People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

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Vayutuvan
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Nightwatch on China's political environment

Postby Vayutuvan » 09 Nov 2012 23:34

Some interesting take on the Chinese Leadership hand-off from Nightwatch -

NightWatch-For the night of 8 November 2012 wrote:China: President and outgoing Secretary-General if the Communist Party Hu Jintao told the opening session of the 18th National Party Congress, "If we fail to handle the corruption issue well, it could prove fatal to the party, and even cause the collapse of the party and the fall of the state."

The reform of the political structure," he said, "is an important part of China's overall reform." "However," he added, "we will never copy a Western political system."

On this issue, Cai Mingzhao, a spokesperson for the party congress, emphasized to reporters the limits of political reform that the Party is willing to consider, stressing that any measures would maintain its firm leadership. Reforms, he said, would combine "centralism and democracy, discipline and freedom, and unity of will and peace of mind".

Comment: Hu's suggestion that corruption could cause the collapse of the party and the fall of the state is extraordinary for several reasons. In Communist lore, the corruption of the Kuomintang - the nationalists-was responsible in large measure for the Communist takeover of China. Secondly, Hu implies that the expulsion of regional party leader Bo Xilai involved a much more serious threat to the Communist system than just the removal of a corrupt regional head. Hu's statement suggests China survived a near-existential threat.

Finally Hu implied that the Chinese Communist leaders are aware that they have been skirting the limits of political reform within the Communist system and revolutionary change to a more Western style of democracy. The leadership sees one or more scenarios in which Communist China could collapse.

NightWatch judges that there are so many contradictions and fault lines in the jerry-rigged communist system that violent, revolutionary upheaval could begin with little additional warning at almost any time. China might even fragment into Muslim and non-Muslim states. Hu's speech indicates the leaders are aware of some of the threats.

The Party leaders have decided that China's political system will remain Communist, centralized, disciplined from the top-down and un-Western. Experts who expected China could not resist the pull of increasingly greater political openness in a semi-capitalist economy have misread badly the Communist leadership.


Some comments are on Economic situation which I am posting in the Chinese Economy thread.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Philip » 10 Nov 2012 02:52

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... ottom.html

Communist Party Congress: corruption in China runs from top to bottom
As China’s Communist Party Congress got under way in earnest on Friday, question after question was raised among delegates about the rampant corruption that runs from the top to the bottom of the party. Malcolm Moore investigates.

By Malcolm Moore, Beijing

09 Nov 2012

Six months ago, Chen Xiaodong’s uncle came to him with an idea. For £15,000 up front, the 28-year-old could leave his office job and become a policeman in Inner Mongolia.

He would only earn £170 a month for the first three years, rising to £330 with more experience. But his parents and his in-laws clubbed together to raise the money – they thought it was a good investment.

“The job is stable and there is profit in it,” explained Mr Chen. “The other cops in my bureau all have houses and possessions that do not match their salaries. Some of them have several houses in expensive areas and the deputy chief drives a Toyota Prado, which is worth £50,000”.

Two months into his new job, Mr Chen still has a desk job, but is hoping to get his share of the police station’s wealth shortly.

“The bureau manages a few areas which are full of entertainment joints like karaoke parlours and massage houses, so they get protection money,” he said.

The other policemen have also all coughed up in one way or another, he added. “What you pay depends on how good your connections are. There is another policeman under 30 whose parents run a major Party department in the province and he has already become a fully-fledged officer.”

He still has to pass an exam, but the bribes he paid for the job are all openly acknowledged. “I was promised if I did not end up working here the money would be returned. I have receipts for everything,” he said.

Nor is Mr Chen’s case unusual. The corruption in the Communist party runs from the billions allegedly amassed by the families of top leaders all the way down to the lowliest state employees.

One source who used to work at the Ministry of Railways now runs a recruitment company providing low-level employees, such as pillbox hatted train attendants.

Recently he charged eight new recruits £3,000 each for their jobs, dividing his kickbacks with his contacts in the ministry. The price for a train supervisor’s job is £10,000.

For the applicants, the jobs come with a salary of around £300 a month but plenty of benefits, including a three-day week and a pension.

But even here, China is increasingly becoming divided into those who have connections and those who do not.

“You need to know someone just to hear about these purchase opportunities,” said the source.

“It is impossible to get a proper office job at a state-owned company without solid connections,” said an investment banker whose parents work in two of China’s large state firms.

“One popular approach is for the parents of two families who both work in state firms to arrange jobs for each other’s kids,” he added.

The average income for government jobs in 2011 was more than four times what workers could earn in private firms, according to a survey by 163.com, one of China’s major internet portals.

And with thousands of applicants vying for every state job, the phrase “Mai Guan”, or “Buying a Job”, has even entered the official dictionary.

He Guoqiang, the current head of the Party’s internal investigations department, has also named the practise as one of the 10 most popular forms of corruption.

“We must crack down on cases where codes and regulations are violated in the recruitment of personnel for state-owned companies and government institutions,” he said, in a speech reprinted by Qiushi, one of the Party’s journals.

“As a major source of discontent, [corruption] has become one of the major factors undermining relations between Party and government cadres and the public,” he added.

