NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby RamaY » 23 Dec 2011 06:15

shiv wrote:...
This constant caterwaul about Indian socialism is laughably fake because every Indian has secretly or openly milked Indian socialism to his advantage while he now curses socialism as if he hates it and would never stand up for it. Why not cut the crap. Socialism has many ills but cursing it after enjoying it continuously for decades stinks of hypocrisy.

Rhetorical onlee..

If grand father had ***** he would have been a grand mother.

In a non-socialist India my father who was a teacher would have earned enough to send me to a private university.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby shiv » 23 Dec 2011 06:29


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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby SBajwa » 23 Dec 2011 08:40

India go to pursue NK (whoever is in charge) for something. It is my opinion that Panda (China) is controlling NK's all aspects (economic, military, social) and is running some kind of "socialist" experiment there.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Gerard » 25 Dec 2011 03:53

Demise of Kim Jong Il, Greatest Loss to World Progressives: Indian Party Leader
Pyongyang, December 23 (KCNA) -- Prakash Karat, general secretary of the C.C., Communist Party of India (Marxist), visited the DPRK embassy in New Delhi on December 21 to mourn the demise of leader Kim Jong Il.

He made an entry in the condolence book.

The demise of Comrade Kim Jong Il, general secretary of the Workers' Party of Korea, is the greatest loss to the progressive people the world over, he said, adding:

The Korean people registered great successes in building a thriving socialist country under the energetic guidance of Comrade Kim Jong Il.

We are sure that they will overcome the sorrow and surely achieve brilliant successes in the efforts for building of a thriving socialist country and national reunification under the leadership of respected Comrade Kim Jong Un.

The Communist Party of India (Marxist) will always extend support and solidarity to the WPK and the Korean people in their just struggle.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby RamaY » 25 Dec 2011 04:07

^ NoKos struggle against whom? This Karat guy and his commie colleagues are not only stupid but are morons at it.

JLN's and indian socialism was limited to Govt functionaries. They left the society to be enterprenurial. That saved India. Even today it is the private industry (mostly) that is contributing to tax revenues, which are being used to sponsor Govt socialism.

A full socialism in India would be like Pol Pot regime.

I pray NoKo society uses this window of opportunity to start it's journey toward democratic and economic interdependence and progress with maximum say to it's people.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Gerard » 25 Dec 2011 04:23

The success of the DPRK can be seen in the famous NASA earthlights photo

Image

Thriving socialist country indeed.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Philip » 25 Dec 2011 05:13

Truly progressive by comrade Karat's standards.Absolutely little nighttime sky pollution,perfect for astronomic research! Jut compare NoKo with Beijing,do you call Beijing's horrendous smog "progress"? NoKo's eco-warriors are doing a fantastic job of development without pollution.Let the lowly Japs,SoKos and Chinkos too learn from the master-race!

Comrade Karat,you are mistaken indeed,as the greatest Communist alive (by world opinion) is Fidel Castro,who has survived the might of umpteen US administrations and their efforts to dislodge him from power.His personal integrity (Castro never lies-CIA statement) is what has kept his popularity at such a high level,despite the material poverty of his nation.Despite that,Cuba has a better health system than even the US! Chavez could come in second,keeping his nation's oil wealth from capitalist paws, while fighting elections and cancer and winning thus far.

Back to NoKo and the aptly named "Jong Un".The young one,being called the "Great Successor", is now being beseeched by his people to accept the mantle of "supreme commander",announced on the very day that his late father,"Dear Leader",received the same position 20 years ago.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/de ... led-leader


Kim Jong-un hailed by North Korean media as next leader

Son of Kim Jong-il urged to embrace 'people's call on him to become supreme commander' by Rodong Sinmun newspaper

Jasmine Coleman
guardian.co.uk, Saturday 24 December 2011

Kim Jong-un
North Korean TV footage shows Kim Jong-un, son of late leader Kim Jong-il, at a memorial for his father. Photograph: Ho/AFP/Getty Images

North Korea's state-run media has hailed Kim Jong-il's son as "supreme commander" of the country's armed forces as the transition of power gains pace.

