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India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

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tandav
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby tandav » 13 Apr 2017 12:47

ramana wrote:Tandav, Can you show a document that prohibits CO2 from naphtha plants usage on food grade applications?


This is hearsay that was told to me by a consultant 10 years ago. Apparently for human consumptive purposes the source of gas/liquids itself must be from edible sources. The example he gave was must be produced by edible sources say calcining Calcium Carbonate Or from a carbohydrate fermentation process and cannot be sourced by burning fuels. I will try to get the correct gas specifications from FSSAI and update.

Link below show possible contaminants from various typical sources of industrial CO2 as assessed from a food safety perspective.
http://www.foodsafetymagazine.com/magazine-archive1/december-2000january-2001/international-society-of-beverage-technologists-carbon-dioxide-guidelines/

Gyan
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Gyan » 13 Apr 2017 16:50

I think that whole of edible oil industry runs on chemical extraction through hexane.

tandav
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby tandav » 14 Apr 2017 01:39

Gyan wrote:I think that whole of edible oil industry runs on chemical extraction through hexane.


it's true but Hexane based solvent extraction is for oil extractons and separations. However Hexane itself is not an ingredient in food and is easily boiled off. AFAIK Hexane BP~45C or lower from the higher BP~180C food oils being extracted.

CO2 with trace gas phase impurities is far more difficult to purify and likely the batch used was potentially not pure.

nvishal
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby nvishal » 01 May 2017 13:51

Expect indian nuclear tests to resume in the coming years.

KL Dubey
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby KL Dubey » 01 May 2017 15:35

tandav wrote:CO2 with trace gas phase impurities is far more difficult to purify and likely the batch used was potentially not pure.


CO2 - in the presence of even small amounts of water vapor - forms carbonic acid (H2CO3), i.e. becomes an acid gas. This could be causing slow corrosion of the Zr/Ni alloy.

Vips
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Vips » 13 May 2017 03:12

Should India Inc. bid for Westinghouse?

George Westinghouse and the company he founded in 1886 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pioneered the commercial production and transmission of a scientific marvel called electricity, which has since powered and revolutionized the modern world. With the dawn of the nuclear age, Westinghouse Electric Company went on to develop pressurized water reactors (PWRs) for marine propulsion of aircraft carriers, submarines and ice-breakers. Based on these military reactors, Westinghouse supplied the world’s first PWRs in 1957 for a nuclear power plant. Since then it has remained one of the most prominent companies in the nuclear industry whose technology formed the basis of nearly half the world’s nuclear units. Until now.

This US nuclear industry giant, which was acquired by Japanese conglomerate Toshiba in 2007, filed for bankruptcy in March this year on account of mismanagement and billions of dollars of cost overruns for the construction of four nuclear reactors in the US states of Georgia and South Carolina. Toshiba, which itself sank into a deeper financial quagmire because of its US subsidiary, is now desperate to sell Westinghouse’s nuclear business.

Within days of the announcement on Westinghouse, which is slated to build six nuclear reactors in India at Kovvada, Andhra Pradesh, several prominent voices called for India not to enter into a contract with the bankrupt company. This conventional wisdom notwithstanding, it is worth exploring whether India might be better off taking a bold step by bidding for Westinghouse instead.

Prima facie there might be very little financial logic for India trying to acquire a bankrupt US company. Yet, the Indian government has a long record of bailing out several loss-making public enterprises, the sum of which is, doubtless, more than any bid it will need to acquire Westinghouse. Of course, the counter-argument would be that India should not be bankrolling loss-making Indian public sector companies in the first place, let alone throwing a lifeline to non-Indian companies. However, some investments inevitably need to transcend short-term financial reasoning to secure long-term strategic and economic gains.

A bid for Westinghouse would inevitably have to be done by an Indian consortium of public and private companies, since neither one is likely to be in a position to raise the necessary funds. This consortium might be able to raise additional funds from Japan and the US as well to make the bid. Such an effort would benefit India Inc. in several strategic ways.

First, it would be an ideal test case for the public-private partnership model promoted by the Narendra Modi government to work at a global scale. Acquiring Westinghouse would not only secure the six reactors that the company plans to build in India but would also make India a major player in the global nuclear market, competing with a state-of-the-art reactor.

While the Westinghouse AP1000 was an experimental reactor, which faced numerous teething troubles, most of these have now been resolved, albeit at a heavy cost. The revolutionary prefabricated plants, coupled with existing orders to build reactors in Bulgaria, China, the UK and the US, would make India part of a global nuclear supply chain. This would also strengthen India’s credentials for membership of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG).