In his speech on the opening day of the 18th Party Congress, Hu Jintao, China’s president, was even more blunt. Corruption, he said, “could prove fatal” to the Party.

For young Chinese graduates, the network of connections and payments required to advance in China can be daunting.

One professor at an elite university in Beijing said one of his ablest students had been quoted a £100,000 fee for a top job with the government company.

“He was determined to come back to China [after graduate studies abroad] to do good but simply could not afford it,” he said.

“The problem with the payments is that it forces you to be corrupt whether you want to be or not.

“He said it was possible to get jobs at state firms through the exams alone, but that those people would not get promoted. And he said it in a matter of fact way. He did not think I would be surprised,” he said.

Additional reporting by Valentina Luo


China using massive surveillance grid to stop Tibetan self-immolation
China has revealed it is using a massive surveillance camera network to cover restive areas of Tibet and bring to an end a grisly wave of self-immolations.

China reveals massive security operation to stop Tibetans setting fire to themselves
On Friday thousands of students marched in protest in Rebkhong county, Qinghai province Photo: AP
Malcolm Moore

By Malcolm Moore, and Tom Phillips in Beijing
09 Nov 2012

Officials at the 18th party Congress claimed yesterday that the 'Skynet’ network has divided the region into a closely monitored grid and that teams of security personnel can be mobilised within two minutes to put an end to the suicide attempts.

Six Tibetans have doused themselves with petrol and set themselves alight since the eve of China’s once-in-a-decade leadership change on Wednesday bringing to 69 the number who are reported to have died in the past year.

Yesterday (FRI), thousands of students marched in protest in Rebkhong county, Qinghai province, according to Free Tibet, an activist group, and armed police stepped up their presence.

Speaking at the Congress in Beijing Losang Gyaltsen, the vice chairman of the local government in Tibet, said: “We do not want to see such incidents,” he said. “We do not want anyone to spoil Tibet as a happy region. For locals, we are checking IDs and for visitors we have checkpoints and security checks on travel.

“We also have a grid management system, so if any immolation happens in a certain block, we can launch an emergency rescue within two minutes,” he added.

Skynet is a highly secretive network and it is not known how many people work for it or how far is its reach. It has hardly been mentioned in official state media communications and is supposed to have a camera on every road in Tibet and in the Tibetan areas of Gansu and Sichuan.

Beijing has been steadily expanding its use and in June, in a rare mention, it was praised as a way of combating crime in the region.

Lately there has also been a heavy security presence in Tibet’s temples. “There has been no immolation in the past year at any of the 1,700 temples and among the 46,000 monks in Tibet,” said Mr Gyaltsen.

He blamed the self-immolations on activists and “some monks outside the country”.

“Some overseas Tibetans are trying to achieve their ugly targets at the cost of others’ lives. It is immoral,” he said. So far, the Dalai Lama has yet to instruct his followers not to self-immolate.

Despite the tensions between Tibetans and Han Chinese, the party secretary of Lhasa, Che Dalha, said the city had been voted one of China’s happiest cities for five years in a row.

“For four of those years, it was number one,” he said. “It needs to be felt and experienced, so only the Tibetans can tell how happy they are. Lhasa has the bluest sky, the whitest clouds, cleanest water and air and happiest people,” he added.

Elsewhere at the Congress, corruption continued to preoccupy Communist party officials.

Wang Jingqing, the vice minister of China’s powerful and mysterious Organisation Department, which is responsible for internal HR, vowed senior leaders would battle corruption to preserve the “pure nature of the Chinese Communist Party”.

“Detachment from the people is the biggest danger to the Party’s governance,” he said, claiming that 668,000 party members had been punished for corruption in the last five years.

Without “strict party discipline” the Communist Party would “only be a pool of loose sand and will not achieve anything,” Mr Wang added.

But asked if he would support a policy under which leaders would have to publish their assets, he simply ignored the question.

Wang Ying, the head of the prosperous southern province of Guangdong, and a man who is often described as one of the Party’s reformers, also demurred over whether officials should make their wealth public.

Before the Congress opened, the New York Times revealed that the family of Wen Jiabao, the outgoing premier, had at least £1.67 billion of assets. The family of Xi Jinping, the incoming president, is worth some £235 million, according to a Bloomberg investigation.

“The Party central has clearly specified rules on the property ownership of government officials,” he said. “Guangdong has been exploring ways of publishing assets and will keep exploring in this direction. We will gradually do this according to policy from Beijing,”

Additional reporting by Valentina Luo


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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Rony » 10 Nov 2012 10:27


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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby svinayak » 11 Nov 2012 03:49

