Managing Chinese Threat

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby vijaykarthik » 05 Jun 2014 09:24


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby vijaykarthik » 06 Jun 2014 11:20

China underreporting defense budget by 20%?

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China is modernising its air force on an “unprecedented” scale and is “rapidly closing the gap with Western air forces”, the Pentagon said on Thursday in its annual report on the capabilities of the Chinese military.

The improvements in the Chinese air force were apparent not only in its aircraft, but also in its use of jamming communications and electronic warfare, said the report. China also appeared to be operating a drone for reconnaissance at sea.

The Pentagon said that China’s headline defence budget of $119.5bn was understated by about 20 per cent, with the real figure for spending on the military closer to $145bn.

The report is an annual publication by the Pentagon which is mandated by Congress. However, it comes at a time of increasing military tensions between China and the US and its allies in Asia.

US and Chinese officials sparred verbally at a major regional security conference at the weekend, with Chuck Hagel, US defence secretary, accusing China of using coercive tactics in its maritime disputes while Wang Guanzhong, deputy chief of the Chinese general staff, said that Mr Hagel’s comments were “full of hegemony”.

China’s dispute with Vietnam in the South China Sea has escalated in recent weeks after China started drilling for oil in an area claimed by both countries while Chinese and Japanese fighter jets twice came dangerously close to each other in the East China Sea.

According to the Pentagon report, China conducted its “largest open sea exercise to date” last September when its three navy fleets took part in drills in the South China Sea – one of the growing number of signs that China’s military focus is shifting beyond its traditional emphasis on Taiwan.

The section on the air force provided the most new detail. The Pentagon said that within a few years, the air force would use largely fourth-generation fighter aircraft. The report also claims that China is trying to buy Su-35 aircraft from Russia which has a sophisticated radar system and which would allow it to undertake longer patrols in the East China and South China Seas.

The Pentagon said that it was “probable” that China used a drone for a reconnaissance mission in the East China Sea in 2013 and it had revealed details of four different drones under development. It cited another Pentagon report that claimed the China drones programme enjoyed “unlimited resources” and “might allow China to match or even outpace US spending on unmanned systems in the future”.

While the US Justice department in May filed charges against five Chinese military officers for allegedly stealing trade secrets of US private companies, the latest Pentagon report did not provide any new details on Chinese cyber activities.


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 06 Jun 2014 13:19

From NightWatch for the night of June 5, 2014
China-Xinjiang: Update. Chinese media reported that local courts in six cities or prefectures in western China sentenced 81 people for terrorism-related acts in 23 cases. Twelve people were sentenced to death, but three received a two-year reprieve.

The crimes included organizing, leading or participating in terrorist organizations; murder; illegal manufacture or storage of explosives; and making and distributing audio and video tapes on terrorism, inciting hatred and teaching criminal behavior.

Comment: This indicates the crackdown continues. The harsh punishments are intended to serve as a lesson and a deterrent.

China-Philippines: The Philippine government told the press that it has confirmed that China is engaged in land reclamation operations on 2 more reefs in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea.

The 2 reefs -Gavin Reef and Cuateron Reef -- are close to Johnson South Reef, where the Philippines reported Chinese reclamation activity in May.

A Philippine military spokesman said China already has erected structures on the 2 reefs.

Comment: The Chinese appear to be making a string of manned, if not fortified, islets to back up their claims to sovereignty with physical presence. When they are finished, the reefs will have been re-engineered to Chinese requirements.


Possession is three-fourths of law.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 07 Jun 2014 06:11

China expanding operational deployment in Indian Ocean: Pentagon - Rajat Pandit, ToI
China is steadily spreading its wings in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR) with its rapidly-growing Navy being equipped with advanced nuclear submarines, destroyers and frigates as well as training for long-range deployments.

This is the assessment of Pentagon
, in its latest report submitted to the US Congress, on China's expanding military might that ranges from long-range missiles, armed drones and stealth fighters to potent nuclear, space and cyber warfare capabilities.

While a "neutral" India does not want to be dragged into the ongoing geopolitical jostling between the US and China, especially in the new 'Great Game' unfolding in the crucial Asia-Pacific region, it cannot afford to ignore the warnings about its own strategic backyard of IOR.

The Pentagon report notes the People's Liberation Army Navy "continues to expand its operational and deployment areas further into the Pacific and Indian Oceans" but is somewhat hemmed in as of now by its limited logistical and intelligence support, especially in the IOR.

"China desires to expand its access to logistics in IOR and will likely establish several access points in this area in the next 10 years. These arrangements will take the form of agreements for refueling, replenishment, crew rest and low-level maintenance," it says.

India has tried to belatedly counter China's moves to assiduously forge maritime links with eastern Africa, Seychelles, Mauritius, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar and Cambodia, among others, over the last decade.

India realizes China is mainly trying to ensure protection of its sea lanes for critical energy needs, but it cannot allow the so-called Chinese "string of pearls" to choke it by strategic encirclement, say officials here [New Delhi].

China enjoys huge military superiority along the 4,057-km Line of Actual Control but India still has the upper hand with its blue-water Navy in the IOR. "But while the Eastern Naval Command at Vizag is being strengthened with additional warships, aircraft and drones, the crucially-located Andaman and Nicobar Command also needs immediate attention," said a senior officer.

The Pentagon report, on its part, says, "The PLA Navy's goal over the coming decades is to become a stronger regional force that is able to project power across the greater Asia-Pacific region for long-term, high-intensity operations."

India has reasons to worry. It, for instance, has just one nuclear-powered submarine, leased from Russia without long-range missiles, and 13 ageing diesel-electric submarines. China, in turn, has five nuclear and 51 conventional submarines. It will induct up to five JIN-class SSBNs (nuclear-powered submarines armed with long-range nuclear missiles) with the new 7,400-km range JL-2 missiles before proceeding to its next-generation submarines over the next decade. "This will give PLA Navy its first credible sea-based nuclear deterrent," says the report.

Similarly, after inducting its first aircraft carrier Liaoning in September 2012, China is moving to "build multiple carriers" over the next decade. "The PLA Navy has made long-distance deployments a routine part of its annual training cycle," it says.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby Prem » 08 Jun 2014 01:47

China stands by you in pursuit of dreams: Wang
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/c ... sliderNews

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi arrives in New Delhi on Sunday as the Special Envoy of President, Xi Jinping. Responding exclusively to Ananth Krishnan by e-mail, Mr. Wang said the Chinese leadership was keen to deepen ties with the new government in New Delhi under Prime Minister Narendra Modi. He expressed confidence that both sides could address differences over the boundary dispute. Excerpts.