Kim Jong-un, who is in his late 20s, has been called "the great successor" in state media since his father's death was announced on 19 December.

And as the national grieving continues, Rodong Sinmun newspaper, which is run by the ruling Workers' party, said on Saturday that the country would uphold Kim Jong-un as "supreme commander" with vows made in "blood and tears" before Kim's body.

"We urge Comrade Kim Jong-un to embrace the people's call on him to become our supreme commander," the editorial said. "We will complete the great task of our songun [military-first] revolution by upholding Comrade Kim Jong-un as our supreme commander, our general."

The young heir, who was educated in Switzerland, will be the third generation Kim to rule the country since its inception in 1948.

He was promoted to four-star general and appointed a vice-chairman of the Central Military Commission of the Workers' party in September 2010 while being groomed to succeed his father, who died aged 69 last Saturday.

The third son of the late leader has little political experience and senior officials are believed to be guiding the transition.

State media have heaped praise on him amid fears that his succession could meet with resistance from the powerful Korean People's Army.

The appeals are expected to be followed by a declaration from the ruling party's Central Committee, announcing him as supreme commander.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby shiv » 25 Dec 2011 06:09

Gerard wrote:The success of the DPRK can be seen in the famous NASA earthlights photo

Image

Thriving socialist country indeed.



Tibet looks like NoKo too. Also socialist. Also cold - but I digress. A friend of mine who lived in NoKo (Seoul) as part of the UN food program told me how all the apartment blocks would be dark and unlit at night save for the UN compound. The joke was "Why are North Koreans so trim and fit looking?". Because everyone has to use stairs there are no working lifts.

A link earlier in this thread spoke of NoKo having just about 1000 miles of paved road is indicative of how deep in doodoo that country is. But NoKo is China's Pakistan, just like Pakistan is America's NoKo. Both these powers conveniently used the naive-buffoon leaders of those countries to support them. Now it is being alleged that the 'world" faces the NoKo and Pakistan problem.

Wouldn't it be nice if America got its ass chewed off by Pakistan and China by NoKo?

If wishes were horses. ..

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby niran » 25 Dec 2011 07:45

all hail the most loving caling deal readel Kim(what in sanakrit) dung II



"Respected Comrade Kim Jong-Un, who has been overcome with the deepest grief at his (father's) demise, took all necessary measures to truck fresh fish to the capital city in time and supply the fish to the citizens even in the mourning period," Ri Chun-Guk, a vice department director of the Pyongyang City People's Committee, was quoted as saying.


"Officials in the commercial service field in the city pledged their loyalty for Kim Jong-Un, saying the history of loving care for the people continues and no people on earth are blessed with leaders and generals as the Koreans," KCNA said.


meanwhile for those who wishes to cavourt NoKo do remember the just dead dear leader was the founder and propagator of such exotic items "ice" "speed" "amphetamines" agree he was not the inventor but he was the one who used diplomats for his drug empire.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby shiv » 25 Dec 2011 08:46

niran wrote:all hail the most loving caling deal readel Kim(what in sanakrit) dung II



"Officials in the commercial service field in the city pledged their loyalty for Kim Jong-Un, saying the history of loving care for the people continues and no people on earth are blessed with leaders and generals as the Koreans," KCNA said.


meanwhile for those who wishes to cavourt NoKo do remember the just dead dear leader was the founder and propagator of such exotic items "ice" "speed" "amphetamines" agree he was not the inventor but he was the one who used diplomats for his drug empire.


Other, semi-philosophcal, semi-rhetorical questions come to mind.

There is a coterie of people in the leadership of North Korea who are doing their best to keep a dynasty alive. A dynasty with no evidence of experience or competence in governance. Philosophically would we be doing the North Koeran people a favor by wooing and bribing and helping to prop up the coterie who wish this dynasty to continue?