Besides, Westinghouse’s expertise in marine nuclear propulsion systems would be particularly welcome, given India’s ambitious plans for building nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and submarines.

Second, such a bid, which will inevitably save thousands of US jobs (while also generating a significant number in India) is likely to curry favour with the Donald Trump administration. It would build on the decision by Infosys to create 10,000 jobs in the US. Moreover, it is bound to strengthen the India-US nuclear deal and partnership, along with the India-Japan partnership, and might also pave the way for US subsidies for Westinghouse power plants.

Third, and perhaps most significantly, a successful bid will allow New Delhi to steal a strategic march over Beijing. China, which is developing its own reactors based on a copy of the AP1000 has, unsurprisingly, and so far unsuccessfully, made a bid for Westinghouse. This bid, despite the faux bonhomie at the summit between Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jingping, has alarmed top US officials, given China’s well-documented espionage efforts to acquire details of the reactor from Westinghouse. Thus, Washington will block any official bid by Beijing.

Moreover, were India Inc. able to acquire Westinghouse, it would also gain leverage over the US reactors being built in China, which are crucial for the future of China’s own nuclear ambitions. As a corollary, China might feel compelled to acquiesce to India’s membership of the NSG for its own interest.

Of course, there is every chance that the Trump administration might directly intervene to assist Westinghouse or that a bid by India Inc. might be blocked after it is reviewed by the all-powerful committee on financial investment in the US. Nonetheless, declaring its intentions to save Westinghouse and US jobs, and making a sincere effort to rescue both, will be well received in Washington. It will also provide India with several other advantages.

Not making a bid will bring no gain and might even disrupt the India-US nuclear deal if no agreement is reached on the construction of the six reactors by the belaboured company. The Westinghouse woes offer an opportunity for India to grab a place at the high table. Will it be bold enough to seize it?

Neshant
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Neshant » 13 May 2017 13:49

^^ If Japanese could not turn a profit on Westinghouse, how likely is India to do so.

Interesting historical fact -
Nicola Tesla saved Westinghouse from bankruptcy by tearing up his contract to receive royalty payments for his many patents used by that company.

Kashi
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Kashi » 13 May 2017 17:18

I'd rather India go after Toshiba's memory chip unit that's up for sale. It's profitable for one, they hold many patents in cutting edge technologies and would give us leg up on "indigenisation" across civil and military domains.

Supratik
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Supratik » 13 May 2017 23:06

It will be a good buy if properly managed as Indian nuclear power industry is in its infancy and will grow for at least 50 years. So a readymade, large market is there.

arshyam
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby arshyam » 14 May 2017 09:09

^^ Not with all tech restrictions that will continue to stay in place. These companies come with clauses that high tech stays in-house and in-the-home-country. So even if we are the owners, we will need massa's permissions to use the tech we would own. It will only be a waste of money.

We are better off developing our own tech.

Ashokk
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Ashokk » 17 May 2017 04:57

Nuke MoU: Govt makes Russia sweat before PM Modi-Putin meet
India has warned Russia that it will stall cooperation with its foreign partners for development of its civil nuclear programme if it is unable to become a full member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group in the near future.

To make its point, it is threatening to put in cold storage an MoU (memorandum of understanding) with Russia for developing Kudankulam 5 and 6 reactor units.

With Russia working increasingly in tandem with China on global issues, India has often looked at Moscow to persuade Beijing to let go of its opposition to India's membership.

Russia is now worried that India might be delaying the MoU to get Moscow to work more proactively for its NSG membership.

Taken aback by this Indian reluctance to seal the MoU, Russia's deputy PM Dmitry Rogozin took up the issue with PM Narendra Modi in their meeting last week, a top official source confirmed to TOI. Rogozin, however, left without any assurance from India on signing the MoU.

The meeting was held to prepare the groundwork for Modi's summit with President Vladimir Putin early next month. Moscow is worried that without the MoU, there will be no real takeaway from the summit which is barely two weeks away.

India's message, conveyed to Moscow through official channels, is said to have been quite explicit in nature.

It stated that without NSG membership in the next one-two years, India would have no option but to go for an indigenous nuclear energy programme.

TOI was unable to ascertain if a similar "threat" was made to the US and France, two other important partners in nuclear energy, but it's clear that the government sees Russia as the only big power which has enough influence with Beijing to soften its position on the issue of India's NSG membership.

