People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 06 Sep 2012 07:25

Visiting Chinese Defence Minister hands over cash to IAF pilots
In what turned out to be an awkward situation, visiting Chinese Defence Minister General Liang Guanglie’s expression of appreciation and goodwill gesture to the Indian Air Force (IAF) pilots who ferried him from Mumbai to New Delhi bordered on violation of protocol norms in India.

The visiting dignitary handed over two envelopes containing Rs. 50,000 each to the two IAF pilots who had flown him and his delegation to the capital on Monday for the delegation-level talks with Defence Minister A.K. Antony.

The sources said that it is a normal custom for visiting dignitaries to present mementos as a token of their appreciation for the services rendered to them and their delegation; but money is never offered. Officials, familiar with VIP flights, said that whenever Indian dignitaries use these aircraft for their travel abroad, small mementos like pens, ties and other tokens are given to the aircraft crew. They said that in some countries crews do accept money but not in India.

The sources said when the pilots opened the packets, they realised that these contained money. The pilots informed the IAF headquarters which in turn has written to the Ministry of Defence. The money would be deposited in the Government Treasury, the sources said. Officials were inclined to believe that the visiting Minister was probably not well briefed on the protocol and customs followed in such situations in India.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby ramana » 07 Sep 2012 00:10

They should put the money towards Ex-Service men's welfare Fund.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Kukreja » 07 Sep 2012 04:13

ramana wrote:They should put the money towards Ex-Service men's welfare Fund.

or donate it to the Dalai Lama for his causes or to other Tibetan charities in India :)

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Kati » 07 Sep 2012 04:40

According to chinese custom, money in envelopes are given to younger people by the seniors.
So is the chinese defence chief trying to convey the message that they are wise, senior,
powerful, and the indian side is immature, yet to grow up, and look up to the seniors for directions??????

This money giving issue has created a lot of consternation in MEA as well as in MoD.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Karan Dixit » 07 Sep 2012 08:43

We can use the money towards building border roads or runways. There is no need to do hai touba.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Suppiah » 07 Sep 2012 09:27

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp ... 868685.ece

China says Liang visit ‘successful’, but silent on cash gift to IAF pilots


The silence is not just on the part of Beijing..its puppets in India, mass murderers, and contract killing mafiosi have also gone silent. Had Ombaba done this, there would be noisy protests outside the embassy, 20 editorials by puppet yellows and two weeks of cover to cover coverage in yellow media.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 07 Sep 2012 10:28

Suppiah wrote:http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/article3868685.ece
China says Liang visit ‘successful’, but silent on cash gift to IAF pilots

The silence is not just on the part of Beijing..its puppets in India, mass murderers, and contract killing mafiosi have also gone silent. Had Ombaba done this, there would be noisy protests outside the embassy, 20 editorials by puppet yellows and two weeks of cover to cover coverage in yellow media.

Of course. The contrast is stark when we consider that on the day the General arrived in India and refused to visit Amar Jawan Jyoti, Comrade Budhdhadev was vociferously protesting his opposition to GoI ganging up with the US to isolate China. He never admonished the Chinese for being inimical to India, for aggressing Indian lands, for surrounding India, for transferring nukes & missiles to Pakistan specifically to target India etc.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Suppiah » 07 Sep 2012 10:58

I am glad though he did not visit the Amar Jawan Jyoti...that would be like chief of Nazi party visiting the holocaust memorial. These jawans died to protect us against commie scums.

I am no surprised at all that Beijing behaved that way. I am not even surprised that its puppets and their "intellectual" yellows are busy burying the whole pumpkin in the rice. That is sad, but understandable given their track record..they are paid to do that.

I sincerely wish those that get fooled by the anti-American rhetoric of these traitors (and thereby become useful idiots to the rapist goons) would let the scales drop from their eyes and see them for what they really are....they are perfectly okay with collaborating with the fanatics from Unkil-land to destroy Indian culture and heritage just as they are keen to become jihadi terrorists' mouthpieces.

India and China can be 'bhai-bhai' - the Chinese are a great nation. But any realistic start to that process will have to wait for commies to be thrown out of power there and their agents in India recede into further irrelevance.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby zlin » 09 Sep 2012 22:06

China makes history of taking 95 Paralympic golds in London

LONDON, Sept. 8 (Xinhua) -- China on Saturday made history of lifting its Paralympic gold count to 95 in London 2012, refreshing the record of 89 set in Beijing 2008.