What would we the people India feel about rich and powerful external powers and entities who might want to support a coterie in India who are doing their utmost to prop up and empower a dynasty with no experience or history of competence in ruling.

What would make people say that a young Kim Yung Un is too young to lead 24 million North Koreans while an untested person of similar age is fine for 1,100 million Indians? Who is fooling with whom?


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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby RamaY » 27 Dec 2011 02:21

shiv wrote:Other, semi-philosophcal, semi-rhetorical questions come to mind.

There is a coterie of people in the leadership of North Korea who are doing their best to keep a dynasty alive. A dynasty with no evidence of experience or competence in governance. Philosophically would we be doing the North Koeran people a favor by wooing and bribing and helping to prop up the coterie who wish this dynasty to continue?

What would we the people India feel about rich and powerful external powers and entities who might want to support a coterie in India who are doing their utmost to prop up and empower a dynasty with no experience or history of competence in ruling.

What would make people say that a young Kim Yung Un is too young to lead 24 million North Koreans while an untested person of similar age is fine for 1,100 million Indians? Who is fooling with whom?


+1.

We will never get the answer to such a pointed question. Because it will undo the centuries old feudal system that is morphing into an industrial/corp house model under the guise of economic progress.

Unless we know what problem we are trying to solve, mere advancing forward will not solve anything.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Katare » 27 Dec 2011 02:27

Philip,
Please accept my heart felt condolences. Ha

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Rahul M » 27 Dec 2011 02:28

:mrgreen:

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby RajeshA » 31 Dec 2011 12:33

Published on Dec 30, 2011
By Palash Ghosh
Why Does India Have Relations With North Korea?: International Business Times
In the wake of the death of former North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, I was surprised to learn that one of the isolated country’s biggest trade partners is India.

Not only that, but both countries mutually maintain embassies and relations appear to be growing closer. Bilateral trade between India and North Korea reportedly totals about $500-million annually, while increasing number of North Koreans are receiving scientific and computer training in India.
Also, India’s growing ties to North Korea doesn’t appear to have rankled North Korea’s bitter enemy, South Korea. (Delhi and Seoul have a robust $10-billion annual trade relationship and there is little chance of that being hurt).

A recent report in India’s Telegraph newspaper stated: “During discussions on North Korea’s request for food, India harbored worries about Seoul’s reaction to any decision to step up contacts with Pyongyang. But in [a] surprise, the South Korean government showed great understanding of the Indian decision.
Rajeev Sharma, of The South Asia Analysis Group, a non-profit, non-commercial think tank, asserted that what happens in North Korea is of great importance to India – and it all has to do with China.

India’s interests in North Korea cannot be over-emphasized,” he wrote. “Indian interests in North Korea have to begin and end with China. It is China, after all, that has been pursuing a… a strategy of encircling India. China’s close strategic friends are well known, all of whom have been nations like Pakistan, Myanmar and North Korea. Pakistan is currently in a snake pit, has a rapidly deteriorating economy and a tinder box political situation domestically. Myanmar has suffered UN sanctions for decades and has been an iron country for decades sitting in the kangaroo pouch of China. Now Myanmar is showing signs of liberating itself from the clutches of the Chinese and has hosted Hillary Clinton recently. This leaves out only the North Koreans from the list of trusted and tested friends of the Chinese in half a century. If North Korea were to extend an olive branch to the Americans, a scenario that is not unlikely, it will bring the Chinese cup of strategic woes to the brim. And the Indians would not be complaining!

