People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

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jamwal
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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby jamwal » 03 May 2013 21:57

Rat meat sold as lamb in Shanghai, police say
:rotfl: :rotfl:
If you have ordered lamb or mutton for hotpot in Shanghai over the last four years, you might have been served rat, fox or mink, the Ministry of Public Security said on Thursday.

"Since 2009, the suspect, surnamed Wei, has bought foxes, minks, rats and other uninspected meat products in Shandong," the ministry said in a press release on its website.

"After adding gelatine, carmine, nitrate and other substances, he sold the meat as fake lamb rolls [for hot pot] at farmers' markets in Jiangsu and Shanghai."

Wei's organisation was raided in Jiangsu and Shanghai in February, which led to the arrest of 63 suspects and the seizure of 10 tons of meat and additives.

Police estimates that Wei's sales over the last four years have reached a value of 10 million yuan (HK$12.6 million).

In March, police in Baotou, a city in the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region, stopped a company that since 2010 has been producing beef jerky from duck meat and selling it in 15 Chinese provinces. Almost 15 tons of the fake jerky were confiscated.

These are two of 10 stomachs-wrenching cases the ministry listed as exemplary of a crackdown on food product fraud - meat of diseased animals, steroid-manipulated meat and sewer oil - that started two weeks before Chinese New Year, on January 25.

Over the last three months, authorities throughout China have seized some 20,000 tons in counterfeit meat and arrested 3,576 suspects in the operation, dealing "a heavy blow to the arrogance of criminals", the ministry said.

The campaign comes amid a growing shortage in agricultural products and a general sense of anxiety over food security.

The task of providing an adequate supply of safe food would be "very tough", Agriculture Minister Han Changfu said at a meeting in December.

In 2010, some 300,000 children got sick after consuming melamine-tainted milk products. Studies last year showed excessive amounts of heavy metals in rice from several regions. In 2005, a fake chicken egg producer's website boasted producing 1,500 eggs a day out of paraffin wax and algae.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby kish » 07 May 2013 10:31

Pigs and people get same treatment in China. Both are disposed off quietly after disease. :shock:

China reports four more bird flu deaths, toll rises to 315

Four more people in China have died from a new strain of bird flu, bringing to 31 the number of deaths from the mysterious H7N9 virus, with the number of infections rising by two to 129, according to Chinese health authorities

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby JE Menon » 07 May 2013 10:35

>>If you have ordered lamb or mutton for hotpot in Shanghai over the last four years, you might have been served rat, fox or mink, the Ministry of Public Security said on Thursday.

I often watch CCTV 4 the chinese state English language TV channel.. There was a report on the above. Stomach churning stuff, and it was meant to be sanitised for international viewing; it appears they have a completely different concept of what is palatable, generally speaking... It was being reported as "normal", so to speak...

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Suraj » 07 May 2013 10:52

Clashes with Uighurs leaves 21 dead in Chinese-occupied Xinjiang
Twenty-one people were killed in a violent clash involving axes, knives and the burning down of a house in Xinjiang on Tuesday, the regional government said yesterday.

Nine officials, six police and six ethnic Uygurs were killed in Tuesday's drama, said Hou Hanmin, spokeswoman for the Xinjiang government.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Philip » 07 May 2013 11:11

The best way to shove a diplomatic carrot up "Leaky-King's" nether end when he visits,invite HH the Dalai Lama to the banquet!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politic ... lions.html

David Cameron's rift with China could cost UK billions
David Cameron has effectively been barred from visiting China because Beijing is so angry at the Prime Minister for meeting the Dalai Lama last year.


By Malcolm Moore in Beijing and James Quinn in London

10:00PM BST 06 May 2013

China wants Mr Cameron to apologise for hosting Tibet’s spiritual leader, who disputes Beijing’s territorial claims on the region. The Government insists there is nothing to apologise for.

There are now fears that the frosty diplomatic relations could put at risk Chinese investment in Britain, which was worth £8billion last year.

Chinese sources have made a veiled threat that for investment in the UK “there needs to be a strong relationship”.

That raises the prospect of large infrastructure projects such as the High Speed 2 rail network and the Government’s nuclear investment programme missing out on billions of pounds of key investment from China’s sovereign wealth fund.

The damaging stand-off has seen a cooling of relations up to the level of the countries’ leaders.
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Under a bilateral agreement, Mr Cameron was due to visit China last autumn but that visit was called off. This year it was the turn of Li Keqiang, the Chinese premier, to visit Britain – but plans for that have now been put on hold.

Last month, a British trade trip to China, also due to have been led by Mr Cameron, did not take place. In contrast, François Hollande, the French president, was greeted with a 21-gun salute in Beijing recently.

Last May, China warned Mr Cameron and Nick Clegg, the Deputy Prime Minister, of “serious consequences” for Britain after the private meeting with the Dalai Lama in St Paul’s Cathedral.

Sebastian Wood, Britain’s ambassador in Beijing, was summoned to the foreign ministry to receive a rebuke from Song Tao, China’s vice-foreign minister. The foreign ministry said the meeting with the exiled Tibetan leader had “seriously interfered with China’s internal affairs”. Mr Song urged Britain to take “practical actions to correct the error”.

However, the pleas were ignored, and China is now exerting public pressure on the Government to bow to its demands and make amends.

The Beijing foreign ministry has now escalated the row by insisting the UK must “work with us to bring the relationship back on to a healthy track at an early date”.

A spokesman said: “We all know that the relationship between China and the UK was undermined by David Cameron meeting the Dalai Lama and this is not something we are willing to see.”

Diplomatic sources told The Telegraph that Mr Cameron was now not welcome to visit China and Mr Li will not visit the UK until Britain resolves the situation.

David Cameron and the Dalai Lama pictured at the Houses of Parliament in 2008

Although Chinese investment in the UK hit an all-time high last year of some £8billion, five times as much as in 2011, one source in London threatened that “a political relationship is a pre-condition for a trading relationship”.

Among the British investments of the China Investment Corporation are London’s Canary Wharf financial district — of which it owns a third — and Heathrow, in which it has a 10pc stake worth £450million.

Alistair Michie, the deputy chairman of the 48 Group, a pro-China British business organisation, said Britain’s position is “doubly unfortunate” because a new generation of Chinese leaders has just taken charge for the next 10 years.

“The UK has not fully grasped the significance of the handover to the new leaders and we have got off on the wrong foot,” he said. “None of our leaders has a personal relationship with any of the new Chinese leaders, and relationships are key to doing business with China.”

Currently there are only a handful of Britons with links to the top of the Communist party, including Lord Mandelson, the former trade and industry secretary, and Lord Powell , an adviser to Margaret Thatcher in office.

There are fears that Britain’s intransigence risks jeopardising billions of pounds of investment. There was a 13 per cent increase in British goods exported to China last year, worth £10.5billion. There were some 179,000 Chinese visitors, a 20 per cent increase, spending some £300million.

Beijing has a policy of punishing countries whose leaders meet the Dalai Lama, but the current freeze with the UK is thought to be the longest ever.

After Nicolas Sarkozy, then French president, met the Dalai Lama in 2009, France was forced to issue a joint statement. The statement was widely interpreted as a promise to discuss any future meetings with the Dalai Lama with Beijing. In 2007, after Angela Merkel met the Dalai Lama, Germany published a joint statement with China.

Government sources admitted there had been some frustration after the Dalai Lama meeting but strongly denied any visits had been cancelled because of it. They insisted Beijing had been warned before the meeting and it was on sacred ground to emphasise it was a meeting with a spiritual leader.

They said that last autumn’s visit by Mr Cameron had been called off early in 2012, before the meeting with the Dalai Lama took place, because it clashed with the election of new leaders in Beijing.

In January, the Government looked at rearranging a visit in April, but this was called off because Mr Li only took over in March. Sources said Mr Cameron would visit before the end of the year.

A Downing Street spokesman said: “We haven’t cancelled any PM visits to China. We want to deepen our relations with China and indeed we already are — UK exports to China grew faster than any of our main European partners last year and we were the only EU country to benefit from increased trade and investment.

“Of course we engage with China on a huge range of issues, on some we agree, on others we disagree, but we strongly believe it is in the interests of both countries to manage our differences with respect, and cooperate as much as possible. Our position on Tibet is longstanding and clear: we regard Tibet as part of the People’s Republic of China. The PM spoke to Premier Li Keqiang in March and they agreed that they looked forward to meeting and continuing to strengthen relations in due course.”

