People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20825
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Prem » 26 Dec 2011 10:53

self-explanatory thread title. will add links and materials on understanding PRC as time goes on, similar to the TSP thread.
This is the NEW china thread.
If users feel there are links that can be added to the first post, they can post them AND use "report post" option to contact the moderators.

****for discussions on PRC's economy or industry****
use the PRC economy thread viewtopic.php?f=2&t=4036 in tech/econ forum.

NOTE 1 : India China thread viewtopic.php?f=1&t=6204 is locked for now. we will bring it back if there's a need for a dedicated thread on India china relations.

NOTE 2 : Understanding chinese thread viewtopic.php?f=1&t=3992&start=360&st=0&sk=t&sd=a now locked. will be archived.

***************************************************

UNDERSTANDING CHINA

1. Sardar Patel's Letter to Nehru, outlining the threat from China and its likely intentions.
http://www.friendsoftibet.org/main/sardar.html

2. Studies of Modern Chinese History: UC San Diego
http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/chinesehistory/ ... tml#essays

Thanks to Ray C.
---------------------------------------------------------
Dhiman wrote:
Jimi wrote:All the "will" stuff is boring. Really boring.

Simple question sir. Assume that India gave nuclear boom boom to a random "splitist" group in china and these crazy splitist actually boom boomed a Chinese city using indian provided nukes.In that case would china nuke India?


Uighers are already known to have few Nukes made of Enrihed Uranium. No one knows if Tibetans are tryig to acquire few of their own. Paki loose Nukes as well Russian suitcase bombs are rumored to be in the market. Soon , Japan and SouthKorea will go Nuclear and then Taiwan has already requested assistence in strategic defence matters. Basically , the chances of Nuke going off in Shenzen , Peking etc are increasing by the day because of small minded policies pursued by the wise men of PRC . They have no one to blame but themsleves and their big bragging and little thinking. Chances are that just like the Nanking, they will find a face saving escape route to fool their public in hope of avoiding the shame.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 29 Dec 2011 11:45

Police Shoot 7 ‘terrorists’ In China’s Muslim West
BEIJING (AP) — Police in China’s restive Central Asia border area fatally shot seven members of a Muslim ethnic group in what officials say was an attempt to end a kidnapping.

Officials and state media accounts said Thursday that police opened fire after encountering resistance in trying to free two men who had been kidnapped by what officials called “a violent terrorist group.”

Four others were injured and another four arrested in Wednesday night’s raid outside the city of Hotan. The two hostages were freed.

The area has been plagued by tensions between China’s Han Chinese majority and ethnic Uighurs, the indigenous, mainly Muslim group. Some Uighurs have embraced militant separatism, though the Chinese government has provided scant evidence of organized terrorism.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 30 Dec 2011 00:41

Chinese housing activist is latest dissident put on trial in sweeping government crackdown
BEIJING — A former lawyer and veteran activist left disabled by past police mistreatment went on trial Thursday, the third dissident in a week to be prosecuted as China presses a sweeping crackdown to deter popular uprisings like the ones that shook the Arab world.

Looking thin and frail, Ni Yulan lay on a bed and used an oxygen machine to help her breathe during the hearing, her daughter, Dong Xuan, said afterward. Dong said she told the court about her mother’s run-ins with police since 2002 and how police beatings left her crippled.
Ni and her supporters deny the charges and say she is being punished for her years of activism, especially her advocacy for people forced from their homes to make way for the fast-paced real estate development that remade Beijing for the 2008 Olympics. Her outspoken defense earned her the enmity of officials and developers. Her family’s house in an old neighborhood in the capital’s center was also razed, and the couple became homeless.

The couple’s trial comes near the end of a year that has seen Chinese authorities use disappearances, house arrest, lengthy prison terms and other means to prevent activists from drawing inspiration from the Arab Spring protests that unseated autocrats in Egypt, Tunisia and Libya.
Ni described abuse she suffered at the hands of police, saying that guards have beaten her, insulted her and urinated on her face. While in detention in 2002, police pinned her down and kicked her knees until she was unable to walk, she said.

While serving the second prison term of two years, Ni said she was deprived of her crutches and had to crawl up and down five stories and across the prison yard every day for months.
Ni said the authorities were trying to silence her because in trying to defend those who had been wrongly evicted from their homes, she had found evidence of wrongdoing by Beijing officials in lucrative land deals.

“When they were making me crawl in prison, they were basically trying to kill me so that they can silence me,” Ni said in the 2010 interview. “Isn’t it just because I’m trying to tell the truth?”

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20825
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Prem » 31 Dec 2011 10:44

The Coming Collapse of China: 2012 Edition
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2 ... n?page=0,0
Yet China's "sweet spot" is over because, in recent years, the conditions that created it either disappeared or will soon. First, the Communist Party has turned its back on Deng's progressive policies. Hu Jintao, the current leader, is presiding over an era marked by, on balance, the reversal of reform. There has been, especially since 2008, a partial renationalization of the economy and a marked narrowing of opportunities for foreign business. For example, Beijing blocked acquisitions by foreigners, erected new barriers like the "indigenous innovation" rules, and harassed market-leading companies like Google. Strengthening "national champion" state enterprises at the expense of others, Hu has abandoned the economic paradigm that made his country successful. Second, the global boom of the last two decades ended in 2008 when markets around the world crashed. The tumultuous events of that year brought to a close an unusually benign period during which countries attempted to integrate China into the international system and therefore tolerated its mercantilist policies. Now, however, every nation wants to export more and, in an era of protectionism or of managed trade, China will not be able to export its way to prosperity like it did during the Asian financial crisis in the late 1990s. China is more dependent on international commerce than almost any other nation, so trade friction -- or even declining global demand -- will hurt it more than others. The country, for instance, could be the biggest victim of the eurozone crisis. Third, China, which during its reform era had one of the best demographic profiles of any nation, will soon have one of the worst. The Chinese workforce will level off in about 2013, perhaps 2014, according to both Chinese and foreign demographers, but the effect is already being felt as wages rise, a trend that will eventually make the country's factories uncompetitive. China, strangely enough, is running out of people to move to cities, work in factories, and power its economy. Demography may not be destiny, but it will now create high barriers for growth. At the same time that China's economy no longer benefits from these three favorable conditions, it must recover from the dislocations -- asset bubbles and inflation -- caused by Beijing's excessive pump priming in 2008 and 2009, the biggest economic stimulus program in world history (including $1 trillion-plus in 2009 alone). Since late September, economic indicators -- electricity consumption, industrial orders, export growth, car sales, property prices, you name it -- are pointing toward either a flatlining or contracting economy. Money started to leave the country in October, and Beijing's foreign reserves have been shrinking since September.

Not long ago, everything was going well for the mandarins in Beijing. Now, nothing is. So, yes, my prediction was wrong. Instead of 2011, the mighty Communist Party of China will fall in 2012. Bet on it.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 22773
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 31 Dec 2011 12:27

Chinese envoy claims media portrayals of an aggressive China are wrong
Media reports of unverified Chinese incursions in the border, hackings of Indian computers and dumping of goods are nothing but fallacy, China's Consul General in Mumbai Niu Qingbao said here on Friday.

“China and India are partners in establishing a new world political and economic order… With the emergence of India and China, the standing of the Third World is getting stronger by the year.”

