.
The Tribal Areas are convulsed in sectarian warfare: Kurram, Parachinar and Hangu (in the settled districts) are killing grounds for both Sunni and Shia, but with most casualties being Shia. City life has also become increasingly insecure and segregated; Karachi’s Shia neighborhoods are visibly barricaded and fortified.

But while Shias are numerous enough to put up a defence, Ahmadis are not.
Last month, a raging 5,000-strong mob descended upon their sole worship place in Satellite Town, Rawalpindi. Organised by the Jamaat-i-Islami, various leaders from Jamaat-ud-Dawa, Lashkar-e-Taiba and Sipah-e-Sahaba addressed the rally demanding the worship place’s security cameras and protective barricades be removed. The police agreed with the mob’s demands, advising the Ahmadis to cease praying. The worship place has now been closed down.

Forbidden from calling themselves Muslims, Ahmadi children are expelled from school once their religion is discovered. Just a hint may be enough to destroy a career. Knowing this, the school staff at a high school in Mansehra added the word ‘Qadiani’ to the name of an Ahmadi student, Raheel Ahmad, effectively eliminating the boy’s chances of getting a university education. The same school also held an anti-Ahmadi programme, distributing prizes to winners.

The latest outrage is that new ID cards, issued by the Punjab government, require the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA) to insert a ‘Qadiani’ entry in the online forms. Ahmadis now do not have the option of declaring themselves non-Muslims. Instead the government demands that they open themselves to public persecution, a method that Nazi Germany used against Jews.


Even dead Ahmadis are not spared: news had reached the Khatm-e-Nabuwat that Nadia Hanif, a 17-year old school teacher who had died of illness ten days ago, was actually an Ahmadi but buried in a Muslim graveyard in Chanda Singh village, Kasur. Her grave was promptly dug up, and the body removed for reburial.

Pakistan’s state apparatus, for all its tanks and guns, offers no protection to those deemed as religious minorities. Is it just weakness? Or, perhaps, complicity? While swarms of intelligence agents can be seen in many places, they fail spectacularly to intercept religious terrorists. More ominously, recent months have seen state-sanctioned Difah-e-Pakistan Council (DPC) rallies across the country, drawing many tens of thousands. Prominent self-proclaimed Shia and Ahmadi killers, prance on stage while holding hands in a show of unity.

At the Multan DPC rally on February 17, Khatm-e-Nabuwat leaders bayed for Ahmadi blood while sharing the stage with the famed Malik Ishaq, a self-acclaimed Shia-killer. Newspaper reports say Ishaq was freed last year after frightened judges treated him like a guest in the courtroom, offering him tea and biscuits. One judge attempted to hide his face with his hands. But after Ishaq read out the names of his children, the judge abandoned the trial.

What does the Pakistan Army think it will gain tolerating — or perhaps encouraging — such violent forces once again? Its jawans pay an enormous price in fighting them, and their offshoots, elsewhere in the country. But perhaps the notion that extremists are Pakistan’s ‘strategic assets’ for use in Kashmir and Afghanistan has captured the military’s mind. Or, post-OBL, perhaps a miffed leadership seeks to show anger at the US through such rallies. Whatever the explanation, Pakistan’s minorities face catastrophe.
Published in The Express Tribune, March 5th, 2012.

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby saip » 06 Mar 2012 22:03

Last month, a raging 5,000-strong mob descended upon their sole worship place in Satellite Town, Rawalpindi.


Even he is afraid to call it a mosque. I wonder what would happen to him if he called it moque?

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby Roperia » 08 Mar 2012 21:07

Video of people protesting against Injustice with Hindus in Sindh,Pakistan

I don't understand the first half of the video but from 2:40 he speaks in Hindi. He basically says that his niece was kidnapped and when they went to police they wouldn't make a FIR. Later after protests the police yields but in the court, the judge says that if he gives a decision in favor of Hindus, 1000s of Hindus will be killed on the streets.

Two quick observations -

1. Not only the executive, the Paki Judicial system too is unable to tame the Islamist upswing in Paki stan.

2. The last tolerant region in Pakistan, Sindh too is radicalizing.


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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 14 Mar 2012 07:54

In the Islamic Republic of Pakistan , being Mohammadden in a country that is overwhelmingly Mohammadden is not reason enough to be immune from religious persecution.