It has been learnt by TOI that despite repeated exhortations for over six months, Russia has been unable to convince India to sign the MoU which was originally meant to have been signed on the sidelines of the Brics summit in Goa last year.

It was then said that it would be signed by the end of 2016 but halfway into 2017, India continues to hold back on it despite issues like pricing and technology having been long settled.

Moscow is concerned that India is not responding to its request for signing the MoU even weeks ahead of the Modi-Putin summit.

It sees nuclear energy cooperation as one of the most significant elements of its bilateral relationship with India.

India has at several levels in the past asked Russia to persuade Beijing, which continues to back a criteria-based, and not a merit-based approach as desired by India, for expansion of the global body which controls nuclear commerce.

While Russia has worked hard to secure support for India's membership, New Delhi clearly believes that it hasn't done enough to convince China which sees Moscow as a key partner in dealing with the emerging international situation.

However, the Russians seem to believe that India has only further complicated its case by inviting Dalai Lama to Arunachal Pradesh and that this will only see China further hardening its position.

Russia's interests now converge sharply with China's as evident also from the way it has endorsed Beijing's ambitious OBOR project. Putin himself attended the OBOR conference this week, which India chose to ignore.

Russia, like several Indian neighbours, maintains that its endorsement of OBOR has nothing to do with the contentious CPEC which raises sovereignty issues for India.

Moscow's strategic embrace of Pakistan, made manifest in its first joint military exercise with the latter last year, has also spooked India.

That India might shun foreign collaboration in nuclear energy is also interesting.

The government only recently reiterated in Parliament that it expects to raise nuclear power generation capacity to 15,000 MW by 2024 from the 4780 MW that it was in 2014.

ramana
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby ramana » 17 May 2017 05:32

Supratik wrote:It will be a good buy if properly managed as Indian nuclear power industry is in its infancy and will grow for at least 50 years. So a readymade, large market is there.



:lol:

Supratik, So many years on the forum and yet you think there is a chance?

SSridhar
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby SSridhar » 17 May 2017 08:18

Nuke MoU: Govt makes Russia sweat before PM Modi-Putin meet - Sachin Parashar, ToI
India has warned Russia that it will stall cooperation with its foreign partners for development of its civil nuclear programme if it is unable to become a full member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group in the near future.

To make its point, it is threatening to put in cold storage an MoU (memorandum of understanding) with Russia for developing Kudankulam 5 and 6 reactor units.

With Russia working increasingly in tandem with China on global issues, India has often looked at Moscow to persuade Beijing to let go of its opposition to India's membership.

Russia is now worried that India might be delaying the MoU to get Moscow to work more proactively for its NSG membership.

Taken aback by this Indian reluctance to seal the MoU, Russia's deputy PM Dmitry Rogozin took up the issue with PM Narendra Modi in their meeting last week, a top official source confirmed to TOI. Rogozin, however, left without any assurance from India on signing the MoU.

The meeting was held to prepare the groundwork for Modi's summit with President Vladimir Putin early next month. Moscow is worried that without the MoU, there will be no real takeaway from the summit which is barely two weeks away.

India's message, conveyed to Moscow through official channels, is said to have been quite explicit in nature.

It stated that without NSG membership in the next one-two years, India would have no option but to go for an indigenous nuclear energy programme.


TOI was unable to ascertain if a similar "threat" was made to the US and France, two other important partners in nuclear energy, but it's clear that the government sees Russia as the only big power which has enough influence with Beijing to soften its position on the issue of India's NSG membership.

It has been learnt by TOI that despite repeated exhortations for over six months, Russia has been unable to convince India to sign the MoU which was originally meant to have been signed on the sidelines of the Brics summit in Goa last year.

It was then said that it would be signed by the end of 2016 but halfway into 2017, India continues to hold back on it despite issues like pricing and technology having been long settled.

Moscow is concerned that India is not responding to its request for signing the MoU even weeks ahead of the Modi-Putin summit.

It sees nuclear energy cooperation as one of the most significant elements of its bilateral relationship with India.

India has at several levels in the past asked Russia to persuade Beijing, which continues to back a criteria-based, and not a merit-based approach as desired by India, for expansion of the global body which controls nuclear commerce.

While Russia has worked hard to secure support for India's membership, New Delhi clearly believes that it hasn't done enough to convince China which sees Moscow as a key partner in dealing with the emerging international situation.

However, the Russians seem to believe that India has only further complicated its case by inviting Dalai Lama to Arunachal Pradesh and that this will only see China further hardening its position.