Addressing a meeting organised by Indo-China Friendship Association (ICFA), Tamil Nadu Committee, the Chinese envoy said, “There has been sayings of a Century of Asia. But there can be no Century of Asia for a risen China or a risen India only. It will come only when both China and India are risen and united.”

“Seeds of confusion”

China and India are the two largest and fastest growing economies and were the main engines for global economic recovery. As such, the two countries had been coordinating and cooperating to safeguard the interests of developing countries in crucial issues such as climate change, he said.

Stating that misunderstandings had existed between the two Asian giants, he blamed the “European colonists” for sowing the seeds of confusion. Both countries had suffered in the hands of colonialist powers.

Strongly disputing reports of Chinese aggression, he said that the border was not demarcated and both sides have different understandings of the position of Line of Actual Control and as such it was unavoidable for patrols to cross areas claimed by the other side.

He also recalled statements by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in Parliament that he did not believe China was going to invade India.

As regards reports of computer hacking, he said that China itself was the largest victim of such crimes. Further, he pointed out that India's IT industry was more advanced as it was the world's back office and had the best IT engineers.

Trade surplus

China's trade surplus with India was due to its comparative advantage in manufacturing high quality Chinese goods which were also affordable and brought profits to Indian traders and benefits to consumers.

He recalled that China's Premier Wen Jiabo had stated that friendliness accounted for 99.99 per cent of the 2,200 year old Sino-Indian exchanges with misunderstandings merely 0.01 per cent.

Mr. Niu Qingbao said that bilateral trade totalled US $ 61.7 billion last year, a growth of 21 times since 2000 with China being India's largest trading partner and India being China's largest trade partner in South Asia and the two-way trade and investment had seen rapid growth.

F.H. Fernandes, vice-president, ICFA National Committee, recalled that India under Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru was the first country to accord diplomatic recognition to the People's Republic of China in 1949.


SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 22773
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 31 Dec 2011 15:38

Japan-India ties, cause of concern to China: State Media
Japan’s move to lift decades-old ban on arms exports and its efforts to strengthen defence ties with India are a cause of concern to China, the state-run media here said.

Japan’s decision, which would allow its companies to take part in arms development projects with countries other than the US, was followed by a $ 15 billion currency swap deal between Japan and India, ‘China Daily’ reported.

Japanese and Indian navies are also expected to hold their first joint drill next year.

The daily noted that Japan had just concluded its first-ever trilateral dialogue with the US and India in Washington.

Japan’s moves toward boosting its military might will send alarming signals across Asia, it quoted Shi Yinhong, a researcher at the China Institute of International Studies in Beijing, as saying.

An arms trade between Japan and India may further deepen tensions in the Asia-Pacific because China is a potential target of the two evolving strategic partnership, Zhao Gancheng, director of the South Asia research department at the Shanghai Institute for International Studies, claimed.

“In terms of political safety, (Japan) wants to counter China by linking with countries such as the US, India and Australia. But on the other hand, it is aware of the fact that Sino-Japanese relations are a prerequisite for its quest to become a normal country. So personally, I think the policy is itself contradictory,” Zhao was quoted as saying.

Nonetheless, Liu Jiangyong, an expert on Japan studies at Tsinghua University, said Tokyo’s incentives are primarily economic.

Liu said the long-term impact of this latest policy change will be detrimental for China.

“From now on, Japan can export weapons to its neighbours and allies such as India, the Philippines and Australia.

At first, these may be for maritime security. But offensive weapons may eventually enter the picture, because that’s the only way to fuel its indigenous defence industry,” he said.

“When these countries engage in maritime disputes with China — that’s when the impact of this policy may come to affect us,” Liu said.

Pan Zheng, a researcher at the National Defence University, called the Japanese move “a serious violation of the Peace Constitution“.

The move’s impact, he said, will be extremely significant as “Japan broadens its own military influence through boosting military cooperation with other countries in the name of arms trade”.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 31 Dec 2011 16:16

New China food safety scandal widens to oil, peanuts
BEIJING — Chinese authorities in a southern boomtown have detected a cancer-causing toxin in peanuts and cooking oil that was only recently discovered in milk, in the nation's latest food safety scandal.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 31 Dec 2011 16:20

Rat fever kills 24 people in eastern China
Beijing: Twenty four people died in an eastern China province this year after suffering from viral hemorrhagic fever that spreads through rats, figures released by the provincial health bureau said on Saturday.

Among the 24 deaths reported from Shandong, 13 were in Qingdao, a port city in the province. Most of the cases were recorded after October, it said, adding that the number of deaths are 11 more than last year.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 01 Jan 2012 00:53

Peking University Professor Says China Reform a Dead End
A professor at Peking University, one of the most prestigious institutions of higher education in China, has gone out on a limb in recent remarks in Taiwan, denouncing the Chinese communist political system and saying that he and his colleagues have given up hope in the Communist Party.

Dr. Xia Yeliang, an economics professor, also concluded in the seminar at National Taiwan University on Dec. 18 that the economic reforms of the last 30 years are as far as it is going to go, because the Chinese Communist Party will not willingly relinquish its monopoly on power. There will be no democratic political reform in China under the Party, he said.

“If the people in China want democracy, the society at large need to pressure the CCP,” he said.

“One-party ruling easily leads to a tyrannical government due to the lack of supervision and restraining mechanisms,” he said.

He said that the CCP has meticulously controlled public opinion by monopolizing the media, where all televisions, radios, newspapers, and publishers—in China, and in Hong Kong, and Taiwan to a lesser extent—are transmitting the CCP’s propaganda in one way or another.


All universities in China are public schools directly controlled by the CCP, he said.

The Party also maintains what it calls a “stable society” through what Xia calls “national terrorism,” which cost 570 billion yuan (US$90 billion) last year, more than the country’s entire military expenses. This year the operation is estimated to exceed US$95 billion, he said.

When asked by a member of the audience whether China is a capitalist or socialist country, Xia allowed that there are capitalist themes, but that it is really state monopolistic capitalism, elitist capitalism, and nepotistic capitalism, instead of free market capitalism.

“They adopt whatever is beneficial for them,” he said of Party officials. “They have neither religious belief nor political ideals. They worship money.”

Xia noted that the number of people involved in local protests in China has gone from dozens or thousands in the past to tens of thousands at a time now. The protests take place in one village after another, and desperate people are willing to die for their appeals, having been pushed so far by the regime.

He believes that there will be more widespread and violent social conflicts which, if not diffused, could bring an end to the communist regime. Totalitarian regimes in general, he said, are all bound to end sooner or later. If most of people in the country believe that the regime is corrupt, in decline, and its doings go against the general welfare, then it is only natural that the people will overthrow it, he said. That will take a variety of social forces working over a period of time, he said.

Is he in a hurry to get his 72?

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 01 Jan 2012 01:07

Youth-Led Protests Gain Momentum in China
Just as protests were winding down in Wukan, another standoff between the people and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) was taking place 80 miles to the east: residents of Guangdong Province’s Haimen Township, in Shantou City, stepped up another round of protests against a proposed coal-fired power plant and its expected environmental pollution. And like in Wukan, energetic young people with a newfound sense of their own rights played an important role.