Members of the minority Shia Sect of Mohammaddenism are preyed upon by their co-religionists via a demonstration of the IEDology of Pakistan in Kurram:

Suspected sectarian attack kills two in Pakistan

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 16 Mar 2012 09:00

Green on Green sectarian violence returns to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan’s commercial capital of Karachi.

For a country claimed to have been created as a safe haven for the Mohammaddens of the Indian Sub-Continent, the level of violence inflicted upon minority sects of Mohammaddenism for nothing more than practising a different variant of that religion by their co-religionists, is shocking:

Shia killing: Hail of bullets leave Jafaria Alliance leader injured, son dead

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby BijuShet » 16 Mar 2012 20:26

From "Tribune" (posted in full).
Lashkar-e-Islam threatens locals: Your money or your life, demands banned outfit
Eight-year-old killed and five people injure­d in an attack in Peshaw­ar.
By Our Correspondent - Published: March 16, 2012

PESHAWAR: Activists of the Khyber Agency-based militant outfit, Lashker-e-Islam, have demanded payment from the resident of the Acheni Bala union council in exchange for their safety, local villagers told The Express Tribune on Wednesday.

They said that militants of the banned outfit came to their village, a part of Peshawar district, and after a show of muscle in the shape of an armed patrol inside the village they informed the residents that each house-owner must pay Rs5,000, besides a monthly payment of Rs1,000 – if they don’t comply, the militants warned, the residents will have their houses blown up.

“They were well armed and riding bikes. There are at least 500 houses in the locality and the local residents must obey the order to avoid confrontation as we are poor people and cannot afford it,” explained a resident who requested anonymity.

Replying to a question, he said that they had no option but to obey the order as the police too had abandoned them despite the fact that their village, known as Mera Acheni, lies in the settled district of Peshawar.

“Adding further insult to our injuries, after the militants came the activists of the so-called Aman lashkar of the Shalober area of Khyber Agency, who informed us that anyone who pays the amount to the militants will be dealt with harshly,” he added, saying they had been given the option to choose between the two.

People in surrounding villages have been similarly harassed.

Published in The Express Tribune, March 16th, 2012.


From Comments column it is clear that this attrocity is being committed on Hindus
Mirza - 9 hours ago
Reply They call it Jazya, but it is extortion. Nothing to do with any religion. They are a bad name to Pakistan. It is about time the innocent people of Pakistan see their ugly face.

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 16 Mar 2012 21:51

In the Islamic Republic of Pakistan the Mohammadden Sabbath of Friday sees yet another demonstration of the IEDology of Pakistan with members of the minority Shia sect of Mohammaddenism being targeted by their Mohammadden co-religionists of the Sunni sect:

Remote-controlled bomb blast hit passenger bus in Kurram Agency

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 20 Mar 2012 08:44

The discovery of 14 bodies sets of suspicion that the Punjabi dominated security forces of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan are killing off their fellow Mohammadden’s belonging to the minority Pathan / Pashtun ethno-linguistic group.

Editorial in Dawn:

Khyber operation

ALARMING news has been coming out of the ongoing operation in Khyber Agency. Fourteen bodies found on Sunday raised suspicions that men in custody had been killed, a charge denied by security agencies. This followed the discovery of 12 bodies last week ………………………….

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 25 Mar 2012 09:01

Yet more Green on Green violence In the Islamic Republic of Pakistan , a country claimed to have been created as a safe haven for the Mohammaddens of the Indian Sub-Continent.

Mohammaddens of the minority Shia sect at the receiving end in an incident of sectarian targeted killing dished out by their Sunni co-religionists in Karachi:

Senior lawyer, son killed in Malir

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby Supratik » 25 Mar 2012 18:12

Arun Roperia wrote:
2. The last tolerant region in Pakistan, Sindh too is radicalizing.



This may have something to do with demographics as well. Unofficial sources from Sindh suggest that the Hindu population may have significantly increased in the region. This may be a way to ethnic cleanse them from Sindh. We should wait for the
2011 census results to come out.

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby member_19686 » 29 Mar 2012 18:00

Pakistan: Hindu girl tells Supreme Court she would rather die than convert to Islam

Islamabad - "In Pakistan there is justice only for Muslims, justice is denied Hindus. Kill me here, now, in court. But do not send me back to the Darul-Aman [Koranic school] ... kill me". This is the desperate, heartbreaking outburst of Rinkel Kumari, a Hindu girl aged 19, who has entrusted her heartfelt appeal to the judges of the Supreme Court in Islamabad. Her story is similar to that of many other young women and girls belonging to religious minorities - Christians, Hindus, Sikhs, Ahmadis - kidnapped by extremist groups or individuals, most of the time lords or local mafia, which convert them by force and then marry them . And that is what the girl said on 26 March, before the judges of the capital's court.