Foundation For India and India Diaspora Studies
(FIIDS)
http://fiids-usa.org
Date: Sat 10 Nov 2012 Time: 6pm
Situation on Indo China Border : 50 Years After 1962 War
Geopolitically Significant and Ethnically Diverse North East Region of India: Challenges and Present Situation
Venue:704 Daffodil Ct,
Sunnyvale, CA 94086
Program6:00 pm - Introductions6:10pm - Panelists: Dr. Joram Begi and Shri Vijay Swami, MSW7:00 pm - Questions and Answers
7:15pm - Conclusion
Speakers Introductions:
Dr Joram Begi, PhD, is the Director of Higher Education for the state of Arunachal Pradesh (AP) in India. He is also the Chairperson of the Research Institute of World Ancient Traditions and Cultures (RIWATCH), based in AP. Arunachal Pradesh, situated amidst the Himalayas, is the largest state in north-east India and shares borders with China, Bhutan, and Myanmar. It is home to about 24 major tribes and more than 100 sub and minor tribes, and shelters a diversity of cultures. Dr. Begi is the first member of his tribe (Nyishi) to attend college.
Shri Vijay Swami, MSW, is a Fulbright Scholar and also the Executive Director of RIWATCH. For his work, Vijay Swami has received many awards from the government. Vijay Swami has more than 20 years of experience in community development, having initiated multiple innovative projects including “Herbs for better health”, “Back-pack science program”, self-help groups of women, and a government-funded repository which brings together resources on the unique traditions, costumes, healing practices, and languages of the tribal communities in AP.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Kukreja » 15 Nov 2012 00:08

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/14/opini ... .html?_r=0
China’s Great Shame
THIRTY-SIX million people in China, including my uncle, who raised me like a father, starved to death between 1958 and 1962, during the man-made calamity known as the Great Famine. In thousands of cases, desperately hungry people resorted to cannibalism.

The toll was more than twice the number of fallen in World War I, and about six times the number of Ukrainians starved by Stalin in 1932-33 or the number of Jews murdered by Hitler during World War II.

After 50 years, the famine still cannot be freely discussed in the place where it happened. My book “Tombstone” could be published only in Hong Kong, Japan and the West. It remains banned in mainland China, where historical amnesia looms large and government control of information and expression has tightened during the Communist Party’s 18th National Congress, which began last week and will conclude with a once-in-a-decade leadership transition.

Those who deny that the famine happened, as an executive at the state-run newspaper People’s Daily recently did, enjoy freedom of speech, despite their fatuous claims about “three years of natural disasters.” But no plague, flood or earthquake ever wrought such horror during those years. One might wonder why the Chinese government won’t allow the true tale to be told, since Mao’s economic policies were abandoned in the late 1970s in favor of liberalization, and food has been plentiful ever since.

The reason is political: a full exposure of the Great Famine could undermine the legitimacy of a ruling party that clings to the political legacy of Mao, even though that legacy, a totalitarian Communist system, was the root cause of the famine.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Rony » 15 Nov 2012 23:03

Fat Generals a Sign of China’s Weakness?

In an article on the vast wealth enjoyed by China’s top elites, the Financial Times included the following striking passage:

"Some western diplomats estimate that as much as 40 per cent of China’s military budget is siphoned off through corruption.
As a phalanx of senior PLA officers ascended the steps of the Great Hall of the People in Tiananmen Square this week, many of them sported generous pot bellies, leading one party member to comment wryly to the Financial Times that nothing displays structural weakness like overweight generals."

Forty percent is no small number! If things are really this bad, it could suggest that moral and social decay among China’s ruling elite is undermining the country’s strength faster than growth can make it powerful.

Japanese nationalists study China very closely. It’s possible that a belief that China’s elite is weak and corrupt, and that the country is much less formidable than it looks, explains why they are pushing back so hard against China’s regional assertiveness. Are we looking at the world’s biggest and most imposing paper tiger?

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby disha » 16 Nov 2012 00:09

^^^ Highlighting two quotes from above:

"Some western diplomats estimate that as much as 40 per cent of China’s military budget is siphoned off through corruption.

Japanese nationalists study China very closely. It’s possible that a belief that China’s elite is weak and corrupt, and that the country is much less formidable than it looks, explains why they are pushing back so hard against China’s regional assertiveness. Are we looking at the world’s biggest and most imposing paper tiger?

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Philip » 16 Nov 2012 08:33

I am impressed...with China's new leadership.First,the new man at the helm, "Pink Gin",openly acknowledged that China's leadership had failed the party and the people,acknowledged the disease of corruption,etc. They next did another surprise by reducing the number of the politburo from 9 to 7.In India,jumbo sized cabinet expansions would've been the norm to give equal representation to all allies! Compare the snake-oil mendicant's cabinet reshuffle-old wine in new bottles,with that of China's retiring the old.

The task before the party is immense,as entrenched state institutions and the military will not give up their cosy territories that easily,but making pink Gin the head of both party and military gives him unprecedented power to achieve whatever he wants.

Another v. interesting fact is that China has been studying for long the Singapore (Lee Kwan Yew) model,where a v. powerful party with a weak opposition,pliant judiciary and well paid babus ,runs a v. efficient city state.Here corruption is almost non-existant because those at the helm of affairs are very well looked after China appears to be serious in getting its house in order,while in India,the scams and scandals rocking the nation are being swept under the carpet,denied that they even exist and a blatantly corrupt govt. is using state machinery to blackmail the political and non-opposition.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Rony » 16 Nov 2012 10:47

Very interesting , although wont be suprising for people in BRF

China uses mysterious Australian to rig Congress coverage

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby kish » 20 Nov 2012 18:33

Xinhua Insight: Street children's deaths a wound in society

As the world marks Universal Children's Day on Tuesday, the Chinese are mourning five street children who were found dead in a roadside dumpster last week.

Police said the boys had burnt charcoal for warmth in their humble shelter, but were poisoned by carbon monoxide.