As a new government takes office in New Delhi, this is the first high-level visit from China. How does China view the future of working with the government under Prime Minister Modi?

I am very honoured to visit India as the special envoy of President Xi Jinping shortly after the new government took office. I was here in this beautiful country many times, but this trip is different. It is a trip to convey messages and to get to know more friends. It is also a trip to cement our existing friendship and explore further cooperation. India was a cradle of splendid ancient civilisation, and I am glad to see this country gaining new vigour and vitality.

Less than two weeks into office, the new Indian government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has already shown to the world its resolve and courage in pushing forward reform and development, and its sincerity and enthusiasm in seeking friendship and cooperation with other countries. The international community, impressed by the great opportunities in India, is full of confidence in the future of the country. My trip brings a most important message to the people of India — China stands by your side throughout your efforts of reform and development, and your pursuit of dreams. China is ready to work with our Indian friends for an even brighter future of our strategic and cooperative partnership.

How does China view the current situation along the boundary?
The boundary question is indeed a difficult one, but with strong will and resolve, we will eventually find a solution. Even if we could not resolve it for the time being, we could at least manage it effectively, not allowing it to affect the normal development of our relations. Thanks to our joint efforts, the border areas between China and India have on the whole enjoyed peace and stability over the past 30 years and more. What has happened proves that as long as we respect and accommodate each other’s concerns, and insist on managing differences through dialogues instead of confrontation, we are surely able to properly handle the boundary question, and to reduce its impact on our bilateral relations to the minimum level. The Border Defence Cooperation Agreement signed last year represents further efforts by the two sides to strengthen communication and properly manage differences on the basis of a series of existing mechanisms related to the boundary question. It will help increase direct engagement and mutual trust between the Chinese and Indian border troops and promote peace and tranquillity in the border areas. It is unavoidable that between neighbours, there might be certain issues left from history or some differences in immediate interests. However, let me emphasise that China and India have much more strategic consensus than differences, and cooperation is our top priority. No country can choose its neighbour, but friendship may be fostered. Certain issues may not be avoided, but innovative answers could be found. One cannot rewrite history, but the future is in our hands.

On the trade front, both sides have been discussing setting up China-dedicated industrial parks in India. What is the current status?
To carry out cooperation on industrial zones is one of the important agreements reached between leaders of the two countries. An important piece of experience we have drawn from China’s sustained and rapid economic growth over the past 30 years and more is the setting up of development zones to attract foreign investment with preferential policies and promote cluster development of industries. China is willing to share its experience and cooperate with India in this regard. At the current stage, competent authorities of the two countries are negotiating on relevant agreements, which are expected to be finalised and signed soon. China has sent a delegation to India to inspect the prospective sites of the zones. To my knowledge, some Chinese businesses are already on the move and have begun construction on the ground. We hope that India will introduce more preferential policies and investment facilitation for Chinese businesses so that we can push for early, substantive outcome of such cooperation and foster signature projects of China-India practical cooperation.

China recently suffered a series of terror attacks. Considering the increasing and common challenges faced by both countries in this regard, do you see any room for India and China to do more on counterterrorism cooperation?

Recently, China was hit by a number of serious violent terrorist attacks. The Indian government publicly stated its position immediately after the attacks, standing together with China and condemning the terrorist attacks. China highly appreciates India’s positionChina and India, both being victims of terrorism, share common interests and face similar challenges in counter-terrorism, and enjoy broad prospects for cooperation in this area. The two sides have already had good cooperation in terrorism-related issues, including policy exchange and joint exercises. Going forward, China stands ready to deepen counter-terrorism cooperation with India to better safeguard the common security interests of the two countries

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby svinayak » 08 Jun 2014 07:04

A Chinese Monroe doctrine?
Beijing’s creation of an air defence zone in East China Sea is like the 1823 US move to place Latin America in its sphere of influence
By Jaswant Singh | Special to Gulf NewsPublished: 20:00 June 7, 2014

http://gulfnews.com/opinions/columnists ... -1.1344146

Another major point of contention is China’s reflexive support for Pakistan’s efforts to destabilise Ladakh and Jammu & Kashmir, buttressed by deepening military cooperation. This aspect of China’s foreign policy is puzzling, not only because it undermines relations with India, but also in view of Chinese fears of Islamist radicalism among the Xinjiang’s Uighurs.
All of this highlights a fundamental flaw in China’s external strategy: its efforts to use its increasingly powerful military to intimidate its neighbours come at the expense of its own long-term security. Indeed, instead of trying to build a mutually beneficial relationship with its largest neighbour, China has sought to encircle India by asserting military control of surrounding territories. This so-called “string of pearls” strategy directly threatens India’s national-security interests, rendering the type of robust bilateral relationship that would benefit both countries next to impossible.

Of course, China claims that its intentions toward India are peaceful. For example, it contends that its efforts to establish bases in the Indian Ocean and bolster its blue-water navy are aimed at safeguarding the Malacca Straits, a maritime trade route that is perceived as a choke point for the Chinese economy. But actions speak louder than words — and the message that China’s behaviour is sending is far from peaceful. Indeed, Chinese leaders seem to be taking advantage of the opening provided by an overstretched US to assert control over a broad expanse of Asia’s oceans. To this end, China has created a vast Air Defence Identification Zone covering most of the East China Sea — including territories claimed and controlled by Japan and South Korea — where it has also declared disputed territories to be part of its own exclusive economic zone. These unilateral moves resemble the announcement by the US in 1823 of what became known as the Monroe Doctrine, which, among other things, placed Latin America within a strictly US sphere of influence.



— Project Syndicate, 2014
Jaswant Singh, a former Indian finance minister, foreign minister and defence minister, is the author of Jinnah: India – Partition – Independence and India At Risk: Mistakes, Misconceptions And Misadventures Of Security Policy.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 08 Jun 2014 12:20

China building-up more land at Spratly Reefs, Manila says - Japan Times
China has been reclaiming more land to bolster its military presence in the disputed Spratly Islands in the South China Sea, where its increasing assertion of its territorial claims has brought it into standoffs with its neighbors, Philippine officials said Thursday.

The Philippines protested in April after discovering that Chinese dredgers had expanded the size of the usable land at Johnson Reef in the Spratlys, which could become the basis for a military outpost or an airstrip far from the Chinese mainland.

President Benigno Aquino III said he was disturbed to see surveillance photos of ships capable of reclaiming land near two other Chinese-occupied reefs in the Spratlys, called Cuarteron and Gaven.

“We are again bothered that there seems to be development in other areas within the disputed seas,” Aquino said at a news conference.

