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Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Prem » 09 Feb 2017 01:33

China's PakiNoko paws turning It into Pinnochio on terror issue .

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby NRao » 09 Feb 2017 01:45

It is going to be fun watching two false news experts, China and Trump, go at it, punctuated by the shrill logic of Nikki, whom nobody will pay attention to.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Amoghvarsha » 09 Feb 2017 02:49

The only way we can control the chinese threat is by a military alliance.Give the Americans a base in the Andaman sea or even one in Kashmir overlookng Gilgit Baltistan.Only this will terrify the CHinese to their bones.Right now they are not bothered.They have no fear of any Indian retaliation.No costs to bear.There have to be costs for the Chinese if they are openly being inimical to us without any provocation.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby NRao » 09 Feb 2017 05:58

The one thing China has is patience. Anyone can do whatever they want, as long as the status quo is maintained they do not care.

So, IMHO, giving a base to the US will make no diff, they will yell and scream, re-calibrate and start all over again.

Which is why, I think, no one can "manage" China.

What will work is breaking up of Pakistan, perhaps with someones help. Or derail their one belt whatever thinking. Or their One China policy. Feel free to re-write history and claim all of Thailand ..................... something

Do not allow them to re-calibrate.

In the 90s I had suggested India taking over the Chittagong tracts - all the way to Sittwe in Myanmar (Hindus are being persecuted). AND, the North East corner of Somalia (it is barren).

Now everybody and their grandfather is in Djibouti. Gwadar is nearly a lost cause - India had an agreement with Iran that India could start a second from with Pakistan from Iranian soil!!!!!

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 09 Feb 2017 07:16

NRao wrote:What will work is breaking up of Pakistan, perhaps with someones help. Or derail their one belt whatever thinking. Or their One China policy. Feel free to re-write history and claim all of Thailand ..................... something

I agree. At least on BRf we have always known that Pakistan has to be dismantled by India for two reasons: one, to eliminate its constant nuisance value for us, and two, to eliminate it being used as a handle by *both* China and the US against our interests.

However, nobody is going to help us do that, except perhaps Afghanistan. Not Iran, even though it may have a lot of angst against Pakistan. That's why Pakistan & China are striving to put a compliant-version of Taliban back into power. Mrs. IG should have conducted something like Op. Babylon on Kahuta. Allowing CPEC to take root through GB and Gwadar would be akin to missing Kahuta in the 80s because Pakistan is about to become another province of China. But, it is almost unachievable now.

Had we not gone to the UN in 1947-48 and had we allowed the IA to complete its task of driving out infiltrators & rebels from GB as well, there would have been no Karakoram Highway, no ganging up between China & Pakistan and no CPEC & Gwadar to worry about. Of course, pundits would argue that hindsight is always 20/20 and that a nascent independent India had no option etc. But, the fact is that we are woefully myopic in strategic thinking. Our assessment of Pakistan (and Muslim League before that) - even after seven decades of nothing but enduring hostility and its ambition of destroying India - is that we are still pining for unrequited love from a 'somewhat lost' brother.

Our failures in both 1947-48 & then not following through with Op. Kahuta are both grave strategic mistakes that haunt us very badly.

At this point, the only option left for us is to enter into undisguised alliances with all who fear China (which is practically the whole of AustralAsia), ensure that animosity between them and China grows, continue 'reasonable' diplomacy with China while not passing up an opportunity for a determined tit-for-tat whenever China goes against our interests, checkmate the enlarging Chinese influence in our backyard as far as possible, throw everything at our disposal to dismantle Pakistan and make it 'useless' for both China & the US, and prepare assiduously for a two-front war.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby svinayak » 09 Feb 2017 12:59

Amoghvarsha wrote:The only way we can control the chinese threat is by a military alliance.Give the Americans a base in the Andaman sea or even one in Kashmir overlookng Gilgit Baltistan.Only this will terrify the CHinese to their bones.Right now they are not bothered.They have no fear of any Indian retaliation.No costs to bear.There have to be costs for the Chinese if they are openly being inimical to us without any provocation.

This is US and China game going on.
India cannot get caught and has to protect itself.

India has many options but has to find the least cost options

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 10 Feb 2017 05:03

India formally protests to China for blocking ban on Masood Azhar - Indrani Bagchi, ToI
India has issued a demarche (diplomatic missive) to China regarding its continued block on a UN ban on Jaish-e-Muhammed+ leader Masood Azhar. The MEA confirmed on Thursday demarches had been served to the Chinese embassy in New Delhi and in the foreign office in Beijing by the Indian embassy.

China blocked once again, a joint move by the US, UK and France+ to proscribe Masood Azhar in the UNSC 1267 committee.[b] The move, made on January 19, saw 14 members out of 15 agreeing to the ban, but China's block prevented it from happening
. Responding to the Chinese foreign ministry statement that there was "no consensus", MEA spokesperson Vikas Swarup told journalists, "if there is a change in the Chinese position, there will be consensus as well ..."

He also refuted the Chinese stand that India and Pakistan should talk to each other on the issue. "It is our understanding that this was a classic counterterrorism proposal meant to proscribe a dreaded terrorist leader Masood Azhar whose organisation the Jaish-e-Muhammed has already been proscribed by the UN 1267 Committee. We don't view this as a bilateral matter between India and Pakistan but as an issue of global counter terrorism. We hope that eventually China will also come around to accepting this view."

Meanwhile, India will be sending a delegation led by Gopal Baglay in charge of the Pakistan-Afghanistan-Iran desk in MEA, to a Russia-sponsored conference on Afghanistan in Moscow on February 15.