Meanwhile, Zong Qinghou, a drinks tycoon and China’s richest man, claimed he had snubbed both the Queen and Mr Cameron in the space of one week in February. He said he had been invited by the Queen for dinner and by Mr Cameron to celebrate Chinese New Year. Nothing in the court circular indicated any such event at Buckingham Palace.



Check the last para,it shows how habitual the Chinese are at lying!

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby svinayak » 07 May 2013 19:23

JE Menon wrote:>>If you have ordered lamb or mutton for hotpot in Shanghai over the last four years, you might have been served rat, fox or mink, the Ministry of Public Security said on Thursday.

I often watch CCTV 4 the chinese state English language TV channel.. There was a report on the above. Stomach churning stuff, and it was meant to be sanitised for international viewing; it appears they have a completely different concept of what is palatable, generally speaking... It was being reported as "normal", so to speak...

The PLA military does not have a civilian counter part to sanitize their TV. They serve the same military visuals to rest of the world thinking that rest of the world is also in the same way

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby jamwal » 08 May 2013 11:26

[url=http://blogs.asiantown.net/-/3898/video–cute-girl-cruelly-abuses-and-kil-amp–108-s-a-baby-rabbit.aspx]Chinese girl cruelly abuses and kills a baby rabbit, posts the video on internet[/url]

Recently a video of this young girl senselessly killing a little rabbit had appeared on the Internet (Video and pictures are from a Chinese website Weibo.com). In the video, a young girl with long hair dressed in white abused and killed the little rabbit. She put a piece of thick glass plate on top of the the little rabbit and then sat on top of the glass plate. Using her body weight she crashed the little rabbit to death. Her 2 female friends watched and laughed

Dont know if PETA knows anything about this but I think we should do something to stop these cruel, heartless people killing innocent animals

It's such a heart breaking seeing human treat animals in this way as well as seeing other animal abuse videos on youtube channel

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Vasu » 08 May 2013 18:21

You know how every endangered species is in demand in China as an aphrodisiac? Have the Chinese considered eating themselves considering they have such a high libido?

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby kish » 09 May 2013 18:08

China media: Territorial disputes

State media contrast the recent resolution of a "tent" dispute on the Sino-Indian border with a deadlocked territorial dispute and historical grievances with Japan.

Global Times and other state media have played down a recent dispute between China and India over alleged border intrusions by Chinese armed forces ahead of Indian External Affairs Minister Salman Khurshid's arrival in Beijing today on a two-day visit.

Commentators in the People's Daily overseas edition and other media have been careful not to point the finger of blame at the Indian government in the dispute, instead blaming the Indian media, military or opposition parties of populist tactics in drumming up a "China military threat".


Yeah, its the media, military and opposition parties. GOI is subservient to China, can give any number of concessions. :(

Turning to domestic news, police and hundreds of protesters clashed yesterday over the unexplained death of a 22-year-old migrant worker from Anhui who was found dead on 3 May after falling from the top of a clothing mill in southern Beijing where she worked, Global Times reports.

Police say they found nothing suspicious at the scene of her death or in the autopsy, however, the deceased woman's relatives believe that she was raped and killed and suspect a cover-up by police, Ming Pao adds


Classic case of communist party officials raping a women and covering it up as a suicide. Poor women RIP.

Hong Kong's South China Morning Post says China's better-than-expected export growth last month may be "too good to be true", :D with economists linking the surge to speculative fund inflows.

"The better-than-expected data also prompted economists to question its accuracy, with some saying the data may have been inflated by Chinese exporters to circumvent capital control on funds they bring into the country," Global Times adds.


Shangai statistics!!

The newspapers note that local authorities often resort to intercepting and detaining petitioners in "black prisons" and call for better channels for people to voice grievances.

Beijing police have denied political interference and say an unsolved poisoning case that crippled former Tsinghua University student Zhu Ling in 1994 was closed due to a lack of evidence, Southern Metropolis Daily reports.


Black prisons, Death squads, Torcher chambers, Reeducation camp or what ever you call it. Its still tyranny. Chinese people need independence.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby kish » 11 May 2013 23:11

China coal mine blast in Guizhou province kills 12

An explosion at a coal mine in China's south-west Guizhou province has killed 12 miners and injured two others, state media report.

The blast occurred on Friday evening in the Dashan coal mine in Pingba county, provincial officials said.


World's second largest economy can't even protect its citizens. Dozens get killed every month.!

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby jamwal » 12 May 2013 11:33

Chinese cheats rort NZ universities with fakes

An investigation has uncovered a well-organised commercial cheating service for Chinese-speaking students in New Zealand.


The long-standing business uses a network of tutors, some outside New Zealand, to write original assignments ordered by Chinese-speaking students attending New Zealand universities, polytechnics and private institutions.

The tutors are paid by assignment and have specialist subjects.

The assignments go up to masters level but the service claims to have tutors up to doctorate level.

Tertiary Education Minister Steven Joyce last night said the police and the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) were launching an inquiry into the service following the investigation.

Joyce said the NZQA was anonymously tipped off three months ago and took action to inform universities and polytechs, but failed to tell him.

He said it was now an "open question" whether NZQA's response had been adequate, and chief executive Karen Poutasi was conducting an internal investigation.

The revelation of the cheating service has serious repercussions for the New Zealand international education sector, which earns about $750 million a year from about 93,000 students. China is New Zealand's biggest education market, last year accounting for 27 per cent of this country's international students.

The Sunday Star-Times, using the name of a fictitious Chinese student, successfully ordered an essay for a first-year university course subject from the company, which markets itself under a Chinese-language website called Assignment4U and is run from a unit at 88 Cook St, Central Auckland.


The signage in the office says Ateama Ltd in large, bold letters. The company also offers tutoring, counselling, help and academic "solutions" for overseas students.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby kish » 12 May 2013 22:58

Two accidents in a span of 2 days 68 killed. :|

Coal mine accidents kill 40 miners in SW China

Authorities say 40 miners have died in two separate coal mine explosions in southwestern China.

Provincial officials say 28 miners were killed in a blast on Saturday afternoon at a coal mine in Sichuan province. They say 108 people were working underground at the
time.

Less than 24 hours earlier, another coal mine blast in neighbouring Guizhou province killed 12 people.

China's mines are the deadliest in the world. Authorities have improved safety in recent years, but regulations are often ignored.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby krishnan » 13 May 2013 07:59

i wonder why such a heavy toll ??? do mines employ so many people ???? i think it has got to do with over loading the mines with workers

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby sanjaykumar » 13 May 2013 12:10

A few years ago, about ten thousand people used to die in China's coal mines yearly.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Philip » 14 May 2013 08:27

The mystery of Shane Todd: Did US electronic engineer commit suicide – or was he murdered because he knew too many Chinese secrets?
Parents claim son had been unhappy at work and feared 'heavy hands coming after him'

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world ... 14217.html

Warning to all who work in China!

coroner’s inquiry that opened in Singapore on Monday may offer a final chance of resolving whether an American electronics engineer committed suicide – or was killed to stop him talking to the US authorities about his work at a Singapore institute on a sensitive research project involving a high-profile Chinese telecommunications firm.

The body of Shane Todd was found on 24 June 2012 by his girlfriend in his apartment in Singapore, hanging from a strap attached to a door. A police autopsy said his death was caused by asphyxiation, but his parents believe he was murdered. They said suicide notes purportedly left by their son were faked and the initial police account of the scene bore little relation to what they found when they arrived at the apartment 48 hours after his death.

Mr Todd, who was 31 when he died, had joined the Singapore government-backed Institute for Micro Electronics (IME) 18 months earlier and for the final year of his life worked on an IME project to develop an amplifying device, using gallium nitride (GaN), a heat-resistant material with the potential to make superconductors with many possible uses in the civilian and military fields. Mr Todd had been trained in the US on proprietary equipment that produces GaN but is restricted for export because of its potential military applications.

During an early stage, IME was talking about the project with the Chinese telecom company Huawei, which is deemed a security risk by the US, Australia and India. According to his parents and his girlfriend Shirley Sarmiento, a Filipino nurse working in Singapore, Mr Todd was showing increasing signs of stress and unhappiness with his job as the project progressed.

Testifying on Monday as the first of at least 36 witnesses, Ms Sarmiento told the court that Mr Todd had frequently told her how he felt uncomfortable at IME and complained about the “dishonest environment” in his workplace. He had also mentioned how he feared “heavy hands coming after him”, she said.