With only one competition day to go, China is sure to top the Paralympic standings for the third consecutive time. So far, on the tally, China is leading with 95 gold, 71 silver and 65 bronze medals

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby kancha » 09 Sep 2012 22:11

I really don't know where to post this, so doing it here. The video is something like this:-

A Princeling in Christchurch ignores all warning signs & drives his BMW into a flooded street. Needless to say, he gets stuck & has to be rescued by the emergency services.
But the best part is at 1:20. After his rescue, he wants the firemen to actually push his car out of the water :rotfl:
The reply by the fireman is priceless! :rotfl:



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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Suppiah » 10 Sep 2012 06:43

^^ A lot of the ill-gotten wealth in PRC is ending up in 'safer' countries...they bring their boorish behaviour and obnoxious wealth in tow. Recently there was a Ferrari crash involving a PRC driver in Singapore that caused lot of heart burn...this guy called himself 'Financial Investor' at age 31!. Rumours in Chinese net was that he was a princeling that too of a drug dealer.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Lilo » 10 Sep 2012 08:11

Just to bring things on an even kneel..
A snippet from a Chindu news item on the Chinese defmin visit.
Liang visit is to avoid border “turbulence”
....
Asked about reports suggesting that the visiting Minister would give the Amar Jawan Jyoti a miss, the sources asserted that it was never on his itinerary. “Whether it was Pranab Mukherjee’s visit to China as Defence Minister in 2006 or the then Chinese Defence Minister’s visit to India in 2004, they did not visit any memorial for fallen soldiers. The fact is that the visit to the Amar Jawan Jyoti was never on the agenda. Neither did we propose that he visit the memorial, nor did he refuse to go.”
....
It seems there is no convention being adhered to of visiting fallen soldier memorials in India-China defence exchanges by either side.

Even though the source quoted in Chindu denies this , i guess in this specific case some one on our side may have infact proposed it (maybe out of turn as a cbm) as the visit progressed and the chinese could have promptly refused giving the unplanned overture.

And as usual the leaked details on this issue have been blown out to give an entirely different impression in the rest of our anglophone media.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby anupmisra » 10 Sep 2012 23:23

Construction and Real Estate Hinder China’s Growth
NY Times article. The heading does not reflect the actual picture the latest figures seem to portend.

The more numerous cranes looming above the skeletons of future high-rises move much less often, even by day, and are dark and deserted by night. The pattern among Chengdu’s construction cranes is evident across the country.
Even the service sector, still underdeveloped and widely seen by economists as full of potential, is showing signs of distress.
But the real problem, as signaled by the slow-moving cranes at high-rises in Chengdu, lies in fixed-asset investment, previously the mainstay of the Chinese economy.
The monthly data also includes extensive double-counting
The national government’s own index of real estate prices attracts skepticism from analysts.
Even before the release of Sunday’s data, some economists were already marking down their forecasts for China’s growth this year and next year.
Tao Wang, the China economist at UBS, did so on Friday, lowering her forecasts for the third quarter of this year to 7.3 percent and for the fourth quarter to 7 percent — both figures below the government’s target for this year of 7.5 percent.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby ramana » 11 Sep 2012 00:25

OK RamaY, Wong and Lilo, Deleted your posts.

Normally would have given warnings but let it go this time.

Dont do that again.
ramana

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby nakul » 11 Sep 2012 01:31

According to the Chinese, Japan has infringed on its sovereign territory

Japan says it will soon buy disputed islands claimed by China

Here is what the Chinese Prime Minister had to say
Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao, speaking later Monday at a ceremony at the China Foreign Affairs University in Beijing, said the islands "are an inalienable part of China's territory, and the Chinese government and its people will absolutely make no concession on issues concerning its sovereignty and territorial integrity," the official New China News Agency reported.


The Chinese constitution treats secession as a capital offence. The Chinese govt cannot appear to be weak against Japan. At last, they have a worthy competitor. Unlike Philipines & Vietnam, they will have to show some hard power to win the islands back. Let's see how this plays out.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Philip » 11 Sep 2012 03:34

The 50th anniversary of the dastardly Chinese attack against India is fast approaching,Oct.20th.Let's dedicate a thread to it or use an existing thread for discussions as to how we can meet the threat this time round,"Never Again", Jai Hind!

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby arun » 11 Sep 2012 08:47

Extract dealing with Indian attitudes to the Peoples Republic of China from a Pew Global Report :
Only a third of urban Indians have a favorable view of China. And those who say that China’s growing economic influence is bad for India are more likely to describe relations between the two countries as hostile.


From here:

Deepening Economic Doubts in India

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby RSoami » 11 Sep 2012 16:04

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asi ... story.html

China sending patrol ships to disputed islands.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby svinayak » 12 Sep 2012 23:08



Several probelsm with this kind of data.