"We are happy to accept the invitation of Russia for consultations to be held in Moscow in Afghanistan on February 15. We look forward to the valuable opportunity to discuss with other regional countries all aspects of the situation in Afghanistan," Swarup said.

The Russian move comes after apprehensions that Moscow was tilting towards the Pakistan line+ that the world had to make peace with the Taliban in Afghanistan to bring stability, making ISIS/Daesh as the real villains in the country. This has been contradicted by Afghan government+ , but the argument has found takers both in China and Russia, whose senior official even supported this at several forums, drawing India's ire.

India also scotched speculation that official dialogue between India and Pakistan could resume after elections in five states, which was a speculation expressed by a Pakistani minister.+

"It is not state elections in India but state terrorism by Pakistan which has stood in the way of a peaceful bilateral dialogue. It is high time Pakistan gets the diagnosis of the problem right. It should no remain in denial on the impact of cross border terrorism on the bilateral relationship. Both the problem and its solution are within Pakistan's reach," Swarup said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Prem » 11 Feb 2017 05:25


Prem
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Prem » 11 Feb 2017 08:03

Chinese development in Indian Ocean raising concern of possible militarisation among major players

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-09/c ... ea/8257204

Japan, India, Australia and the United States are closely monitoring China's infrastructure development on the Indian Ocean rim amid increasing concern about the potential for militarisation in the sea lanes which carry much of the world's oil.One former American intelligence chief is warning the only way to avoid that is to make confrontation unpalatable for China.With an eye to China's current island reclamation activity in the South China Sea, Japan, which is almost wholly dependent on imported oil, is particularly nervous."Yes, China is a kind of threat to us in the South China Sea. Will this Indian Ocean be the same, or different?" asked Nobuo Tanaka, a former Japanese bureaucrat and head of the International Energy Agency."This area, the Indian Ocean, is so important for us now because it connects our energy sources in the Middle East to Asia and to Japan," Mr Tanaka said at an Indian Ocean security conference in New Delhi this week.The chair of the Sasakawa Peace Foundation think tank said Japan was worried about a Chinese road, rail and pipeline project from China through central Asia and Pakistan, which culminates at a deep-water port close to Karachi, strategically located near the entrance to the Persian gulf."China is trying to develop so-called 'one belt, one road' strategy and they're extending their power projecting their power to this area also," he said.
The question among policy wonks is whether he will adopt a similar stance in the Indian Ocean."I would also urge those of you who are watching the United States to look a little bit below the surface and not to be captured by social media — from whatever source," retired US Admiral and former Director of America's National Intelligence agencies, Dennis Blair, joked at the New Delhi conference."Enjoy the spectacle," Admiral Blair said, in reference to President Trump's penchant for conducting foreign policy via Twitter.But in support of President Trump's promised military build-up, Admiral Blair also said the only way to deter Chinese aggression was for other countries to ensure that China knew it would lose any confrontation."What's really important, I believe, is for India, Japan and the United States to modernise and strengthen our own maritime, air and, where necessary, ground capabilities to improve that military balance in our favour, and therefore make it very high risk for China to undertake military aggression."
Within Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs, there is also continued debate on the merits of reviving formal four-way security cooperation between Australia, Japan, India and the United States.Supporters argue it would send an important message about the democracies' shared desire to protect the status quo.Professor Rory Medcalf, from the Australian National University's National Security College, said since then, much of the work as continued 'by stealth' under three-way arrangements between Australia, Japan and the US, and the US, Japan and India."The four countries are of course being careful about Chinese reactions, but at the same time, none of us wants to allow China to veto the dialogues we have with each other," he said.Professor Medcalf argues Australia's interests are best served by working with regional powers to urge Chinese restraint, and to keep America engaged."Countries like Japan, Australia and India will get together with one voice, to say, on the one hand to China, 'be more stabilising' in the way its using its growing power," Professor Medcalf said."But also to send a message to the United States, that we want a forthright and engaged and balanced American presence in the region."

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby TKiran » 13 Feb 2017 13:07

http://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmourdo ... 5e7d725f3a

China tells India to stay off its Indian-Ocean colony Srilanka.


http://m.indiatoday.in/story/chinese-me ... 76627.html

Chinese media slams India 'meddling' in its projects in Srilanka -- Global Times

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 13 Feb 2017 19:15

^ The above should be read along with Sartaj Aziz's outburst yesterday on India being responsible for nuclearization of the Indian Ocean Region, a region about which it has no locus-standi. The two rogues are coordinating their words and deeds. This is the first time Pakistan has talked about nuclearization of IOR. Clearly, a Chinese SSN is on the way to join the PN. The recent claim of test-firing of a Submarine-launched nuclear-capable cruise missile (either by China or a Chinese missile test-fired by PN) and the Sartaj Aziz statement are certain giveaways of an impending transfer of Chinese maal.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Bheeshma » 13 Feb 2017 20:16

This is not the first time pakis have talked about nuclearization of IOR. They had this khujli when K-4 was tested also. But of course they are being prodded by the chinese. The lack of any condemnation from US, Russia or wes thas greatly upset them. Chinese will not hand a SSN so easily. That will compromise their own security with USN, JSMDF and IN running them down in SCS and IOR.
As they say if pakis and chinis are whining then you are doing something right.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby svinayak » 13 Feb 2017 23:02

TKiran wrote:http://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmourdoukoutas/2017/02/11/china-tells-india-to-stay-off-its-indian-ocean-colony-sri-lanka/#3d5e7d725f3a