While many web users accused the local government of negligence, others said the parents of the children were also to blame. :mrgreen:

Bijie, a land-locked, resource-rich city with 7 million people, is perched on craggy mountains. Many local peasants fled home in search of city jobs, leaving their children under the custody of grandparents or distant relatives.

The five kids who died were cousins and their fathers were three brothers. Two of the fathers worked as trash collectors in Shenzhen, a boom city near Hong Kong.


The second fastest growing economy is soo much like third world onlee. :-o

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby jamwal » 26 Nov 2012 21:25

Vietnam 'cancels' Chinese passports

Vietnam's passport control offices are refusing to stamp visa pages in the new Chinese passports containing a map showing islands in the South China Sea as part of Chinese territory.
To counter this, Vietnamese passport control offices are issuing separate visa sheets to new Chinese passport holders instead of stamping inside the pages, state-run CCTV reported.
China's controversial move to print the map in the passport forced its neighbours to come out with innovative moves to counter it as it contained the disputed parts.
Diplomats say stamping visas on the passports amount to tacitly accepting China's claims over the areas.
The discreet Chinese move also riled India as the map showed Arunachal Pradesh and Aksai Chin as part of China for which the two countries are holding periodic talks to resolve the border dispute.
In a tit-for-tat move, Indian Embassy here started stamping the Chinese passports with official map of India, catching the Chinese officials by surprise. :mrgreen:
Vietnam, along with the Philippines, also objected to Chinese maps in the passports.
Hanoi countered it with stapled visas, similar to what China had done in 2009 for residents of Jammu and Kashmir to show that it is a disputed region.
It is not yet clear whether China has taken umbrage to the stapled visas as India did.
China introduced the new e-passports, which contained an electronic chip in May this year.
Reacting to the objections from neighbouring countries to the maps, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said: "The passport is not designed to target any specific country. We hope relevant countries regard it in a level-headed and rational manner so as not to bring unnecessary disruptions to normal people-to-people exchanges", she said.
:rotfl:

Picture from another source:
Image

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby RamaY » 26 Nov 2012 22:58

^ "people to people exchanges" heh :evil:

Then why China started stapling Indian passports for JK residents and why it complained about Arunachal Pradesh?

Next step is to show Tibet as disputed :twisted:

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby hnair » 27 Nov 2012 01:23

Indian Embassy did nice, kudos. Next time, Indian Embassy should have a stamp with a map of combined India + Tibet + China captioned "bhai-bhai". Bet there will be some churning on both sides of Pacific and frantic pulling out of strings of pearls from the sphincter.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Mahendra » 27 Nov 2012 02:32

Best would be to stamp with a map that includes Mecca as a part of China. The Bakis and other such Jhadi buffoons would do the rest

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby sanjaykumar » 27 Nov 2012 03:07

Next step is to show Tibet as disputed


No need to state anything. Maps published by the GOI should have absorption coefficients of the ink for Tibet five angstroms different from that of China.Or the albedo should be such that if a CCP official holds it at the summer solstice at an angle of 43.7 degrees, he will get enraged at the difference with China's.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby putnanja » 27 Nov 2012 03:27

Is there any picture of the chinese passport with the new map, and India's visa with the map?

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Manny » 27 Nov 2012 06:34

Its time we stamp Chine passport showing Tibet as the "Indipendent Dharmic nation of Tibet" and India as the "Dharmic Nation of Bharat"

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Bade » 27 Nov 2012 07:03

The Indian map with stamped visa on chinese passports should show Dharmasala as the capital of Tibet, and all of Tibet as occupied territory with a dot matrix pic of Dalai Lama over the Tibetan region.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 27 Nov 2012 08:43

jamwal wrote:Image


I see too many red dashes in the map above because it is not an official PRC map. In 1947, the Kuomintang produced a similar map with eleven dashes but encompassing the same areas as above. It was known as the eleven-dash map. This map is the basis on which Mao's government published a new map in 1953 with nine dashes instead of the eleven but with no material change in the territory claimed. Littoral countries facing their own political problems and insurgencies at that time paid no attention to this development which has been assumed by PRC as an implicit acceptance by all parties concerned.

When PRC objected to ONGC Videsh Ltd.'s (OVL) joint exploration with Vietnam in the South China Sea claiming violation of its sovereign territory, Man Mohan Singh told Wen Jiabao in the 19th ASEAN Summit in mid-November, 2011 at Bali, that Indian activities were purely ‘commercial’ and issues of sovereignty needed to be settled ‘according to international laws and practices’. However, the Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson, in response to a question on Prime Minister Man Mohan Singh’s assertion of commercial venture, said on Nov. 21, 2011 that “We don't hope to see outside forces involved in the South China Sea dispute and do not want to see foreign companies engage in activities that will undermine China's sovereignty and interest.” When questioned as to why China disputed India’s presence in oil exploration in South China Sea while she herself was building dams and roads in disputed PoK, Mr. Sun, Deputy Director-General of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs gave a very unconvincing and convoluted answer. He said that the South China Sea dispute was “very complex” and involved many parties. China was trying to discuss the issue with other countries with overlapping claims. In PoK, China's “only focus” was on the development of the local economy. “It doesn't mean” that China had ratified Pakistan's claim to the territory. “The dispute [over the PoK] is between India and Pakistan. So, whenever there are disputes or tensions, China will not be judgmental. Therefore, I don't think they should be mixed”.