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby jamwal » 07 Jul 2012 14:16

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqOLhx_QGto


I hope this is the correct thread for posting this


IN THE LAND OF PARADISE: A Journey Into North Korea

My friends and I thought it would be cool to go to North Korea, so in June 2012 we did just that. Government minders picked us up at the airport and took us on what felt like the strangest four-day amusement park ride in the world. We arrived in the middle of Children's Week. Young Pioneers (similar to Hitler Youth) from all over the country flooded into Pyongyang for several days of fantastical public rallies, all seemingly meant to bolster the personality cult of their new leader, 28 year old Kim Jong Un. Propaganda vans drive through the city blasting cheery slogans. People all over Pyongyang walk with purpose, but you can never figure out where they're going. Most of the lights in the city go off at 11pm. They let you ride the Metro for one stop, but your fellow passengers may be actors. The rest of the Metro might not function. In short, nothing you see is verifiably real. It's a Stalinist Disneyland on acid where everyone you meet smiles but the far-off fields are filled with elderly laborers snipping individual blades of grass with scissors.

Surprisingly, they let me film and photograph everything but soldiers. There have been plenty of excellent NK documentaries that focus on the country's history or try to pull back the curtain on what's really going on, so I chose to focus solely on what was presented, i.e. the relentless stream of hyper-positive propaganda. Since we are well aware that their country has devolved into a quasi-religious cult with one of the worst human rights records in the world, the government's facade is no less unsettling than the truth that lurks beneath it.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Singha » 07 Jul 2012 14:42

looks like people in pyongyang are well looked after to keep the facade.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby member_23626 » 13 Jul 2012 20:16


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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby wig » 16 Jul 2012 09:36

North Korean army chief relieved of all posts, state media says

SEOUL: Kim Jong Un's top military official - a key mentor to North Korea's new young leader - has been removed from all posts because of illness, state media said on Monday.

At least one analyst speculated that a more likely reason for Ri Yong Ho's departure is Kim's desire to put his own mark on the government he inherited from his father late last year.

The decision to relieve Ri of his duties was made at a Workers' Party meeting Sunday, according to the North's official Korean Central News Agency. It was not immediately clear who would take Ri's place, and the North Korean media dispatch did not elaborate on Ri's condition or future.

Ri was vice marshal of the Korean People's Army and the military's General Staff chief, as well as a top figure in the Workers' Party.

He has been at Kim Jong Un's side since the young man emerged as father Kim Jong Il's successor in 2010, often standing between father and son at major events. That role appeared to deepen after Kim Jong Il's death in December, helping Kim to solidify support among the military.

Kim Jong Il's "military first" policy made the army North Korea's most powerful institution. Ri wielded power from his position at the intersection of three crucial institutions: the Korean People's Army, the Central Military Commission of the ruling Workers' Party and the standing committee of the party's influential political bureau.

Ri also oversaw an influential Kim Jong Un support group comprising officers in their 50s and 60s whom commanders consider rising stars, according to Ken Gause, a North Korea specialist at CNA, a U.S.-based research organization.

Hong Hyun-ik, an analyst at private Sejong Institute near Seoul, was skeptical about the illness claim, saying that when top North Korean officials do get sick, they typically remain in office while deputies handle their duties. There had been no previous sign that Ri was ill, he added.

Hong said the change appears aimed at replacing an appointee of Kim's late father, Kim Jong Il, with a closer confidant.

"It can be seen as part of a general change," Hong said, adding that he expects similar news on the dismissal of other aging, senior officials will come out in coming weeks.

Animosity on the Korean Peninsula has deepened since a North Korean rocket launch in April that the UN called a cover for a banned long-range missile test. North Korea says it was a satellite launch.

North Korea has repeatedly threatened harm to South Korea's president and his supporters in recent months, angry over perceived insults to its leadership and recent US-South Korean military drills that Pyongyang says are a prelude to an invasion.