China tells India to stay off its Indian-Ocean colony Srilanka.


http://m.indiatoday.in/story/chinese-me ... 76627.html

Chinese media slams India 'meddling' in its projects in Srilanka -- Global Times

India has to create little India city next to the port and near colombo

That city will be the hub of the India Sri Lanka trade and commerce.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby A_Gupta » 14 Feb 2017 01:17

How China does things:
from http://blogs.cfr.org/asia/2017/02/10/fau-210/
South Korean companies feel pinch over THAAD. Chinese displeasure with South Korea’s decision to deploy the U.S. Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-missile system has manifested recently in economic troubles for South Korean companies. While South Korean Finance Minister Yoo Il Ho has stated that China has not taken any retaliatory measures over THAAD that warrant official state action, companies like Hyundai are experiencing fallout from Beijing’s dissatisfaction. Hyundai Motor Company recently announced the deferment of the Chinese launch of its Sonata plug-in hybrid due to a recent revision of Chinese qualifications for government subsidies, which now conveniently exclude the Hyundai Sonata hybrid. Lotte’s construction on a theme park in Shenyang, China has also been postponed after Beijing took issue with procedural matters following a fire inspection. The company has also been subject to an increasing number of regulatory probes in China. South Korea’s popular culture and tourism sectors are also feeling the THAAD backlash; music concerts and other performances by South Korean artists have been mysteriously cancelled or postponed, while reports of increasing restrictions on Chinese tourism to South Korea during peak travel seasons have led to a slump in stocks reliant on Chinese tourism.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby A_Gupta » 14 Feb 2017 18:19

Should North Korea collapse:
After all, if North Korea collapses, China would face the largest refugee crisis in its history, with thousands upon thousands of starving North Koreans fleeing across the two countries’ relatively porous border. Many would probably settle by the border, in China’s northeast, destabilizing an economically lagging region. A small number of these refugees might smuggle North Korean nuclear material or weapons through China—some of which could end up in the hands of disgruntled Chinese, who could use it to commit violence against the state.

North Korea’s collapse would also likely lead to the peninsula’s eventual unification under Seoul. This would not only put another Western-leaning democracy on China’s border, but could encourage the millions of ethnically Korean Chinese living in the country’s northeast to agitate for their territory to join a Greater Korea. Unlike the Tibetans, Uighurs, and even Mongolians, there is no independence movement among the Koreans: They don’t want to join the failed state of North Korea. But if the peninsula were a healthy, unified polity, this could change, giving China another unhappy minority population to manage.


from:
https://www.theatlantic.com/internation ... un/516528/

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 14 Feb 2017 18:57


svinayak
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby svinayak » 14 Feb 2017 20:48

SSridhar wrote:Events leading to the Sino-Indian Conflict of 1962 - Linus Irtahk, IDSA Monograph


It was in March 2015 that the author set out to search for evidence for
the Dalai Lama’s older brother, Gyalo Thondup’s assertion made in
his autobiography, The Noodle Maker of Kalimpong: The Untold Story of
My Struggle for Tibet (2015) in which he has written that the Sino-Indian
conflict of 1962 was one of the outcomes of the Central Intelligence
Agency’s (CIA’s) covert operation in Tibet, which commenced in 1956.
The fact that very little has been written about that operation made the
task of searching for evidence somewhat challenging. Apart from
Thondup’s account, two other accounts1
written by persons directly
associated with the covert operation in which that operation is covered
in some detail are available. For some reason, this operation has not
received the sort of attention that it deserved. One reason for this
could be that very little material pertaining to the operation has been
declassified, despite intentions to the contrary.

The CIA, either on account of Thondup’s assertion or otherwise, most
probably the former, through an ex-functionary, Bruce Reidel’s book,
JFK’s Forgotten Crisis: Tibet, the CIA, and the Sino-Indian War (2015), has
made a quiet admission to the effect that the ‘covert operation played
a role in Mao’s decision to invade India’. However, in an attempt to
water down this admission, the Sino-Indian conflict has been portrayed
as an ‘unanticipated consequence’ of that operation. Reidel is shy in
providing citations for his qualified admission. He even chooses to
make an indirect reference to some of the CIA’s declassified documents
on the Sino-Indian conflict (referred to in this monograph) through
citation of Anuj Dhar’s book, CIA’s Eye on South Asia (2009), which
purports to summarise these declassified documents


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Lisa » 15 Feb 2017 15:20

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 164764.cms

Taiwan parliamentary delegation visits India, China sees red

I think China should work towards building a "consensus" on this matter and also talking with their "brothers" across the straits to "peacefully" negotiate a solution to their differences. India does not feel that this visit will adversely effect Indo Chinese relations.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby g.sarkar » 15 Feb 2017 16:51

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 163158.cms
India is playing with fire by challenging China over Taiwan: Chinese media
BEIJING: China's official media today warned India against playing the 'Taiwan card', saying New Delhi will suffer losses by challenging Beijing over the sensitive issue.
The warning came after a Taiwanese women Parliamentary delegation visited India.
"By challenging China over the Taiwan question, India is playing with fire," state-run Global Times said in an op-ed article titled 'New Delhi will suffer losses if it plays Taiwan card'.
"At a time when new US President Donald Trump has put the brakes on challenging China over the Taiwan question, agreeing to change course and respecting the "one China" policy, India stands out as a provocateur," the tabloid daily, which is a part of Communist Party of China's publications, said.
"High-level visits between India and Taiwan are not very frequent, so why did India invite the Taiwan delegation to visit at this time?" the article asked referring to Taiwanese MPs delegation.
...