When asked whether reclamation of land was underway in the two reefs, Aquino did not give a clear reply, but two military officials said government surveillance had monitored land reclamation activities in Cuarteron and Gaven.

In the Senkaku Islands on Friday, two Chinese coast guard ships entered Japanese territorial waters, the Japan Coast Guard said. It was the 13th intrusion by Chinese government vessels this year and the first since Sunday.

The two ships crossed into Japanese waters near one of the five islands, Uotsuri, around 10 a.m. A Japanese patrol vessel told them to leave, but they ignored the order.

The Chinese ships left the waters around noon, taking a route past Minamikojima, another islet in the chain.

China, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, Taiwan and Vietnam have overlapping territorial claims in the Spratlys, a group of mostly barren islands, reefs and atolls that are believed to be sitting atop deposits of oil and natural gas. They also straddle some of the world’s busiest sea lanes.

Taiwan, Vietnam and the Philippines occupied separate islands in the archipelago decades ago. China later stepped up efforts to take control of uninhabited submerged reefs by reclaiming land and constructing buildings on them that resembled military outposts.

Southeast Asian countries have failed so far to convince China to negotiate a legally binding code of conduct aimed at discouraging actions that could escalate to fighting in the disputed waters.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby kmkraoind » 08 Jun 2014 12:23

See this video, this show the brazenness of Chinese.

Vietnam boat sinks after collision with Chinese vessel

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 08 Jun 2014 12:27

China's forces grew more sophisticated - Japan Times
China is improving its military doctrine, training, weapons and surveillance to be able to conduct more sophisticated attacks against the United States and other adversaries, including Japan, according to the Pentagon.

After jamming communications and mounting other forms of electronic and cyberwarfare, stealthy Chinese aircraft, drones and missiles could attack U.S. warships, aircraft and supply craft, the Defense Department said last week in its annual report on China.

The report, which is required by Congress, doesn’t suggest that such attacks are likely, only that the Chinese military last year continued to demonstrate new capabilities similar to those the U.S. began embracing at least 20 years ago, with mixed success. The buildup is occurring as China increasingly asserts itself in territorial disputes with its neighbors, including Japan, Washington’s top Asian ally.

“Although the Pentagon was overstating the Chinese military threat to avoid more cuts in its budget, the speed of the People’s Liberation Army’s modernization has indeed exceeded western countries’ expectation,” said Ni Lexiong, director of national defense policy research at Shanghai University of Political Science and Law.

“The gap is between 20 and 30 years,” he said. "At the current pace, China may catch up with the U.S. in 40 years, and may start to get ahead in 60 years,” he said.


China’s military buildup is appropriate and solely for defending its own sovereignty, Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said Friday at a briefing in Beijing. “We hope the U.S. gets rid of its biases, objectively and rationally regards China’s defensive capacity, and stops releasing these reports and makes concrete contribution to China and U.S. military cooperation,” he said.

China views the Pentagon’s annual report as a relic of the Cold War, when the U.S. prepared similar studies on the Soviet military threat, said Song Xiaojun, a Beijing-based military commentator for state-controlled CCTV.

Beijing’s anger is over “the fact that the U.S., whose military expenditure accounts for more than 4 percent of GDP and still runs the world’s biggest defense budget even with the proposed cutbacks, is accusing China of splashing out on the armed forces,” Song said in an interview. “In Beijing’s mind, it’s like you can eat five pieces of bread but not allow me to eat even half a piece.”

The Chinese Navy last year commissioned nine new Jiangdao-class corvettes armed with anti-ship cruise missiles for operations close to shore, “especially in the South China Sea and East China Sea,” the Pentagon said. The Pentagon’s test office and internal U.S. Navy reviews have warned that its new Littoral Combat Ships are vulnerable to such weapons.

The report may provide new fodder for U.S. congressional advocates of more defense spending who argue for improving naval capabilities to blunt Chinese advances through such systems as Boeing Co.’s EA-18G Growler electronic-warfare plane and Raytheon Co.’s new air and missile defense radar and next-generation jammer.

China “now has incredible economic clout and has become adept at applying pressure below the threshold that would trigger a strong military response from the U.S. or its allies,” said John Blaxland, a senior fellow at the Australian National University’s Strategic and Defence Studies Center, based in Canberra. “China may well be critical of this report but they’re probably secretly happy that that’s the perception.”

Last year, the Chinese military “emphasized training under realistic combat scenarios” and the ability to execute long-range mobility operations, such as maritime exercises that involved all three Chinese Navy fleets, the report found.

The report doesn’t add new details to the U.S. contention that China is increasing its cyberattacks on the Pentagon, instead repeating paragraphs it published last year about Beijing’s activities in 2012 in a section entitled “Cyber Activities Directed Against the U.S. Department of Defense.”

Last month, the Justice Department escalated its effort to curb China’s technology thefts from American companies by charging five Chinese military officials with stealing trade secrets, casting the hacker attacks as a direct economic threat.

The Pentagon said China’s most significant military developments last year included air defense upgrades to destroyers and frigates; testing of its Y-20 transport to fly ground forces quickly across great distances; at least eight launches to expand its intelligence and surveillance from space; and a “probable” Chinese drone conducting reconnaissance in the East China Sea.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 08 Jun 2014 12:35

Japan-Australia eye submarine deal and closer military ties - Straits Times
A huge submarine deal is on the table this week when Japan and Australia meet to shore up their military relationship, as the security architecture of the Asia-Pacific shifts to meet the challenge of a rising China.

Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida and Defence Minister Itsunori Onodera will play hosts in Tokyo on Wednesday to Julie Bishop and David Johnston, their respective opposite numbers, for the fifth round of so-called "2+2" talks.

High on the agenda will be discussions on the transfer of Japanese submarine technology to Australia, with Canberra needing to replace its fleet of stealth subs over the coming years at a reported cost of up to US$37 billion (S$46 billion).

This could see Tokyo's technology - or even entire Japanese-built vessels - used in the fleet, in a deal that would yoke the two nations together for several decades, binding their militaries with shared know-how.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby svinayak » 08 Jun 2014 21:13

Image

Image

Chinese Foreign Minister holds talks with Sushma Swaraj

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby abhishek_sharma » 09 Jun 2014 02:27

K. C. Singh ‏@ambkcsingh 10h

Chinese FM here2 assess if Tibetan PM at Modi swearing, ArnchlPrdsh MP as MOS, Frmr army chief as MOS4 NEast are change of style/ substance.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 09 Jun 2014 06:50

China heaps praise on old-friend, Modi - Sachin Parashar, ToI
In its first official engagement with India after the change of guard here, Beijing's statecraft again came to the fore as visiting foreign minister Wang Yi used nothing short of a panegyric to PM Narendra Modi to reach out to the new government.