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/worl ... 978551.cms

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby RajeshA » 29 Jan 2013 02:28

Published on Jan 27, 2013
By Becky Evans
North Korean parents 'eating their own children' after being driven mad by hunger in famine-hit pariah state: Daily Mail UK

  • Undercover reporters found a 'shocking' number of cannibalism incidents
  • Up to 10,000 people feared dead after 'hidden famine' in farming provinces
  • Drought and confiscated food contribute to desperate shortage, reports say
  • Reports of men digging up corpses for food and murdering children

I don't know what to make of it. Is this just some sadistic propaganda considering the upcoming nuclear test, or are they making some plans for intervention, i.e. to intervene before Kim Jong-un consolidates his position?

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby RamaY » 29 Jan 2013 02:31

They wont intervene even if the reality is ten times this scenario.

Dont forget Rwanda.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby RajeshA » 29 Jan 2013 02:43

RamaY ji,

the intervention would of course not be for ameliorating any alleged hunger in North Korea, but for reasons of regime change, denuclearization, taking away China's ally, etc.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby RamaY » 29 Jan 2013 03:58

^ that is what I meant RajeshA ji. NK is non-state actor of PRC which is a P5 member and nuke power. Nothing can be done to NK regime.

And PRC doesn't care about NK because for all practical purposes they are not connected and whatever happens in NK doesn't impact PRC image.

To get NK, one need to hurt PrC. In current scenario, who has time, energy, resources and motivation to touch PRC? Only Vivek-Ahuja :D

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Sriman » 13 Dec 2013 12:55

Kim Jong Un’s Purge of His Uncle May Test Ties With China

http://world.time.com/2013/12/09/kim-jo ... ith-china/

North Korea today confirmed that Kim Jong Un’s once powerful uncle Jang Song Taek, has been purged — and purged in a spectacular fashion.

In a television segment broadcast on Monday, Jang — the erstwhile No. 2 — is shown being arrested in front of an audience of top party members. State media kept up the drumbeat with charges Jang was “affected by the capitalist lifestyle” and allegations ranging from economic mismanagement to womanizing and drug use. “Jang pretended to uphold the party and leader,” reported KCNA, the party mouthpiece. “But was engrossed in such factional acts such as dreaming different dreams and involving himself in double-dealing behind the scene.”


Full text of the actual announcement:

http://www.scmp.com/article/1379577/ful ... -execution

However, despicable human scum Jang, who was worse than a dog, perpetrated thrice-cursed acts of treachery in betrayal of such profound trust and warmest paternal love shown by the party and the leader for him.


When his cunning move proved futile and the decision that Kim Jong Un was elected vice-chairman of the Central Military Commission of the Workers' Party of Korea at the Third Conference of the WPK in reflection of the unanimous will of all party members, service personnel and people was proclaimed, making all participants break into enthusiastic cheers that shook the conference hall, he behaved so arrogantly and insolently as unwillingly standing up from his seat and half-heartedly clapping, touching off towering resentment of our service personnel and people.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby ArmenT » 13 Dec 2013 13:55

^^^
Not only did Kim's uncle get removed from his post, he appears to have met his 72 as well.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-25359939
The once-powerful uncle of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has been executed after being purged for "acts of treachery", state media say.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Sriman » 13 Dec 2013 15:00

^^
Yes. As per rumours, starving dogs were used. :shock:

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby krishnan » 13 Dec 2013 15:50

Jang Song-Thaek has fallen out of favour before. In 2004 he was understood to have undergone "re-education" as a steel mill labourer because of suspected corruption, but he made a comeback the following year.

Jang expanded his influence rapidly after Kim Jong-Il suffered a stroke in 2008 and he was appointed vice chairman of the powerful National Defence Commission in 2010.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby krishnan » 13 Dec 2013 15:57

this guy looks innocent , but surely isnt , seems like a power struggle , he even had his uncles face being removed from some of the videos, and in few videos is clearly seen keeping a close eye on his uncle

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Gerard » 18 Feb 2014 03:43

North Korea’s Kim Jong-un forced mothers to drown newborn babies: U.N. report
The commission’s chairman, Michael Kirby, warned Mr. Kim in a letter that he could face trial at the International Criminal Court in The Hague for crimes against humanity.
The commission documents crimes against humanity, including “extermination, murder, enslavement, torture, imprisonment, rape, forced abortions and other sexual violence, persecution on political, religious, racial and gender grounds, the forcible transfer of populations, the enforced disappearance of persons and the inhumane act of knowingly causing prolonged starvation.”