Gautam
Last edited by g.sarkar on 15 Feb 2017 20:18, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby TKiran » 15 Feb 2017 17:14

The problem with India is that, we are internal looking. We have self-doubt that if we say,

1.China is not single, there is a Han China, then there is Tibet, and then there is East Turkestan.
2.Taiwan is not China.

They may react that Kashmir is not India, Arunachal Pradesh is South Tibet.

Anyway they are saying all these., what difference does it make if we articulate our position?

Maybe we don't want to say this, as we ourselves given them in platter Tibet, in writing in 2003 by NDA-1. At least why don't we use unofficial but authentic BJP or RSS, and later saying that that is not official... It's all noise only etc., in order to escape the "wrath" of the lizard?

Pusillanimous we are... Diplomatic they are...

I still don't understand why we are holding out..

I can understand we have to be good boys before unkil, because if we misbehave, nrn murti to 12 year old boy in the 3rd tier city in Andhra Pradesh (who is aspiring to be future NASA scientist) would be unhappy, as unkil has us by balls., I can also understand that isi has honey trapped 600 million Hindus, and they can't tolerate the insults to their favorite r@@nd, but China... Gimme brake...

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 15 Feb 2017 18:54

India says in talks with Vietnam for first missile sale - Reuters
India is in talks to sell short range surface-to-air missiles to Vietnam, the head of India's defence research agency said on Wednesday, in what would be its first transfer of such weapons to the Southeast Asian country.

India has been helping the Vietnamese military with training and patrol vessels, but a further deepening of ties with missile sales could draw criticism from China that has been locked in a territorial dispute with Hanoi in the South China Sea.

New Delhi is currently talking to a number of countries for sales of its surface-to-air Akash missiles, said S. Christopher, chairman of state-run Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO). The move is in line with Prime Minister Narendra Modi's push to establish India as an arms exporter.

"We are talking to countries, one of them is none other than Vietnam," he told a news conference on the sidelines of an air show where the DRDO is showcasing its missile programmes and other key projects, including a home-grown light combat fighter.

Christopher did not provide any details of how many Akash missile batteries the government planned to supply Vietnam.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Singha » 15 Feb 2017 21:46

nrn murti to 12 year old boy in the 3rd tier city in Andhra Pradesh (who is aspiring to be future NASA scientist) would be unhappy, as unkil has us by balls., I can also understand that isi has honey trapped 600 million Hindus, and they can't tolerate the insults to their favorite r@@nd, but China... Gimme brake...


:rotfl: touche

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby IndraD » 15 Feb 2017 22:03

going by how whimsical & unpredictable current US regime is, India can;t bank on US either for containing China, only way out is personally engage with Japan, SoKo, Vietnam etc.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby JohnTitor » 15 Feb 2017 22:47



This is all India is capable of. Protest this, feel uneasy about that, bring in the ambassador to express "dissapointment".

India has always been a pushover, and looks like that will continue. Unless there is retaliation (I don't mean just war), no one will take India seriously <<The China-US gap in tech etc is as much if not much more than India-China. Do you see China merely registering protests to the US? They counter them elsewhere elsewhen>>. Why should they, India doesn't take itself seriously!

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Prem » 15 Feb 2017 23:55

http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/10330 ... ign=buffer
New Delhi will suffer losses if it plays Taiwan card

A female "parliamentary" delegation from Taiwan, at the invitation of India, began a visit to the country on Monday, the first such visit since the Tsai Ing-wen administration took office. High-level visits between India and Taiwan are not very frequent, so why did India invite the Taiwan delegation to visit at this time? Some Indians view the Taiwan question as an Achilles' Heel of the mainland. They have long wanted to use the Taiwan question, the South China Sea and Dalai Lama issues as bargaining chips in dealing with China. With the advancement of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor in recent years, India's strategic suspicions about China have been growing. It stubbornly misinterprets the flagship project of the One Belt, One Road Initiative that will benefit countries along the route, including India. As the corridor passes through the disputed Kashmir, some Indian strategists have advised the Modi government to play the Taiwan card, using the commitment of the "One-China" policy as leverage in exchange for China's endorsement of "One India."
By challenging China over the Taiwan question, India is playing with fire. To India, the island can not only help realize some of India's development goals, but also, strategically, check the mainland. Growing Taiwanese investment in India, including steel, telecom and information technology are important to Modi's "Made in India" campaign. Although the mainland is a major trading partner of India, political discord and the historical feud make economic cooperation between the two difficult. Tsai is exploiting India's vigilance and strategic suspicions against China. The pro-independence leader came up with the "new southbound policy" to ramp up trade and economic interactions in Southeast Asia, South Asia and Oceania, in which India is considered "not one of the, but the most" important country, according to Taiwan's representative to India Chung Kwang Tien. Tsai hopes to put pressure on the mainland by tying India and Taiwan closer. India wants benefits from the development of trade with Taiwan and Taiwanese investment. But it should be wary of Tsai's political intentions and avoid being used to confront the mainland. The best way for India to develop is by participating in the Belt and Road Initiative and attract more investments from the mainland. Pro-independence forces in Taiwan have become more isolated in the world. Those who want to use the Taiwan question to contain the mainland will have to suffer losses.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 16 Feb 2017 07:30

To soothe China, India calls Taiwanese group ‘informal’ - ToI
After China strongly protested the presence of a Taiwanese parliamentary delegation in India, the government sought to soothe Beijing saying that political meanings should not be read into the visit by an "informal" group.