Russia's interests now converge sharply with China's as evident also from the way it has endorsed Beijing's ambitious OBOR project. Putin himself attended the OBOR conference this week, which India chose to ignore.

Russia, like several Indian neighbours, maintains that its endorsement of OBOR has nothing to do with the contentious CPEC which raises sovereignty issues for India.

Moscow's strategic embrace of Pakistan, made manifest in its first joint military exercise with the latter last year, has also spooked India.

That India might shun foreign collaboration in nuclear energy is also interesting.

The government only recently reiterated in Parliament that it expects to raise nuclear power generation capacity to 15,000 MW by 2024 from the 4780 MW that it was in 2014.

nash
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby nash » 17 May 2017 16:19

Cabinet clears proposal to build ten atomic reactors

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/new ... 704221.ece

arun
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby arun » 17 May 2017 17:01

^^^ Pleased to note that all 10 of the 700 MW capacity PHWR’s approved for building by our Union Cabinet will be indigenous nuclear reactors 8) .

JayS
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby JayS » 17 May 2017 17:09

SSridhar wrote:Nuke MoU: Govt makes Russia sweat before PM Modi-Putin meet - Sachin Parashar, ToI
India has warned Russia that it will stall cooperation with its foreign partners for development of its civil nuclear programme if it is unable to become a full member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group in the near future.

To make its point, it is threatening to put in cold storage an MoU (memorandum of understanding) with Russia for developing Kudankulam 5 and 6 reactor units.

With Russia working increasingly in tandem with China on global issues, India has often looked at Moscow to persuade Beijing to let go of its opposition to India's membership.

Russia is now worried that India might be delaying the MoU to get Moscow to work more proactively for its NSG membership.

Taken aback by this Indian reluctance to seal the MoU, Russia's deputy PM Dmitry Rogozin took up the issue with PM Narendra Modi in their meeting last week, a top official source confirmed to TOI. Rogozin, however, left without any assurance from India on signing the MoU.

The meeting was held to prepare the groundwork for Modi's summit with President Vladimir Putin early next month. Moscow is worried that without the MoU, there will be no real takeaway from the summit which is barely two weeks away.

India's message, conveyed to Moscow through official channels, is said to have been quite explicit in nature.

It stated that without NSG membership in the next one-two years, India would have no option but to go for an indigenous nuclear energy programme.


TOI was unable to ascertain if a similar "threat" was made to the US and France, two other important partners in nuclear energy, but it's clear that the government sees Russia as the only big power which has enough influence with Beijing to soften its position on the issue of India's NSG membership.

It has been learnt by TOI that despite repeated exhortations for over six months, Russia has been unable to convince India to sign the MoU which was originally meant to have been signed on the sidelines of the Brics summit in Goa last year.

It was then said that it would be signed by the end of 2016 but halfway into 2017, India continues to hold back on it despite issues like pricing and technology having been long settled.

Moscow is concerned that India is not responding to its request for signing the MoU even weeks ahead of the Modi-Putin summit.

It sees nuclear energy cooperation as one of the most significant elements of its bilateral relationship with India.

India has at several levels in the past asked Russia to persuade Beijing, which continues to back a criteria-based, and not a merit-based approach as desired by India, for expansion of the global body which controls nuclear commerce.

While Russia has worked hard to secure support for India's membership, New Delhi clearly believes that it hasn't done enough to convince China which sees Moscow as a key partner in dealing with the emerging international situation.

However, the Russians seem to believe that India has only further complicated its case by inviting Dalai Lama to Arunachal Pradesh and that this will only see China further hardening its position.

Russia's interests now converge sharply with China's as evident also from the way it has endorsed Beijing's ambitious OBOR project. Putin himself attended the OBOR conference this week, which India chose to ignore.

Russia, like several Indian neighbours, maintains that its endorsement of OBOR has nothing to do with the contentious CPEC which raises sovereignty issues for India.

Moscow's strategic embrace of Pakistan, made manifest in its first joint military exercise with the latter last year, has also spooked India.

That India might shun foreign collaboration in nuclear energy is also interesting.

The government only recently reiterated in Parliament that it expects to raise nuclear power generation capacity to 15,000 MW by 2024 from the 4780 MW that it was in 2014.