The drama of Rinkel Kumari, a student of Mirpur Mathelo, a small village in the province of Sindh, began the evening of February 24: A handful of men seized her and delivered her a few hours later into the hands of a wealthy Muslim scholar, the man then called her parents, warning them that their daughter "wants to convert to Islam."

Nand Lal, the girl's father, a teacher of an elementary school, accused Naveed Shah, an influential Muslim, of kidnapping his daughter. The man has the "political cover" provided by Mian Mittho, an elected National Assembly Member, suspected of aiding and abetting.
After identifying the perpetrators of the kidnapping of his daughter, he was forced to leave the area of origin to escape the threats of people affiliated with the local mafia. The father found refuge and welcome in Gurdwara in Lahore, in Punjab province, with the rest of his family.

As often happens in these cases, even the judiciary is complicit: a local judge ordered that the girl should be given to the Muslims, because her conversion is "the result of a spontaneous decision" and also stated the marriage was above board. A claim that was repeated on February 27, at the hearing before the court, after which the girl was "renamed" Faryal Shah.

However, the story of Rinkel is not an isolated case: every month between 25 and 30 young people suffer similar abuses, for a yearly total of about 300 conversions and forced marriages. Hindu girls - but also Christian - who are torn from their family and delivered into the hands of their husbands / torturers.

On March 26, she appeared before the judges of the Supreme Court in Islamabad, while the Hindu community waited with bated breath for the girl's statements in court. To avoid pressure, the presiding judge ordered the courtroom cleared and - later - the dramatic testimony was relayed: in Pakistan, "there is no" justice, "kill me here but do not send me back" to the kidnappers.

Speaking to AsiaNews Fr. Anwar Patras, the Diocese of Rawalpindi, condemned "with force" the kidnapping and forced conversion. "The Hindus in Sindh - adds the priest - live a hard life. The reality is getting harder for them, they are forced to migrate because the state is unable to protect them and their property.

http://www.speroforum.com/a/MBUDRVVHOG5 ... nQ.twitter

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 01 Apr 2012 16:10

In the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, the world’s first “Ideological Muslim State”, "kaafir" "dhimmi’s" can expect no security from the depredations of the momin:

Land mafia knocks over historical Sikh temple in Mardan

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 01 Apr 2012 16:12

Continuing Green on Green intra-Mohammadden violence in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan with members of the minority Shia / Shiite sect of Mohammaddenism at the receiving end of violence meted out by their co-religionists belonging to the majority Sunni sect:

Four Shias, two UN workers killed

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 01 Apr 2012 16:19

The travails of being a “kaafir” “dhimmi” in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan from the perspective of an individual following Christism:

A disappointed Pakistani Christian

Cynthia Roberto

March 30, 2012

Dear Pakistani Muslims,

Pakistan has been hell for my family and I.

Yes, we get Christmas and have a few churches here and there and attend the same schools as the rest of you, but life as Christian minorities has been torture for us.

I had to carpool in a public van to a convent school that had the richest and most influential of Pakistani Muslims in attendance. I shared class rooms with the most spoilt and unforgiving spawn of business tycoons, politicians, smugglers and architects who called me a “karanti”.

A karanti is a derogatory, slang term for dark Christians, because of course being born as a “darkie” in Pakistan automatically makes you ugly and unimportant with horrible marriage prospects – if any at all. They also degraded my father because he could not afford to drive me to school in a tinted, bullet proof Land Cruiser.

My father’s ‘shameful’ salary as an accounts teacher was not substantial enough for us to mingle with the creme de la creme of Defense; a dingy apartment in Nazimabad and a sputtering motor bike was all we could afford.