Wang is in India as a special envoy of President Xi Jinping. In his first meeting with his Indian counterpart Sushma Swaraj, which lasted for three hours, Wang showered encomiums on the NDA government led by Modi, even saying it had injected a "new vitality into an ancient civilization". Modi, Wang said, was an old friend of China.

Outlining ancient links between the two countries, Modi had earlier regaled Chinese Premier Li Keqiang with a reference to the travels of Hiuen Tsang in their telephonic conversation, saying the Chinese scholar had even visited his village Vadnagar during his stay in India in the 7th century. Li was the first foreign leader to call Modi after he assumed office.

Without getting into the specifics, Indian officials said "all perennials'' of China-Indian relations were discussed in a "frank manner" during the meeting. This included the need for resolving the contentious border issue and Beijing's insistence on giving residents of J&K and Arunachal Pradesh stapled Chinese visas, it is learned.

Wang, who promised support for India's economic development, insisted that the dreams of both China and India have commonalities and that Beijing was ready to engage with the new government. Foreign ministry spokesperson Syed Akbaruddin described the talks as "cordial, useful, substantive and productive".

"Even while there was a determination to add new content and substance to the relationship, there was an understanding that respect for the sensitivities and aspirations of each other was essential for expansion of bilateral relations,'' said the spokesperson, as he summed up the mood by referring to the Chinese proverb that a 1000-mile journey begins with a single step. "That step has been taken with this engagement,'' he added.

The two sides also discussed economic issues in detail, including specific projects and the rising trade deficit between the two countries. Swaraj spoke about the need for more Chinese investments into India and also the possibility of setting up industrial parks in India. Wang responded by saying that China will support expansion of economic cooperation with India.

Wang will call on PM Modi, and also President Pranab Mukherjee, on Monday. In his interaction with Swaraj, joint secretary (East Asia) Gautam Bambawale said, Wang thanked India for the position it had taken on recent incidents of terrorism in China. Possible counter-terrorism cooperation was also discussed even though there is already a joint working group to address the issue.

The Wang visit will also pave the way for a slew of engagements between the two countries in the next six months. While Xi is expected to visit India after September, there are at least five other meetings likely to take place between the two countries at the levels of President, PM, vice-president and foreign minister.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 09 Jun 2014 07:34

Wang Yi Visit to Set Tone for Modi-Xi Meet - Suhasini Haider, The Hindu
The pace of India-China engagement led Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi to compliment the new government, saying it “had injected new vitality into an ancient civilization.”

Officials said on Sunday that Mr. Wang's trip was essentially an ice-breaker for the two countries, and contentious issues, including Tibet, hydel projects on the Brahmaputra, conflicts over the LAC are not on the agenda. It is considered significant, however, that the new government included the PM of the ‘Tibetan-Govt in exile’ Lobsang Sangay at Prime Minister Modi's swearing-in ceremony in May. In Delhi on Sunday, Tibetan groups held protests against Mr. Wang’s visit.

China is keen to have President Mukherjee attend a special commemoration of 60 years of the Panchsheel Treaty in Beijing on June 28. {China involves India in the useless Panchsheel while in the more substantive SCO, we are kept out. China knows that for long we have been more concerned about form than content.}

Mr Modi will also meet Mr. Wang on Monday, and set the course ahead of his trip to the BRICS summit in Brazil in July, where he will meet President Xi.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby vijaykarthik » 09 Jun 2014 08:50

Vietnamese ships have rammed into us atleast '1000 times'

WOW. Are the Chinese for REAL?

(Reuters) - China has accused Vietnam of ramming its ships more than 1,000 times in a disputed part of the South China Sea and said while it wants good relations with its southern neighbor, it would not abandon principles to achieve that.

China claims most of the South China Sea and has over the past couple of years been taking various steps to assert its claim, raising tension in particular with Vietnam and the Philippines.

A Vietnamese fishing boat sank on May 26 during a confrontation not far from where China has towed an oil rig, accompanied by a cordon of Chinese vessels, 240 km (150 miles) off Vietnam.

The two sides have been trading accusations over the incident and last week, Vietnam state television broadcast video showed a large Chinese vessel steaming after two smaller Vietnamese fishing boats, then colliding with a Vietnamese fishing boat which then capsized.

The dispute is the most serious deterioration of relations between the Communist states and traditional rivals since a brief war in 1979 following Vietnam's invasion of Cambodia.

Shortly after China brought its oil rig into the area, Vietnam sent a large number of vessels, frogmen, and dropped numerous obstacles, including fishing nets, into the sea, China's foreign ministry said on Sunday.

"As of 5 p.m. on 7 June, there were as many as 63 Vietnamese vessels in the area at the peak, attempting to break through China's cordon and ramming the Chinese government ships for a total of 1,416 times," the ministry said in a statement.

"In the face of Vietnam's provocative actions on the sea, China exercised great restraint and took necessary preventive measures," the ministry said, adding that China sent ships to the area to ensure the safety of its operations.

China has communicated with Vietnam more than 30 times at various levels, asking it to "stop its illegal disruption", the ministry said.

"China wants good relations with Vietnam, but there are principles that China cannot abandon," it said. "The channel of communication between China and Vietnam is open."

Scores of Vietnamese and Chinese ships, including coastguard vessels, have squared off around the rig despite a series of collisions after the platform was towed to the area in early May. Until the May 26 incident, no ship had sunk.

The Haiyang Shiyou 981 rig is drilling between the Paracel islands occupied by China and the Vietnamese coast. Vietnam has said the rig is in its 200-nautical mile exclusive economic zone and on its continental shelf. China says it is operating within its waters.

The rig's deployment also set off anti-Chinese riots in Vietnam last month in which at least four people were killed.

China claims about 90 percent of the South China Sea, displaying its reach on official maps with a so-called nine-dash line that stretches deep into the maritime heart of Southeast Asia. The Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan also have claims to parts of the potentially energy-rich waters.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 09 Jun 2014 10:47

vijaykarthik wrote:Vietnamese ships have rammed into us atleast '1000 times'
WOW. Are the Chinese for REAL?

Yes, they are for real because they believe in lying, lying repeatedly, lying always and standing firm on their lies.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 09 Jun 2014 14:28

Japan & US to help ASEAN boost anti-cybercrime skills - Japan Times
Japan and the United States plan to boost the technical abilities of the 10 members of ASEAN to investigate cybercrimes, according to government sources.