Great to hear that. Without getting anything in return, why should we give business to foreign companies, haan ji..??

rgosain
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby rgosain » 17 May 2017 17:47

I still think that Rusatom will probably get the deal, but it looks like cap, roll back and eliminate for Westinghouse Toshiba. A way forward might be to explore how to bring India into the NPT with the same right as the P-5.
Will these indigenous reactors be outside of the remit of IAEA inspections and will there be any reprocessing for the spent fuel.
It might be useful for India to offer units 10 and 11 for export to Vietnam as part of the OBOr project

Supratik
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Supratik » 17 May 2017 20:55

Ramana,

Given that those companies are now bankrupt, a ready made market is there and fuel supply is now easier, it seems like a good deal Earlier it was not.

I doubt Russia has enough leverage on China to force them on NSG.

Bheeshma
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Bheeshma » 17 May 2017 21:35

Good news. I hope these are outside any IAEA inspection or control.

Gagan
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Gagan » 17 May 2017 21:47

1. The proposed N site at Kovvada, Srikakulam, AP was supposed to get 6 x 1000 MW Westinghouse, US based light water reactors. But now this might go to the Russians
2. The other sites are Chutka, near Jabalpur, MP
3. Bhimpur, near Jhansi
4. Kumaharia, Gorakhpur, in Haryana was supposed to get 4 x 700 MW= 2800 MW
5. Mahi Bhanswara in Rajasthan

But each of these sites might get two 700 MW plants to begin with, then expanded later
Last edited by Gagan on 17 May 2017 21:54, edited 1 time in total.

Gyan
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Gyan » 17 May 2017 21:53

nash wrote:Cabinet clears proposal to build ten atomic reactors

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/new ... 704221.ece


My personal feeling is that this is first real major Make In India project based on Indian Manufactering. It will amount to atleast US$ 15-20 Billion dollar project

Gagan
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Gagan » 17 May 2017 21:54

Cheaper Gyan ji.
The 700 MW plants are not that expensive

Gagan
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Gagan » 17 May 2017 21:55

But India needs to upgrade to 1000 MW PHWR now, and also build an indian designed 1000 + MW light water design

pankajs
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby pankajs » 17 May 2017 22:09

Modi GOI is walking the talk to go indigenous on future requirement as a signal for our *friends* on NSG co-operation.

I expect the reactors to be under IAEA safeguard considering the shortage of domestic U supply.

nash
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby nash » 17 May 2017 22:34

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/ind ... n=ETTWMain

He said the decision will lead to Rs 70,000 crore domestic orders for pressurised heat water reactors and create 33,400 direct and indirect jobs

Singha
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Singha » 17 May 2017 23:56

Do we have any LWR plans..this is more common type and useful for naval application also

Gagan
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Gagan » 18 May 2017 00:00

India has built compact LWRs for the N subs. They should start building one on land for commercial electricity generation.
It has to be atleast the size of any chinese reactor, or bigger.

Cosmo_R
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Cosmo_R » 18 May 2017 00:51

Supratik wrote:Ramana,

Given that those companies are now bankrupt, a ready made market is there and fuel supply is now easier, it seems like a good deal Earlier it was not.

I doubt Russia has enough leverage on China to force them on NSG.


But it's useful for us to know they really tried and spent some political capital doing so. It's also a warning shot across the bow that messing with the Taliban, Pakis and OBOR at our expense is going to cost them. It's important to let them know that this is an India that can say 'No' to Russia.

!0x700MW Indian reactors are a very good start. We will learn how to build larger ones too.

Kakkaji
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Kakkaji » 18 May 2017 00:58

One report says the 10 reactors are to be built in the 'fleet mode'. Does that mean simultaneously? If so, great.

ramana
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby ramana » 18 May 2017 03:17

Gagan, LWR does not fit the roadmap to Thorium reactors.
Its a US distraction for NPT considerations.

hanumadu
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby hanumadu » 18 May 2017 07:46

Kakkaji wrote:One report says the 10 reactors are to be built in the 'fleet mode'. Does that mean simultaneously? If so, great.


Why couldn't India do this earlier if uranium supplies could be secured? We waited till the all other nuclear companies went bankrupt except the russians to build our own.

Now that we are proceeding with our own, will be design larger reactors or since we need only 30 gw of first state reactors, will we just build 30gw of these and get done with them?

chetak
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby chetak » 18 May 2017 07:55

ramana wrote:
Supratik wrote:It will be a good buy if properly managed as Indian nuclear power industry is in its infancy and will grow for at least 50 years. So a readymade, large market is there.



:lol:

Supratik, So many years on the forum and yet you think there is a chance?