Many of the Muslim kids refused to share food with me, nor would they take a bite or sip from anything I may have consumed. I have had girls tell me point blank that their parents have instructed them never to sit and eat with people of other faiths because it’s haraam (forbidden). I will tell you what’s haraam; teaching your children to hate instead of love…that’s what’s haraam. ……………………………

Express Tribune

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby Yogi_G » 01 Apr 2012 20:48

Surasena wrote:
Pakistan: Hindu girl tells Supreme Court she would rather die than convert to Islam

Islamabad - "In Pakistan there is justice only for Muslims, justice is denied Hindus. Kill me here, now, in court. But do not send me back to the Darul-Aman [Koranic school] ... kill me". This is the desperate, heartbreaking outburst of Rinkel Kumari, a Hindu girl aged 19, who has entrusted her heartfelt appeal to the judges of the Supreme Court in Islamabad. Her story is similar to that of many other young women and girls belonging to religious minorities - Christians, Hindus, Sikhs, Ahmadis - kidnapped by extremist groups or individuals, most of the time lords or local mafia, which convert them by force and then marry them . And that is what the girl said on 26 March, before the judges of the capital's court.

The drama of Rinkel Kumari, a student of Mirpur Mathelo, a small village in the province of Sindh, began the evening of February 24: A handful of men seized her and delivered her a few hours later into the hands of a wealthy Muslim scholar, the man then called her parents, warning them that their daughter "wants to convert to Islam."

Nand Lal, the girl's father, a teacher of an elementary school, accused Naveed Shah, an influential Muslim, of kidnapping his daughter. The man has the "political cover" provided by Mian Mittho, an elected National Assembly Member, suspected of aiding and abetting.
After identifying the perpetrators of the kidnapping of his daughter, he was forced to leave the area of origin to escape the threats of people affiliated with the local mafia. The father found refuge and welcome in Gurdwara in Lahore, in Punjab province, with the rest of his family.

As often happens in these cases, even the judiciary is complicit: a local judge ordered that the girl should be given to the Muslims, because her conversion is "the result of a spontaneous decision" and also stated the marriage was above board. A claim that was repeated on February 27, at the hearing before the court, after which the girl was "renamed" Faryal Shah.

However, the story of Rinkel is not an isolated case: every month between 25 and 30 young people suffer similar abuses, for a yearly total of about 300 conversions and forced marriages. Hindu girls - but also Christian - who are torn from their family and delivered into the hands of their husbands / torturers.

On March 26, she appeared before the judges of the Supreme Court in Islamabad, while the Hindu community waited with bated breath for the girl's statements in court. To avoid pressure, the presiding judge ordered the courtroom cleared and - later - the dramatic testimony was relayed: in Pakistan, "there is no" justice, "kill me here but do not send me back" to the kidnappers.

Speaking to AsiaNews Fr. Anwar Patras, the Diocese of Rawalpindi, condemned "with force" the kidnapping and forced conversion. "The Hindus in Sindh - adds the priest - live a hard life. The reality is getting harder for them, they are forced to migrate because the state is unable to protect them and their property.

http://www.speroforum.com/a/MBUDRVVHOG5 ... nQ.twitter


So the old tradition of Sikhs protecting continues in this case. And see what the Congi govt did to our Sikh brothers in '84 bcoz of the action of some ISI backed Paki sikhs?

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 02 Apr 2012 08:55

In the Islamic Republic of Pakistan belonging to the majority Mohammadden religion does not grant immunity from being persecuted on religious grounds by co-religionists:

In police custody: Ahmadi schoolteacher ‘tortured to death’

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby Sudip » 02 Apr 2012 11:25


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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby Lilo » 04 Apr 2012 00:40

arun wrote:In the Islamic Republic of Pakistan belonging to the majority Mohammadden religion does not grant immunity from being persecuted on religious grounds by co-religionists:

In police custody: Ahmadi schoolteacher ‘tortured to death’

http://www.humanrights.asia/news/urgent ... C-057-2012

Name of victim: Mr Abdul Qudoos Ahmad, a school teacher, resident of Chenab Nagar (Rabwah), Punjab province
Names of alleged perpetrators:
1. Mr. Sujhat Ali, Sub Inspector of Police
2. Mr. Manazar Ali, Sub Inspector of Police
3. Mr. Khadim Hussain, Station House Officer (SHO)


High probability that the perpetrators were Shia.

A case of less impure halaling the "most impure" for grace and protection from the purest ?

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 04 Apr 2012 21:09

^^^ You are right, the names of the perpetrators suggest Mohammaddens of the Shia sect.

Meanwhile if it was "a case of less impure halaling the "most impure" for grace and protection from the purest", then it did not work as there is yet more Green on Green religion fuelled intra-Mohammadden violence in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan with Mohammaddens of the minority Shia sect yet again being exterminated by their co-religionists of the majority Sunni sect .