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Austin » 26 Apr 2014 19:09

Kim Jong-Un urges to be ready for 'conflict' with US
North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un has chided his soldiers, telling them to be ready for "impending conflict with the United States," Pyongyang media reported Saturday as satellites showed a nuclear test could be near.

The report comes as US President Barack Obama is finishing up a two-day visit to South Korea, where he warned the North it faced tougher sanctions if the underground detonation tests went proceeded.

It also comes after Pyongyang claimed it had been holding a young, 24-year-old American for two weeks.

Kim, the supreme commander of the North's 1.2-million-strong armed forces often visits military units to deliver on-the-spot "guidance" on ways to strengthen the army's might.

He usually praises his troops and presents gifts such as rifles or binoculars as symbols of their vigilance.

But after watching a shelling drill by an artillery sub-unit on Friday, he lashed out at soldiers for their lax approach, the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said. "Watching the drill, he severely criticised the sub-unit for failing to make good combat preparation" citing the time it had taken to deploy, it said.

"Dear Supreme Commander Kim Jong-Un said nothing is more important than preparing for combat now, in the face of an impending conflict with the United States", KCNA reported.

North Korean state media is traditionally rich in headlines referring to the isolated state being on the verge of war.

Pointing at a map, Kim ordered the unit whose tests he saw to establish a firing position and start the shelling exercise, the agency said, without revealing the location.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby ramana » 05 Oct 2014 02:49

Looks like Kim Young is very sick. His sister has taken charge.
NoKo general is visiting Seoul.

I think talks are on for Korean unification.

vijaykarthik please run the thread on Korean unification timeline.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Prem » 05 Oct 2014 05:11

NOKO goes out of Chinese orbit will be Big blow to Mr Eleven. Apparently the NOKO Khaki who visisted SOKO is 2nd in Charge and senior most after Kim.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby vijaykarthik » 05 Oct 2014 18:22

I have no idea about a reunification timeline currently. But then, we surely ARE tracking 3 qns reg missile tests, nuclear tests, a ferry restart [between Japan & No-Ko: Mangyongbong-92 for the interested] and a few others.

And drumroll please: We are as confused as anyone else. A bit of statistics and hindsight to give an idea. KJU has disappeared for the longest period known so far.

this was from a news snippet from the end of last month: ""Kim has had three prolonged absences: of 21 days, 24 days, and 18 days, in March 2012, June 2012, and January 2013 respectively. Today is Kim's 26th day of absence, and because of the unyielding opacity of North Korean politics, it's impossible to say where he is."
"

In March 2012, they had the UNHA-3 SLV launch. 2nd disappearance lead to removal of Vice-Marshal Ri. 3rd disappearance was a month before the nuclear tests. Cant say I am very comfortable about whats cooking in NoKo.

But its also quite likely that KJU has died in an internal struggle (or atleast has been disabled in some way) and the new guy has taken charge too? Its quite surprising and I cant remember hearing anytime earlier that a leader is sick from the NK press? Even his dad's death came only after it was confirmed. Not earlier like its been done now. (And this news bit is about the current leader being sick!) Cant see any mileage / advantage that can be obtained by calling their supreme leader sick and what not.