It will be a monumental poison pill of the technological variety if at all anyone lets you buy it. :)

chetak
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby chetak » 18 May 2017 08:06

Cosmo_R wrote:
Supratik wrote:Ramana,

Given that those companies are now bankrupt, a ready made market is there and fuel supply is now easier, it seems like a good deal Earlier it was not.

I doubt Russia has enough leverage on China to force them on NSG.


But it's useful for us to know they really tried and spent some political capital doing so. It's also a warning shot across the bow that messing with the Taliban, Pakis and OBOR at our expense is going to cost them. It's important to let them know that this is an India that can say 'No' to Russia.

!0x700MW Indian reactors are a very good start. We will learn how to build larger ones too.


The russians have disappointed us already in so many important contracts, basically due to ill managed customer and product support. They seem to think that they have a lock on the Indian market.

Putin is seeking more business from India without correcting the underlying defects in earlier contracts and that is not acceptable anymore.

The Modi govt has brought out the stick and is wielding it to show everyone that the market conditions have changed in India. Our suppliers cannot run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.

The US, french, israel etc are also being given the same message vis-a-vis the afpak, china situation as well as the NSG situation.

Even the kudankulam projects did not go as planned with unscheduled shutdowns that sapped confidence and credibility.

Why should russia get a free pass, if it cannot deliver as promised??

This is after all 2017 and contractual terms are sacrosanct and there is a tiny but vital thing called customer satisfaction.

Sanatanan
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Sanatanan » 18 May 2017 08:47

ramana wrote:Gagan, LWR does not fit the roadmap to Thorium reactors.
Its a US distraction for NPT considerations.


+1 Sir

Philip
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Philip » 18 May 2017 14:25

Monumental decision! Mr.Modi gets my vote well in advance of the next election for just this one decision.Congratulations PMji,keep up the great work!

http://indianexpress.com/article/india/ ... n-4660369/
Cabinet approves 10 nuclear reactors for power generation: Piyush Goyal
Goyal, who is Union Power and Coal Minister, said the new PWHRs will generate 7,000 MW power.

This monumental decision came a day before the report in above posts that India was also holding back on extra N-reactors from Russia as its NSG membership was being repeatedly sabotaged by China.It wanted Russia to influence China on the same.This fabulous decision should be a message to all N-states that we cannot be taken for granted and that our N-sovereignty will never be at the mercy of any firang power. Goodbye "Wasting-house" whoever...!

Coming soon after the globally acclaimed feat of launching 100 sats from a PSLV ISRO launcher,this decision of the GOI,led by our PM ,should be hailed across the country.We now need to export our N-reactors to anyone we like ,like Vietnam for instance...whoever.If the N-powers do not grant us membership of the NSG within a specific timeframe,Dec 2017 for instance,we will then take it for granted that we can do what we like and tear up any intl. N-agreements already signed. F..K the effing sh*tworms of the PRC.they can b*gger off.

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/ca ... 476876.ece
Cabinet gives nod for 10 indigenous nuclear reactors
TCA Sharad raghavan NEW DELHI, MAY 18, 2017 00:00 IST
UPDATED: MAY 18, 2017
Approval shows strong belief in the capability of Indian scientists, says Centre
:D

The Union Cabinet on Wednesday cleared the proposal to construct 10 indigenous pressurised heavy water nuclear reactors with a total capacity of 7,000 MWe.

Briefing the media on the Cabinet decisions, Power Minister Piyush Goyal said each of the reactors would have a capacity of 700 MWe. “We already have 6,780 MWe of operational nuclear power plants and about 6,700 MWe of plants under implementation, which will be set up by 2021-22.”

The decision comes against the backdrop of recent troubles for India’s international collaborations in nuclear projects. While the U.S. deal, involving Toshiba Westinghouse for six reactors in Andhra Pradesh, is floundering after Westinghouse filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, the deal with French company Areva for reactors in Jaitapur remain mired in negotiations over costing.

No timeline

While the Minister said these 10 plants would create Rs. 70,000 crore worth of business for domestic manufacturers and generate about 33,400 jobs, he did not provide a timeline for their completion, saying the government would update the details when they are clear.

“The approval also shows our strong belief in the capability of India’s scientific community to build our technological capacities,” an official statement said.

Rapid advances by India

“The design and development of this project is a testament to the rapid advances achieved by India’s nuclear scientific community and industry. It underscores the mastery our nuclear scientists have attained over all aspects of indigenous PHWR technology,” it added.