For the first time in its 45-year history, ASEAN failed to issue a communique at an annual meeting of its 10 foreign ministers at Phnom Penh when host Cambodia, viewed as pro-Beijing, rejected a proposal by the Philippines and Vietnam to mention their separate territorial disputes with China in the statement. China’s Vice President, Xi Jinping who is taking over from Hu Jintao as the General Secretary of the Communist Party of China (CPC), assured ASEAN countries in September 2012 in a China-ASEAN business meeting that China “ will never seek hegemony nor behave in a hegemonic manner.” It has been the ploy of the Chinese to negotiate individually with countries with which it has maritime disputes while the ASEAN countries want to collectively resolve the issue.

Whether it is the border dispute with us or the question of Taiwan, Tibet or Uyghur or the delineation of South & East China Seas, the Chinese leaders cannot compromise on their unilateral position because they would otherwise risk their lives in view of the Anti-Secession Law of 2005. It is a capital offense to agree to a compromise on perceived Chinese sovereignty.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby jamwal » 27 Nov 2012 10:53

Here’s the Chinese passport map that’s infuriating much of Asia

Image

China’s new official passport carries, on its eighth page, a watermark map of China that has set off diplomatic disputes with four neighboring countries. The small map shows a version of China that includes disputed territory claimed by India, a vast stretch of the South China Sea, including islands claimed by several other countries, and the entirety of Taiwan.

The map seems to affront diplomatic protocol around the disputed territory; it risks exacerbating regional fears of Chinese heavy-handedness with its neighbors and their sovereignty. Southeast Asian nations, on guard against China’s rising strength and sometimes pushy foreign policy, have been edging away from Beijing in recent years. So this map is probably not going to help.

The offended Asian nations are striking back in their own ways. Vietnamese border officials are refusing to stamp the new passports. India is stamping its own version of the map on visas issued to Chinese citizens. The Taiwanese and Philippine governments have formally complained.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Chinmayanand » 27 Nov 2012 14:13

The best way to counter this Chinese map fetish is to show Chinese provinces only , not China as a country. This will reach deeper into the anals of CCP and take them into esctasy.

-------------------


If corruption is allowed to run wild in China then the ruling Communist Party risks major unrest and the collapse of its rule, state media on Monday quoted Communist Party chief Xi Jinping as saying at one of his first major meetings since taking the role.


Is this also one reason to divert the attention of the discontent poor Chinese mob from CCP corruption to false bravado with its smaller nighbours ?

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Sanku » 27 Nov 2012 17:57

http://www.financialexpress.com/news/no ... c-/1036972
Beijing: A Chinese supplier to popular US fast food chain KFC (Kentucky Fried Chicken - reportedly world's largest fried chicken chain) has been accused of lacing chicken feed with huge amounts of toxic additives to make chicken grow faster, media reports have said.

The reports emerged last week alleging that the Suhai Group adds toxic industrial chemicals to chicken feed to make the chicken grow faster --45 days for a chicken to grow big enough for slaughter.

Reports said that the chicken feed Suhai prepared was so toxic that it could even kill flies.


I believe that GoI should immediately ban ALL food products from China, as well as food additives. Any and all other material imported must be tested by independent (non Chinese) inspectors, for which the Chinese exporters must pay.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Manny » 27 Nov 2012 21:16

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/2 ... 96882.html

Chinese Newspaper Falls For 'Onion' Article Naming Kim Jong Un Sexiest Man Alive


BEIJING — The online version of China's Communist Party newspaper has hailed a report by The Onion naming North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un as the "Sexiest Man Alive" – not realizing it is satire.

The People's Daily on Tuesday ran a 55-page photo spread on its website in a tribute to the round-faced leader, under the headline "North Korea's top leader named The Onion's Sexiest Man Alive for 2012."

Quoting The Onion's spoof report, the Chinese newspaper wrote, `'With his devastatingly handsome, round face, his boyish charm, and his strong, sturdy frame, this Pyongyang-bred heartthrob is every woman's dream come true."

"Blessed with an air of power that masks an unmistakable cute, cuddly side, Kim made this newspaper's editorial board swoon with his impeccable fashion sense, chic short hairstyle, and, of course, that famous smile," the People's Daily cited The Onion as saying.

The photos the People's Daily selected include Kim on horseback squinting into the light and Kim waving toward a military parade. In other photos, he is wearing sunglasses and smiling, or touring a facility with his wife.

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

The original article

http://www.theonion.com/articles/kim-jo ... for,30379/

With today’s announcement, Kim joins the ranks of The Onion’s prior “Sexiest Man Alive” winners, including:

2011: Bashar al-Assad
2010: Bernie Madoff
2009: Charles and David Koch (co-winners)
2008: Ted Kaczynski
2007: T. Herman Zweibel
The Onion’s commemorative “Sexiest Man Alive” issue will be available on newsstands everywhere this Friday and contains a full 16-page spread on Kim. :mrgreen:

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby harbans » 27 Nov 2012 21:57

^ Nice find Manny :D However i notice, Satire is completely missing from mainland Chinese society. People living for long in a totalitarian society just are devolved of the gene to comprehend satire. China is pretty much a humorless society. I would say S. Korea and Japan too suffer still in some ways from a lack of humor. In India it is very highly developed as in the US/ West. Rest of Asian societies it's very weak, ME it is absent..JMT/

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Rony » 28 Nov 2012 06:26

Sadanand Dhume tweet. Will Nooranis and Chindu's listen ?