Mr Todd had a history of depression dating back to his days as a college student, but in letters to his parents he had emphasised that his problem in Singapore was not depression but work-related anxiety. In particular, his parents, Rick and Mary Todd, told the Financial Times earlier this year that their son suspected he might be involved in a project that might be illegal, or something that in could compromise US national security. For this reason, they believe, he may have been murdered.

There are other apparent inconsistencies, apart from suicide notes that do not appear to be in Mr Todd’s handwriting. One of them apologised for being a burden on the family – but his mother pointed out he had never been a burden, but rather had excelled at everything he did.

According to the parents, the original police report described an elaborate mechanism for the hanging, including bolts drilled into the marble wall of the bathroom, that secured a pulley. But the Todds said they saw no trace of drilled holes when they arrived at the apartment from their home in Montana.

What they did discover, they told the FT, was an external hard drive. When they had it analysed by an IT expert in the US it was found to contain copies of their son’s computer files from IME, including a planned project apparently involving Huawei.

Friends have said that in the days before he died Mr Todd seemed in a much better mood, having secured a good job back in the US.

His parents said they found boxes of his effects and clothes laid out as if for packing, as well as the air ticket to the US on a table. The place, they said, “looked like a snapshot of a man in the middle of a move”.

The official version, however, is very different. The state counsel, Tai Wei Shyong, told the court police found no signs of foul play when they arrived on the scene and no evidence that anyone had tried to force their way into his apartment. In addition, Mr Tai said, Mr Todd’s computer showed he had visited several suicide-related websites in the days before he died and had made 19 searches about depression in the last two months of his life.

Meanwhile, IME and Huawei have minimised their collaboration on GaN research. K Shanmugam, Singapore’s Foreign Minister and law minister, has said Mr Todd was involved in “a small project” with Huawei that lasted nine months. IME and the Chinese company had also discussed a possible GaN project, he added, but could not agree terms. “Thus the project never materialised,” Mr Shanmugam said.

The inquest is expected to last a fortnight and some time after that a verdict will be handed down, which under Singapore law cannot be appealed. But the Todds have vowed to seek an investigation by the US Congress, no matter the outcome.

“We believe China and Singapore are illegally transferring technology,” Mary Todd said last week.

“If our son was murdered, the implications for Singapore and China are so extreme that they will go to any lengths to make it look like suicide.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby kish » 14 May 2013 18:10

China’s prostitutes routinely extorted, abused by police, report says

Police raids on brothels in China have a pattern, sex workers say, often occurring a few days ahead of politically sensitive events or whenever someone in government orders an anti-pornography campaign to please the leadership.

It’s during these times, the workers say, that their already miserable jobs grow more perilous with some police officers demanding steep bribes or sex, beating them, or locking them up for as long as two years without trial.


Poor girls. Chinese people should raise up against such opaque and dubious justice system.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Prem » 19 May 2013 10:20

http://www.tealeafnation.com/2013/05/vi ... -problems/

Several days ago, the state-run People’s Daily ran a piece entitled “The Post-80′s Generation is Dispirited: Early Decline Cause for Alarm,” arguing that while China’s youth born after 1980 have far and away better material conditions than their forbearers, they face “spiritual confusion and a loss of identity.” The piece concludes by noting that a country’s youth are its future, and that it is the duty of the younger generation to address this problem. In response, social media celebrity and social critic Zuoyeben (@作业本) penned an essay on the real cause of this issue. The essay quickly became the top trending post on Sina Weibo, China’s Twitter, drawing more than 100,000 retweets and 29,000 comments in just a few hours. Tea Leaf Nation has translated the essay below in full.
In response to the People’s Daily: Why Is the Post-80’s Generation Dispirited?Several days ago, the People’s Daily ran a story about how the post-80’s generation was dispirited, and how their premature decline in spirit was a source of concern. In this article, I will discuss this issue, using myself as an example.When I was in elementary school, I was moved to tears by [such Communist heroes as] Qiu Shaoyun, Lai Ning and Lei Feng. At all times, I was prepared to sacrifice myself and become a martyr for the establishment of the motherland, spilling every last drop of blood. I thought my red neckerchief [symbol of the Young Pioneers, a Communist organization for children] was more important than my own life, because you told me: it was dyed red with the blood of martyrs. Back then, I wondered, how did martyrs keep their blood so fresh and red before they died?

In the history books, you outlined the crimes of the Japanese, and made me want nothing more than to swim over to Japan and blow it up. You talked of how countless martyrs, Party members, and soldiers sacrificed themselves to win the War of Resistance against Japan. Back then, I was so deeply moved, I was angry I hadn’t been born several decades earlier, so that I could ride boldly into battle with just my knife and my horse. It’s a good thing I wasn’t born back then, after all, or who knows where I would have died.In your anti-Japan dramas, seven or eight-year old kids could kill a lot of [Japanese] devils, and guerrilla units could charge at them with machetes to kill soldiers holding machine guns. Each died after being stabbed once – and sometimes you could kill two with one thrust. Were these devils stupid? You could kill more devils with a machete than a machine gun.Those idiots beat students just as often as they ate. In my third year of high school, the PE teacher beat me within an inch of my life because my morning exercises were not up to par. My homeroom teacher slapped me across the face because I fell asleep in class. My art teacher knocked down my painting and easel because I cut class. The principal kicked me to the ground and wouldn’t allow me to stand up because I was late to school. What I’m trying to say is, back then, almost all teachers beat students, as long as they had some kind of physical advantage.Of course, these days you’ve made some progress. You don’t beat secondary school students, you just get a hotel room with primary school students. [Editors: the reference is to the recent news that a primary school principal took six girls to a hotel room. Sexual attack is suspected.]You approach education as if you had to force-feed us, always making us “recite the whole text,” learn from [Maoist model student] Jiao Yulu and to be wary of Western brainwashing. What use is it to recite the whole text? What are we supposed to get out of studying your examples and models? Do we deceive ourselves? Is there any meaning in “political thought education” for middle school students? Where is the value in making college students study Marxism, Leninism, Maoist Thought and Deng Xiaoping’s theories?How many of your professors do real academic research? Or have done real academic research? The world has already developed to this point, but you still require students to attend classes, or fail.After I graduated, I entered the job market, and nearly drowned in a sea of other job-hunters. If your employment assistance office just for show? After I found a job, I saw most companies didn’t pay requisite insurances. During the period in which I was unemployed, you forced me to sign a fake employment agreement, then you shamelessly declared to the outside that your employment rate was over 98%….After entering society, your regulations beat people about the head until they bled. You collected so much in taxes that companies figured out ways to steal and evade them. What about the employees, then? There wasn’t a single law that could fully ensure that citizen’s rights in the workplace were not infringed upon.
Why must we continually pay taxes for five years before we are allowed to buy a house? Why must someone who makes 3,000 RMB a month in this city, where property costs more than 10,000 RMB per square meter on average, pay individual income tax?When going to your various departments to fill out paperwork, you hold up endless hoops for us to jump through. When I went to obtain a certificate of unemployment, I had to go back and forth more than ten times between three different offices, traveling over 200 kilometers in total.When I went to obtain my driver’s licenses, the instructor gave me all kinds of hints that I should give him a bribe. When it was time for me to be tested in reverse maneuvering, he told me three minutes into my allotted ten minutes that time was up.When I went to get a replacement ID card, it took you over a month to deliver it to me. When I go to the bank, the unresponsive tellers act as if I’m stealing their money.There are all kinds of ridiculous overcharges for my cellphone.
When I surf the net or mess around on Weibo, you freely delete my posts, which in and of itself isn’t a big deal, but you also invite people to “drink tea,” monitor them, or send them to re-education through labor camps for nothing more than a tweet.If I want to buy a house, I can’t afford to eat or drink for thirty years.
When I buy stuff, fake goods, low-quality goods, toxic goods and unsafe items are everywhere.If I want to buy a foreign-made car, I have to pay two times its original price.“Primary school food meets sanitation standards, lamb meat is lamb meat, the rivers are clean, and there aren’t 10,000 pigs in the river. The air we breathe isn’t poisonous; you don’t have to wear a face mask.”Now that I’ve grown up, you even dare to put poison in infant milk powder. The stench of the rivers is awful; the air is filled with the smell of the End Days. Housing prices are rising faster than anything, agents are evil, landlords are cunning, and renting an apartment has become like a battle.I don’t care that your organizations are bloated beyond recognition, but why must I obtain a ‘temporary residence permit’ in my own country?So you tell me. I belong to the post-80’s generation. How is it possible for me not to be dispirited? It’s enough of a f**king accomplishment that I’m somehow still alive!