China had earlier objected to the visit by a delegation of women parliamentarians from Taiwan asking New Delhi to be more "prudent" in its dealings with Taiwan. Beijing had only last week forced US President Donald Trump to endorse US' 'One China' policy, bringing to an end the ambiguous position which Trump had earlier sought to maintain.

MEA described the visiting group as that of Taiwanese academics and business persons, including "a couple of legislators''. "Such informal groups have visited India in the past as well for business, religious and tourist purposes," external affairs ministry spokesperson Vikas Swarup said.

"I understand that they do so to China as well. There is nothing new or unusual about such visits and political meanings should not be read into them,"
Swarup added. India's reaction came after Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang said his government had lodged a diplomatic protest with India for hosting a Taiwanese parliamentary delegation.

"We are always opposed to any forms of official contacts and exchanges between countries that have diplomatic ties with China and Taiwan (simultaneously) and we are also opposed to the establishment of any official institutions," he said responding to Taiwan's announcement that it plans to upgrade its office in India. Geng said, "the Indian side has made a commitment on the Taiwan-related issues."

A three-member women's parliamentary delegation from Taiwan visited India earlier this week amidst signals of increasing engagement between the two sides. Taiwan currently has a Taipei Economic and Cultural Centre located in New Delhi. India's office in Taiwan is called India-Taipei Association.

China is buoyed by Trump's somersault on Taiwan and is striking the iron when it is hot.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Prem » 17 Feb 2017 10:52

http://nationalinterest.org/feature/did ... sile-19459
Did North Korea Just Launch a Chinese Missile?

Richard Fisher of the Virginia-based International Assessment and Strategy Center, in comments to the National Interest, also points out the similarities between China’s and North Korea’s SLBMs, as sub-launched missiles are known. “North Korea’s KN-11 SLBM is roughly the same size as the Chinese JL-1 SLBM, and both use a similar two-stage structure,” Fisher wrote me. “In addition, as the new Pukguksong-2 is a longer 2,500-kilometer-range version of the KN-11, so is China’s land-based DF-21 a larger, longer-range version of the JL-1.”Both Fisher and Bechtol are suspicious of the origins of the Pukguksong-2. “The genesis of the missile is unknown,” Bechtol noted in comments sent to the National Interest. “There is no evidence—at least not yet—telling us where the missile design and capabilities came from, but let there be no doubt, the North Koreans did not just go out and develop a solid-fuel, medium-range ballistic missile on their own.”
Bechtol thinks it unlikely Pyongyang obtained Western technology, so the leading candidates for the source of this missile are Russia and China.
The transfer could have been direct, on orders from Moscow or Beijing, but there are other possibilities, Bechtol suggests. For instance, Pyongyang could have somehow obtained tech from a country Russia or China proliferated to. He mentions two possible third-country sources: Iran and Pakistan.Fisher’s top candidate is Islamabad. “That there would be a big Chinese hand in this certainly has precedent,” he notes. “Just look at how China transferred to Pakistan, lock, stock, and barrel, the ability to make mobile, solid-fuel medium-range ballistic missiles.”
As Bechtol points out, the North Koreans are adept at stealing weapons tech, buying it, and getting it with the help of rogue scientists and engineers. “All that is certain today is that the North Koreans did not develop this missile system completely on their own,” he told me, “and the missile fired Sunday as a land-based missile and several months ago as an SLBM has almost exactly the same appearance and capabilities as the Chinese JL-1.”
However the North Koreans got the technology, they are on the way to making their unstable regime an existential threat. The important advance
is that they now have a solid-fuel engine for their land-based missiles. Solid-fuel engines permit quick launches, which means the North’s targets will not have much warning time.“This is truly dangerous,” Fisher tells me. North Korea has “crossed the line from failure-prone, liquid-engine, long-range missiles to long-range, solid-fuel ones.” And now, having made it to the other side of the threshold, it can make rapid improvements: “We can now expect the North will soon produce solid-fuel, intermediate- and intercontinental-range ballistic missiles and space launch vehicles.”
Moreover, to make matters worse, the Pukguksong-2 is carried on a transporter-erector-launcher, essentially a truck. That means the North Koreans can hide missiles before shooting them.The United States is not particularly worried about North Korea’s longest-range launcher, the Taepodong-2, as a weapon. Yes, it has the range to put a dent in the Lower 48 states, but it takes weeks to transport, assemble, fuel and test. The U.S. Navy or Air Force can destroy this missile on the pad.The United States worries about the North’s mobile missiles, however, especially the KN-08, carried on a Chinese-supplied transporter-erector-launcher, and the KN-08’s longer-range variant, the KN-14.
We call on all members of the Security Council to use every available resource to make it clear to the North Korean regime, and its enablers, that these launches are unacceptable,” urged a statement, issued Monday, of the U.S. ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley.
Although she did not mention any specific countries, observers were taken aback by her talk of “enablers.” It was, wrote CNN’s veteran correspondent Richard Roth, “not the diplomatic norm at the United Nations” to be so direct in public
.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby kit » 17 Feb 2017 16:39

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Chinese_weapons_reaching_near-parity_with_West_study_999.html

It said one of China's air-to-air missiles had no Western equivalent and that China had introduced a type of short-range missile that "only a handful of leading aerospace nations are able to develop".

It said China was also developing "what could be the world's longest range air-to-air missile".

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 17 Feb 2017 18:26

We need 'solid evidence' to back India's efforts to ban Masood Azhar at UN: China - PTI
Ahead of its strategic dialogue with India, China on Friday said "solid evidence" was needed for it to back efforts to get JeM chief Masood Azhar banned by the United Nations.