Tens of thousands of Haimen residents took to the streets from Dec. 20–21, blocking a highway. Riot police were dispatched and violence deployed. Authorities later announced that they would halt the construction of the power plant, but in obvious disbelief, villagers continued to protest.

A rally on Dec. 23 was better organized: under the direction of two young men in their early 20s, Fang and Lin, protesters were prepared. Demonstrators had face masks and mint toothpaste over their noses and mouths, and buckets of water were provided for them to bathe their irritated eyes.

When a round of tear gas was discharged, the crowd would disperse while young demonstrators would quickly scurry to pick up the canisters and throw them into the field, where others were waiting to extinguish them with water.

The crowd had expanded to the tens of thousands by the end of the afternoon.

Authorities made a request at 4:30 p.m. to negotiate with the representatives of the demonstrators. Lin and Fang volunteered as representatives.

Young people in their late teens and early twenties were a driving force in the Haimen demonstrations, according to several accounts in Hong Kong and Chinese media. Young people told Oriental Daily, a Hong Kong-based newspaper, that after seeing evidence of pollution in their hometown (there was a coal-fired power plant built there some years ago that polluted the air and water, destroying the local fishery and increasing the rate of cancer), they had to stand up for their own people.

One resident, Mr. Lin, told The Epoch Times that elementary and high school students in the Haimen area participated in the protests, as well as factory workers and others. Many high school students were at the front of the crowd, according to Mr. Mao, who was reached by phone at the scene.

“Many of those youngsters were beaten,” he said. “I am worried that more people will die if things continue to be this way. Two young men died yesterday, a 17-year-old and a 24-year-old,” Mao said. News of two deaths at the hands of police was circulated on Sina Weibo, a popular microblogging service, but is yet to be confirmed.

Two student organizations from Shantou and Chaozhou published a joint letter asking police to stop violence, illegal detention, and torture, and called central authorities to investigate. Oriental Daily speculated that the protest in Haimen could erupt into a student movement across China, though this has yet to be seen.

One of the organizations said they are attempting to break away from a “stiff and rigid system,” to pave the way for civil society in China, and that as the younger generation they are willing to shoulder that responsibility.

Hong Kong media also reported that around a dozen youth were apprehended and secreted away. Ming Pao reported that three were released, but five are still in detention. Thousands continued to rally in front of the Haimen township Party building on Dec. 24–25, demanding the release of protesters in custody.

Over 10 villages in the Chaozhou and Shantou region have begun to initiate Wukan-style initiatives recently, according to Radio Free Asia (RFA). Some are said to be planning large-scale demonstrations.

Huang Qi, founder of Chinese human rights advocacy website 64tianwang.com, told RFA that the Wukan incident is a sign that a new form of peasant movement has begun in China.

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20825
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Prem » 01 Jan 2012 04:12

Report: Chinese man dies of bird flu
http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/12/31/re ... -bird-flu/
39-year-old man in southern China died Saturday from what appears to be a contagious strain of avian flu, state media reported Saturday.The man - identified by Xinhua as a bus driver with the surname Chen - was hospitalized in Shenzhen on December 21 as he battled a fever. He tested positive for the H5N1 avian influenza virus, the provincial health department said in a statement, according to the official news agency.
The man had not traveled out of the city of Shenzhen, nor did he have direct contact with poultry in the month before he came down with the fever, according to the department.Shenzhen borders Hong Kong, where more than 17,000 chickens were ordered culled on the same day that Chen was hospitalized. That decision came after a chicken carcass tested positive for avian flu.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 22773
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 01 Jan 2012 09:28

Centre for India-China Studies Mooted at Madurai-Kamaraj University
China's Consul General in Mumbai, Niu Qingbao, visited Madurai Kamaraj University here on Friday and had discussion on some key proposals for ‘academic partnership.'

Earlier, in the meeting, several questions on Sino-Indian ties, Chinese aggression in 1962, influence of Buddhism, no-first strike of nuclear weapons and nuclear capability of both the countries were posed to the Consul General. {It would be interesting to know the Consul's answers to these questions. The one I posted earlier did not talk about these questions}

“The essence of the discussion was that India and China must strengthen their bilateral ties and mutual trust so that the domination of Western powers can be ended. If the distrust is removed and if we have better understanding among us, there will be peace and prosperity for both the rising powers,” Dr. Chelladurai had stressed.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 22773
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 01 Jan 2012 10:59

The Fallen God: Mao - Ananth Krishnan in The Hindu
Excerpts
Yuelu is the first stop on what has now unofficially become the Mao Pilgrimage Tour. The second stop is Shaoshan, his birthplace
Shaoshan's main square is, however, the main draw for visitors. A towering Mao statue, one of the largest in China, casts a shadow over the main square. The devotees — there is no more apt description — walk around the statue slowly, their heads respectfully lowered. They circle the statue four times, before kneeling down in front of it. As they place a wreath at Mao's feet, some utter prayers. Many are moved to tears.
There are two aspects to this devotion, says Chen Yuxiang, who is a professor at the Marxism School of Hunan University, whose campus today houses the Yuelu Academy. The first, he says, is the pervasive belief of most Chinese today that Mao was a great man, despite an awareness of all his flaws, from the 1958 Great Leap Forward and subsequent famine, which claimed the lives of an estimated 30 million Chinese, to the devastating Cultural Revolution (1966-76). Government propaganda, which emphasises Mao's achievements as the People's Republic's founding father while downplaying his mistakes, has contributed to this perception.
The second reason, Professor Chen says, is a calculated commercial attempt to build a “Red tourism” industry. Last year, more than five million visitors descended on Shaoshan. Part of the tourism effort has been to create an image of Shaoshan as an almost mystical place of pilgrimage. One popular story that locals like to tell visitors is when the Mao statue was unveiled in 1996, both the Sun and the Moon rose together. Others say this town of green fields and lakes, which is surrounded by mountains, has the best feng shui in all of China, which passes positive energy to visitors.
One young Changsha girl, who works in the town's booming entertainment industry and carries a Louis Vuitton bag, said she had visited Shaoshan on three occasions. On each trip, she made a sizeable donation. She said her prayers “always came true”. “In the 20th century Mao in China was treated no different as a God,” Professor Chen told me.“In China now, many people have no belief so they need to have some source of spiritual support. In part it is the belief Mao was a great man. But encouraging Mao as a god is also a way to earn money.
Earlier this year, a leading Chinese economist, Mao Yushi, triggered heated debate when he penned an article flaying Mao's legacy. “In Mao Zedong's eyes, the people were just meat and muscle,” he wrote. “They were tools he used to shout ‘Long Live'. His thirst for power dominated his life, and to this end, he went entirely mad.” Such explicit criticisms are rarely voiced in China, in spite of a consensus among historians of Mao's direct responsibility for both the calamitous Great Leap Forward and the cruelties of the Cultural Revolution, even as the CPC continues to officially largely blame Mao's associates for the disasters.
The article was taken down by censors, but not before it unleashed a storm of controversy. Nationalists and the “New Left” lambasted Mao Yushi. Some called for his arrest, and others threatened violence. What was remarkable was that a number of liberal intellectuals openly came to his defence. I visited Mao Yushi, now 82, in his modest west Beijing apartment and asked him why he wrote that essay. “My view,” he said, “is that the legitimacy of the CPC comes from success in conducting reform and opening up, and not because of Mao.”
“The fact is in the last 50 years, we have had many problems because of Mao Zedong Thought,” Professor Chen told me when I asked him about the temple. “Mao believed we needed violent revolution for independence. The main problem was that after the PRC was founded, we continued to use violent revolutionary ways to solve all problems. This has been his biggest negative influence.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 01 Jan 2012 12:05

China’s secrecy about its past could stifle its future
NINGBO, China

With China stumping assertively on the world stage, one might think Beijing would be open, even gracious, about the country’s past. To the contrary, history remains an exceedingly sensitive subject here, drawing relentless attention from authorities anxious to keep all skeletons safely in closets.