The section -
Chapter 2. India and Pakistan
This is a western view point. India is not affected with anything about Pakistan and it is not a factor for India view for majority of Indians.


These report information gives a false picture and it is for western researchers for social engineering. This kind of Human caliberation and human experimentation on a global scale is a neo colonial project

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Prem » 13 Sep 2012 01:10

http://www.universityworldnews.com/arti ... 4100946519

China has become preferred destination for medical education
ix years ago, when he was preparing to sit for multiple medical entrance examinations, Dr Vishal Swaroop had not heard of Liaoning province in China, five hours east of Beijing. Today he has a medical degree from Liaoning Medical University in the coastal city of Jinzhou.“China was nowhere on my radar. But I did not qualify in the medical entrance exam in India. When I started exploring options for medical education abroad, China had a lot to offer,” says Swaroop, who is back in India and preparing for his postgraduate medical exam.
Tough competition, few seats and rising costs of medical education have prompted Indian students to look at education abroad, and countries like China and Russia are attracting Indians, with a host of student-friendly measures.Swaroop is one of the thousands of Indian students pursuing medical education in China, which has emerged as a preferred destination for Indians. More than 8,000 Indian students enrolled to study medicine in China in 2010.Consultants estimate that seven out of 10 mobile Indian medical students are opting for China for undergraduate medical education. Many are also choosing Russia and former Soviet Union countries.
Affordable education
Affordable costs of education and living, and easy access to admission, are the two important factors attracting Indians to Chinese and Russian universities.“The Russian government heavily subsidises education and hence it is affordable to a middle-class foreign student,” said Asish Sondhi, director of the International Foundation for Studies and Culture (IFSC), an Indian-based organisation that helps to promote premium Russian universities and academies in India.“In India, the demand for medical education exceeds the current supply. Also with the private and deemed universities, which charge a heavy capitation fee [charging money in exchange for admission], the middle-class section of the society is deprived of quality medical education,” Sondhi said.Compared to the US, UK and other European countries, the cost of medical education in countries like China and Russia is much lower and varies from US$3,400 to US$6,000 per year.
Indian students have to satisfy minimum qualifications but are not required to clear any entry tests for either Chinese or Russian universities, which is a big attraction for many students.
Overcoming the language barrier
Neither Russian nor Mandarin is a popular foreign language in India. But universities have overcome this by teaching in English.
“The teaching is in English. But we are also given language classes to learn Mandarin. By the time you enter the fifth year of internship or practical work, you are fluent enough in Mandarin to be able to intern at a local hospital,” said Dr Pradeep Banerjee, an alumnus of China Medical University who is now practising in a private hospital in Hyderabad. For Dr Mathari Sanjeev Kumar, who graduated from Odessa State Medical University in Ukraine in 2009, adjusting to the language, food and culture took some time.“The culture and language is so different to ours. But these can be overcome because you get admission and the course structure is similar to that of India. Moreover, compared to private medical colleges in India I had to pay much less,” said Kumar, who is now working as a junior resident in Ram Manohar Lohiya hospital in New Delhi.According to Sondhi of the IFSC, Russian-speaking countries have woken up to the potential of international students, especially from Asia, and more universities are opting to teach in English.
Streamlining regulations
China opened medical education to Indian students in 2004, with four universities offering English medium education. The number has since grown to 50 universities, which are approved by the Chinese government and the Medical Council of India (MCI).

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Suraj » 13 Sep 2012 01:32

Hu's heir-apparent goes AWOL:
China maintains silence on Xi Jinping's absence from public
Chinese authorities and media remained silent on the whereabouts of Vice President Xi Jinping on Wednesday, sparking rumors and raising questions over why Beijing is not being more forthcoming on the health of its president-in-waiting.

Xi has skipped meetings with visiting leaders and senior officials over the past week, including U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, because of what sources told Reuters was a possible back injury suffered while swimming.

Xi has not been seen in public since September 1 but Chinese officials have refused to give any explanation for his absence from the public stage, giving rise to bizarre speculation on the country's Internet rumor mill.

Xi failed to appear on state television's evening broadcast on Wednesday, which featured almost every other member of the nine-man Politburo Standing Committee, China's top political body.

Among various theories being floated, the 59-year-old Xi has had a stroke or heart attack or was the target of an assassination attempt.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei, asked on Wednesday for the third consecutive day about Xi's health, again declined to respond. "I don't have any information about this to announce," he said.

The ministry, for the most part the only government department that regularly takes question from foreign reporters, has repeatedly refused to comment on Xi's status and whereabouts.

"Something serious must have happened, because they would have put him on national TV right away had there been no serious physical problem," said Minxin Pei, professor of government at Claremont McKenna College in California.