India generated 37,674 million units of nuclear energy in 2016-17, according to the Nuclear Power Corporation of India, at a capacity factor of 80%. The two major projects under construction at the moment are located in Rajasthan and Gujarat, of 1,400 MWe each. Both plants, comprising two units of 700 MWe each, are under review.

“The 10 reactors will be part of India’s latest design of 700 MWe PHWR fleet with state-of-the-art technology meeting the highest standards of safety,” it added.

The Cabinet also approved a coal linkage policy, called the Scheme for Harnessing and Allocating Koyala Transparently in India (Shakti), that will award fuel supply agreements to coal plants already holding letters of assurance (LoAs). Thermal plants holding LoAs will be eligible to sign fuel supply pacts under the new policy after ensuring that all the conditions are met.


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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Supratik » 19 May 2017 00:00

Chetak, yes if they let Indians buy it. I doubt they will. But if they do I was thinking more of private buy (will need a consortium perhaps) while govt keeps on doing what they are doing.
I am not that worried about NSG at present. Unless US betrays on the nuclear deal the only benefit I see are more security of supply chain and a place in the high table which will lead to other things. We should get Wassenar and Australia first. That will keep China out from three clubs including MTCR and then bargain.

Supratik
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Supratik » 19 May 2017 00:33

More on why PHWRs. Some of these may not be under safeguards.

https://swarajyamag.com/technology/expl ... r-reactors

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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby SSridhar » 19 May 2017 09:56

Ending India's nuclear dependency M.R.Srinivasan, The Hindu
India now has 22 nuclear power units. The first pair, located in Tarapur, Maharashtra, uses enriched uranium and incorporates U.S. nuclear technology. These two reactors have operated safely and reliably for the past 47 years and supply the lowest cost non-hydro power. The second pair, located in Rajasthan, uses natural uranium and is based on Canadian technology.

The first unit of this pair has been out of service for some years due to deficiencies in some key equipment; the second unit has been operating satisfactorily. Commencing from 1983 and over a span of two and a half decades, India built 16 nuclear power units using its own technology, materials and equipment. These reactors use natural uranium as fuel. Fourteen of them have a size of 220 MW and two are of 540 MW.

Nuclear push in the 2000s


During the period 2000-2010, India designed a nuclear power unit of 700 MW capacity, using natural uranium. Construction work on two such units in Kakrapar (in Gujarat) and two in Rajasthan was taken up. These four units will go into operation in the next three years. Work on two similar units has been taken up at a site in Haryana.

All equipment and materials for these larger units will come from Indian suppliers. In recent years, two 1000 MW VVER power units have come up in Kudankulam, Tamil Nadu, using Russian technology. They use enriched uranium supplied by Russia. In 2016, work on two more such units was commenced. When all these units go into operation, India will have 30 reactors with a capacity of 13,000 MW. By then some of the earlier units will be reaching their retirement age.

In the period 2005-2008, the Indian nuclear establishment was focussed on concluding the civil nuclear cooperation agreement with the U.S. India then agreed to build about 10,000 MW of nuclear capacity using U.S. technology. A similar assurance was given to France. Russia and India agreed to install additional units at Kudankulam. The expectation in 2008 was that a rapid increase in Indian nuclear capacity would take place. During 2010-2011, India passed the civil nuclear liability legislation which made a supplier liable for claims under certain circumstances. The U.S. nuclear industry was not prepared to consider any cooperation with India under this condition. In 2016, India came up with the mechanism of an Indian insurance pool that could extend protection to the supplier.

The Fukushima accident of 2011 jolted the nuclear industry globally and the first priority was assessment of safety of nuclear plants in operation all over the world under what was termed as ‘Beyond Design Basis’ natural events. An unconnected development in the U.S. impacted a nuclear revival there: the availability of shale gas at low prices, in the range of $2.50 to $3 per million BTU. In consequence, General Electric de-emphasised the prospects of nuclear energy. Westinghouse designed a 1400 MW enriched uranium reactor (AP1000) complying with the current safety requirements. It managed to get Chinese utilities to build four such units at two sites and they are in an advanced stage of execution.

Westinghouse also secured orders to build four AP1000 reactors in the southern U.S., at two utilities. Unfortunately, these projects suffered great delays and huge cost overruns. Toshiba of Japan, a major owner of Westinghouse, incurred $7-8 billion in losses due to the nuclear business in the U.S. and is considering selling its successful chip business to accommodate this loss. Westinghouse has filed for bankruptcy and the future of the four nuclear power units under construction in the U.S. is highly uncertain.