As a university professor in China, I face the consequences of this official apprehension every day. My young, bright students know little about their country’s recent past. What they do know tends to agree with government-sponsored discourse on the pride and glory of China’s rise after a century of humiliation by Western powers. Library and bookstore shelves tell, with enviable conviction, this same story of national grandeur. And it is hard to get around that government-approved tale.

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 19360
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Philip » 01 Jan 2012 12:06

Regardless of China's economic progress,whether it is at a trot or a gallop,the simple fact is that as the world's largest nation population wise,China has the most unenviable task of keeping its people content and not in revolt.500 years of colonialism affected both China and India,which then were the world's two richest nations.Opium was deliberately dumped into China by the British in exchange for hard cash,so who was the world's largest drug cartel then,John Company and the British govt!

Having cast off the shackles of colonialism and the Japanese excesses of WW2,the Chinese picked themselves up into a nation thanks to Chairman Mao.Communism was his opium for the masses.Sadly,that fix couldn't feed his hundreds of millions and after bouts of experimentation and the arrival of Deng,who said that being rich was great,put the powerhouse of the Chinese people into making his country the world's sweatshop. From sweatshop to steel shop has been the upward path of the PRC and a relentless,focussed plan to modernise China allowing all its private enterepreneurial resources to also bloom,has turned China into becoming the most important nation on the planet after the US.

Having seen over the last 500 years and during WW2,the suffering of its people,Chinese paranoia today is the equivalent in Asia of the similar sentiment which Russians too feel.In WW2,the Russians lost over 20M people,far greater than any other nation or western casualties put together.the "rape of Nanking" and the bestial manner in which the Japanese cruised through Asia,more often than not,has remained a very sore point with the Chinese.Therefore,India cosying up with its old enemy,Japan,whose militaristic nature lies just beneath its skin,and rising with each day,alarms the Chinese no end.

Unfortunately,Chinese diplomacy leaves much to be desired.China's worst enemy is itself.It grandly believes itself to be the "Middle Kingdom",between heaven and earth,superior to all other nationalities and ethnic entities.It thus displays the Asian equivalent and arrogance of the Nazis and their misconceived belief in "Aryan" racial superiority.The Chinese envoy to India asking a journo to "shut up" was a display of that very arrogance of the Asian "Nazi.Chinese moves to encircle India and restrain it "below the Himalayas" using rent-boy Pak,the world's worst terrorist state as its catspaw,while continuing to nibble at Indian territory all along the disputed border,and shockingly claims Indian states as belong to it or 'disputed" as with Ar.P. and Kashmir,only alarms India even more.Like a modern day pirate,the PLAN is also greedily bribing small IOR entities to use their ports as bases for PLAN warships and subs.As for its relations with other Asian states,China has deployed its troops in islands far from its coast off the shores of the Phillipines and other ASEAN states,claiming them as its own as well as the OEZ.Such actions inevitably lead one day to conflict,which is why the nations of Asia,from SoKo,Japan,Taiwan,Vietnam,the ASEAN states,Oz and India, are all beefing up their navies in order to stop the relentless surge in naval might of the PLAN,the fastest growing navy in the world.

In such a scenario,India must keep all its options open.While one personally feel that getting drawn into a US-led anti-Chinese Asian version of NATO is a catastrophic act,as we will eventually be let down by the US,as it has done to all its allies in Asia,etc. during and since the last century,post WW-2,India cannot but rearm itself and make plans to face a joint Sino-Pak military misadventure,especially when China;s key ally and catspaw,Pak,is going down the tube! As Pak weakens and descend into the abyss,its capacity to harm India actually increases as its military power as the only strength that it possesses.

Therefore cutting India down to size is essential for the PRC and the sooner it does so the better.Unfortunately,the indifference to India's security,internal and external, by the UPA regime,led by an apparent invisible,deaf,dumb and blind mouse-like figure,one Dr.Who(?),is no match for the skullduggery of Chairman Hu! Prodded on in the backside by his Washington masters,we are now engaged with Japan (welcome back old ally!) to forge a ring of steel on the high seas along with Oz-a nation that until recently thought that Indians ate leaves,lived in trees and required Oz coaches to teach it cricket,and a motley assortment of willing ASEAN states to effect a "cordon sanitaire" to the PRC in Indo-Pacific waters when required.This is going to enrage China even further and we will see some sort of reaction from it first in the Af-Pak region.

China should realise that if it wants India to remain independent and not participate in any US-led military alliance,it should get serious and drop its outrageous demands on our territory,that J&K is disputed and treat the Tibetans with the respect and honour that they deserve.Let the geriatric leadership of Zhong-nan-hai remember that India too can declare Tibet as an Indian protectorate,which is its legal right to do so as Buddhism spread into Tibet from India,recognise Taiwan and establish a permanent naval presence in the Indo-China Sea.Chairman Hu should also realise that in the near future,Dr. Who in India will be truly a Q mark,replaced with a more nationalist leadership either from the right of the political spectrum or a coalition of non-UPA entities who will be far more willing to take on China and give it the upturned finger,if it continues with its abominable and despicable behaviour ,more suited to the gutter than an exalted level between heaven and earth!

shiv
BRF Oldie
Posts: 35041
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Pindliyon ka Gooda

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby shiv » 01 Jan 2012 12:13

cross post from other forum
Selamat Pagi wrote:
VikramS wrote:Then we have someone here claim that all the reports about Tinnamen Square and tanks were false and only a few people died and those too were armed, and the reports of the death are all Western propaganda and the journalists reporting the killings were not there and all kind of "rewriting of history".


Strange isnt it ? The western "free" press has been lying about TAM all these years while the CCP has been closer to the truth.

http://ilookchina.net/2011/07/26/the-ti ... uare-hoax/

Don't just believe a hoax just to satisfy your hatred of the CCP.


Not strange.

When bird flu broke out in China the news of multiple deaths was hidden initially. When the high speed train crash took place in China the number o deaths announced was kept low initially. very often free thinking Chinese on blogs and dissidents have stated news about China and a lot of the moroninc-robotic "I support the Commie party lies" indoctrinated types get very upset

China is accused of hiding things which it does. The western press criticises India too, but in a different way. And Chinese join that criticism merrily. India hides very little so India is criticised for poverty, hunger, filth, squalor abortion of female fetuses etc.