Foreign secretary S Jaishankar and China's executive vice-foreign minister Zhang Yesui will hold a new round of strategic dialogue in Beijing on February 22, Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang told a media briefing here.

The two sides will have an in-depth exchange of views on the international situation and other regional and global issues of mutual interest in the strategic dialogue which is an important communication mechanism between India and China, he said.

Commenting on reports of "friction points" in the bilateral relationship, including the Masood Azhar issue and India's admission into the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), Geng said "differences are only natural".

"Through all kinds of conversation and exchanges, including (the) upcoming Strategic Dialogue, (the) two sides can step up communication to narrow differences and reach new consensus on achieving cooperation," he said.

On the Masood Azhar issue, over which China has put a technical hold on the recent US move to list the Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) chief as a terrorist in the 1267 committee of the UN Security Council, Geng said China will support the move if there is solid evidence.

"China upholds principles of objectivity, impartiality and professionalism and takes part in relevant discussions. Whether last year's application by India or this year's by (the) relevant country, our position is consistent," Geng said.

"Our criteria is only one, we need solid evidence. If there is solid evidence the application can be approved. If there is no solid evidence there is hardly consensus," he said.

Stating that China has reiterated its stand several times, Geng said, "On (the) 1267 committee, the latest development is relevant countries have made another application with the committee. Relevant members of (the) committee are in consultation and relevant parties have failed to reach consensus so far."

China last year put a technical hold twice on India's application to get Masood Azhar banned by the UN.

This year, the US moved the proposal in the UNSC to designate Masood Azhar, the mastermind of the Pathankot terror attack, as a terrorist. China once again has put a technical hold on the move.

On India's entry into the NSG, he said, "We have said many times this is a multilateral issue".

"We stick to two-step approach namely, first NSG members need to arrive at a set of principles for the entry of non-NPT state parties into NSG and then move forward discussions of specific cases," Geng said.

"Our position is consistent. Apart from India, other non-NPT state parties are also making applications. Our position on those applications is consistent," he said.

Whether the Masood Azhar issue or the NSG issue, they are in essence multilateral issues and not bilateral ones, Geng said.

"We hope India can understand China's attitude and position on the two matters," he said, adding that China and India are the two largest developing counties having a wide range of converging interests.

"China India cooperation benefits not only two countries but the region and developing world which can contribute to our solidarity," he said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby kit » 18 Feb 2017 00:03

SSridhar wrote:We need 'solid evidence' to back India's efforts to ban Masood Azhar at UN: China - PTI
Ahead of its strategic dialogue with India, China on Friday said "solid evidence" was needed for it to back efforts to get JeM chief Masood Azhar banned by the United Nations.

Foreign secretary S Jaishankar and China's executive vice-foreign minister Zhang Yesui will hold a new round of strategic dialogue in Beijing on February 22, Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang told a media briefing here.

The two sides will have an in-depth exchange of views on the international situation and other regional and global issues of mutual interest in the strategic dialogue which is an important communication mechanism between India and China, he said.

Commenting on reports of "friction points" in the bilateral relationship, including the Masood Azhar issue and India's admission into the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), Geng said "differences are only natural".

"Through all kinds of conversation and exchanges, including (the) upcoming Strategic Dialogue, (the) two sides can step up communication to narrow differences and reach new consensus on achieving cooperation," he said.

On the Masood Azhar issue, over which China has put a technical hold on the recent US move to list the Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) chief as a terrorist in the 1267 committee of the UN Security Council, Geng said China will support the move if there is solid evidence.

"China upholds principles of objectivity, impartiality and professionalism and takes part in relevant discussions. Whether last year's application by India or this year's by (the) relevant country, our position is consistent," Geng said.

"Our criteria is only one, we need solid evidence. If there is solid evidence the application can be approved. If there is no solid evidence there is hardly consensus," he said.

Stating that China has reiterated its stand several times, Geng said, "On (the) 1267 committee, the latest development is relevant countries have made another application with the committee. Relevant members of (the) committee are in consultation and relevant parties have failed to reach consensus so far."

China last year put a technical hold twice on India's application to get Masood Azhar banned by the UN.

This year, the US moved the proposal in the UNSC to designate Masood Azhar, the mastermind of the Pathankot terror attack, as a terrorist. China once again has put a technical hold on the move.

On India's entry into the NSG, he said, "We have said many times this is a multilateral issue".

"We stick to two-step approach namely, first NSG members need to arrive at a set of principles for the entry of non-NPT state parties into NSG and then move forward discussions of specific cases," Geng said.

"Our position is consistent. Apart from India, other non-NPT state parties are also making applications. Our position on those applications is consistent," he said.

Whether the Masood Azhar issue or the NSG issue, they are in essence multilateral issues and not bilateral ones, Geng said.

"We hope India can understand China's attitude and position on the two matters," he said, adding that China and India are the two largest developing counties having a wide range of converging interests.

"China India cooperation benefits not only two countries but the region and developing world which can contribute to our solidarity," he said.


That it .

They are trying to be the local cop here !! .. shades of American imperialism ?!!! who do they think they are ?

Some one should tell the Chinese to take the hard evidence and shove it into you know where !!! :evil:

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Bheeshma » 18 Feb 2017 00:11

India should test a solid A-5 and K-4 over South china sea. Block any resolution against uighurs and tibet and support any resolution against china there.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ranjan.rao » 18 Feb 2017 03:47

^^ perhaps first start should be by responding to their comments in a strong way..here is my speculation, in a true desi fashion this govt is trying to build robust military capabilities before taking a strong stance. They will get their danda but we dnt have a stick long enough

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 20 Feb 2017 05:49

As US-China ties run into trouble, India eyes bigger Asean role - Indrani Bagchi, ToI
As the US-China relationship becomes fraught with tension, Asia is doing what it does best — looking for balancing powers to hedge against both an aggressive China and an uncertain America.