The side developments are interesting too: talks with SK, talks with Japan (mediated by China) on the missing persons. A bit of Russian meetings etc. Really unsure about what's really happening. But if there is a power struggle currently, a reunion with SK becomes extremely unlikely. (I saw one report which said that Kim's sister will take charge in his absence. I doubt if that's even possible though)

ps: when Kim's dad disappeared on a few occasions, he secretly met Chinese, Russian Pres / officials etc... but this time with the 31-yr old obese son seem different. Doesn't look like he has been around outside NK too. Besides, with so much of stories about internal struggle, I doubt if he can afford to move out of NK too unless he felt certain of being in control.

wig
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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby wig » 06 Oct 2014 10:35

Kim Jong-un's public absence due to double ankle fractures

http://www.ansa.it/english/news/2014/09 ... 73514.html
Tokyo, September 30 - Concealed heels in Kim Jong-un's shoes have been blamed for the nearly one-month absence of North Korea's supreme leader from public view, Chosun Ilbo reported Tuesday.
The Korean news site said Kim underwent double surgery to fix fractures in both ankles, caused by an elevation trick used by his father Kim Jong-il. The internal thickness of the shoes reportedly added several more centimeters to the height of the shoes than what could be seen externally. The absence of the leader from any public events has been a target of speculation since the State television KCTV announced the leader's "indisposition" last week.

Kashi
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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby Kashi » 06 Oct 2014 12:09

Former Top Official Says Kim Jong-un Is No Longer in Control of North Korea

An elite group of exiles from North Korea gathered in September in the Netherlands to discuss the state of the regime they used to serve. The conference included top diplomats, an ex-senior official of the Ministry of Security, and a high-ranking military officer, but the keynote address was given by Jang Jin-sung, formerly a key member of Kim Jong-il's propaganda machine. Included in Jang's speech was a surprising assertion: North Korea is in the midst of a civil war.

According to Jang — a former counterintelligence official and poet laureate under Kim Jong-il — members of the government's Organization and Guidance Department (OGD), a powerful group of officials that once reported only to Kim Jong-il, have stopped taking orders from his son, Kim Jong-un. The OGD, Jang says, has effectively taken control of the country, and a conflict is simmering between factions that want to maintain absolute control over the economy and others seeking to gain wealth through foreign trade and a slightly more open market....

member_22539
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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby member_22539 » 06 Oct 2014 15:04

^Are these exiles like the famous Iraq exiles :D ? Take with a bucket load of salt.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby gunjur » 06 Oct 2014 16:29

TIFWIW. Also apologies if already posted on BRF.

Has North Korea’s Kim Jong Un Been Toppled?
Hwang Pyong So must be feeling pretty good about himself right now. At the latest Supreme People’s Assembly meeting, he was made vice chairman of the National Defense Commission. This was after his promotion to director of the General Political Bureau of the Korean People’s Army, making him the top political officer in the military. In a country where there is supposed to be no No. 2 official, he is called the second-most powerful figure.

Now he has crossed the border into South Korea on a one-day, short-notice trip, triggering hopes of reconciliation between the arch-rival republics—and heightening speculation about the fate of Kim Jong Un, North Korea’s young supremo, who has not been seen in public since September 3.

Hwang’s trip South on Saturday comes on the heels of a widely publicized report that Kim has been deposed. Jang Jin Sung, a former North Korean counterintelligence and propaganda official, is claiming that the Organization and Guidance Department of the Korean Workers’ Party, responsible for promotions within the regime, has taken over the country. Kim, according to Jang, is now merely a “puppet.”

Leading Korea watchers, however, say they doubt Kim has lost his position at the center of the state founded by his grandfather and passed down to his father, his immediate predecessor. “This kind of travel would be way too out there if anything serious was going on in North Korea, so I don’t think it’s a sign of a coup,” John Delury of Yonsei University in Seoul told The Washington Post of Hwang’s jaunt down to Incheon, near the South Korean capital. Andrei Lankov of nearby Kookmin University, meanwhile, called the surprise visit merely a part of Pyongyang’s recent “charm offensive.” “North Korean diplomacy has been engaged in concerted, well-arranged, well-managed efforts to improve relations with pretty much the entire outside world,” he told the Post. “And you would not expect it to happen with nobody in control.”