There are abortion clinics in China too. The information is available from a few free thinking Chinese. But how does the ChiCom straitjacketed party explain the skewed male to female ratio in China? You don't have God so it can't be an act of God. You deny abortion/killing of females so that's not happening. You stonewall and deny leading to allegations which you call "lies" How extraordinarily stupid for an ancient and wise civilization raped by a bunch of closed minded commie goons. :roll:

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20825
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Prem » 01 Jan 2012 12:21

We should in no rush to settle any dispute with PRC unless China makes unilateral concession and settle with India. They cant be number One as long as India maintain its current pace and position. If they get into fight with us , they can say good bye to their dream of being Middle Kingdom as we send them back to licking their wounds for long time. Chinese, if they are smart, must know that their strategic interests cant be served by antagonizing India. Them being Number one or even remain number 2 for long term depends on Indian goodwill. All the alliances are temporary in nature. We can and should join and go separate way as dicktated by our national interests. As long we keep and alliance help in maintaining the military balance, China cant emerge as a true unilateral global power, capabale of managing 21st century affairs .

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 01 Jan 2012 12:22

To add to shiv ji's post

Peking University Professor Says China Reform a Dead End
He said that the CCP has meticulously controlled public opinion by monopolizing the media, where all televisions, radios, newspapers, and publishers—in China, and in Hong Kong, and Taiwan to a lesser extent—are transmitting the CCP’s propaganda in one way or another.


Is the above the benchmark for "free" press?

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 19360
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Philip » 01 Jan 2012 22:58

Coming back to our response to China's perfidy,our stand is so diluted in public perception,that we seem almost afraid of farting in China's presence! There was a recent pic of a meeting between our Dr.Who? and Chinese strongman Hu.
I do not know how many saw the utterly shameful picture of our beloved PM meeting the Chinese overlord.Our PM's bow was so low and demeaning, that of a inferior,to his superior,while the Chinaman smugly looked on with just a mere nod from the head! In Asian tradition,especially in the Far East,there are different kinds of bowing.A deep bow from the waist (as delivered by MMS),from an inferior to one's superior,a less pronounced bow from the chest to one's equal and a nod from the head delivered by one's superior.Surely,our dear PM with his vast international experience and knowledge (one expects),or the mandarins of our MEA would've pointe dout toi him the significance of the bow? The pic made me so ashamed,as it looked exactly what our foreign policy towards China is worth,that of a vassal state kowtowing to its lord and master!

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 01 Jan 2012 23:10

Brother Says Missing China Rights Lawyer Held in Remote Prison
The brother of a prominent Chinese dissident lawyer who has been missing for 20 months says Gao Zhisheng is being held in a remote prison in far western China.

Gao Zhiyi said that he had finally received an official notice of a Beijing court's decision on Sunday. He said his brother is being held in the Shaya County Prison in Xinjiang.

Gao Zhisheng, who earlier said he had been kidnapped and tortured by Chinese authorities, had been missing for more than a year and a half, until state media reported last month that he had been sent back to prison for three years for violating his probation.

Gao was sentenced to three years in prison in 2006 for inciting subversion of state power. He was given five years of probation, effectively sparing him from prison, but has been detained without charges almost continuously since 2009.

Gao's wife, Geng He, left for the United States in early 2009 with their two children.

The lawyer, an outspoken critic of the government, has worked for the rights of some of China's most vulnerable people, including persecuted Christians, those arrested for reporting government corruption and land grabs, and miners working in unsafe conditions.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 01 Jan 2012 23:21

China continues Christmas crackdown on activists
Chen Xi, 45, was found guilty of "inciting subversion" after he wrote a series of articles criticising the Communist-led government for several websites.
"Severe punishment is the Chinese government's clear choice of response to spreading protests at home and in many parts of the world: it is determined to 'kill the chicken in order to frighten the monkeys'," said Ms Xia.
During Mr Chen's trial, his lawyer Sun Guangquan was repeatedly interrupted by the judge during the defence's argument.

Chen Xi was not allowed to read out his final statement but managed to tell the court he was innocent.

Like Chen Wei, who was jailed on Friday, Chen Xi said China's notoriously rigged legal system meant an appeal was pointless.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 02 Jan 2012 00:28

Why Is Nepal Cracking Down on Tibetan Refugees?
Friction between Chinese authorities and the five million Tibetans who live within the borders of China is on the rise, and nowhere is the strife more apparent than in the neighboring nation of Nepal.
According to an informal arrangement hammered out twenty-two years ago between the government of Nepal and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (U.N.H.C.R.), Kathmandu pledged to allow Tibetans to travel through Nepal en route to India, and to facilitate their transit. Lately, however, this established protocol has been ignored with increasing frequency. Nepalese police have been apprehending Tibetans far inside Nepal, robbing them, and then returning them to Tibet at gunpoint, where they are typically imprisoned and not uncommonly tortured by the Chinese.

These violations of the U.N.H.C.R. agreement and international law were bought and paid for by Beijing. According to a confidential U.S. embassy cable published by WikiLeaks in 2010, China “rewards [Nepalese forces] by providing financial incentives to officers who hand over Tibetans attempting to exit China.” Another cable stated, “Beijing has asked Kathmandu to step up patrols … and make it more difficult for Tibetans to enter Nepal.”
The upshot is that a generation of Tibetans who’ve spent their entire lives in Nepal don’t exist as far as the Nepalese bureaucracy is concerned. Lacking R.C.s, these young refugees cannot obtain driver’s licenses, apply for jobs, or open bank accounts. It is difficult or impossible for them to attend Nepalese schools. Without an R.C., a Tibetan has no legal right to remain in Nepal and may be deported to China at any time—yet Kathmandu refuses to provide these refugees with travel documents that would allow them to immigrate to nations such as the U.S., Canada, and India, where they have been offered asylum.
Beijing is adamant that granting concessions to any Tibetans, even Tibetans in exile, poses a dire threat. The great fear is that Tibetan dissent will inflame other ethnic groups inside China, initiating a chain reaction that culminates in the People’s Republic suffering the same fate as the Soviet Union.

ashish raval
BRFite
Posts: 1371
Joined: 10 Aug 2006 00:49
Location: London
Contact:

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby ashish raval » 02 Jan 2012 06:19

Karma sooner or later catches up. It did with every non-dharmic ancient civilisations that suppressed innocent and non violent people around the world. China will see that too. Time is a powerful weapon. Tibetans will have their promised land and china will be broken on historical lines sooner or later. That is their destiny.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 22773
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 02 Jan 2012 07:36

Philip wrote:Coming back to our response to China's perfidy,our stand is so diluted in public perception,that we seem almost afraid of farting in China's presence! There was a recent pic of a meeting between our Dr.Who? and Chinese strongman Hu.
I do not know how many saw the utterly shameful picture of our beloved PM meeting the Chinese overlord.Our PM's bow was so low and demeaning, that of a inferior,to his superior,while the Chinaman smugly looked on with just a mere nod from the head!

I haven't seen that pix. But, almost always, the posture of our leaders when meeting or talking to leaders from other nations, seems to convey a sense of insecurity or timidness. They might be delivering the punches in their talks with the foreign leaders but they should also appear to look confident. The only pix that I saw that was very satisfying was that of Mrs. IG talking to Pres. Nixon. The usual roles were reversed.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 02 Jan 2012 10:09

Liu Xiaobo’s Plea for the Human Spirit
“I have no enemies, and no hatred.” Liu Xiaobo, the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize winner, spoke those words on Dec. 23, 2009, just before he was sentenced to 11 years in prison for “incitement of subversion of state power.” It was his fourth jail term since the Tiananmen Square massacre of 1989.
Liu was the prime mover (although not the originator) of Charter 08, the petition signed by several thousand Chinese who demanded an accountable government and freedoms of speech, assembly, press and religion. The petition was the main evidence the Chinese government used against Liu when it sent him to prison in 2009, but his accusers might have reached further still, through his hundreds of articles and poems, and his 17 books. Even his 1988 Ph.D. dissertation, “Aesthetics and Human Freedom,” was “a plea for liberation of the human spirit,” as Link explains in his introduction.