"I rule out political foul play, that he is in some kind of serious political trouble. It's simply unimaginable. He gave a speech on September 1, and that's after Beidaihe - if he were in political trouble, he wouldn't have given that speech."

Beidaihe is the seaside summer retreat of senior Communist Party leaders, who meet there every August to hammer out policies for the coming year. This year the talks were likely to have focused on the new party leadership to be unveiled at the party congress expected to be held in October.

With the congress held only once every five years and its top leaders being replaced only every decade, it is China's most important political event. The fact that its timing has not yet been announced has fuelled speculation about discord within the party.

One of the more bizarre rumors - first floated then retracted by overseas Chinese website Boxun -- was that Xi and He Guoqiang, another standing committee member, were targets of separate assassination attempts by staged car crashes.

He Guoqiang made his first public appearance since late August on the evening news on Wednesday, visiting a newspaper publisher in apparent good health.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby gunjur » 15 Sep 2012 17:57

Chinese, overseas and insecure
As the number of Chinese citizens working, studying and traveling overseas rises in line with China's growing global clout, the government is under mounting pressure to provide for their off-shore security. As Beijing grapples with how to respond, it must balance domestic calls for help with foreign perceptions that its economic expansion into developing countries is imperial in nature.

Officially, China sends about five million workers and 350,000 students abroad each year; unofficially, taking into account unofficial migration, that figure is undoubtedly much higher.

Military operations in far-flung theaters are still logistically difficult for China.

More than 1 million Chinese are in Africa, up from about 100,000 less than a decade ago.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Bade » 16 Sep 2012 04:04

Finally some good news as Japan and China spar over ill defined territories. Good for us as the lizard engages in more silliness. PRC should sit down and talk with their neighbours, no ? How silly of them to behave like TSP. :twisted:
http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/15/world/asia/china-japan-islands/index.html?hpt=hp_t3
Waving Chinese national flags and :roll: holding portraits of the late Chairman Mao Zedong, the mostly young protesters chanted "down with Japanese imperialism" and called for war as they made their way down the streets under the watchful eyes of police and guards.

Elsewhere in China, anti-Japanese rallies broke out in dozens of cities and sometimes turned violent. Messages and photos posted on Chinese social media sites showed angry mobs in numerous cities ransacking Japanese stores and restaurants as well as smashing and burning cars of Japanese make.

Japanese media also reported incidents of assault on Japanese nationals in China in the past few days. A Chinese foreign ministry spokesman insisted Friday that the public anger was not aimed at the Japanese people, whose safety would be protected in China according to law.

Authorities rarely permit protests in China, prompting suspicion that Saturday's nationwide rallies were government-sanctioned. In Beijing, police walking along the demonstrators were seen to ask spectators to join in instead of blocking the street. :rotfl:

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Philip » 16 Sep 2012 09:46

Watch the warmongering grasping Han swine girding their loins ready to do battle over the islands dispute with Japan!

"Japan, get the hell out of China!," some yelled.
..... You're very welcome in India!

http://in.reuters.com/article/2012/09/1 ... 2T20120916


Sun Sep 16, 2012 8:57am IST

* Shops looted, Japanese factories attacked

* Protests spread over second day

* Japan PM says China must protect Japanese citizens, companies

By Ben Blanchard and Jason Lee

BEIJING/CHENGDU, China, Sept 16 (Reuters) - Torrid protests against Japan flared in Chinese cities for a second day on Sunday, with the government struggling to find a balance between venting public anger and containing violence that could backfire ahead of a delicate leadership succession.

The protests over islands claimed by both countries broke out in Beijing and other cities on Saturday, when demonstrators besieged the Japanese embassy, hurling rocks, eggs and bottles, and testing cordons of anti-riot police with shields and batons.

In other Chinese cities, demonstrators looted shops and attacked Japanese cars. Protesters also broke into a dozen Japanese-run factories in the eastern city of Qingdao, according to the Japanese broadcaster NHK.

The threat of fresh violence drew a warning from Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda, who told Fuji TV that China "must strictly be on guard to prevent harm to Japanese citizens and companies", according to Japan's Kyodo news agency.

The protests, the latest setback in long-troubled relations between Beijing and Tokyo, followed Japan's decision on Tuesday to buy the disputed islands, which Tokyo calls the Senkaku and Beijing calls the Diaoyu and which could contain valuable gas reserves, from a private Japanese owner. China called that decision a provocative violation of its sovereignty.

In the biggest flare-up on Sunday, police used tear gas and water cannon to drive back thousands of protesters occupying a major street in the southern city of Shenzhen, near Hong Kong.