Indian reluctance to rile China understandable, but too much understanding of "their perspective" downplays focus on who changed status quo.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 28 Nov 2012 06:58

Rony, A.G.Noorani is also propagating a false proposition that in c. 1960, during his visit to New Delhi, Chou-en-Lai offered a deal of swapping NEFA for Aksai Chin. Jagat Mehta, ex-foreign secretary and in 1960, head of the team that discussed with the Chinese the boundary question, flatly denies any such offer being made by the Chinese. It is a moot point whether India would have accepted that even if a deal had been made. One cannot take a part of my property and then offer it as a swap for another piece of the same property !

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 28 Nov 2012 10:03

A Chinese Opportunity that India Tourism Misses - Ananth Krishnan in The Hindu
Through his critically-acclaimed film Life of Pi , Taiwan-born director Ang Lee has appeared to have succeeded in doing what the Indian government has failed to achieve over more than a decade of tourism campaigns and promotion drives in China: rekindling Chinese interest in travelling to India and in Indian culture.

The film, which has scenes set in Puducherry in South India, has triggered huge interest in China since its opening last week, breaking box office records and raking in $16 million in its opening weekend — more than four times the amount in India.

Beyond the box office too, the film has sparked wide debate — and thousands of comments — in the vibrant online community, with Chinese writers and microbloggers seeing the film as a long-overdue introduction to Indian culture for a Chinese public often ignorant about India.

Lost chance

“A beautiful film; India is now the most beautiful travel destination in my heart,” wrote a blogger named Beautiful Carpenter who writes on travel and fashion.

Au Xin, a DJ at Radio Guangdong, said in a message to his 45,000 followers on the Chinese Twitter equivalent Sina Weibo that what he liked about the film was director “Ang Lee’s respect and belief in Indian culture.”

Miss Ruby, a Beijing-based microblogger, added on Weibo in a message that echoed most of the online reactions that the film, which also dwells on India’s religious and cultural traditions, would “correct the prejudice and ignorance about Indian culture [in China],” while Xu Xiaohuang, an executive at an insurance company in Zhejiang, said the film was “meaningful and beautiful, and makes me want to travel to India.”

Another microblogger in Shanghai, who professes an interest in films and travel, said in a post on Weibo that he had taken his daughter to see Life of Pi . “India’s Minister of Travel should award Ang Lee with a medal!”, he wrote. “He presents the beauty of India to the world.”

The Indian government has not, however, followed his suggestion of using the film’s hugely anticipated release here last week to promote tourism in India – a popular practice followed by other countries looking to tap the China market.

China’s booming tourism market has, over the past few years, largely ignored India. Of the around 50 million Chinese who travel overseas every year spending some $40 billion, less than 1,00,000 travel to India on business and tourism, according to tourism figures from two years ago.

This year’s tourism figures, excluding business travel, paint an even bleaker picture. In the past six months, India only issued 25,000 tourist visas in its Embassy in Beijing and three Consulates in Shanghai, Guangzhou and Hong Kong, suggesting that tourism figures are only in the range of 50,000 annually — 0.001 per cent of the total outbound tourism.

Chinese tour operators say demand for travel in India is low because of inadequate promotion efforts in recent years — particularly involving tour operators — and dissatisfaction with the service offered by current operators, from a lack of Chinese-speaking guides and the availability of Chinese cuisine. Hence, tourists were choosing to travel to Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and even Sri Lanka and Nepal instead.

Up until March, India did not even have a director at its Tourism Office in Beijing, with the position remaining vacant for many months because of delays in appointing a new director. Officials in New Delhi acknowledge that the China market is low on the Tourism Ministry’s priorities, reflected in the small budget accorded to tourism promotion in China which has, in recent years, not been expanded despite the multibillion dollar tourism boom.

When asked why the Indian government did not, for instance, look to use the success of Life of Pi or the hugely successful 3 Idiots by flying in actors such as Irrfan Khan or Aamir Khan who have since become popular in China — a practice followed by other countries — one official said: “The budget for tourism isn't even enough for campaigns such as external advertising, so where is the money for flying in film stars?”


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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Bharath.Subramanyam » 29 Nov 2012 07:44

Seemed to have missed out a new book by Edward Luttwak 'The Rise of China vs. the Logic of Strategy'

http://www.amazon.com/The-Rise-China-Logic-Strategy/dp/0674066421/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1354155107&sr=8-1&keywords=Edward+Luttwak

Some youtube videos about the book:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLmk9IceqJQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hor_X9--6w


Dr Luttwak is saying that China has made mistake in its 'peaceful raise' . And countries like India, Japan & Vietnam are forming alliances to counter China.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 29 Nov 2012 08:29

Bharath.Subramanyam wrote: Dr Luttwak is saying that China has made mistake in its 'peaceful raise' .