Liu has always been most animated by democracy. This concern underlies his essays on Taiwan, Gorbachev’s reforms in the Soviet Union, the failures and lies of the Mao era, the “miracle” of the Deng Xiaoping reforms after Mao’s death in 1976 and, perhaps most emotively, Tibet. Even while Beijing condemned the Dalai Lama as “a wolf in monk’s clothing,” Liu breathtakingly suggested in 2008 that China could solve its ethnic unrest by inviting “the Dalai Lama back to China to serve as our nation’s president. . . . Such a move would make best use of the Dalai Lama’s stature in Tibet and around the world.”

An accomplished poet, Liu pays close attention to the power of language. Noting that the party charged him with “incitement of subversion of state power,” he said this was an excellent example “of treating words as crimes, which itself is an extension into the present day of China’s antique practice called ‘literary inquisition’ ” — a practice exemplified by the 18th-century emperor Qianlong’s purge of subversive books.

More fervently still — Liu never misses an opportunity to skewer Communist Party hypocrisy — he recalls that in the years before its victory in 1949, the party’s newspapers “were constantly criticizing the Chiang Kai-shek regime for its repression of free speech and often issued loud appeals on behalf of persecuted voices of conscience.” He contrasts this with the execution during the Cultural Revolution of Zhang Zhixin, who was condemned to death for criticizing the Mao cult; before Zhang was shot, her throat was cut so she could not cry out a final denunciation.

I recall Liu’s arrival in Tiananmen Square in May 1989. An angular, awkward, bespectacled man bending over and waving his arms, he exhorted the demonstrators to add democracy to their demands for a free press and an end to corruption. On June 2, he and three friends announced the start of a hunger strike. “We seek not death,” they read out to a crowd that had fallen silent, “but to live true lives.” They emphasized that “we should recognize that all Chinese citizens are strangers to the matter of running a country on democratic principles. . . . We must not let hatred or violence poison our thinking. . . . We are citizens before we are anything else.” The next night the tanks and soldiers of the People’s Liberation Army crashed into the square and began the slaughter of many hundreds. Liu and a few others negotiated with the soldiers to allow the surviving students to leave the square in safety.

Some of Liu’s most eloquent observations came afterward. He recalls “the cruelty of the executioners and, even more clearly, the brightness of humanity that shone in the midst of great terror.” Liu faults himself for seeking shelter after the massacre rather than staying in the square to help the victims. Soon after, he was imprisoned for the first time — the sentence was for 19 months. In 2003 he wrote, “I remain acutely aware that I am the lucky and undeserving survivor of a massacre in the waning years of a dictatorship.” Referring to himself ironically as “one of those ‘influential’ figures” on the night of the killings, Liu remembers that “all the people who . . . went out to rescue the wounded or received heavy sentences were common people,” and that “the blood of ordinary people has gone to nourish the reputations of opportunists large and small, people who run around presenting themselves as the leaders of a ‘people’s movement.’ ” I think I know who Liu means, but those who survived, like him, were also heroes who waited to flee until death was staring them in the face.

Nothing escapes Liu’s scalpel. The economic reforms that have transfixed many foreigners who claim that China is on its way to being No. 1 were not the result, he insists, of top-down policies. They arose, he says, from demonstrations in Beijing and the countryside that began even while Mao was alive: peasants called for control over the crops they grew, and ordinary workers like Wei Jingsheng put their mark on Democracy Wall in 1978-79. Liu writes that Deng Xiaoping and his colleagues in the Chinese leadership granted a little more space to those who demanded to be treated like citizens — before stamping on them. “These spontaneous popular forces for reform were rooted in the human longing for freedom and justice, not some slogans of the rulers.”

Always he sees words as the party’s enemy: “Democracy Wall laid a foundation for language — and hence a system of values — that was independent of official ideology.” In a foreword to “No Enemies, No Hatred,” the late Vaclav Havel observed that Charter 08 “articulated an alternative vision of China, challenging the official line that any decisions on reforms are the exclusive province of the state.” Liu notes that the Internet has provided China’s people with news and views of the world hitherto denied them and a way to communicate instantly and often safely. But he laments that “under the guise of restoring national honor . . . thuggish language that unabashedly celebrates violence, race hatred and warmongering passion now haunts the Chinese Internet.”

After Liu was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2010, Beijing cowed 16 ambassadors to Norway into shunning the ceremony. An empty chair on the Oslo stage highlighted Liu’s absence. His words, however, are always with us. Already in 2003, Liu wrote that those “who dare to speak out about major public events may not receive tangible benefits, but they receive the very considerable reward of high moral reputation among fellow Chinese as well as in the international community.” Within Liu’s dark Communist world, the court’s judgment was wholly correct: “Defendant Liu Xiaobo has committed the crime of incitement to subvert state power.”

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20825
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Prem » 02 Jan 2012 11:18

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/02/opini ... .html?_r=1
In China, the Grievances Keep Coming
By YU HUA
Victims of corruption and injustice have no faith in the law, and yet they dream that an upright official will emerge to right their wrongs. Although a complaint mechanism is in place at all levels of Chinese government, petitioners seem to believe that the central authorities are less susceptible to corruption, and so make Beijing their destination. By some estimates, more than 10 million complaints are filed around the country each year, far more than are heard by the regular courts.Often, the State Bureau for Letters and Visits simply goes through the motions of registering the complaints, then asks the petitioners’ local governments to look into them. But years of failure have sharpened the petitioners’ wits. They know that the only way they can put pressure on their local governments is by persistent, repeated visits to Beijing, and they realize that collective visits are even more effective. The government rigidly controls demonstrations, but the collective submission of a complaint remains a means for ordinary people to exert pressure. . In the fall of 2007, during the Chinese Communist Party’s 17th Congress, a man from Shandong Province phoned his village chief and told him he was in Tianjin and about to board a train for Beijing to appeal a miscarriage of justice. The village chief was shocked: if the petitioner were to appear in Tiananmen Square at such a prominent moment, not only would the chief lose his job, but his immediate superiors — the township and county chiefs — would be disgraced as well. He begged the villager not to go to Beijing. All right, the man said, but there was a price for his acquiescence: 20,000 yuan, about $2,600 at the time. The village chief put down the phone, withdrew this sum from public funds, and personally delivered it that very day, to the man’s wife.
The pay-off should not surprise us. Alarmed by worsening social unrest, government officials have adopted “stability maintenance” as a mantra — and a pretext to stifle protest. While the grievance process coexists politely with the regular legal system, the insistence on maintaining stability is, all too often, utterly at odds with it.


In China, an extramarital love interest who comes between a happy couple is known pejoratively as “Little Three.” The expression appears in a joke about three kindergartners who want to play house.