A much smaller crowd, some throwing water bottles, resumed marching past the Japanese embassy in Beijing, now guarded by a six-deep cordon of anti-riot police.

"Japan, get the hell out of China!," some yelled.

Police used loud speakers to tell protesters that, while their anger was understandable, they should respect the law and remain "rational".

Crowds also gathered in the southwest city of Chengdu.

In Shanghai, about 1,500 people marched towards the Japanese consulate, although they were only allowed to enter cordoned-off areas in small groups. Protesters carried flags and images of former leader Mao Zedong as hundreds of police looked on.

The Nikkei business newspaper said on Sunday demonstrators had earlier attacked two Panasonic electronic parts plants in the eastern cities of Qingdao and Suzhou, and the company will decide whether to continue operations after checking the damage.

Toyota vehicle dealerships were also set on fire and many vehicles were damaged, it said, citing Toyota's China unit.

DOMESTIC POLITICAL PREOCCUPATIONS

The flare-up in tensions has come while both Beijing and Tokyo are focused on domestic political pressures, narrowing the room for diplomatic give-and-take.

Noda's government faces an election in months, adding to pressure on him not to look weak on China.

China's ruling Communist Party is preoccupied with a leadership turnover, with President Hu Jintao due to step down as party leader at a congress that could open as soon as next month. While the public indignation against Japan could help to foster unity ahead of the succession, it has also exposed widespread public impatience for a tougher line from Beijing.

"I think it's time for the Chinese government to get tougher," a middle-aged Beijing man surnamed Xue told Reuters in front of the embassy late on Saturday.

"I don't mean war, but tougher action like sanctions. You can see how much Japan depends on our economy," he said.

Chinese state media praised "rational" expressions of anger but warned that violence could backfire against Beijing.

"There has been some irrational behaviour that is to be regretted," said a commentary on the website of the People's Daily, the main paper of the Chinese Communist Party.

"Raging expressions of patriotism will only bring joy to the (Japanese) evil doers, put our foreign policy on the defensive and wound the feelings of compatriots."

The territorial dispute escalated on Friday when China sent six surveillance ships to the group of uninhabited islets in the East China Sea. China's state-run media have issued a torrent of condemnation against Tokyo.

Despite their deepening economic ties, China and Japan have long been at political odds over bitter memories of Japan's military aggression in the 1930s and 1940s and present-day rivalry over disputed territory in the East China Sea.

Relations between Asia's two biggest economies chilled in 2010 after Japan arrested a Chinese trawler captain whose boat collided with Japanese coastguard vessels near the islands.

China's official Xinhua news agency said on Saturday big anti-Japan protests were also held in the Chinese cities of Xian, Changsha, Nanjing and Qingdao.

The protests could continue for days yet. On Tuesday, China marks its official memorial day for Japan's war-time occupation of China, which could provide a fresh focus for demonstrations.

Japan's newly designated ambassador to China, Shinichi Nishimiya, died in Tokyo on Sunday, the Japanese Foreign Ministry said. He had collapsed several days earlier.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby nakul » 24 Sep 2012 15:32

Commentary: Japan's "theft" of Diaoyu Islands risks China-Japan economic, trade ties

Despite repeated protests from Beijing, Japan launched its unilateral move to "purchase" the Diaoyu Islands, which are Chinese territories, on Sept. 10 this year.

The move not only ruined the political basis for China-Japan relations, but also greatly harmed Chinese people's feelings. It was not in line with the overall situation of bilateral relations highlighting peaceful development, and it ignited demonstrations across China.

Japan should be responsible for all the possible disastrous effects to China-Japan relations resulting from its single-handed farce of its "purchase" of the Diaoyu Islands since it has challenged one of China's "core interests", which brook no compromise.


Watch out for the word China's core interests. Everything in China's core interests is like Paki sovereignty.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby kish » 24 Sep 2012 21:05

Life in rural China

Reality check for supel dupel power

Image

Image

Villagers live in courtyard homes surrounded by high walls. Inside, people, pigs{how did a paki got in}, cows, chickens and other animals battle for space.

Donglu village has running water and electricity, but homes lack many basic essentials. There are no toilets.


Image

To supplement his income, the farmer also has two cows and a few dozen chickens. He recently bought a piglet{biladels are fond of pakis it seems. Everyone keeps one at home}.