At a time when China’s military is suspected of having launched massive cyberattacks, notably against the U.S., Tokyo and Washington are eager to show their cooperation with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to counter such moves, the sources said Saturday in Tokyo.

To that end, Japan will provide $150,000 and the United States $250,000 to the United Nations to facilitate the dispatch of anti-cybercrime experts by the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime to ASEAN members, the sources said.


Providing technical guidance to the regional bloc to fight cybercrimes is vital because “China is suspected of conducting cyberattacks against Japan, the United States and others through servers in the Southeast Asian region,” one of the sources said.

Tokyo and Washington have decided to involve the U.N. agency because it has been providing technical assistance to countries to help improve their abilities to combat crimes including cybercrime, the sources said.

Working-level talks in May between Tokyo and Washington resulted in an accord to train investigators in ASEAN, following up on a bilateral statement in April saying Japan and the United States would coordinate closely to help the regional bloc address cybercrime.

By spring next year they plan to finish the training, which includes sharing with ASEAN officials how to analyze information on networks and maintaining and gathering evidence, the sources said.

Japan and the United States will discuss soon with the U.N. entity the size of the teams of experts and the duration of their dispatch to the ASEAN members, the sources said, adding the program may be extended based on the success of the initial plan.

As a next step, Japan and the U.S. are considering setting up a consultative body to bolster information-sharing with ASEAN, the sources said. But many experts believe that it will take a considerable amount of time to raise the capabilities of all ASEAN members to counter cyberattacks.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby vijaykarthik » 09 Jun 2014 14:59

SSridhar wrote:
vijaykarthik wrote:Vietnamese ships have rammed into us atleast '1000 times'
WOW. Are the Chinese for REAL?

Yes, they are for real because they believe in lying, lying repeatedly, lying always and standing firm on their lies.


:) They seem to have picked the ol' Soviet propaganda machine and oiled it well to suit their own needs. Which brings us to the most important question: In terms of efficiency and conviction, which one is better currently - the soviet 'un or the Chinese?

I am reminded of my school days. If people don't listen to your logic, don't fret, just raise your voice and keep at it.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 09 Jun 2014 17:55

China-India are strategic partners, not rivals: Chinese Media - Economic Times

The Chinese are lying, as usual. This 'strategic partnership' is part of the New Panch Sheel that China has been trying to revive and re-formulate according to changes circumstances. The Chinese aim is to economically starangulate India by increasing the trade balance to disproportionate levels, exert an undue influence in Indian economy and wean it away from Japan.

China and India are strategic partners and not rivals and they should put aside differences on thorny issues like border dispute and carry forward with the good momentum in bilateral ties, official Chinese media said today.

Some of the Chinese analysts also called on the two countries to resolve the boundary row taking advantage of the historic opportunity of having strong leaderships at their helm.

"As there is good momentum in the bilateral relations, China and India can put aside their differences on such thorny issues as border disputes to make sure they will not hinder the partnership and friendship between the two countries," state-run Xinhua news agency said today in a commentary on the visit of Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi to New Delhi.

Such an approach will be conducive to the world and regional peace and stability, it said in the commentary titled "China India strategic partners not rivals"

Referring to Premier Li Keqiang's decision to choose India to be the first foreign destination after he took over the post last year as well Wang's current visit to establish contacts with Narendra Modi government, it said both countries witnessed the most frequent high-level exchanges between the two countries in nearly 60 years.

This is because they are clear know that mutual benefits and common development can only be achieved through building a strategic cooperative partnership, instead of rivalry, it said.

Wang's trip, with aims to cement the existing friendship and explore further cooperation between China and India, is expected to pave the way for a visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping to India later this year, it said.

Earlier, state-run Global Times in its report on the Wang's visit to New Delhi said strong leaderships in both countries represented by Modi and Xi created historic opportunity to resolve disputes.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby vijaykarthik » 09 Jun 2014 20:31

^^ I am thinking out aloud a bit here. Has there ever been one single instance of history where 2 strong leaders have actually negotiated and settled stuff diplomatically?

Its a serious food for thought. It seems counter intuitive that a strong leader or rather 2 of them will actually even look at diplomacy when they believe in their own strength etc. I might be wrong but I cant remember a lot of instances [read ANY] till date.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby RKumar » 10 Jun 2014 01:29

^I would say must push for early settlement of border issues as china is increasing their activities on the Indian borders.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby ramana » 10 Jun 2014 01:36

Despite being labelled a threat China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi visits India soon after Modi govt takes charge while strategic ally and partner US expects Modi to visit DC while on his UN visit to New York!

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby TSJones » 10 Jun 2014 02:02

He should rush to India. His nation sells way more to India than they buy. You're important customers to them.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby Philip » 10 Jun 2014 07:54

The Chinese have launched an all-out diplomatic war to woo the new dispensation,especially Mr.Modi from pursuing a robust security strategy against the relentless onslaught by the dragon,into the Indo-China Sea and the IOR,threatening India in its very own backyard.A decade ago when I predicted PLAN subs operating in the IOR,firang analysts hooted with derision.It has all come to pass. Chinese squatting in Burma and attempts to set up logistic facilities in Sri Lanka,the Maldives and as I mentioned a long time ago,huge commercial developments in Mauritius,with thousands of Chinese who will "invade" the little island,vital in the south IOR,are part of the grand masterplan for total dominance of the Indo-Asia-Pacific theatre.The only way that India can stop this is to immediately bolster up our defences all along the maritime region.Our offshore island territories,bases/defence agreements with friendly island and littoral nations,a forward base in Vietnam,and other willing nations.

The Chinese intestinal parasite now justifies the "stapled visas" policy against Indians living in Ar.Pradesh.Why is the new dispensation so hesitant to return the favour,issuing its own stapled visas for all Chines e with Tibetan addresses? The Chinese sh*tworm justified the stapled visas ,saying that it was a "gesture of goodwill" to India since the territory is in dispute! What effing crap! The GOI must immediately issue stapled visas to "all Chinese,as the territory of China itself is in dispute between Taiwan and the PRC.Past time to send SS to taiwan to do the groundwork for establishing diplomatic ties with Taipei.

The GOI must take a firm and principled stand against the Chinese,who are bombing us with visits from their jokers in order to delay further India's security measures that need to be taken to deter a Chinese "take-away" of the entire IOR region.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 10 Jun 2014 08:21

Border Resolution Must be Fair: Wang Yi - Suhasini Haider, The Hindu
Wrapping up his two-day visit as the Chinese President’s special envoy, Foreign Minister Wang Yi called India and China “natural partners” and said both countries “feel each other's development is a foreign policy priority”.