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Prem » 19 May 2013 10:27

http://www.tealeafnation.com/2013/05/in ... ectations/
Chinese Anxiety — In Debate About Overwork, a Glimpse of Shifting Expectations
They are going straight from Bachpan TO Burrappa, Avoiding The Jawani Mastani
Almost half of all Chinese report feeling “more anxiety,” now than they did five years ago. What, exactly, is driving these concerns, or increasing reports of these concerns? Avid followers of China-related news might immediately think of censorship and other restrictions on freedoms, yet reports show that the main sources of anxiety in China lie elsewhere. Furthermore, recent coverage of these concerns has revealed changes in the expectations, dreams, and demands of many Chinese.Several days ago, a 24-year-old employee of Ogilvy in Beijing died from sudden cardiac arrest, which initial reports say occurred after the employee worked overtime for one straight month. His last post on Sina Weibo, a popular microblogging platform, went viral, drawing countless comments from other overworked netizens, many of whom noted that China had become the number one country in the world for death by overwork.Studies show that many Chinese are unhappy with their jobs – or lack thereof. This year, millions of Chinese students are graduating and face what is reportedly the worst job market in history. Even if they are able to find a job, their worries will not end. A recent Regus study showed China ranked first among 80 countries in workplace stress.A video produced by Tencent News depicted sources of anxiety felt by Chinese in the workplace: financial troubles, interpersonal relationships, and endless overtime. While the short video included facts and figures about stress in China’s workforce, it focused on individual stories – a 26-year-old who believes he will never be rich enough to buy a house, and a low-level office worker who dreams of emigrating. Chinese increasingly see their anxieties and dreams as individual matters, rather than collective issues.As China’s growth slows, the idea of a national revival – the Chinese Dream, as it is known in official parlance – stands at odds with the hopes and fears of the average Chinese, creating further cognitive dissonance. While state-run media and government bodies continue to focus on positive news about officials’ achievements and economic development, most Chinese have become far more concerned about food safety, the quality of manufactured goods, and the safety of medicine.Given the number social media-driven exposés that have drawn public attention over the past few years – on corrupt officials, rat meat scandals, and fake condoms, among other issues – it may be that increasing transparency is making it impossible to ignore issues that once simply flew under the radar. China’s rapidly growing middle class is already making its voice heard on these issues, and it is expected to swell to 40% of the population by 2020.Despite the fact that anxiety has increased, Chinese overwhelmingly feel they are better off than they were five years ago. Cases like those of Mr. Li, the Ogilvy employee who reportedly died from overwork, may draw more attention because society increasingly values individuals’ lives and dreams.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby arun » 21 May 2013 07:04

Nationally representative opinion survey on Indian attitudes about the Peoples Republic of China prepared by the Lowy Institute in partnership with the Australia India Institute:

China
The poll results suggest wariness towards China from the Indian public. A large majority (83%) considers China a security threat. The poll reveals multiple reasons for this mistrust, including China’s possession of nuclear weapons, competition for resources in third countries, China’s efforts to strengthen its relations with other countries in the Indian Ocean region, and the China-India border dispute. Although China has become India’s largest trading partner, only 31% of Indians agree that China’s rise has been good for India. But in responding to China’s rise, most Indians want an each-way bet: 65% agree India should join other countries to limit China’s influence yet a similar number (64%) agree that India should cooperate with China to play a leading role in the world. Almost two thirds of Indians (63%) would like relations with China to strengthen.


China

A significant minority of Indians (41%) consider India-China relations to be strong, although only 14% describe this relationship as very strong, and 47% define it as weak. Almost two thirds of Indians (63%) would like relations with China to become stronger over the next 10 years, with 33% wanting them to be a lot stronger
.
Indians are divided about what a rising China means for their country, although a majority tends towards wariness or even mistrust. Despite the fact that China has become India’s largest trading partner, only 31% of Indians agree that China’s rise has been good for India, with 58% disagreeing. Indians are more divided on the question of whether a more powerful and influential China would harm their country’s interests: 45% consider it would not be harmful to India, 41% disagree. Similarly, 40% of Indians agree that the United States should give China a larger say in regional affairs in Asia, while 42% think it should not.

Greater mistrust towards China is evident when Indians are asked whether ‘China’s aim is to dominate Asia’: 70% of Indians agree with this statement, 40% strongly, and only 14% disagree. A slightly smaller majority of Indians (65%) agree with the statement that India should join with other countries to limit China’s influence, and only 21% disagree. Yet many Indians are hedging their bets about China: a majority (64%) of Indians also agree that India should cooperate with China to play a leading role in the world together, with 30% agreeing strongly and only 23% disagreeing. In other words, some Indians who want cooperation against China also want cooperation with China. Most Indians do not, however, want their government to do more to pressure China on human rights, with 57% agreeing that India is doing enough in this area already and 25% disagreeing, 6% strongly.

A large majority (83%) of Indians consider that China poses a threat to India’s security, with 60% defining this as a major threat and only 9% saying it does not pose a threat. These threat perceptions are most intense in north India, where 93% consider China a threat, and 81% consider this threat to be major. Threat perceptions are markedly lower in south India, where only 31% consider China a major threat, although a total of 77% there still consider China a threat to some degree. Almost all of those Indians who consider China a threat indicate that they do so for multiple reasons, with the top four being China’s possession of nuclear weapons, competition for resources in third countries, China’s efforts to strengthen its relations with other countries in the Indian Ocean region, and the India-China border dispute.

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From here:

India Poll 2013


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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby jamwal » 28 May 2013 10:35

China is starting to get embarrassed about its tourists’ obnoxious behavior abroad

Chinese tourists are making their mark on the global tourism industry—literally. The picture above is a relief etched 3,500 years ago in Egypt’s Luxor Temple in Egypt. More recently, someone added the characters “Ding Jinhao was here,” as documented by an ashamed Chinese traveler who posted his photo to Sina Weibo (registration required). “We want to wipe off the marking with a towel,” the traveler wrote. “But we can’t use water since it is a 3,500 year-old relic.”

Ding, who turned out to be a 15-year-old from Nanjing, was quickly found out via Sina Weibo research. His parents have since apologized.

A tour guide surnamed Zhang told QQ (link in Chinese) that he “had never seen this sort of behavior from tourists,” and that “until recently, the Chinese tourists going to Egypt were relatively few, and their character was relatively good.”

“There’s a lot of this kind of uncivilized behavior out there,” said Zhang. “Take for example the sign outside the Louvre Museum only in Chinese characters that forbids people from urinating or defecating wherever they want.”

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby kish » 28 May 2013 17:59

Newborn Chinese baby is rescued ALIVE from toilet pipe after being flushed away by parentsWarning: The link contains graphic pictures

Baby boy, believed to be a newborn, discovered beneath a toilet commode
Firefighters removed section of pipe and doctors cut the infant free
Emergency services called after woman heard cries coming from pipe
Baby called 'number 59' after the number of his incubator, reports said

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Philip » 28 May 2013 21:39

China steals the plans for OZ's new Intel HQ!

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/ar ... aebd212.11
Xcpt:

China steals plans for new Australia spy HQ: report

By Martin Parry (AFP) – 6 hours ago

SYDNEY — Chinese hackers have stolen top-secret blueprints of Australia's new intelligence agency headquarters, a report said Tuesday, but Foreign Minister Bob Carr insisted ties with Beijing would not be hurt.

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation said the documents taken in the cyber hit included cable layouts for the huge building's security and communications systems, its floor plan and its server locations.

Carr said the government was "very alive" to the threat of cyber attacks on national security, adding that "nothing that is being speculated about takes us by surprise".

But he refused to confirm or deny any cyber attack, or whether China was behind one, saying he wouldn't comment "on whether the Chinese have done what is being alleged or not."

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby jamwal » 05 Jun 2013 00:01

Bodies of student protesters killed by the People's Liberation Army lie in the Tiananmen Square - June 4, 1989
Image

From a poster on Reddit:

I recognise this street. It is Changan Jie, one of the major boulevards that run through Tiananmen. The street lamps on that boulevard is very unique.

This is something I wrote earlier about the incident.

One of the vice premiers (Li Peng) held talks with student leaders such as Wang Dan (who was exiled and is now an international academic) to address their concerns, such as officials' corruption, freedom of speech and liberalisation. Li Peng did not like the student leaders much and the student leaders were... rather arrogant and douchy about their leadership status. The whole thing was televised as well, and it was seen as a severe loss of face by the Chinese leadership.