Image

Political education

Slogans are often used in China - even in villages - to urge the masses to follow the correct political line.{In other words "no freedom", if any one dare questions the party dictates will be dealt with accordingly. }


Image

Despite its local importance, Chiping is a world away from modern cities such as Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby svinayak » 24 Sep 2012 21:50

Just by upgrading 10 cities in China - PRC has been able to project a almost first world image. Total cost may be around $1T or less and careful control of media world wide PRC has been able to create a advanced country image

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Philip » 25 Sep 2012 04:57

Enjoy the Han Chinese slave labour workforce "chew" it in an Apple i-phone manufacturing factory!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/20 ... tory-brawl

Foxconn closes China factory after brawl

Reports suggest as many as 2,000 workers involved in fight in dormitory at Taiyuan plant, which makes Apple's iPhone

Charles Arthur and agencies
guardian.co.uk, Monday 24 September 2012

Foxconn factory in Taiyuan, Shanxi province
Workers clean up glass from the broken windows near an entrance of the Foxconn factory in Taiyuan, Shanxi province. Photograph: Reuters

A brawl involving as many as 2,000 workers forced Foxconn to close its Taiyuan plant in northern China late on Sunday, and left a number of people needing hospital treatment.

"The fight is over now … we're still investigating the cause of the fight and the number of workers involved," said Foxconn spokesman Louis Woo, adding it was possible it involved "a couple of thousand workers".

A police statement reported by the official Xinhua news agency said 5,000 officers were dispatched to the scene.

The violence was brought under control after about four hours and 40 people were taken to hospitals for treatment, the Taiwanese-owned company said. It said several people were detained by police.

The violence did not appear to be work-related, the company and police said.

Comments posted on Chinese internet bulletin boards said it might have erupted after a security guard hit an employee.

The Taiyuan plant, which employs about 79,000 workers, makes parts for automotive electronics and assembles various electronic devices, according to Woo. Other staff sources said it makes parts for and assembles Apple's new iPhone 5, released last week.

It was not clear how long the shutdown would last at the plant.

Woo said the fight happened in the workers' dormitory facilities. Photographs of the incident that were posted to social networks but later deleted showed smashed windows and riot police, and crowds of workers.

Later pictures from just outside the plant showed workers clearing shards of glass from broken windows at a building by an entrance gate and a line of olive-coloured paramilitary police trucks parked inside the factory grounds.

Geoffrey Crothall, spokesman for the pressure group China Labor Bulletin, told the New York Times workers at the plants had become increasingly emboldened.

"They're more willing to stand up for their rights, to stand up to injustice," he said. The same plant was the subject of a brief strike over pay in March.

Foxconn, the trading name of Taiwan's Hon Hai Precision Industry Company, is the world's largest contract maker of electronic goods. It has seen a few violent disputes at its sprawling plants in China, where it employs a total of about 1 million workers. It is an important supplier for companies including Apple, Hewlett-Packard and Microsoft.

Hon Hai shares were down 1.14% by late on Monday morning, lagging behind the broader market's decline of 0.28%.

In June, about 100 workers went on a rampage at a Chengdu plant in south-west China. The company has faced allegations of poor conditions and mistreatment of workers at its Chinese operations, and has been spending heavily in recent months to raise wages and improve working conditions.

A staff member at the Taiyuan plant said he was told the plant could be closed up to two to three days while police investigate.

"There are a lot of police at the site now," the staff member, who asked not to be named, told Reuters by telephone.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby asprinzl » 26 Sep 2012 07:25

Peasant man crushed to death with a steamroller on orders of a CCP official.
http://www.infowars.com/man-crushed-by- ... officials/

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Lilo » 26 Sep 2012 07:40

^^ Man !!
This has some serious potential to show to the chinese the real face of their "communist" government.

If this escapes censorship there could be a typhoon in the blackhole (which is the chinese cyberspace) - little can one predict what it will throw out.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby hulaku » 26 Sep 2012 08:52

asprinzl wrote:Peasant man crushed to death with a steamroller on orders of a CCP official.
http://www.infowars.com/man-crushed-by- ... officials/


Infowars ? Alex Jones ? Seriously ?

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby hulaku » 26 Sep 2012 09:31

Some pics I clicked of the recent events in China. The protestors are on the other side of the road and the White Building houses the Japanese consulate in Guangzhou.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby member_23858 » 28 Sep 2012 10:32

China's provocative gestures toward all sovereign states in its vicinity and beyond (TSP Not included) makes me think that CCP needs external foes for its very existence. Remember that China had, for the entire post world war era, some one or the other nation to fight and be painted as an enemy. This may not be required in other nations, but is very important in Communist China, as Communist china was formed when Mao tricked Chiang Kai-shek to take over china. So this very existence of a outsider threat is essential for communist in China to lead a subdued population, which happens to be the largest population. So long as there is food on plate of common Chinese person, and a perceived external threat, presence of CCP makes perfect sense for the common chinese people. So we can see in foreseeable future that China may keep inciting conflict over minor issue to keep the Communist machinery working. Reminds me of what Fascist and Nazis did in Europe. :| :|

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 28 Sep 2012 19:00

How the China-Japan Island Dispute can Impact India - Cmde. Uday Bhaskar in Economic Times
China has raised the politico-diplomatic ante with Japan over the disputed islands in the East China Sea in a definitive manner through a formal Cabinet-equivalent announcement in Beijing and the follow-up of this assertion at the foreign minister level in New York on Tuesday (September 25).