PRC's is not actually 'peaceful rise'. It has been 'non-confrontationist aggression', a term that has been used in literature to describe PRC's behaviour so far. That included cartographic aggression, hydro-aggression, trade aggression, resource aggression etc. However, the logical next step is 'confrontationist aggression', to which it seems to be naturally moving. Naturally, all the littoral states as well as far-away powers are alarmed and are beginning to formalize an alliance on multiple fronts, though cautiously.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby jamwal » 30 Nov 2012 15:25

Chinese Kung Fu Expert Beats Up Men Who Came To Evict Him From Home

In China, perhaps even more than in Britain, a man's home is his castle.
So when 38-year-old Shen Jianzhong was faced with a mob of thugs trying to evict him, he asked himself what his hero, Bruce Lee, would do.
The answer, according to a video that has attracted more than two million hits on the Chinese internet, is turn to kung fu.
For 20 years, Mr Shen had been practising kung fu, teaching himself Bruce Lee's system in his courtyard home in Bazhou, Hebei province.

Working in a local gym as a fitness coach, he is also the holder of a world record, at least according to an association in Hong Kong, for the most press-ups in a minute using a roller. "I am now training to break the record for most press-ups on a balance beam," he said.

At the end of October, Mr Shen was able to put his kung fu into action. For six months, a property developer had been trying to get his hands on Mr Shen's house.

"They called it a remodelling project, to turn our village into a town," he said.

"They wanted to tear down the whole street, and promised we would get a new house of the same size in two years, as well as rent to cover the interim.

But I heard of people in a neighbouring village getting a much better deal, so we refused to sign."

At first, the property company stuck up posters warning of dire consequences for any families who held out. Then, Mr Shen said, when 70 of the 100 households had left, the threats escalated.

"This mob of thugs would block the street most days. They would pick on the women, threatening to kill their kids. Then people started tossing bricks through windows and letting off fireworks at night. Some people got beaten on the street."

On October 29, as Mr Shen went to work and his wife popped out for a packet of instant noodles, a mob of "30 to 50 men" materialised at their front door.

"My wife tried to close the door, but they pushed it back and she tripped over. That is how the fight started," said Mr Shen.

With a flurry of kicks and punches, he and his 18-year-old son, a fellow kung fu devotee, set about the attackers, rendering seven of them near unconscious in the hallway.

"It was self defence. I really cannot remember what kung fu skills I used.

It was quite messy. Only seven people were injured because the rest were scared and stayed outside. Some of them ran away," he said.

When the police arrived, however, they were little help, insisting that since the thugs were unarmed, it was Mr Shen and his family who were in the wrong. They urged the family to sign the contract.

Instead, the Shens posted their homemade video online, where it has gone viral as a rare David versus Goliath moment in the bleak fight against China's avaricious property barons.

They then fled, on the evening of November 21, to Beijing. Upon arriving in the capital, however, Mr Shen's son was arrested by the police, who said they would charge him with assault.

"I do not regret the fight, but I am worried about my son," said Mr Shen.

"I think they are trying to fit up him up with some crime. I am concerned that my actions will end up hurting him," he said, acknowledging that officials may try to emotionally blackmail him into signing over his lease.

As the Telegraph interviewed Mr Shen, however, his phone rang. It was, he said, a man named Zhou Jin, who claimed to be a member of the Central Military Commission, which oversees the People's Liberation Army.

"He said he had seen my plight and was outraged. He said I should not give any interviews to the media and he would come and collect me in his car this afternoon," said Mr Shen.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Rony » 01 Dec 2012 00:13


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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Rishi » 02 Dec 2012 20:35

From a stellar investigative article on CIA (and the killing of one of their bankers):

http://www.salon.com/2012/12/02/better_ ... nick_deak/

But the company’s most important client was always the CIA. From its founding until the late 1970s, Deak’s firm was a key financial arm of the U.S. intelligence complex. Because it carried out the foreign-currency transactions of private entities, Deak and Co. could keep track of who was spiriting money into and out of which countries.

In 1962, for example, Deak warned the CIA that China was planning to invade India after his company’s Hong Kong branch was swamped with Chinese orders for Indian rupees intended for advance soldiers. Deak’s offices were more than observation posts.


:eek: Has this been chronicled elsewhere? Indian jurnos on the board?

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 03 Dec 2012 18:55

What China's Transition Means to India - Ananth Krishnan, The Hindu
“Continuity” is a word that National Security Adviser Shivshankar Menon is likely to hear often from his Chinese interlocutors during his visit to Beijing, which begins today.
Among Chinese strategic scholars, there is little expectation that the boundary talks, of which 15 rounds have been held, will yield any major concrete outcomes in the near future.Since 2005, when the two countries completed the first of three stages of negotiations by signing an agreement on political parameters and guiding principles, perceptions in Beijing are that the crucial second stage of framework negotiations has been deadlocked.
He {Hu Shisheng, a South Asia scholar at the China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations (CICIR)} agreed that India fared far below issues such as relations with the United States, current territorial disputes with Japan and the situation in the South China Sea in terms of China’s pressing priorities.
China’s concerns on the United States “pivot” or “rebalancing”, which has emerged as Beijing’s primary foreign policy focus in recent months, is likely to cast a shadow on ties with India. “Obama’s “pivot” offers a lens through which many Chinese analysts see India’s strategic intention toward China,” said Han Hua, a leading South Asia scholar at Peking University. “The two have to talk to each other on “core interests” and how to avoid challenging those interests,” she said. “Small frictions will be still there, but in general, stable relations are the main theme in China’s India policy.” {PRC's strategy clearly is to keep India on a lower priority to avoid another major country joining hands with the likes of the US, Japan, Korea etc. It can lull India into complacency for the time being until the other issues are resolved somehow and the US is unmounted from its back. It can then tackle India one-on-one}