Moreover, June 4 was the culmination of a series of events since April of that year. It was a prolonged student protest, a protest that happened after the death of Hu Yaobang, one of the prominent reformers (economic reform, that is) in the Chinese Communist Party (hereby after shortened to the CCP). Students started gathering at Tiananmen Square spontaneously to mourn the death of Hu in April, and also all over the country. The last time such emotional outpouring of grief happened in China was in 1976, when the masses gathered to mourn the death of Zhou Enlai, and it lead shortly after to the collapse of the regime in power, the Gang of Four. The lesson imparted by that must be still fresh in the CCP leadership's minds.

The CCP leadership itself was also split between the reformers and the more hardline conservatives. Zhao Ziyang, the General Secretary at the time, was a reformer and he did not want an open confrontation with the students. Not so Li Peng (if you haven't figured out already I really don't like that guy, and most Beijingers also don't like him - my grandparents, who are both CCP members, hold nothing but contempt for him), who wanted a good old fashioned crackdown.

The visit by Gorbachev in May further galvanised the issue. Students had been occupying the Square since April, and a hunger strike by students began 2 days before his visit. This was very very embarrassing for the CCP leadership, because every State visit has its welcome ceremony held at the Square - imagine the White House occupied by all the Occupy Wall Street protesters, and you can get a similar picture.

Anyway, by this stage, it was no longer just the students demonstrating - the labour unions chimed in, as well as a range of other groups with their own grievances. So it was unclear to the CCP as to who they should deal with, over what issues. A meeting was held by the Politburo with Deng Xiaoping (who was the de facto leader and power behind the throne of China from 1977 until 1992, even though he had retired in the 80s) and he criticised the approach held by Zhao, which was non-confrontational. The CCP leadership decided to stop the demonstration and remove students from premise.

Marshall law was declared on the 20th, but a lot of Beijing residents, low level CCP members and the police all had sympathy for the students, and the 38th Army Group, which is based near Beijing, refused to go in and quell the students (and its commander requested a written order for the suppression of students - he was immediately suspended from duty). So nothing had really happened until the 1st of June.

Meanwhile, the student group was becoming a ******, with different factions arising, lack of organisation, big hygiene problems (a gathering of tens of thousands of people in a few square kms means a big open door latrine) and is running out of steam - but a styrofoam statue called the 'Lady of Liberty' was erected in Tiananmen Square by a group of art college students, and that had re-ignited the momentum and passion. Moreover, the statue was facing directly towards the Portrait of Mao Zedong, hung on the walls of Tiananmen itself. The symbolism is quite clear.

So, anyway, the CCP had had enough and by the 1st of June the top leadership plus the Party Elders (the Founding Fathers of the PRC) decided to remove students from premise, peaceful or not. 27th Army Group was moved in from a different region and they had no qualms about using force, even against other PLA units who may be sympathetic towards the students. The crackdown began in earnest on the 3rd of June, and by the 4th of June it was pretty well known across the world.

It might also be interesting to note that the reason why the image of the Tank Man is so famous and widespread is because the CCP had significantly relaxed media law, letting international outlets to cover the student protests. The Tank Man image was captured by a CNN photog, and this open media reform is one thing that the CCP won't repeat in a hurry.

Following the June 4th incident, the reformers in the party lost. Zhou Ziyang was purged from the Party and held in house arrest until his death in 2009 or 2010. Li Peng and his gang won out, and that's why Li Peng is known as the 'Butcher of Beijing'.

TLDR: A peaceful student protest over corruption and liberalisation fragmented and became leaderless. The Chinese Communist Party was split, and the conservatives won out. It was an opportunity for China to liberalise from the top up, but the chance was missed and the ensuing tragedy is...just tragic.

Lady Of Liberty
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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 05 Jun 2013 08:51

New Leadership but Old Response to Tiananmen Anniversary - Ananth Krishnan, The Hindu
After Xi Jinping and Li Keqiang took over as China’s most powerful leaders in November, liberals and pro-reform voices were invigorated by hopes for change under the new leadership with a markedly different profile from their predecessors.

Mr. Xi (59), the son of liberal former leader Xi Zhongxun, adopted a relaxed demeanour in public, in sharp contrast with former President Hu Jintao. His first few speeches won praise from progressives, with the President and Party General Secretary arguing for strengthening the rule of law, the power of the Constitution and curbs on corruption.

The charismatic Mr. Li (57) was a product of the pro-democracy student protests that rocked China in the 1980s. While the Prime Minister was not directly involved, many of his close classmates, with whom he was known to enjoy long debating sessions, later became student leaders in the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989.

Yet, under their leadership the Party has only strengthened rather than eased ideological control, whether through the media or in universities — a fact sharply underscored on Tuesday, the 24th anniversary of the violent denouement of the student protests.

In the early hours of June 4, 1989, the leadership under Deng Xiaoping sent tanks through Beijing’s streets to clear the square, and hundreds were shot dead around the capital.

Since then, tightening of controls on June 4 has become an annual affair. This year, too, the authorities remained wary of allowing any public reflection on the protests, issuing warnings to university students and restricting discussions online.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby jamwal » 05 Jun 2013 12:38

Be my guest and call yourself something stupid

So you set out in life with the name your parents give you and make the most of it, since it's going to follow you around wherever you go. For Chinese people, however, all this changes once they start English lessons, and suddenly they are given a Christian name.

My daughter recently came home from her local school full of pride at the new name she had been baptized with by her Chinese English teacher. "Call me Scooter!" she proudly announced. Oh dear, I thought, but didn't let on, since the only Scooter I had ever heard of was a disgraced American politician surnamed Libby. I felt even sorrier for her schoolmates, as they were named after other modes of transport or vegetables: Trike, Motorbike, Carrot and Pumpkin. :rotfl:



"Star", as the English teacher calls herself, deserves credit for her attempt to expand the vocabulary of her charges in such an imaginative way, but it does remind me of the dictum: "A little knowledge is a dangerous thing."

Once Chinese students learn a little English they often get to choose their own names, often with unfortunate consequences from the point of view of a native English speaker. For instance, I know that Fanny sounds like the Chinese name, Fan Ni. It's an old and reasonably venerable name in English, deriving from the Latin and meaning "from France". But, and I don't know how to put this more delicately, other than quoting from Urban Dictionary, fanny is a "vagina, named after the early 18th-century English erotic novel, Fanny Hill. Later became slang for the posterior in the US".

One of the most popular websites for choosing an English name is 24.encom, where boys may unwittingly choose a name meaning "gao gui de lang" or "Noble Wolf". Now this sounds great to an adolescent teen, but after telling his expat friends he may be disappointed by the reaction. Rare indeed is the individual, German or otherwise, who is given the name Adolph, as it has been synonymous with Hitler and persecution since World War II.

Being named after fruit is cute in Chinese, but in English it sounds daft, while naming oneself after Hollywood heroes such as "Rambo" and "Superman" is likely to cause shock and merriment rather than awe.

Finally, some advice to English learners: Don't always trust your native speaking teachers, either, because they might be having a laugh at your expense, and being called after characters in Lords of the Ring, or body parts, just isn't cool.

On the other hand, there are now a lot of "foreigners" learning Chinese, so to some extent the roles have been reversed and locals now have the opportunity to have a bit of a giggle themselves - though I must say, Chinese are generally more polite and less liable to point out the errors of their international friends' ways.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Agnimitra » 22 Jun 2013 01:43

X-post from Islamism & Islamophobia thread:

China jails 11 for extremist crimes in Muslim west
BEIJING (AP) — Chinese courts have sentenced 11 people for inciting religious extremism and related crimes in the northwestern Muslim region of Xinjiang, just weeks ahead of the anniversary of bloody ethnic rioting that spread through the region four years ago.

The Justice Ministry's official newspaper Legal Daily said Thursday that Aihetaimu Heli was given the harshest sentence of six years in jail for uploading to the Internet materials promoting jihad and ethnic hatred. The sentence on charges of inciting ethnic hatred and ethnic prejudice was handed down Wednesday in the far-western city of Aksu, the paper said.

In the city of Kashgar, an additional eight people were sentenced to between two to five years for creating a public nuisance after breaking into homes and destroying 17 television sets in what the paper called a religious frenzy.

Two others were fined and given less serious administrative punishments of from five to 15 days for posting extremist material to a blog and spreading rumors of a suicide bombing on the popular QQ Internet messaging service.

Calls to the courts either rang unanswered or were answered by people who said no one was available to comment.

All of the defendants identified by name appeared to be from Xinjiang's native Turkic Muslim Uighur ethnic group, who are culturally, linguistically, and religiously distinct from China's majority Han.