Territorial disputes with certain key Asian countries is a high-octane issue in Beijing and the manner in which China is asserting its claim with Japan over a total area of 7 sq km spread over eight uninhabited rocky islands has a specific relevance for India. October 20, 2012, marks the 50th anniversary of the commencement of the brief 1962 Sino-Indian border war that resulted in a complex and contested territorial-cum-border dispute that remains unresolved to-date.

On Tuesday, the State Council in Beijing issued a white paper that proclaimed, "China's will to defend national sovereignty and territorial integrity is firm and its resolve to uphold the outcomes of the World Anti-Fascist War will not be shaken by any force." The historical recall refers to the Chinese resistance to the brutal Japanese military invasion and occupation that began in September 1931 and concluded with the apocalyptic end of World War II in August 1945.

The domestic determination exuded in Beijing over the islands — it should be added that the diminutive figure of 7 sq km in the East China Sea also translates into a huge exclusive economic zone over a radius of 200 nautical miles, or 370 km — was conveyed in New York on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly on Tuesday by the Chinese foreign minister to his Japanese counterpart. Tokyo has euphemistically described the prevailing atmosphere as being 'severe'.

The current Sino-Japan tension is centred over the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands — the names being the Japanese and Chinese variants, respectively. Japan claimed the islands in 1895 when China was the subaltern in the bilateral relationship and, over the last century, the vicissitudes of colonialism and two World Wars have left their bloody, traumatic imprint on both countries. Currrently, while Japan has physical possession of the islands, both China and Taiwan have claimed them over the decades with varying intensity — as per their respective recall of the historical record.

The catalyst for the current tension was the decision by the Japanese government to 'buy' the islands from one of its own citizens to preempt overt politicising of the sensitive issue by the more provocative Tokyo governor, Shintaro Ishihara. This has clearly boomeranged and Beijing has taken extreme affront to the purported sale and invoked a Chinese proverb, "It is up to the one who tied the knot to untie it" for Tokyo to reflect on — and make amends/atone.

Delhi is familiar with this Chinese adage apropos the May 1998 nuclear test and the subsequent communication to the White House with its attendant boomerang effect!

Will China and Japan go to war over this dispute? Current consensus is in the negative. Given the trade volume and economic dependency index that is the most dominant feature of the bilateral relationship over the last decade, received wisdom is that while there will be high-visibility posturing, close manoeuvres by ships and a determined attempt to make the other party 'blink' first, the critical tipping point will not be crossed. If it does, all kinds of military escalation will be on the table —including the credibility of the US-Japan military alliance and the larger east Asian security architecture.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Karan Dixit » 30 Sep 2012 00:23

^ That was a stupid article. I read the whole thing and did not see any analysis on the so called impact on India.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby krisna » 30 Sep 2012 02:45

China rushes to build a new generation of mega-dams as thirst for power grows
Of course we are willing to move!" Mr Feng sniggered sarcastically as bulldozers levelled his community. "This is the Communist Party's land, isn't it?"

Mr Feng is one of hundreds of thousands of people facing relocation as China embarks on a new, multi-billion dollar hydropower drive in the country's southwest.

But campaigners say the race for China's rivers is now gaining momentum once again, as authorities battle to meet soaring energy demand while simultaneously slashing carbon emissions by making 15 per cent of its energy "clean" by 2020.

At the centre of China's latest hydro push is the Jinsha, a murky brown tributary of the world-famous Yangtze. Two vast projects – Xiluodu and Xiangjiaba – will soon go online here, becoming China's second and third biggest dams with joint capacity to produce around 20GW - enough to power almost all the homes in England. With an installed capacity of 12.6GW, Xiluodu is one of the biggest hydroelectric projects being built anywhere on earth.

Meanwhile a "cascade" of dozens more dams are planned or already under construction elsewhere on the 1429-mile river.

[The Jinsha] is big and beautiful. [But] if you have 25 dams and every 100km there is a dam then you don't have a river. You will never have a river again," said Liu Jianqing, an environmental journalist and campaigner. "It means you won't have fish, you will lose a lot of land and many people have to lose their homes. We call that a dead river."