Speaking to the media before returning to Beijing, Mr. Wang, who met with President Pranab Mukherjee, Prime Minister Narendra Modi, National Security Adviser Ajit Kumar Doval as well as his counterpart Sushma Swaraj, said the two sides had reached agreements on many points and had discussed all bilateral issues.

Sources said Mr. Wang had a particularly “constructive and cordial” 45-minute meeting with the Prime Minister, who has travelled to China four times as Gujarat Chief Minister. Mr. Wang carried a message from Chinese President Xi Jinping, whom Mr. Modi will meet next month at the BRICS summit in Brazil. “Under your leadership,” Mr Xi is reported to have conveyed through Mr. Wang, “India will achieve greater development and progress.”

Developing trade and people-to-people ties was the focus in the conversation between Mr. Modi and Mr. Wang as it was during the bilateral talks. “We have reached an agreement on visa facilitation between India and China,” announced Mr. Wang on Monday. He said the two sides had discussed the contentious border issues in detail. He called the joint efforts to maintain peace along the LAC a “hard won achievement”, and expressed the hope that this “question left to us by history” could have a “fair” resolution.

Mr. Wang’s visit and the bonhomie of the visit denotes the NDA government’s desire to balance its relations in the region. Mr. Modi has decided to make his second bilateral foray after Bhutan and Japan, that has very tense relations with China at present. Later this month, India will also host the India-US-Japan trilateral in Delhi that is seen as a counterpoint to the close engagement with Beijing.

During the meeting on Monday, Mr. Modi reportedly referred to the visit of 7th Century traveller Hsuin Tsang’s visit to a Gujarati monastery near Mr. Modi’s hometown near Mehsana, saying, “India and China share strong civilisational contacts and should build on them to enhance understanding of each other.”

That civilisational understanding will be tested against “the question of history” with the border negotiations when the special representatives meet next for the 18th round of talks between India and China. :D


Suhasini Haider seems to have joined The Hindu as its foreign correspondent.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby RoyG » 10 Jun 2014 09:27

The only way we will be able to be at peace is with tibet as a separate country or as a semi-autonomous zone within the union of india.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby vijaykarthik » 10 Jun 2014 10:34

I concur with Philip too. First things first. Ensure full and underground connectivity to the Andaman and Nicobar command. Ensure territorial integrity and fight [both offense and defense capacity in the Andamans]. that command is critical to ensure dominance in the IOR.

Power projection isn't easy and it isn't cheap. Besides, it takes time and we were marginal powers there. If we don't up the game, we are losing the IOR maritime area.
However, all's not LOST. Just a few months back, I read a report from a defense analyst (Bharat Karnad?) who mentioned that Chinese subs were spotted loitering near the IOR region and the Indians quickly got into action and asked them to expose themselves and come up or else... and the Chinese smartly came up avoiding an 'incident'. So, its not completely lost yet. However, time is running out.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby svinayak » 10 Jun 2014 11:03

Chinese Logic

Stapled Visas to People of Arunachal Pradesh a 'Goodwill' Gesture: China
All India | Press Trust of India | Updated: June 09, 2014 23:25 IST

Stapled Visas to People of Arunachal Pradesh a 'Goodwill' Gesture: China
PTI Photo
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi addressing a press conference in New Delhi on Monday.
New Delhi: China has justified as "goodwill" gesture its policy of issuing stapled visas to residents of Arunachal Pradesh, saying such a policy does not "undermine" the positions of both India and China which have disputes over big parts of that area.

"China has resorted to a special arrangement of issuance of stapled visa to address the need for travel of local people. This gesture is out of goodwill and flexibility and if we do not do that we will not be able to address the concern of outbound and overseas travel of these people," Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, on a two-day visit to India, said.

Wang further said "if this is acceptable to Indian side, it could be continued in the future as it does not undermine or compromise our respective positions on the border question and we will be able to address the question of these people".

However, Wang, who was addressing a press conference at the end of his two-day visit to India during which he called on President Pranab Mukherjee and Prime Minister Narendra Modi and held talks with his counterpart Sushma Swaraj, said there can be further discussion on the stapled visa issue during consultation between the consular officials and pitched for a simpler visa regime to enable more people-to-people contact.

China has been issuing stapled visas to residents of Arunachal Pradesh, which India has been protesting, maintaining that it does not recognise such visas.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby vijaykarthik » 10 Jun 2014 12:43

^ ofcourse. stapled visas are indeed for goodwill just like ramming into Vietnamese vessels are to help improve quality of ship design.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 10 Jun 2014 19:09

Wang Yi's trip to India is of great significance: China - PTI
Beijing: China today said Foreign Minister Wang Yi's just concluded visit to India is of "great significance" and sent out a message that Chinese leaders pay high attention to bilateral ties and their mutual interests far outweigh disputes.

"From this visit, we know that Sino-India relation is now in a new age of gearing up," Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying told a media briefing here

"I believe that Foreign Minister's visit sent the following messages, that is, Chinese leaders pay attention to growing relations with India, common interests between the two countries far outweigh disputes.

"...we are natural partners rather than rivals and the Chinese and Indian dream integrate with each other, so we should build closer development partnership with each other," she said.

"Indian leaders also responded positively," Hua said, pointing to the observations by Mukherjee that the two countries which had a combined population of 2.6 billion people make the most magnificence map in the human civilisation.

Modi said that Wang brought important messages from President Xi Jinping to chart a new course for the development of India and the two sides should maintain development, cement practical cooperation, people-to-people exchanges, so as to maintain peace and tr ..

"Therefore, we believe that Foreign Minister Wang Yi's visit to India at this time is of great significance. We expect to make joint efforts with India to bring our amicable and friendly relations with India to a new high," she said.

"We believe that the development of Sino-India relations are not only in the benefits of the two people but will also help peace, stability and development of the region and beyond," she said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby rsingh » 10 Jun 2014 19:33

Philip wrote:The Chinese have launched an all-out diplomatic war to woo the new dispensation,especially Mr.Modi from pursuing a robust security strategy against the relentless onslaught by the dragon,into the Indo-China Sea and the IOR,threatening India in its very own backyard.A decade ago when I predicted PLAN subs operating in the IOR,firang analysts hooted with derision.It has all come to pass. Chinese squatting in Burma and attempts to set up logistic facilities in Sri Lanka,the Maldives and as I mentioned a long time ago,huge commercial developments in Mauritius,with thousands of Chinese who will "invade" the little island,vital in the south IOR,are part of the grand masterplan for total dominance of the Indo-Asia-Pacific theatre.The only way that India can stop this is to immediately bolster up our defences all along the maritime region.Our offshore island territories,bases/defence agreements with friendly island and littoral nations,a forward base in Vietnam,and other willing nations.