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 04 Dec 2012 07:15

China's new leadership tells India to ignore differences, deepen ties - Ananth Krishnan, The Hindu
The message from China’s new leadership to India was that both countries should “not let differences and problems stand in the way” of taking the relationship forward, Chinese State Councillor Dai Bingguo told the visiting National Security Adviser, Shivshankar Menon, here on Monday.{Now, Dai Bingguo is not exactly 'new' leadership}

Amid persisting political mistrust over the long-running border dispute and more recent spats over passports and visas, Mr. Dai said both countries needed “to prevent noise from diverting friendly cooperation and common development.”

The State Councillor, who is Mr. Menon’s counterpart as the Special Representative on the boundary talks, called on both countries “to have a clear idea about some parties’ intentions of undermining bilateral ties,” without specifying who those parties were.{Now, that is the Chinese ploy. As it faces the wrath of all littoral countries of South & East China Seas, and the 'rebalancing' of the US and the general economic slowdown, it wants to wean India away from that informal alliance that is taking shape.}
“Mr. Menon’s visit is not about the boundary issue [alone]. It is about the whole relationship,” Qin Gang, head of the Foreign Ministry’s Information Department, told reporters.

Mr. Menon held two sessions of talks with Mr. Dai, which officials said covered a broad range of issues from the impact of the leadership transition and bilateral ties to wider strategic issues and the boundary question. He also met with Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi.
We have seen a lot of convergence of views and shared interests, shared aspirations, shared goals,” Mr. Qin said. “This meeting will send out a strong message that as two neighbours China and India will continue to work for good neighbourly relationship. {These are Panchsheel-like back-stabbing words from PRC} This meeting is not an occasion where both sides expressed differences on the boundary issue.”
“The passport issue did not come up,” Mr. Qin said. “We have expressed ourselves very clearly, and Mr. Menon and other senior Indian officials have talked about it… We have fully explained to other parties, including India, and both sides need to work for the smooth travelling of citizens.” {The Chinese are sticking to their guns and are giving an impression that the Indians understood the Chinese position.}

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby arun » 04 Dec 2012 07:42

X Posted from the TSP thread.

P.R.China government-linked company has pleaded guilty to illegally exporting high-performance coatings from the US to the Chashma II nuclear power plant in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan:

Chinese firm in illegal nuclear exports to Pakistan

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Indian navy ready to deploy to South China Sea as tensions c

Postby dnivas » 04 Dec 2012 08:02

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/12/ ... 3M20121204

India has declared itself ready to deploy naval vessels to the South China Sea to protect its oil-exploration interests there, a potential new escalation of tensions in a disputed area where fears of armed conflict have been growing steadily.

India's naval chief made the statement on Monday just as Vietnam's state oil and gas company, Petrovietnam, accused Chinese boats of sabotaging an exploration operation by cutting a seismic cable being towed behind a Vietnamese vessel.


Indian Navy Chief Admiral D.K Joshi said that, while India was not a territorial claimant in the South China Sea, it was prepared to act, if necessary, to protect its maritime and economic interests in the region.

"When the requirement is there, for example, in situations where our country's interests are involved, for example ONGC ... we will be required to go there and we are prepared for that," Joshi told a news conference.

"Now, are we preparing for it? Are we having exercises of that nature? The short answer is yes," he said.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby shiv » 04 Dec 2012 08:06

China's narrative of Han expansion
http://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opi ... -expansion
This expansion of the Han presence both inside and outside the current borders of the People's Republic was not just a coincidence. It was linked to China's mix of political weakness and demographic strength. The Qing bequeathed an empire which had rarely been bigger and certainly had never been so Han.

Political and military strength is now China's guardian against humiliation, but a stagnating population is a danger, as Russia found when ethnic Russians either failed to procreate as fast as their Kazakh and other neighbours, or simply found life on the fringes of the empire too harsh. China's neighbours are now in awe of its power. But on the fringes of China, non-Han are breeding faster, and neighbours such as Vietnam and Korea have become fierce defenders of their own cultures and borders. The more China focuses on avenging past humiliations, the more it will raise awareness among neighbours of the previous 200 years of mostly Qing-era expansion of the Han state and its global presence.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby krisna » 04 Dec 2012 09:16

Image
Image
Image
What happens in China when an old couple refuse to move out of their house for a highway to be built in its place? They just build the road anyway around the house. An elderly couple in Wenling, Zhejiang province refused to sign an agreement to allow their house to be demolished. They said that compensation offered was not enough to cover rebuilding costs, according to local media. Their house is the only building left standing on a road which is paved through their village.


Happens in china-- a highway road skirting past a home of an aged couple.
feel sorry for the aged couple. :(


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