Grumbine said there were concerns about building dams in an area prone to earthquakes.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Prem » 01 Oct 2012 10:33

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/china-n ... 98239.html
After Bo Xilai’s Purge, Web Searches for ‘Organ Harvest’ Suddenly Allowed

So
when, soon after it was announced on Sept. 28 that ousted Politburo official Bo Xilai was being expelled from the Party, searches for highly sensitive political terms like “live harvest” and “bloody harvest” were allowed on several popular websites, analysts began trying to figure out what it meant.A similar sequence of events took place back in March, after Wang Lijun fled to the U.S. Consulate in Chengdu. He was thought to have divulged to U.S. officials his involvement in organ harvesting activities in China’s northeast.From 2003 to 2008 Wang was security chief in Jinzhou City and ran a medical laboratory attached to the Public Security Bureau, focused on practical organ transplantation research. he terms, related to organ harvesting in China, were apparently uncensored for searching soon after it was announced that Bo would be expelled from the Party (Weibo.com)
In an award speech that was posted online, Wang admitted to participating in “thousands” of on site transplantation operations. Given the context of his remarks, analysts came to the provisional conclusions that many of the transplantations were conducted while the victims were still living, and that most of
the victims were probably practitioners of the Falun Gong spiritual discipline, a popular traditional practice that has been persecuted in China since 1999.Analysts formed the opinion that top Party leaders were aware of Wang’s crimes, and by effectively publicizing information about his connection with them, they were attempting to sanitize, however dubiously, the Communist Party as a whole from involvement.Sina and Tencent microblogs also lifted bans on the names of Bo Xilai, Gu Kailai, and Wang Lijun. Gu Kailai is Bo’s wife and was recently given a suspended death sentence for the murder of British businessman Neil Heywood.The censorship change, though subtle, sparked discussion and reflection by netizens.
“Such heinous crimes have already been made known in international society, but not many people are aware of it in China where information is heavily blocked,” wrote one user. “The instigators are the most evil extreme leftist forces. They must be accounted for and tried!” The term “leftist” refers to the hard-liners in the Party.“Live organ harvesting probably strikes the raw nerve of the evil Party, so they dare not talk about it,” a user of Tencent wrote.“Governor B [Bo Xilai] committed crimes of live organ harvesting and the production of human specimens. When will his crimes against humanity be settled?” another user wrote.Another wrote, “They dare not let the public know of live organ harvesting and organ sale, because they would perish once it becomes known.”“Everyone knows that the Communist Party takes meticulous care with every statement on the Bo Xilai issue, because it is such a sensitive case. They pay attention to every punctuation mark,” said analyst of Chinese politics Lin Zixu, in an interview with Sound of Hope, a Chinese-language radio network based outside of China.He said that many people inside China, including Party leaders, already know about Bo and Wang’s involvement in organ harvesting. “Those people in the Party who weren’t involved know that sooner or later this is going to blow up, and then they’re going to have to say that they were investigating it the whole time, so they can push the responsibility onto Bo Xilai and others,” he said.Lin continued, “But at this point everyone also knows that the fundamental reason this happened in the first place was due to the Communist Party’s system.”

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby rsingh » 01 Oct 2012 19:48

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There was guy who complained about wildekife (mice) on train in Bihar. I wonder what he has to say about this :mrgreen:
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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby rsingh » 01 Oct 2012 20:20

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby RajeshA » 10 Oct 2012 13:06

Published on Sep 07, 2012
Chinese university beauty pageant organizers mandate contestants' nipples be at least 7.8 inches apart: Agence France-Presse

A Chinese beauty contest requiring candidates to have nipples spaced at least 20 centimetres (7.8 inches) apart sparked a storm of criticism on the Internet on Friday.

"Why more than 20 centimetres? I honestly don't know who came up with these figures," said a user on Weibo, China's version of Twitter.

"How can beauty standards include breast distance? Do they take women as toys?" Judging women by such rigid criteria is so 'out'!" said TV personality Yang Lan on the microblog.

The contest, aimed at crowning 10 university students in central Hubei province, drew from traditional Chinese and modern Western standards of beauty, a contest staff member was quoted as saying in the Global Times on Friday.

He added that contest organisers had conducted research on the Internet to determine the criteria.

In addition to considering traditional measurements like chest, waist and hips, the contest also said the space between candidates' pupils should be 46 percent of the distance between their pupil and their ear.

China has hosted a slew of beauty pageants, including six Miss World contests, in the past nine years. Its candidate Yu Wenxia won the title when the international competition took place in northern China last month.

"These beauty contests are absurd," said another Weibo user. "On what basis do these so-called judges use their own standards to measure beauty?"

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