The Chinese intestinal parasite now justifies the "stapled visas" policy against Indians living in Ar.Pradesh.Why is the new dispensation so hesitant to return the favour,issuing its own stapled visas for all Chines e with Tibetan addresses? The Chinese sh*tworm justified the stapled visas ,saying that it was a "gesture of goodwill" to India since the territory is in dispute! What effing crap! The GOI must immediately issue stapled visas to "all Chinese,as the territory of China itself is in dispute between Taiwan and the PRC.Past time to send SS to taiwan to do the groundwork for establishing diplomatic ties with Taipei.

The GOI must take a firm and principled stand against the Chinese,who are bombing us with visits from their jokers in order to delay further India's security measures that need to be taken to deter a Chinese "take-away" of the entire IOR region.


China says that people living in AP do not need visa as they are citizen of China ( chinese drama). We can not do so with Tibetians because we have recognized Tibet as Chinese territory. Secondly if we allow them to enter India (being Tibetians) we will be flooded by Han Chinese and you will have China town in every village.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby RoyG » 10 Jun 2014 21:57

Ajatshatru wrote:"India to fortify defence along China border, 54 new ITBP posts being planned in Arunachal":

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 353494.cms


Why do we still persist with the ITBP to counter the PLA?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 11 Jun 2014 06:34

In secret Delhi meet, India tutored China on land reform laws - Pradeep Thakur, ToI
India could be playing a vital role in China's transition to private ownership of land. In a meeting that was kept secret, a high-level Chinese delegation led by its vice-minister for legislative affairs of the state council is understood to have met top officials of India's legislative department here to understand and frame a robust law for China, giving 'individual rights on land to people in both rural and urban areas'.

"Land dispute settlement, compensation, legal and policy protection on house ownership and inheritance were some of the issues discussed," sources said.

On May 16, the day results of India's general elections announced, Chinese vice minister Xia Yong, a special representative of President Xi Jinping, met a team of the legislative department officials in the Union law ministry. Xia was briefed by additional secretary in the department, Sanjay Singh, an expert on framing land laws and someone who was instrumental in the drafting of the Land Acquisition Bill.

The six-member Chinese delegation was keen to learn how land ownership rights are regulated in India, including compensation paid on land acquisition, and the Indian government's rehabilitation and resettlement policies.

In China, at present, land is owned by the state. Farmers neither have rights over the land they cultivate, nor can they claim ownership of the homes they live in.

Chinese President Xi Jinping is preparing, according to Economist, a 'profound revolution' that will completely set the stage for the demise of Mao's 'people's communes' and give rights to people to mortgage properties they have been leased out by the state.

The visit of the Chinese delegation to learn from India's experience on land laws, is considered significant in the backdrop of the vision Xi Jinping unveiled at the third plenum last November, where he spoke about "greater land rights for farmers, the reform of the household registration system" as part of his 60-point reform agenda.

Experts consider President Xi's land reform agenda by far the most ambitious of all his plans, stronger than even the Deng Xiaoping-led reform initiatives of the 1978.

"The Chinese team came to discuss legislation related to urbanization and related land systems; the legal framework on agricultural land, quantum of agricultural land, size of farms, number of landless peasants and the legal system of ownership and rights of using such land and legal protection granted to marginalized sections," sources said.

Vice minister Xia was particularly interested to know how we handle our land acquisition problems and how it is regulated through legislation, the source added. The delegation also discussed the special rights given to tribals and in scheduled areas.

The law ministry is believed to have prepared and distributed a comprehensive note to the Chinese delegation on administration of such scheduled and notified areas and protection given to the people under Article 244.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby vijaykarthik » 11 Jun 2014 08:49

though not essentially china related, this is a sure-fire way to manage the Chinese threat.

Lt General Vijay Oberoi (Former VCAS) elaborates on the topic of CDS

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 11 Jun 2014 13:28

China for new security concept to improve ties with India - PTI
Reflecting growing congruence in bilateral ties, China today pitched for promoting a new security concept featuring mutual trust and cooperation to take the Sino-India relationship further.

Chinese Ambassador Wei Wei also said that China and India should work closely to push for a mutually beneficial global economic regime and oppose protectionism of any form.

"We should promote new security concept featuring mutual trust, mutual benefit, equality and cooperation," he said while delivering a lecture at the Institute of Defence and Strategic Affairs.

The comments by Wei Wei came three days after Chinese President Xi Jinping's Special Envoy and Foreign Minister Wang Yi held extensive talks with External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj during which both sides agreed to further boost ties in diverse fields.

With improving relations, the two countries are exploring the possibility of having joint exercises between the air forces and the navy, besides the armies which have held three exercises so far and agreed to hold the fourth one in India this year.

Seeking better economic and trade ties, Wei said both the countries should actively seek "common development" while following the principle of mutual benefit, cooperation and win-win situation.

He said both countries should make efforts to achieve "peaceful co-existence, equal participation and competition on an equal footing".

"We should respect each other's rights to make independent economic decisions, advocate a mutually beneficial global trade and economic regime and oppose protectionism in any forms," he said
.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 11 Jun 2014 17:18

Tensions Mount in political Japan over Abe's security stance - Japan Times
A political showdown is approaching as Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pressures the ruling coalition to agree to overhaul Japan’s long-standing pacifist security stance, possibly as early as Friday.

The ruling Liberal Democratic Party is trying to persuade junior coalition partner New Komeito to agree to Abe’s proposals for a number of new contingency laws, including the reinterpretation of the Constitution’s war-renouncing Article 9 to allow Japan to use the right to collective self-defense.

But some experts have pointed out that the 16 scenarios Abe has cited as reasons for reform are unlikely and many could be dealt with under existing security laws. They allege Abe may be trying to use those scenarios as a pretext to remove key legal restrictions that have limited Japan’s military capability to an exclusively defensive posture since World War II.


“The scenarios are all unrealistic. They could be handled by the Self-Defense Forces and Japan Coast Guard if existing systems are improved,” said Kyoji Yanagisawa, a former Defense Ministry official who served as assistant chief Cabinet secretary in charge of crisis management from 2004 to 2009.

“Exercising the right to collective self-defense in these scenarios would mean Japan is willingly taking part in potential warfare,” he said.

The right to collective self-defense is the right of a country to use military force in the event of an armed attack on an allied country, even if the former is not itself directly under attack.

The right is recognized by international law, based on Article 51 of the United Nations Charter. But Japan’s pacifist Constitution has long been interpreted as prohibiting the nation from using it, since it would mean exceeding the “minimum necessary” self-defense capabilities.