“I’ll be the daddy,” the boy says.

“I’ll be the mommy,” one girl says.

Another girl frowns: “I guess I’ll have to be Little Three.”

If the law, the grievance process and stability maintenance were ever to play house, I think we’d see the following exchange:

“I’m the daddy,” Stability Maintenance says.

“I’m the mommy,” Grievance Process says.

The Law pouts. “Well, I’m Little Three.”

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 22773
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 02 Jan 2012 15:17


pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 02 Jan 2012 19:52

Crowd Riots over Mosque Demolition in China
(BEIJING) — A crowd of Muslims fought with police who demolished a mosque in China's northwest, a police employee and a human rights group said Monday.

The violence erupted Friday in Hexi, a town in the Ningxia region, after the mosque was declared an "illegal religious place" and about 1,000 officers arrived to demolish it, the Hong Kong-based Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy said.

It said 50 people were injured and more than 100 detained after several hundred members of China's Muslim Hui minority tried to stop the demolition. It cited a villager as saying two people died, but said it could not confirm that.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 02 Jan 2012 21:07

Thousands protest in central China over investment scams
Beijing: Thousands of protesters converged on a train station in central China, angered over collapsing illegal investment schemes that residents said the government had failed to staunch, according to news reports and a government notice on Monday.

On Sunday, the protesters faced rows of police at the railway station in Anyang, Henan province, where some residents said their wanted to board trains to Beijing to lodge their complaints, Hong Kong’s Mingpao newspaper reported.

Pictures in that paper and on China’s “Weibo” microblogging site showed thousands of people milling around the square in front of the station, while police watched. The photos, which Reuters could not verify, showed no scenes of violence.

But news reports over past months have shown that collapsing illegal investment schemes have become a serious problem for the government in Anyang, a heavily rural area of 5.2 million people about 500 km (310 miles) southwest of Beijing.


Chinese city targets ‘get-rich-quick’ schemes
Authorities in the central China city of Anyang have announced a crackdown on illegal investment schemes after a weekend protest by thousands of people who claim they have been defrauded.

The protest over the government’s handling of a number of illegal investment vehicles is the latest in a spate of demonstrations and clashes between civilians and local governments over issues ranging from illegal land confiscations to labour rights.

Chinese savers have limited options for investment, partly because of negative real interest rates on bank deposits, and fraudulent get-rich-quick schemes have been a persistent problem in recent years.

In one of the most famous cases, a Ponzi scheme that sold ant farms to unsuspecting investors netted $400m before it was shut down by authorities and its founder sentenced to death.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 02 Jan 2012 23:02

Chinese President Hu Jintao warns of cultural warfare from West
The West is using cultural warfare to divide China, Chinese President Hu Jintao warned his Community Party yesterday.
Mr Hu called on the 80 million-plus Party members to fight "hostile international powers" and meet the "cultural demands" of the people.

"Hostile international powers are strengthening their efforts to Westernise and divide us," Mr Hu wrote in the latest edition of Communist Party's magazine, Seeking the Truth.
"The international culture of the West is strong while we are weak," Mr Hu's article said. "Ideological and cultural fields are their [western forces'] main targets," Mr Hu wrote.
He also said the Party must meet the "growing spiritual and cultural demands of the people".
Mr Hu's article is also part of general Party rhetoric aimed at countering the growing influence of the internet and increasing commercialism in China – all of which is leading to a more confident and louder public criticism of the government.

Spooked since the start of the Arab Spring uprisings a year ago, Beijing has been further tightening internet and media control in an attempt to "improve positive publicity" and guide public opinion.

Western-style TV programmes such as talent shows – which have proved a huge hit in China – have also been targeted in the crackdown.

The Four Olds
The Four Olds or the Four Old Things were Old Customs, Old Culture, Old Habits, and Old Ideas. One of the stated goals of the Cultural Revolution in the People's Republic of China was to bring an end to the Four Olds. The campaign to destroy the Four Olds began in Beijing on August 20, 1966, shortly after the launch of the Cultural Revolution.

On How the Chinese Communist Party Destroyed Traditional Culture
The CCP has devoted the nation's resources to destroying China's rich traditional culture. The CCP's destruction of Chinese culture has been planned, well organized, and systematic, made possible by the state's use of violence. Since its establishment, the CCP has never stopped "revolutionizing" Chinese culture in the attempt to completely destroy its spirit.

Murugan
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4186
Joined: 03 Oct 2002 11:31
Location: Smoking Piskobidis

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Murugan » 03 Jan 2012 16:01

Made in India, faked in China - $5-billion loss

Chinese manufacturers are increasingly 'faking' popular Indian products of consumer goods giants such as Dabur and ITC, undermining the legitimacy of brands and causing losses worth as much as $5 billion annually, officials said.

'A lot of counterfeit Dabur products are made in China. We have conducted at least 20 raids in China but no proper action has been taken by the Chinese,' said Ashok Jain, general manager of finance at Dabur India, the country's fourth largest FMCG firm.

He said such fake products manufactured in China with 'Made-in-India' tag are supplied across the world, mostly in India and African countries.

'It causes huge damage to the brand. Those fake products are obviously not up to our standards and supplied at very low prices,' Jain told IANS.

Dabur, which has nearly $4 billion market capitalisation, operates in key consumer product categories like healthcare, skin care, hair care and oral care. The company's revenue last fiscal was $910 million.

Pradeep Dixit, a senior official of ITC, a $33-billion conglomerate, said the popular FMCG brands of the company were counterfeited by unscrupulous firms and supplied in domestic as well as foreign markets.

'Our popular cigarette brand is faked and supplied widely in the states like Chhattisgarh, Bihar and Uttar Pradesh,' he said.

'China is a big problem everybody is facing,' said S.K. Goel, chairman of the Central Board of Excise and Customs, told IANS.

Goel said the big international brands like Nokia, Adidas, Reebok and Nivea were also widely counterfeited in China and supplied in India and other parts of the world.

Chinese manufacturers are also faking drugs, endangering lives of patients. Fake drugs, carrying 'Made in India' tags, supplied from China were recently detained in Nigeria and other African countries.

K.K. Vyas, Delhi's deputy commissioner of police (crime), said the police have seized and confiscated a lot of fake and counterfeited products of popular brands in the national capital recently.

Vyas emphasised on the need for enhancing punishment for unscrupulous manufacturers and importers. 'Punishment needs to be enhanced. Also there is need that judiciary addresses these issues quickly.'

'Counterfeiting is a big menace. It is hurting everybody - consumers, industry and the exchequer,' said Anil Rajput, chairman of the anti-smuggling and anti-counterfeiting committee of Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI).

Recently, FICCI formed a panel called 'FICCI-Cascade' that expands into a committee on anti-smuggling and counterfeiting activities destroying the economy. Chaired by Rajput, the committee is working closely with the government to curb this menace.

According to a report by think tank Indiaforensic Research Foundation, the total loss to the economy annually due to crimes such as counterfeiting, commercial fraud, smuggling, drug trafficking, bank fraud, tax evasion and graft is estimated at Rs.22,528 crore.