Xinjiang sees periodic outbreaks of anti-government and anti-Chinese violence, some of it inspired by resentment over economic marginalization by Han migrants who have flooded into the region in recent decades, along with restrictions on Uighur social and cultural life.

Authorities have consistently responded with overwhelming force and repression, and the period leading up to the anniversary of the July 2009 riots in the regional capital Urumqi is always one of heightened tension and increased security.

Almost 200 people were killed in the violence that began with Uighur attacks on Han residents, followed by revenge attacks by Han armed with knives and iron rods.

China said much of the violence was coordinated through text messages and blog postings and in its wake redoubled efforts to monitor online material considered subversive or threatening, including extremist and jihadist material produced abroad.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby MurthyB » 22 Jun 2013 06:11

Riot after Chinese teachers try to stop pupils cheating

"I picked up my son at midday [from his exam]. He started crying. I asked him what was up and he said a teacher had frisked his body and taken his mobile phone from his underwear. I was furious and I asked him if he could identify the teacher. I said we should go back and find him," one of the protesting fathers, named as Mr Yin, said to the police later.


By late afternoon, the invigilators were trapped in a set of school offices, as groups of students pelted the windows with rocks. Outside, an angry mob of more than 2,000 people had gathered to vent its rage, smashing cars and chanting: "We want fairness. There is no fairness if you do not let us cheat." :rotfl:

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby prashanth » 22 Jun 2013 11:00

Couldn't resist posting this comment (and reply) from the newslink above.

<chuckwoking> Personally I find it hilarious that the UK is seen as a bastion of concepts like 'fair play', when its judicial system is rigged to be anything but, and survival of the nastiest is the rule.


Reply:

<Peter_Pan>chuckwoking, where would you rather be an accused? In front of a British court or a Chinese court?
Yeah, that's what I thought...


:rotfl:

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Agnimitra » 24 Jun 2013 12:48

X-post from Tibet Shivabhumi thread:

The Economist:
Tibet policy: Bold new proposals
"Welcome signs that some officials are at last starting to question policies on Tibet"
FEW outside China think the Communist Party’s strategy for Tibet is working. A combination of economic development and political repression was meant to reconcile Tibetans to Chinese rule and wean them off their loyalty to the Dalai Lama, the exiled spiritual leader. Instead disaffection is still rife, especially among the young. And all across Tibetan areas of China, Tibetans still display the Dalai Lama’s portrait, sometimes openly. Since March 2011 more than 100 Tibetans—especially in Tibetan areas of provinces bordering what China calls the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR)—have set themselves on fire. Most have done so in part to call for the Dalai Lama’s homecoming. An overwhelming security presence and the Dalai Lama’s commitment to non-violence mean that the unrest is easily contained. Hence little has suggested that China’s leaders are concerned about the bleak implications for the future: that their rule in Tibet can be maintained only by the indefinite deployment of massive coercive force.

So for a Chinese scholar, Jin Wei, who is director of ethnic and religious studies at the Central Party School in Beijing, to call for a “creative” new approach is startling. For her to do so publicly, in an interview this month with a Hong Kong magazine, Asia Weekly, suggests that she has high-level backing.

Here, on Tibet, is at least a hint of a crack in the hardline consensus. Some have detected another in the appointment of Yu Zhengsheng to head the party’s main policy group on Tibet and Xinjiang, a Muslim-majority region in the north-west. Mr Yu is the head of an advisory body designed to promote national unity. Previous heads of the group have been security specialists.

Ms Jin’s analysis, though couched in the terminology of party orthodoxy, is similar to that of many foreign observers. She argues that, by demonising the Dalai Lama, and viewing any expression of Tibetan culture as potentially subversive, the party has turned even those Tibetans sympathetic to its aims against it. The struggle has evolved from “a contradiction between the central government and the Dalai Lama separatist clique into an ethnic conflict between Han Chinese and Tibetans”.

She is not advocating a new soft approach to “political” issues, such as the Dalai Lama’s call for greater autonomy for Tibet and Tibetans’ hankering after a “greater Tibet”—ie, within its historic borders, beyond the TAR. But in fact, most protests in Tibet are not about “politics”, defined like this. Many have been sparked by anger at Chinese repression—of Tibetan culture, language and tradition, or of individual protesters. It is a vicious circle, made worse by anger at the large-scale immigration into Tibet of Han Chinese.

Ms Jin has ideas on how to break the impasse. Talks with the Dalai Lama’s representatives, stalled since the most recent of nine fruitless rounds in 2010, should resume, she says. They should concentrate on “easy” issues first, setting contentious debate about Tibet’s status to one side for now. China should consider inviting the Dalai Lama to visit one of its semi-autonomous cities, Hong Kong or Macau, and eventually allowing him back to Tibet. It should also try to defuse the crisis his death will bring by agreeing with him on a chosen reincarnation from inside China’s borders. Otherwise, China risks having to deal with two incarnations: one it endorses and one in exile who is more likely to be revered by most Tibetans.

The debate Ms Jin’s comments have provoked will not bring any immediate relief to Tibetans in Tibet. The infrastructure of Chinese repression is being enhanced and refined, with the implementation of a new “grid” system of street-level surveillance (see article). Dissenters are still locked up every week.

Moreover Ms Jin’s is still a lone voice, at least in public. Few others seem to realise that a new approach in Tibet is in China’s interest. Not only would it ease tension in Tibet; it would help relations with other minorities in China, make reunification with Taiwan more likely and improve China’s relations with the outside world. The more conventional Chinese view is the one voiced recently by a scholar at a Beijing think-tank: “The old Dalai will die soon. End of problem.” Though the Dalai Lama seems in good health, he turns 78 next month. The hope is that Ms Jin will not be the only Chinese adviser to understand that the dying in exile of this Dalai Lama would not be the end of China’s difficulties in Tibet. Rather, his death risks an explosion of violence and the rekindling of a Tibetan independence movement that is for now kept in check by the Dalai Lama’s search for a “middle way”.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Agnimitra » 25 Jun 2013 04:51

X-post from Tibet thread:

The systematic level of effort on the ground, infiltrating and engaging with the community at the village level, has to be admired.

Chinese Propaganda Agents Move into Every Tibetan Village
China has dispatched government agents into every village in Tibet as part of an unprecedented surveillance and 'political re-education' programme, according to a recent report.

An army of 21,000 officials scattered into small teams and set up in each of the country's 5,541 villages, with agents in some cases moving into the homes of Tibetans.

According to the report by charity Human Rights Watch (HRW), the "Solidify the Foundations, Benefit the Masses" campaign cost £150 million, or a quarter of Tibet's annual budget.

The officials then attempted to root out supporters of the country's exiled spiritual leader the Dalai Lama, and indoctrinated villagers with the virtues of the communist party and the Chinese state.

"Some work teams follow the everyday life of kids - they go to school and play ball with them, and listen to what they talk about, to find out who most influences them," say the reports authors.

"Even your own children can get you into trouble," one villager claimed.

Residents were subjected to long interviews and made to fill out questionnaires, after which they were placed in one of three broad categories: those wanting wealth and a quiet life; those who secretly pray to the Dalai Lama but cause no trouble; and those "who do not have faith in the motherland or the party".

"In a region where people are already subjected to extraordinary monitoring, this village-level drive, alongside similar efforts directed at towns and monasteries, effectively means that Tibetans cannot avoid state surveillance."

Authorities in Beijing are also stepping up the surveillance of telephone calls and internet communications in Tibet, with China's state-run news agency Xinhua reporting the completion of a programme to register all of Tibet's 2.76 million mobile users and 1.47m internet users by their real names.

A volunteer police force, modelled on the waiwen, or citizen 'stability police', has been set up and surveillance stepped up in Tibet's Buddhist monasteries and temples.

Tibetan opposition to Chinese rule remains strong, and on 11 June, Buddhist nun Wangchen Dolma became the 120th person to set herself on fire in protest at Beijing rule, dying three days later of her injuries.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Narad » 26 Jun 2013 14:45

Riots in China's Xinjiang region kill 27: Xinhua

BEIJING:Riots in China's ethnically divided Xinjiang region on Wednesday left 27 people dead, according to state media which said police opened fire on “knife-wielding mobs”.

It was the latest spasm of violence to hit the troubled western region, which is about twice the size of Turkey and is home to around nine million members of the mostly Muslim Uighur ethnic minority.

Police shot at “mobs” who had attacked police stations, a local government building and a construction site, the Xinhua news agency said, citing local officials.