Project delays aplenty


Westinghouse representatives discussing their proposal with Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL) for setting up six AP1000 reactors in Kovvada, Andhra Pradesh, have said that the new ownership would get sorted out, perhaps within a year or so, and they would continue to be seriously interested in the India project.

The U.S. government might facilitate a new owner acceptable to it, and the nuclear business may resume in some modified manner. From an Indian perspective, delays in this project are inevitable and the outcome would be uncertain.

India has been in discussions with Areva of France on building six EPR reactors of 1600 MW at Jaitapur, Maharashtra. The first such reactor in Finland has been greatly delayed and may go into operation in 2018. There is a pending arbitration case between Finland and France regarding who is to bear the resulting cost increases. A second EPR is under construction in Flammanville, France and that has also suffered delays due to questions regarding the quality of important forgings. Two EPRs in China were making good progress earlier but they also have to address the question of quality of some forgings made in France. Quite independently of these problems, Areva suffered heavy losses post-Fukushima when the uranium market bottomed. Japan, a big buyer of uranium, went out of the market as most of their reactors were shut down in 2011. Only a few have been allowed to restart. The French government has restructured the nuclear business and asked the Electricite de France to take over the nuclear power plant business and let only the fuel and associated activities to be with Areva.

Make in India


Anticipating some of these difficulties, the nuclear community in India has been looking at other options to expand the nuclear capacity. The fleet of pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR), of our own design and construction, have performed well. During the last five years, the cumulative capacity factor has been 78%. The reactors have operated continuously for periods exceeding 300 days quite regularly and one of our reactors was on line for 765 days, the second-longest run in the world. The cost of power has been less than from coal in the same region. Given the context, the Union Cabinet’s nod on Wednesday for 10 700 MW PHWRs is timely. Indian industry is well placed to supply all the components and materials required for these reactors. Russia is willing to supply two more 1000 MW VVER units for Kudankulam and continue the cooperation to build six 1200 MW VVERs at a second site, to be identified by India.

Our reactor designers at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre and NPCIL have completed the design of a 900 MW reactor using enriched uranium as fuel, designated as the Indian Pressurised Water Reactor (IPWR). Our industry is keen to mobilise and build up the capacity to make components for this design. Enriched uranium fuel can be sourced from international suppliers, as such reactors can be placed under International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards.

By about 2025 or so, India may itself supply enriched uranium from its own enrichment facilities. The government’s push for 10 IPWRs will secure India a position of nuclear power plant supplier not only for application in India, but also as a potential exporter.
While our earlier plans on expanding nuclear power have not materialised, the alternative plan suggested now, which envisages building 28 units with a total capacity of about 25,000 MW in 15 years from now, can still ensure that nuclear power remains an important part of our strategy to minimise carbon emissions in the long run.

×
M.R. Srinivasan is former Chairman, Atomic Energy Commission

Philip
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Re: India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011

Postby Philip » 19 May 2017 19:03

V.well put by Padma Vibushan MRS,our former AEC chief. This is the first major step in recent times to accelerate our speed on the roadmap to self-sufficiency. Under the previous N-deal deals that have fallen flat,we would've been perpetual beggars of foreign N-fuel. Though there is no mention of FBRs in this decision/report,one can be sure that our N-scientists will be accelerating on that road too.

Feb '17 report.
Kalpakkam to have two more prototype fast breeder reactors: Govt

PTI | Updated: Feb 9, 2017,
As per the three-stage Indian nuclear energy programme, PFBR will be attaining the second stage.

NEW DELHI: The Department of Atomic Energy will construct two Prototype Fast Breeder Reactors (PFBR) of 600 MW each at Kalpakkam in Tamil Nadu, besides the present one of 500 MW capacity which is expected to go fully functional by October, the government said today.

"All the construction activities of PFBR have been completed and the integrated commissioning activities have started. PFBR is expected to go fully functional by October 2017.
"This delay is primarily due to augmentation of certain additional assessments and checks on the installed equipment prior to commencement of their commissioning," Jitendra Singh, Minister of State in the PMO, which looks after the Department of Atomic Energy said in a written reply in Rajya Sabha.
The minister said the additional assessments and checks have essentially emanated owing to both increased regulatory requirements and as a matter of abundant caution.

The 500 MW PFBR, which is to be functional by October, will be the first PFBR in the world for commercial use. No other country has successfully able to execute this feat.

As per the three-stage Indian nuclear energy programme, PFBR will be attaining the second stage


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