It appears that even in the Gilgit-Baltistan area of Pakistan occupied Jammu & Kashmir where Mohammaddens of the Shia sect enjoy a localised majority, there is no safe haven for Shia’s in a country supposedly created as a safe haven for the Mohammaddens of the Indian Sub-Continent:

Shoot-on-sight orders in Gilgit

By: Agencies | April 04, 2012 | …………………..

In Bonar Das area of Chilas, a Sunni-dominated town about 100 kilometres south of Gilgit, a mob blocked the main Karakoram Highway and killed ten Shias, local police official Alam Jan said.

“The mob took out ten men from buses and shot them dead,” an official said. ..................

The Nation

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 04 Apr 2012 21:23

In Karachi Mohammaddens of the minority Shia sect are once again reminded that the Islamic Republic of Pakistan has not turned out to be the claimed safe haven for the Mohammaddens of the Indian Sub-Continent as they are exterminated by their co-religionists of the Sunni sect:

Three shot dead in `sectarian` attacks

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 04 Apr 2012 22:14

Women belonging to the minority Shia sect of Mohammaddenism protest the persecution meted out by their Sunni co-religionists in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan:

Pakistan's Hazara Women Fight Killings With Bangles

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby member_19686 » 06 Apr 2012 19:26

Pak Hindus protest occupation of temple
PTI | Apr 2, 2012, 05.12AM IST

ISLAMABAD: The minority Hindu community in Pakistan has protested the occupation of a temple in Punjab province, prompting the authorities on Sunday to take steps to "resolve" the sensitive issue.

More than 30 members of the Hindu community from Zafarwal sub-district participated in the protest against the occupation of the temple.
Paul Bhatti, minister-in-charge of national harmony, expressed concern at a protest by Hindus in front of the National Press Club for repossession of the temple at Zafarwal in Narowal district.

He directed concerned authorities to take up the matter and "resolve it at the earliest". "The government is committed to safeguard places of worship of minorities in the country and all possible steps are being taken for care and maintenance of these places...No one would be allowed to occupy the worship places of the minorities," Bhatti said in a statement.

Bhatti, who is a Christian, said, "We should learn to respect faiths and worship places of each other and demonstrate tolerance to bring peace in the country, aimed at promoting interfaith harmony as all the religions are an integral part of society."

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/worl ... 499284.cms

Hindu doctors killings in Pakistan highlight sectarian tension
Farah Hyder | 4 April 2012

KARACHI: The murder of four Hindu doctors in Pakistan’s southern Sindh province has again put the issue of religious tension at the forefront of politics and discussion in the country.

Sheikh Omar Kemvani in Karachi, who runs a large mosque on the city’s outskirts, is one of the few who acknowledge there is a problem in Pakistan.

“We always try to hide the problems, saying this is just one incident or whatnot, but how many one time incidences does it take to make it a real problem facing our country?” he told Bikyamasr.com.

The doctors were gunned down on Monday at their clinic in Chak town. Ramesh Kumar, a former member of provincial assembly and chief patron of Pakistan Hindu Council confirmed that doctors Ashok, Naresh, Ajeet and Satia Paul were killed by armed assailants while working in their clinic.

“This is not the first time such an incident has taken place where members of our community have been targeted. What is of concern is that the law enforcement agencies tend to support the criminals involved in such acts,” Dr Kumar told PTI.

“There is a strong population of around 50,000 Hindus in Chak. Government must take notice of it and provide protection to the minorities.”

Police said they had arrested two of the people involved in the killings and were searching for the other culprits.

A police official confirmed that the killings could have been the result of a dispute between some Hindus and the local Bhaya Baradari that took place two weeks back over a Hindu girl.

But for many, including Pakistani Hindu Rajeev, it matters not.

“Let us not look for simple answers. The reality is that many Hindus hate Muslims and many Muslims hate Hindus,” he began.

“If we cannot have some sort of dialogue between the two communities nothing will get better.”

The killings also come on the heals of the government issuing a report saying that hundreds of Pakistani Hindu girls had been forced to convert to Islam in recent months, again sparking fears that the religious tension could spill over into increase street battles and violence.

http://bikyamasr.com/64965/hindu-doctor ... n-tension/

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 10 Apr 2012 07:36

X Posted.

Roperia wrote:Green on green in Terrorist Islamic Republic of Pakistan.

Gunmen kill four Shias and injure three others in Quetta


The death toll in this particular round of Green on Green intra-Mohammadden violence in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan has reached 6.