Over the coming weeks and months, India plans to ramp up its already strong engagement with Asia with an eye to building alliances, hedging and projecting itself as a "leading power" in the region.

Vietnam's foreign minister Pham Binh Minh and vice-president will visit India in the coming weeks. Malaysia's already embattled PM Najib Razak is also expected to make a trip and India expects to host Malcolm Turnbull, the Australian PM, later this year.

The Bangladeshi PM is likely to visit in April, while foreign secretary S Jaishankar is currently on a tour of Sri Lanka, China and Bangladesh, both as a neighbourhood visit as well as contextualising these relationships within the larger Asian chessboard.


For the countries of the region, the initial days of the Trump administration has been replete with confusing signals. There is a general sense that the US-China relationship will be frosty at best, and the impact of this would be felt in every regional capital. Trump and his top cabinet picks have indicated a more confrontational stance on China's island-building, definitely more aggressive on trade and tariffs, while walking away from the only Obama "pivot" exercise, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

The Trump administration does not believe, as some do, that undoing TPP will open strategic space for China.

It believes that TPP would have had a limited impact in "containing" China
and that Asian nations were in any case wary of Beijing's intent and would look to hedge their bets.

On the other hand, after showing some desire to change the US-China template, Trump reaffirmed the "one-China" policy, secretary of state Rex Tillerson moderated his comments on South China Sea and North Korea's recent missile test went off with a mild reproof from Washington.

For regional powers, it means two things — they know what to expect from China and are concerned, but they do not know much of what to expect from the new US administration, a cause of equal concern.

Philippine defence secretary Delfin Lorenzana told an interviewer last week that China might build on Scarborough Shoal, 300km from Manila, if it felt it would be unchecked.

"If we allow them, they will build," he was quoted as saying. "That's very, very disturbing. Very much (more) disturbing than Fiery Cross because this is so close to us." The Philippines is arguably the closest US ally in the Asean region. Vietnam feels particularly let down with the death of TPP, having banked on its as a political signal.

An unchecked China could revive tensions in South China Sea. While Japan and India remain steady allies, Hanoi is keen to get a better sense of how the US wants to play in that region. This would be one of the top topics of conversation between Vietnamese leaders and their Indian counterparts. India, thus far, appears to be on the right side of the new Trump administration and this gives it an interesting insight into Washington, these countries feel. Malaysia had fallen into China's sphere of influence, particularly after Beijing stepped in to rescue the scam-ridden 1MDB company. Malaysian ports are hosting Chinese submarines, like Sri Lanka, and Malaysia has committed to buying submarines from China as well.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Feb 2017 18:18

Jaishankar begins China visit with talks with top diplomat - The Hindu
Foreign Secretary S. Jaishankar began a high profile visit to China with talks with State Councillor Yang Jiechi, ahead of an omnibus strategic dialogue which was upgraded last year amid the controversy related to a ban on Jaish-e-Mohammad Chief Masood Azhar, and Beijing’s resistance to New Delhi’s membership to the elite Nuclear Supplier’s Group.

Mr. Yang, a former foreign minister enjoys top diplomatic status in the Chinese official hierarchy. He is also China’s Special Representative for the boundary talks
which are headed from the Indian side by the National Security Adviser, Ajit Doval. Mr. Jaishankar will begin a new round of the strategic dialogue with China’s Executive vice Foreign Minister Zhang Yesui on Wednesday.

The format was modified last year during Foreign Minister Wang Yi’s visit to India, following China’s repeated “technical holds” to designate Masood Azhar an international terrorism under the UN Security Council resolution 1267. It was also decided then that a separate official level forum would be established by the two Foreign Ministries to especially to discuss India’s membership to the Nuclear Suppliers Group.

During his stay, Mr. Jaishankar is expected to call on Foreign Minister Wang. While the Azhar issue and the NSG are likely to be taken up, diplomatic sources said that all other items on the Sino-Indian relations can fall under the strategic dialogue framework. India has concerns regarding market access to China to reduce the balance of payments gap between the two countries. China’s investments for the development of the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) which will pass through Pakistan occupied Kashmir (PoK) is another area that is holding up full development of ties.

The geopolitical landscape is also changing rapidly with a change of guard in the United States, the emergence of a multipolar world — a situation that was well recognised in New Delhi during this year’s Raisina Dialogue.

Later this year, China will hold the BRICS summit. Leaders of the two countries are also expected to meet in Astana during the summit of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO). Besides, China is hosting a high profile Belt and Road summit in May, where the guest list remains to be finalised.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Feb 2017 18:53

Chinese warships hold drill in Indian Ocean - IANS
Chinese warships have conducted a drill in the Indian Ocean.

"Chinese Navy flotilla carries out high-seas training in east Indian Ocean," Xinhua news agency reported on Tuesday. It gave no further details.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 21 Feb 2017 19:49

China's 'New Silk Road' Is Derailed In Sri Lanka By Political Chaos And Violent Protests

Yeah.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/wadeshepard ... 0fead62e14

FTA:

It was supposed to be a great new catalyst of transportation, manufacturing, and trade that would be used to stimulate growth in Sri Lanka’s remote Hambantota district. The dream was for Sri Lanka, China, and other nations to join together in the building of a new international city that would rise up from the southern jungles that could complement booming Colombo, a 250 kilometer driver to the northwest. Instead, Sri Lanka found itself with an array of cash-hemorrhaging, half-developed infrastructure projects that are on the verge of becoming white elephants, large amounts of international debt, and a highly unstable political and social social situation.