Abe has argued, for example, that Japan should be allowed to defend a U.S. vessel evacuating Japanese nationals from a third country involved in a military situation, perhaps South Korea, even if Japan itself is not under attack.

Yanagisawa has dismissed the argument, saying it is implausible that the U.S. would use military vessels to evacuate civilians when those ships are at risk of being attacked.

And Japan itself would try to evacuate most Japanese nationals in advance if such a situation ever came to pass, Yanagisawa has argued.

Other scenarios Abe cited include aiding U.S. vessels under attack in an area near Japan, shooting down a ballistic missile heading for U.S. territories such as Guam or Hawaii, and defending U.S. vessels engaged in military operations near Japan after the U.S. mainland is attacked with ballistic missiles.

But Yanagisawa argued that Japan can already exercise the right to individual self-defense under these situations because Japan itself would likely also be under attack.

Many experts believe Japan’s anti-ballistic missile defense system, based on Aegis destroyers, is unlikely to be able to intercept multiple ballistic missiles launched simultaneously.

Abe has also argued a Self-Defense Force unit participating in a U.N.-led peacekeeping operation should be allowed to defend Japanese aid workers with force, which Abe says is currently prohibited by the Constitution.


But Tetsu Nakamura, a doctor who has headed aid group Peshawar-kai for more than 30 years, said he would simply terminate all of the group’s activities in Afghanistan should Japan enter a war citing collective-self defense.

“If Japan’s SDF comes to defend (Japanese aid workers), local people would not understand and would turn hostile toward them. That’s what Western countries have done so far. I would just flee in such a situation,” Nakamura said.

NATO troops got involved in Afghanistan by citing the right to collective self-defense. But local people know Japan has engaged only in non-combat operations, which means Japanese aid workers remain relatively safe, Nakamura said.

Kenji Isezaki, a professor of peace and conflict studies at the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, said Abe should not focus solely on protecting Japanese aid workers.

“It is shameful to assume that Japan only needs to protect Japanese NGO members. In a battlefield, any NGO worker of any nationality should be protected,” he said.

He added it is unrealistic for peacekeepers to ask the SDF directly to protect aid workers because they usually report to the U.N. Command, which would then request a nearby military unit engaged in the U.N. mission to provide protection.

Then why is Abe rushing for new contingency laws? Experts say he believes it is indispensable for improving the alliance with the U.S. at a time when the two countries are revising bilateral defense cooperation guidelines for first time in 17 years.

Abe has argued if the SDF fails to respond when it sees U.S. military forces being attacked by a third country, it would draw huge emotional repercussions from the U.S. and could kill the alliance.

Japan should therefore change the constitutional interpretation to allow it to be more proactive and show more of a commitment to the Japan-U.S. alliance, Abe has argued.

As a nationalist, Abe probably has another personal ambition in abandoning Japan’s pacifist posture and becoming more self-reliant as far as security policies are concerned.

He has long argued that the U.S.-led Occupation imposed the war-renouncing Constitution on Japan to deprive it of the military capability necessary for self-defense.

“The initial intention of the Occupation force was to tie Japan hand and foot so that it would never emerge as a great power,” Abe wrote in his book, published in 2006.


He has openly maintained that Japan should drastically revise the postwar Constitution, particularly Article 9, to “break with the postwar regime” imposed by Washington.

At the same time, Abe has consistently argued the maintenance of the Japan-U.S. Alliance is the “best choice” for Japan, given the U.S.’s massive power and global influence.

The Japan-U.S. security treaty obliges the U.S. to defend Japan if it is under attack by a third country. Japan should be allowed to use the right of collective self-defense to defend the U.S. to make the treaty “more bilateral,” Abe’s approach holds.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby kmkraoind » 11 Jun 2014 18:00

Daniel Twining: Is the "Chinese Dream" Asia's nightmare?

The "Kissinger Trap"

Perhaps the pathway to regional stability is what Chinese leaders call "a new type of great power relationship" with America. Don't let those pesky Japanese and Filipinos drag you into war far from home, America's Chinese friends advise. Rather, build a Sino-American condominium that elevates relations between the current and rising superpowers and allows us to respect each other's core interests. In its more extreme form, this suggestion echoes the 15th-century Treaty of Tordesillas between Spain and Portugal, in which the two powers agreed to divide up the New World between them. "We will be the predominant power in the Western Pacific," whisper the Chinese; "everything from Hawaii eastward will remain part of Pax Americana."

A former senior Obama administration official dubs this the "Kissinger trap": believing that a secret U.S.-China deal that subordinates American allies and subsidiary interests can be a foundation for great-power peace. In reality, it is more likely to erode it by edging America out of the world's emerging center of wealth and power. In any event, Asian powers such as India and Japan would not go along with such a scheme; it is "inconceivable" that India would ever subordinate itself to China, says one leading Indian strategist. Indeed, a theme of this year's Shangri-La Dialogue was the utter absence of consent across Asia to hand China a leadership role.

"China only cares about the U.S.," said another senior Asian official in Singapore. Indeed, America remains the pivot around which East Asian security turns -- because most Asian nations still find its leadership more reassuring than threatening. By contrast, China today seems only to offer a "might-makes-right" doctrine articulated thus by its foreign minister at another regional forum in 2010: "China is a big country and other countries are small countries, and that is just a fact." If this is what President Xi Jinping's "Chinese dream" means for Asia, its neighbors will undoubtedly want to stay in America's orbit.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby Suraj » 12 Jun 2014 02:50

Here's what happens when you don't provide a Jolie good answer:
Angelina Jolie Angers China During 'Maleficent' Promotional Tour
While in China, on a promotional tour for Maleficent, Angelina Jolie sparked an international kerfuffle by referring to China and Taiwan as if they were separate countries. The controversial statement came up when Jolie was asked to name her favorite Chinese director; she identified Life of Pi director Ang Lee, who is Taiwanese-American.

“I am not sure if you consider Ang Lee Chinese, he’s Taiwanese, but he does many Chinese-language films with many Chinese artists and actors,” Jolie answered. “And I think his works and the actors in his films are the ones I am most familiar with and very fond of.”

Chinese social media has since reportedly blown up, with comments calling Jolie “traitorous” and a “deranged Taiwan independence supporter.” Some threatened to boycott her for, in the words of one user, “disrespecting Chinese sovereignty.” Meanwhile, Taiwanese internet users are said to be praising the actress, with one calling her a “brave and brilliant woman.”

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby Gus » 12 Jun 2014 03:28

how the hell can jolie be traitorous to china. how can one be a traitor to a foreign country. :-? :lol:



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