“Seventeen people had been killed... before police opened fire and shot dead 10 rioters,” it said.

The mobs were also “stabbing at people and setting fire to police cars”, the report said.

Nine police or security guards and eight civilians were killed before police opened fire, the report said, adding that three other people were taken to hospital with injuries.

The clashes occurred early Wednesday in an area about 100 kilometres from the desert city of Turpan and about 250 kilometres from the regional capital Urumqi.

The reason for the violence was not immediately clear, and police in Turpan refused to comment when contacted by AFP.

Many of Xinjiang's Uighur community complain of religious and cultural repression by Chinese authorities, and the region is regularly hit by unrest.

Dilshat Rexit, a spokesman for the World Uyghur Congress, an exile group branded by Beijing as “separatist”, said “continued repression and provocation is the cause of conflict”. His comment came in a statement sent to AFP after news of the violence emerged.

China reported that 21 people died in clashes between police and locals in the region in April, which the government said were caused by “terrorists”.

Chinese authorities have often blamed such violence in the region on “terrorists”, and a court in Xinjiang recently jailed nine people for “religious extremism”.

China said clashes in 2011 that killed 19 were organised by terrorists who trained in Pakistan and were part of a separatist movement seeking an independent state in Xinjiang.

Uighur rights groups have dismissed the claims of terrorism, citing economic inequality and religious repression as causes of unrest.

The region's worst ethnic violence in recent years occurred in July 2009, when riots involving Uighurs and settlers from China's Han ethnic majority killed around 200 people in Urumqi.

Those clashes lead to a major security push in the region, which rights groups have said led to intense monitoring of Uighurs by security forces.

A specialised anti-terrorism unit of the People's Liberation Army carried out drills in April, according to a previous report by the PLA Daily.

The region saw more than half of China's trials for the charge of “endangering state security” last year, but is home to less than two per cent of the country's population, suggesting “ethnic discrimination”, the Dui Hua Foundation advocacy group said.

Beijing has launched a stream of high-profile investment projects in an attempt to boost economic growth in the relatively poor region, which has rich reserves of coal and gas.

According to official figures, 46 per cent of Xinjiang's population are Uighur, while another 39 per cent are Han Chinese, after millions from the majority group moved there in recent decades in search of jobs.

The Han settlement drive, which has been mirrored in Tibet, has fostered tensions with the existing community.

The Uighurs, who mostly follow Sunni Islam, speak a Turkic language and have ethnic links with groups in neighbouring countries including Russia, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.

Xinjiang's regional government was not available for comment on Wednesday's violence.

China's foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said at a regular briefing that she was aware of reports, without giving further information.

Information about unrest in Xinjiang is tightly controlled by China's ruling Communist Party, and the government blocked Internet access across the region for several months following the clashes in 2009.


http://www.Yawn.com/news/1020915/riots- ... -27-xinhua

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Ashok Sarraff » 27 Jun 2013 03:52

Knife-wielding? Someone in RAW is sleeping on the job.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 27 Jun 2013 15:40


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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Arihant » 28 Jun 2013 04:08

Agnimitra wrote:X-post from Tibet Shivabhumi thread:

The Economist:
Tibet policy: Bold new proposals
"Welcome signs that some officials are at last starting to question policies on Tibet"
FEW outside China think the Communist Party’s strategy for Tibet is working. A combination of economic development and political repression was meant to reconcile Tibetans to Chinese rule and wean them off their loyalty to the Dalai Lama, the exiled spiritual leader. Instead disaffection is still rife, especially among the young. And all across Tibetan areas of China, Tibetans still display the Dalai Lama’s portrait, sometimes openly. Since March 2011 more than 100 Tibetans—especially in Tibetan areas of provinces bordering what China calls the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR)—have set themselves on fire. Most have done so in part to call for the Dalai Lama’s homecoming. An overwhelming security presence and the Dalai Lama’s commitment to non-violence mean that the unrest is easily contained. Hence little has suggested that China’s leaders are concerned about the bleak implications for the future: that their rule in Tibet can be maintained only by the indefinite deployment of massive coercive force.

So for a Chinese scholar, Jin Wei, who is director of ethnic and religious studies at the Central Party School in Beijing, to call for a “creative” new approach is startling. For her to do so publicly, in an interview this month with a Hong Kong magazine, Asia Weekly, suggests that she has high-level backing.

Here, on Tibet, is at least a hint of a crack in the hardline consensus. Some have detected another in the appointment of Yu Zhengsheng to head the party’s main policy group on Tibet and Xinjiang, a Muslim-majority region in the north-west. Mr Yu is the head of an advisory body designed to promote national unity. Previous heads of the group have been security specialists.

Ms Jin’s analysis, though couched in the terminology of party orthodoxy, is similar to that of many foreign observers. She argues that, by demonising the Dalai Lama, and viewing any expression of Tibetan culture as potentially subversive, the party has turned even those Tibetans sympathetic to its aims against it. The struggle has evolved from “a contradiction between the central government and the Dalai Lama separatist clique into an ethnic conflict between Han Chinese and Tibetans”.

She is not advocating a new soft approach to “political” issues, such as the Dalai Lama’s call for greater autonomy for Tibet and Tibetans’ hankering after a “greater Tibet”—ie, within its historic borders, beyond the TAR. But in fact, most protests in Tibet are not about “politics”, defined like this. Many have been sparked by anger at Chinese repression—of Tibetan culture, language and tradition, or of individual protesters. It is a vicious circle, made worse by anger at the large-scale immigration into Tibet of Han Chinese.

Ms Jin has ideas on how to break the impasse. Talks with the Dalai Lama’s representatives, stalled since the most recent of nine fruitless rounds in 2010, should resume, she says. They should concentrate on “easy” issues first, setting contentious debate about Tibet’s status to one side for now. China should consider inviting the Dalai Lama to visit one of its semi-autonomous cities, Hong Kong or Macau, and eventually allowing him back to Tibet. It should also try to defuse the crisis his death will bring by agreeing with him on a chosen reincarnation from inside China’s borders. Otherwise, China risks having to deal with two incarnations: one it endorses and one in exile who is more likely to be revered by most Tibetans.

The debate Ms Jin’s comments have provoked will not bring any immediate relief to Tibetans in Tibet. The infrastructure of Chinese repression is being enhanced and refined, with the implementation of a new “grid” system of street-level surveillance (see article). Dissenters are still locked up every week.

Moreover Ms Jin’s is still a lone voice, at least in public. Few others seem to realise that a new approach in Tibet is in China’s interest. Not only would it ease tension in Tibet; it would help relations with other minorities in China, make reunification with Taiwan more likely and improve China’s relations with the outside world. The more conventional Chinese view is the one voiced recently by a scholar at a Beijing think-tank: “The old Dalai will die soon. End of problem.” Though the Dalai Lama seems in good health, he turns 78 next month. The hope is that Ms Jin will not be the only Chinese adviser to understand that the dying in exile of this Dalai Lama would not be the end of China’s difficulties in Tibet. Rather, his death risks an explosion of violence and the rekindling of a Tibetan independence movement that is for now kept in check by the Dalai Lama’s search for a “middle way”.

This is a dangerous move that we must counter immediately.

The whole point of the exercise is to ensure that the Dalai Lama's reincarnation is "found" in China. The current trajectory, including explicit moves/statements by the Dalai Lama, was intended to ensure that the successor would be from outside China (and likely India). That scenario has the Chinese panicking - hence this.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby SSridhar » 28 Jun 2013 15:58

12 more deaths reported in the Uyghur uprising - Business Line
Meanwhile, US-based Radio Free Asia said at least 12 Uighurs died in a previously unreported incident in Ghorachol township in Xinjiang’s Aksu district this month when explosive devices they were carrying detonated.

The broadcaster quoted township official Adil Semet as saying the Uighurs died when they were cornered by police during house-to-house searches in Ghorachol, which is some 300 kilometres south-west of Urumqi.

“Some of them were arrested, some of them blew themselves up and others escaped,” Adil Semet was quoted as saying of the Uighurs.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby Agnimitra » 01 Jul 2013 23:27

^^^ Violence continues:

Violence hits west China ahead of key anniversary
Violent incidents have spread over the past week in a tense minority region of western China, just days before the fourth anniversary of a bloody clash between minority Uighurs and the ethnic Han majority that left almost 200 people dead and resulted in a major security clampdown.

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby member_19686 » 03 Jul 2013 17:56

It's a standard assumption in the West: As a society progresses, it eventually becomes a capitalist, multi-party democracy. Right? Eric X. Li, a Chinese investor and political scientist, begs to differ. In this provocative, boundary-pushing talk, he asks his audience to consider that there's more than one way to run a succesful modern nation.