Being a Mohammadden of a minority sect certainly grants no immunity from religious inspired violence by co-religionists in a country claimed to have been created as a safe haven for the Mohammaddens of the Indian sub-continent! :

Raisani sacks seven officials over killing of six Shias

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 10 Apr 2012 07:54

The horror of being a Dhimmi Kaafir in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan:

Conspiracy theory: Maharaj kidnapped two days before Hinglaj pilgrimage

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 14 Apr 2012 19:38

Intra Mohammadden sectarian violence in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan sees 3 members of the minority Shia sect of Mohammaddenism killed:

Three Hazara men shot dead

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 14 Apr 2012 19:42

Intra Mohammadden sectarian violence in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan sees 8 members of the minority Shia Mohammadden sect killed:

Eight Shia Muslims gunned down in Quetta

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 17 Apr 2012 20:17

Green on Green intra-Mohammadden violence continues.

Sunni Mohammadden outfit Lashkar-e-Jhangvi takes credit for 2 separate attacks on their co-religionists of the minority Shia sect.:

Sectarian violence: No let-up for Hazaras as one more killed in Quetta

Despite being a country self claimed to have being formed as a safe haven for the Mohammaddens of the Indian sub-continent, an Islamic Republic and Ideological Muslim State ; is the ability to ignore the slaughter of Mohammaddens for being Mohammaddens in their own country and concern themselves with difficulties of Mohammaddens elsewhere in the world like in Bosnia, Palestine and Kashmir a manifestation of the “Big Heartedness” that Pakistani’s ascribe to themselves?

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby anupmisra » 17 Apr 2012 22:52

Social terrorism: religious vendetta against Ahmadis

Religious persecution of people from Ahmadiyya community is not a new development in Pakistan.
The University of Sargodha, which is in close proximity to Rabwah, is one of a very few universities which houses and educates students from Ahmadiyya community.
“I received a text message from my best friend, a week back, which said we should stop being friends because you are an Ahmadi and my allegiance with you is not considered appropriate within the parameters of my religion,” said a student of University of Sargodha.
Brochures and booklets, entailing details of how Ahmadis should be prosecuted, are also being circulated amongst the students.
“Nobody sits with us. Nobody is willing to talk to us. Most importantly, people enter the lecture session and use abusive language against our religious clerics which is why we have stopped attending classes”
“We miss lectures and when we go back, asking for notes and presentation slides, nobody provides us with the material.”
“I do not feel safe living in the dorm anymore so I now travel from Rabwah to Sargodha every day.
“Ahmadis call themselves Muslims and that is unacceptable for us.”
“They think they are better off than us religiously and they preach other students about their religion. We will not have them preach their religion to Muslim students”

Nobody wants to date us or willing to ask us out to the prom in front of others. I mean why pay for the cow when you get the milk....


No, wait! Scratch the last one. That's part of another paki story.

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby Prem » 17 Apr 2012 23:04

Ahmadis were one of the proud "foundlers" of Djinna's Pakistan. Now they are facing excited Pakistan hell bent to destroy and remove Ahmadis from the scene . These pimps have now no utility for them. Poaqs were trying to claim Gurdaspur using the Ahmadi excuse and these traitors jumped right into the lap of Djinnities.

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby Charlie » 17 Apr 2012 23:56

Paki expression of love towards Hindus.

Image

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 18 Apr 2012 07:34

Green on Green Intra-Mohammadden sectarian violence in Karachi. A Mohammadden of the minority Shia sect is killed by his co-religionists:

Educationist killed in sectarian violence

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby RajeshA » 19 Apr 2012 02:50

Published on Apr 18, 2012

Pakistani children face high rates of incest, receive little support from family, state: Public Radio International
In Pakistan, almost one-third of both girls and boys suffer some sort of sexual abuse. Often it comes at the hands of their own family members -- and they seem to have nowhere to turn for help. So they suffer in silence, in the shadows, often for years.

With Video. Visit the Link

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby Aditya_V » 19 Apr 2012 12:40

Paki SC justice, in the name of freedom for H&D sends the 3 girls with thier abductors.

Hindu girls pick Muslim hubbies in Pak court

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Re: Oppression of minorities in Pakistan

Postby arun » 20 Apr 2012 22:18

Pakistani journalist Mustafa Qadri writing for the Guardian’s Comment Is Free column:

Pakistan is in denial over spreading sectarian violence


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