Lankov and Delury make a commonsense point, but Jang, a defector to Seoul, maintains that Kim was removed from power last year. That means Hwang could have consolidated his position in the interim and now feels secure enough to travel for a day.

Indeed, there are signs that not only has Hwang risen, but also that Kim has fallen. The young ruler did not preside over last’s month meeting of the Supreme People’s Assembly, the first time that has happened since he took power after his father’s death in December 2011. Yes, he may have been ill, but if he was politically healthy, the meeting would have been postponed until he was able to appear.

Also extremely unusual: The reports on the meeting from the state-run Korean Central News Agency mention Kim—first secretary of the Workers’ Party, first chairman of the National Defense Commission, and supreme commander of the People’s Army, all the top positions in the state and party—only at the end and only in passing. In a regime like North Korea’s, these state media reports spell political infirmity.

And is Kim Jong Un really ill? He was last seen in public walking with a limp—he probably has gout —and state media has reported he is not well, but that is not what one member of Hwang’s 11-member delegation told South Korea’s Unification Minister Ryoo Kihl-jae on Saturday. The next day, Ryoo said he was assured that there were “no problems” with Kim’s health. But if Kim were well, there would have been no reason for him to have stayed out of sight for a month, especially during the Supreme People’s Assembly meeting.

It is true that Jang Jin Sung’s storyline may not completely add up. After all, as influential as the Organization and Guidance Department may be—some even think it is more important than the National Defense Commission—it is not an agency built to grab and exercise power.

Nonetheless, there are too many rumors and reports to allow one to conclude that all is well in Pyongyang. The story that the city is in lockdown —no permits to travel in or out issued since September 27—suggests that an extraordinary event has occurred. The mid-December execution of Jang Song Thaek, once thought to be Kim’s regent, and the subsequent eradication of his nationwide patronage network are symptoms of distress.

The continual purges during Kim’s short tenure cannot be a good sign. In the space of 15 months he switched out his army chief three times, and it appears he replaced about half of the top 218 military and administrative officials. Pyongyang, according to the Financial Times, has not seen such turmoil since the late 1950s, when his grandfather Kim Il Sung eliminated opposition after his failure in the Korean War. As famed Korea watcher Bruce Bechtol has pointed out, the constant purges of senior civilians and flag officers over the last few years is proof of Kim’s inability to cement his position at the top of the political system.

“Senior officials in North Korea’s Workers’ Party and military are increasingly objecting to policies or ignoring orders from leader Kim Jong Un, leading to rumors that his grip on the country is weakening,” noted the Chosun Ilbo, the most widely read newspaper in South Korea, in late July. Defying instructions would have been unthinkable during the tenure of his father or grandfather.

Of course, in the world’s most opaque regime, almost any scenario is plausible. We should know a lot more, however, when we see who is on the reviewing stand during the October 10 celebration of the founding of the Workers’ Party.

Until then, we can say there are signs that Kim Jong Un has lost substantial power and will soon become, if he is not already, a figurehead.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby JE Menon » 06 Oct 2014 17:25

I would not be surprised to see a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth on Noko TV in the coming days or weeks to announce the sad demise and upward flight of the last of Kim the Yung Un.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby vijaykarthik » 06 Oct 2014 18:35

Since Oct 10th is the workers psrty day or something, I am keenly on the lookout for that day to have a peek on what the future portends.

It can be a nice day for a missile test or a nuclear 'un or to display to the world the new leader and mention that Kim is disabled / has attain the lotus feet of Juche.

Its unlikely that they will use this short a timeperiod for a test though. But its surely easy to pop a missile once the 'talk of talks' with SK inevitably fails? A few months should tell us.

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Re: NoKo after "Dear Leader" Kim

Postby vijaykarthik » 06 Oct 2014 20:32

ouch, no sign of Kim even to receive the Asian games medallists. And he is supposedly sports crazy. Where is Kim?


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