It is now looking as if Sri Lanka's biggest partner in the Hambantota endeavor, China, is pulling back from what seems to have become an all out fiasco. While a deal was supposed to be formally signed on January 7th that would have seen China take over an 80% share of the struggling Hambantota port for 99 years in exchange for $1.1 billion of much needed debt relief, this agreement has now been put on indefinite hold due to internal political strife and violent public demonstrations.

Sri Lanka began building this strategically-located deep sea port in 2008 with over $300 million in Chinese loans, which the country has subsequently struggled to repay. This was partly due to the poor economic performance of the port itself, which was originally intended to be run in tandem with a nearby industrial zone. However, this part of the project was never built.

...

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 22 Feb 2017 08:14

India, China gear up for tough negotiations during strategic talks - Saibal Dasgupta, ToI
Foreign secretary S Jaishankar set the stage for the upcoming strategic dialogue in Beijing by saying that India remained "strongly committed" to maintaining good relations with China. India wants to maintain its ties with China without making any compromises on its stand on major issues of differences between the Himalayan neighbors.

Jaishankar will attend the first round of the reconstituted strategic dialogue with China's executive vice foreign minister Zhang Yesui and other officials on Wednesday. The two sides are geared up for tough negotiations covering several points of friction affecting their relationship, while ensuring that dialogue and consultations are not hampered.

Two prickly issues that will come up during the first round of the upgraded strategic dialogue on Wednesday are China's negative stance towards India on the issue of Azhar Masood+ and entry+ into Nuclear Suppliers' Group. But Jaishankar has signalled India's determination to question certain aspects of the China Pakistan Economic Corridor, which passes through the disputed Kashmir areas claimed by India.

"For us, there are questions of sovereignty which need to be addressed first," Jaishankar was quoted as saying by state-run Global Times. New Delhi believes that the corridor is an affront on India's stand on Kashmir under Pakistani occupation through which the road passes.

"On terror, China has a very strong, principled position on counter-terrorism. We hope the position China already has will be further implemented," Jaishankar told Global Times.


The foreign secretary met China's state councillor Yang Jiechi at the Zhongnanhai compound in central Beijing, which is filled with offices of senior officials set around a scenic lake in Beijing. He arrived in Beijing with "a very strong sense of commitment to maintaining our relationship", Jaishankar said.

Jaishankar, who was India's ambassador in China till 2013, said he was returning to Beijing was a sense of "nostalgia and very good feelings" about his time there.

Yang said India-China relations have seen "positive growth" in 2016, with President Pranab Mukherjee visiting China and Prime Minister Modi holding three meetings with President Xi Jinping.

"We enjoyed good communication at many levels and continued good cooperation in fields of economy, trade, culture and people to people exchanges," Yang said. India and China were "able to maintain sound economic and social development" despite a "fluid and complex" global situation, Yang said.

"We truly hope that in the year ahead our two countries can enhance our exchanges and mutually beneficial cooperation so that we can jointly contribute more to the peace, stability and development of our region and the world at large, and deliver more benefits to our two countries and the people of our two countries and the whole world," he said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ranjan.rao » 22 Feb 2017 23:59

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/china-pakistan-economic-corridor-violates-our-sovereignty-india-tells-beijing/articleshow/57295768.cms
China must explain how India can take part in the Silk Road summit being held in Beijing: Foreign secretary S Jaishankar
CPEC violates Indian sovereignty because it runs through Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK): Jaishankar


Wonder whats going on

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 23 Feb 2017 07:38

‘Case against Azhar solid’ - PTI
India hit out at China on Wednesday for demanding “solid evidence” for securing a United Nations ban on JeM chief Masood Azhar, saying the extent of his actions were “well-documented” and the “burden of proof” was not on the country.

Foreign Secretary S. Jaishankar, briefing the media on his interactions with top Chinese officials, said the talks were “useful” in conveying India’s concerns and priorities on key issues.

‘Rationale explained’

“On the issue of 1267 Committee’s sanctions on Masood Azhar, we once again explained the rationale for that application and pointed out that this was really pursued by other countries too, not India alone,” Mr. Jaishankar said. He was referring to the U.S. application this year, backed by the U.K. and France, to designate Azhar as a global terrorist.

“In the case of Azhar, Jaish itself is proscribed under 1267. So the proof is in [the] 1267 Committee action. In this case, what he has done, the extent of his actions, are well-documented.

‘Sponsors convinced’

“Also, the proposal in question this time is not moved by us. It is not that the burden of proof is on India. The sponsors seem to be very well convinced... otherwise they would not have taken the initiative to move the proposal,” he said. “On the NSG issue,” he said, “the Chinese side underlined that they were open to India’s application for membership. They have their view of the procedures and processes. These are different from where we are at the moment and most of the group is at the moment,” he said, referring to the wide support India’s application enjoyed in the 48-member grouping.


This means that the talks ended in failure as China stood rock solid on its support for terrorism of Masood Azhar. This should be all amusing to Masood Azhar himself!

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Bheeshma » 23 Feb 2017 08:34

CPEC is a golden opportunity to disrupt and hit chinese inside pakistan. There are so many groups, TTP, BLA, LeJ that plausible deniability exists even if chinese civvies are targeted and eliminated. That should be the goal, all this talk id just for show.


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