Sify

shiv
BRF Oldie
Posts: 35041
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Pindliyon ka Gooda

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby shiv » 03 Jan 2012 18:12



The video above (second link) is a disquieting one. I always instinctively surmised from reading that Chinese had been converted to cultural boors. But this video makes it stark. The behavior of some Chinese trolls on BRF exactly shows that. But what has happened is that humans have a tendency to follow what they feel is good - having no culture and being asked to copy the west - it is not surprising that Hu Jintao is now shivering in his hanfu about western culture. But like Pakis - Chinese have no culture to return to - it has been erased.

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 03 Jan 2012 18:29

shiv wrote:The video above (second link) is a disquieting one. I always instinctively surmised from reading that Chinese had been converted to cultural boors. But this video makes it stark. The behavior of some Chinese trolls on BRF exactly shows that.

From one of my earlier post titled "Liu Xiaobo’s Plea for the Human Spirit"
Liu notes that the Internet has provided China’s people with news and views of the world hitherto denied them and a way to communicate instantly and often safely. But he laments that “under the guise of restoring national honor . . . thuggish language that unabashedly celebrates violence, race hatred and warmongering passion now haunts the Chinese Internet.

member_20317
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3171
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby member_20317 » 03 Jan 2012 18:45

Posted in responses to Wong for doing 'Sikhs = = Tinanmen' in the old thread 'Re: China Military Watch - Jan 11, 2011'



Wong, Sikhs are amongst the smaller communities in India but amongst the better educated ones. The community is exceedingly well represented in the armed forces at all levels and mostly die hard nationalists. Only rarely would you find a Sikh who would support your cause.

Sikhs were the first community that threw out the foreign supported terrorists, under their own provincial leadership. Most other communities in similar circumstances are yet to do that. I would most likely not be challenged if I venture out and say that our democracy has perhaps the biggest contribution from the Sikh community.

Lets for a second grant your wish and say Sikhs are an abused, exploited people (hard to see why Sikh pride will take this victim attitude). Quite like say Uyghurs and Tibeteans. Now we know for sure that Sikhs take part in the democratic process with all their might. Now tell me if you can say the same for Uyghurs and Tibeteans. Right now the situation is that a Han Chinese is afraid of a Han Chinese. Nobody Chinese believes the other will cast his lot with the other Chinese. No Han wants the other Han to decide for him. So CPC comes in as the High Priests of China. A bunch of people afraid of its own blood...what a joke.

member_20317
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3171
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby member_20317 » 03 Jan 2012 19:10

Philip wrote:the "Middle Kingdom",between heaven and earth,superior to all other nationalities and ethnic entities!


Trishanku Ka Swarg :lol:

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 03 Jan 2012 21:00

China's New Leaders Get in Line
BEIJING—China begins a once-a-decade leadership change in 2012 that could paralyze decision-making, stir infighting and expose flaws in an ossified political system—just when urgent action is needed to steer the world's second-largest economy.

The retirement of a generation of Communist Party leaders led by President Hu Jintao, expected by November, will come at a critical time for China as it grapples with flagging external demand, massive local government debt, rising labor costs, and a potential property-market collapse.
Yet the leadership change will make it hard for China to take decisive action. Candidates for promotion, locally and nationally, are anxious not to blemish their records, and retiring leaders are eager to preserve influence by promoting protégés. The slightest wrong move can feed into the secretive process that decides which interest groups have power under the new leadership.
The last big leadership change in 2002 marked the party's first peaceful and orderly transition of power. This one threatens to expose how it has failed to adapt its rigid and opaque decision-making process to suit an Internet-age Chinese populace that is increasingly informed and demanding.

Suppiah
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2569
Joined: 03 Oct 2002 11:31
Location: -
Contact:

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Suppiah » 03 Jan 2012 21:01

http://www.dawn.com/2012/01/02/muslims- ... osque.html

While Beijings puppets in India pretend to be liberals saving the local Muslims against the yeevil Hindus, their paymaster destroys mosques...

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 03 Jan 2012 23:01

China's New Cultural Revolution
No, it won't be as destructive as the original, in which Mao Zedong brought China to its knees in the late 1960s and early '70s. But his successor Hu Jintao has launched another culture-rectification campaign with goals that Mao would recognize: step up ideological struggle and fight back against Western encroachments.
It's not only the rhetoric that harkens back to Mao. Campaigns focusing on culture are often a sign of strife among the political elite. It's no coincidence that Mr. Hu's campaign coincides with the run-up to a major power transition at the end of 2012. Word out of Beijing says the jockeying for position is heated.

Such feuds often end badly for China. That's because the competition is framed in terms of loyalty to the Communist Party's core values of control. Those who argue in favor of a crackdown are at an advantage over those who might favor political reform.
Economic growth has contributed to its legitimacy, but the public's belief that only the Party can make China a strong country and hold hostile foreign forces at bay is its real trump card.

The question is how to maintain that illusion. The usual methods include shutting out alternative world views and fulminating against the foreign forces that are trying to hold back China's rise with "Cold War thinking."

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10255
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby pankajs » 03 Jan 2012 23:13

China's public sector: a different way of working
Chinese SOEs continue to remain mysterious to most outsiders. Confucian culture and Chinese leadership styles are dominant in China's highly centralised, hierarchical and tightly controlled public sector.
Here are five tips to developing effective relationships with the Chinese:

1. Understand the critical important concept of 'face'. Face has a much deeper meaning in China than in the West. Face matters in China the way that it just does not in the West. 'Face' is about dignity and respect, and a person's social role. An old saying is that a person would rather die than lose face. A person can lose face by declining a social or business function on a weak pretext, refusing a present, expressing emotions uncontrollably or being too independent. Loss of 'face' means reduced social resources to use in cultivating and developing one's connections or network.

Other interesting tidbits in the article.

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20825
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Prem » 04 Jan 2012 00:28

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-16394157
India warns traders after dispute in China's Yiwu city
India has warned its businessmen they are not safe to trade in the Chinese city of Yiwu after an angry dispute and a courtroom fracas there.An advisory on India's Beijing embassy website says businessmen can be "mistreated" in Yiwu and have "no guarantee of legal remedies".The warning came after India said one of its envoys was "manhandled" and collapsed at a volatile court aring.Chinese traders were demanding money owed by an Indian company.Two employees of the company, Deepak Raheja and Shyamsunder Agrawal, are under police protection.The Press Trust of India quoted Mr Raheja as saying they were under police guard at a hotel that was surrounded by a large crowd of locals.The pair have been held hostage by local traders for two weeks for non-payment of dues by their company, whose owner has allegedly fled the country.PTI says there is a strong Indian business tradition in Yiwu, with more than 100 Indian businessmen living there.
'Inadequate protection'
The strongly worded statement on the embassy website says that "Indian businessmen are cautioned to stay away from Yiwu". It adds: "Indian businessmen/traders can be illegally held under detention and mistreated by Chinese businessmen there.Based on experience, there is no guarantee that legal remedies will be readily available."Furthermore, in case of disputes arising, experience suggests that there is inadequate protection for safety of persons."Delhi says Mr Balachandran was denied medicine and collapsed as he tried to secure the release of the two Indians in the courtroom in Yiwu on 31 December.Mr Balachandran, attached to the Shanghai consulate, is a diabetic and fainted. He was taken to hospital in a semi-conscious state.On Sunday, he was moved to a hospital in Shanghai and his condition was said to have improved.


Return to “Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: KJo, Lisa, souravB and 32 guests