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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby jamwal » 17 Jul 2013 10:15

'Anything But Humane': Tibetan Exposes China from the Inside

A Tibetan who once believed in the Chinese Communist Party and carved out a career within the Beijing bureaucracy has now decided to publish a damning report of China's policies in his country. To protect his anonymity, the official, who is known nationwide, met secretly with SPIEGEL at a restaurant in a Chinese provincial city. He hopes that what he has written about the oppression of his people will be published as a book in the West, thereby exerting pressure on leaders in Beijing.

Atrocities and Brutal Policies

In the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966 to 1976), the Red Guards, including many Tibetans, attacked their supposedly "revisionist" and "imperialist" countrymen. Thousands of monks were beaten to death or put in camps, and ancient relics were destroyed. The Red Guards used their artillery to flatten hundreds of monasteries.

The Communist Party officials wanted to destroy the culture of their subjects. Tibetan women, for example, were made to wear the kinds of trousers worn by Han Chinese women, and helpers cut off their braids. Clan elders and abbots were sent to reeducation camps, where they were forced to study Mao's directives every day.

The Chinese military brutally crushed any rebellions. When monks killed a corporal in the People's Liberation Army in 1956, a Chinese cavalry regiment exacted its revenge in the town of Qiuji Nawa in Gansu Province with an attack on about "200 innocent women and children. They surrounded a tent, threw hand grenades inside and then fired at it."

The author quotes a former soldier who witnessed a similar massacre: "Some women were stabbed in the vagina with swords and their chests were split open. Some two- and three-year-old children were grabbed and thrown into the Yellow River."

In the early 1980s, the Communist Party had to admit that it had "seriously harmed the interests of the people" with its brutal policy. By then, Tibet had become a permanently restive region. As the Communist Party official writes, Beijing's claim that "millions of Tibetan farmers" had become "masters of their own house under the party's leadership" proved to be nothing but propaganda.

In his opinion, there are many reasons for the unrest and the rage of Tibetans. One is that the long-cherished hope that the Dalai Lama could one day return home from India, where the Tibetan government in exile has its headquarters, is beginning to fade. Beijing condemns him as a "traitor" and refuses to even consider talks.

It was an affront to Beijing when, in 1987, the Dalai Lama spoke to members of the United States Congress in Washington, where he presented his Five Point Peace Plan. He demanded, among other things, that Beijing put an end to the immigration of Han Chinese to Tibet and its use of the Tibetan Plateau as a nuclear waste dump. According to the Communist Party official, after the visit "a new spirit of opposition began to grow among young intellectuals and a few officials, as well as laborers, farmers and shepherds."

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Re: People's Republic of China, Dec. 27 2011

Postby member_19686 » 20 Jul 2013 07:32

Behind China’s Hindu temples, a forgotten history
ANANTH KRISHNAN

Image
A panel of inscriptions of the God Narasimha adorns the entrance to the main shrine of the temple, believed to have been installed by Tamil traders who lived in Quanzhou in the 13th century. Photo: Ananth Krishnan

Image
Li San Long, a resident of Chedian village, offers prayers at the village shrine, which houses a deity that is believed to be one of the goddesses that the Tamil community in Quanzhou worshipped in the 13th century. (Right) A stone elephant inscription on display at the Quanzhou Maritime Museum. Photo: Ananth Krishnan

[youtube]Gcb643uVtSc&feature=youtu.be[/youtube]

But the goddess that the residents of this village pray to every morning, as they light incense sticks and chant prayers, is quite unlike any deity one might find elsewhere in China. Sitting cross-legged, the four-armed goddess smiles benignly, flanked by two attendants, with an apparently vanquished demon lying at her feet.

Local scholars are still unsure about her identity, but what they do know is that this shrine’s unique roots lie not in China, but in far away south India. The deity, they say, was either brought to Quanzhou — a thriving port city that was at the centre of the region’s maritime commerce a few centuries ago — by Tamil traders who worked here some 800 years ago, or perhaps more likely, crafted by local sculptors at their behest.

“This is possibly the only temple in China where we are still praying to a Hindu God,” says Li San Long, a Chedian resident, with a smile.

“Even though most of the villagers still think she is Guanyin!” Mr. Li said the village temple collapsed some 500 years ago, but villagers dug through the rubble, saved the deity and rebuilt the temple, believing that the goddess brought them good fortune — a belief that some, at least, still adhere to.

The Chedian shrine is just one of what historians believe may have been a network of more than a dozen Hindu temples or shrines, including two grand big temples, built in Quanzhou and surrounding villages by a community of Tamil traders who lived here during the Song (960-1279) and Yuan (1279-1368) dynasties.

At the time, this port city was among the busiest in the world and was a thriving centre of regional maritime commerce.

The history of Quanzhou’s temples and Tamil links was largely forgotten until the 1930s, when dozens of stones showing perfectly rendered images of the god Narasimha — the man-lion avatar of Vishnu — were unearthed by a Quanzhou archaeologist called Wu Wenliang. Elephant statues and images narrating mythological stories related to Vishnu and Shiva were also found, bearing a style and pattern that was almost identical to what was evident in the temples of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh from a similar period.

Wu’s discoveries received little attention at the time as his country was slowly emerging from the turmoil of the Japanese occupation, the Second World War and the civil war. It took more than a decade after the Communists came to power in 1949 for the stones and statues to even be placed in a museum, known today as the Quanzhou Maritime Museum.

“It is difficult to say how many temples there were, and how many were destroyed or fell to ruin,” the museum’s vice curator Wang Liming told The Hindu. “But we have found them spread across so many different sites that we are very possibly talking about many temples that were built across Quanzhou.”


Today, most of the sculptures and statues are on display in the museum, which also showcases a map that leaves little doubt about the remarkable spread of the discoveries. The sites stretch across more than a dozen locations located all over the city and in the surrounding county. The most recent discoveries were made in the 1980s, and it is possible, says Ms. Wang, that there are old sites yet to be discovered.

The Maritime Museum has now opened a special exhibit showcasing Quanzhou’s south Indian links. Ms. Wang says there is a renewed interest — and financial backing — from the local government to do more to showcase what she describes as the city’s “1000-year-old history with south India,” which has been largely forgotten, not only in China but also in India.

“There is still a lot we don't know about this period,” she says, “so if we can get any help from Indian scholars, we would really welcome it as this is something we need to study together. Most of the stones come from the 13th century Yuan Dynasty, which developed close trade links with the kingdoms of southern India. We believe that the designs were brought by the traders, but the work was probably done by Chinese workers.”


Ms. Wang says the earliest record of an Indian residing in Quanzhou dates back to the 6th century. An inscription found on the Yanfu temple from the Song Dynasty describes how the monk Gunaratna, known in China as Liang Putong, translated sutras from Sanskrit. Trade particularly flourished in the 13th century Yuan Dynasty. In 1271, a visiting Italian merchant recorded that the Indian traders “were recognised easily.”

“These rich Indian men and women mainly live on vegetables, milk and rice,” he wrote, unlike the Chinese “who eat meat and fish.” The most striking legacy of this period of history is still on public display in a hidden corner of the 7th century Kaiyuan Buddhist Temple, which is today Quanzhou’s biggest temple and is located in the centre of the old town. A popular attraction for Chinese Buddhists, the temple receives a few thousand visitors every day. In a corner behind the temple, there are at least half a dozen pillars displaying an extraordinary variety of inscriptions from Hindu mythology. A panel of inscriptions depicting the god Narasimha also adorns the steps leading up to the main shrine, which houses a Buddha statue. Huang Yishan, a temple caretaker whose family has, for generations, owned the land on which the temple was built, says the inscriptions are perhaps the most unique part of the temple, although he laments that most of his compatriots are unaware of this chapter of history. On a recent afternoon, as a stream of visitors walked up the steps to offer incense sticks as they prayed to Buddha, none spared a glance at the panel of inscriptions. Other indicators from Quanzhou’s rich but forgotten past lie scattered through what is now a modern and bustling industrial city, albeit a town that today lies in the shadow of the provincial capital Xiamen and the more prosperous port city of Guangzhou to the far south.

A few kilometres from the Kaiyuan temple stands a striking several metre-high Shiva lingam in the centre of the popular Bamboo Stone Park. To the city’s residents, however, the lingam is merely known as a rather unusually shaped “bamboo stone,” another symbol of history that still stays hidden in plain sight.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/b ... 932458.ece


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