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Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby tandav » 19 Apr 2017 08:41

Liu wrote:
manjgu wrote:not so poorly armed !!? what are u expecting they will be flying JF 17's?

as i said, During cold warchina produced millions of rifles,thousands of jets, canons , tankers and other armor vechicles, which are enough to arm hundreds of divisions.

those weapons might be outdated to PLA,but still can upgrade indian rebels much.(just imagine what would indian rebel do,if they were armed with canons&tankers)

but china now would rather leave those weapons decayed on stock,rathet gift indian rebels.


I think there is a very real possibility these "Indian rebels" would actually use it to admiister the Indo-China peace park in Tibet and Xinjiang, perhaps Guangzhou also.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby DrRatnadip » 19 Apr 2017 11:59

http://m.timesofindia.com/india/china-a ... 253902.cms
What exactly china is going to get by such stupid moves..I think Dalai Lama's visit has caused more severe burns than i previously thought..

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Lisa » 19 Apr 2017 12:55

^ Now look here. I read and digest maps made in China and written in Chinese all day long. Everybody in India will now be forced to use the new names. What exactly do you not understand?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Bhurishravas » 19 Apr 2017 14:41

The Chinese actually keep switching between -
We are superpower and
We were humiliated and colonised and are victims onlee.

The second position is for Japan and west. The first one for the rest of the countries. The loud crass shouting over every issue under the sun is due to the psychological confusion. The Chinese are better dressed pakistanis.
But it is working for them. At least the western countries give them more attention than they deserve, due to all the shouting. The other big problem for west and Japan is that their capitalist systems have heavily invested in Chinese manufacturing industry making them hostages to their own interests. As is most often the case, it is due to short sighted strategic brilliance of Unkill.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Vikas » 19 Apr 2017 16:47

Why articles in Panda newspapers are construed as official policy statements ? It isn't that Chinese Govt is scared of speaking up for China and has to hide behind articles. It is like Articles in Chindu or ToILet papers are taken in as Policy statements by GoI.

Chine is like a big dog which is good at barking incessantly but afraid to bite.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby nam » 19 Apr 2017 17:39

Thank you China for doing this. We are bored of waiting for Pakis who threaten to invade us every friday.

Please deploy more troops in Tibet to teach us a lesson.

Eagerly waiting .... as we need our politicians to fund more defence RnD jobs.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby nam » 19 Apr 2017 17:41

Bhurishravas wrote:The Chinese actually keep switching between -
We are superpower and
We were humiliated and colonised and are victims onlee.



Just like their brothers across the Himalayas in the west.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 19 Apr 2017 20:06

X-Post from China Military Watch thread

Chinese President Xi Jinping asks new People's Liberation Army units to be ready for combat, modern warfare - PTI
Chinese President Xi Jinping has asked the PLA's newly-formed 84 large military units to prepare themselves for combat and give priority to building "new-type" fighting capabilities in electronic, information and space warfare.

Xi, also the Chairman of the Central Military Commission (CMC), the overall high command of the 2.3 million-strong military, spoke to the commanders of the new units on Tuesday and asked them to improve their joint operation capabilities and technology level.

He said the new units of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) must prepare themselves for combat and study wars.

The President told the new forces to conduct more combat exercises and give priority to building "new-type" fighting capabilities, state-run China Daily reported.

In PLA terminology, "new-type" fighting capabilities generally refers to capabilities of engaging in electronic, information and space operations.

Xi's call for building "new-type" fighting capabilities of the world's largest military came as Beijing prepares to counter the US deployment of Terminal High Altitude Area Defence (THAAD) interceptor missiles in South Korea, whose powerful radars could see through most of the part of China including its missile development programme.

As it expanded strategic influence, China is also flexing its military might especially in the neighbourhood over the territorial disputes with India, Japan and countries in the South China Sea.

All 84 of the new units are at combined corps level, which means their commanders have or soon will be promoted to a rank of either major general in the Ground Force, Air Force and Rocket Force or rear admiral in the Navy.

Though the PLA has not disclosed how these units were set up, it is likely that they were created through the regrouping of existing forces rather than recruiting new personnel, because the Chinese military is still engaged in cutting its troops by three lakhs, the daily said.

The units' emergence also indicates that the PLA's structural shake-up has taken effect.

At a CMC conference in December, Xi ordered the military's structure to be adjusted and optimised, calling for a smaller but capable and flexible military, the report said.

The unprecedented reform began in November 2015, when the Central Military Commission unveiled a blueprint for the PLA's development.

The commission pledged to establish a leaner and more efficient command chain to reduce the number of non-combatant personnel and departments and to build the PLA into a mightier force capable of winning modern wars.

Since then, the PLA has set up a headquarters for its Ground Force, founded a Strategic Support Force dedicated to electronic, information and space operations, and established a Rocket Force to replace the former Second Artillery Corps.

The previous four top PLA departments-staff, politics, logistics and armaments-were dismantled, the report said.

The establishment of the units is the latest move in a massive reform the PLA is undergoing.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Falijee » 20 Apr 2017 05:06

Chinese Tit For Tat ; Re: Dalai Lama's Arunchal Pradesh Visit :roll:

China names areas in region disputed with India to assert claims
Reuters.

China has issued standardised spellings of the names of six places in a region disputed with India, in what China's foreign ministry said on Wednesday was an assertion of sovereignty.
China was upset when exiled Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama, whom it considers a dangerous separatist, visited the contested stretch of land on the India-China border this month.Arunachal Pradesh is an eastern Himalayan region administered by New Delhi but claimed by China as Southern Tibet.Last week, China's civil affairs ministry released a list of six places in the region with what China considers to be their formal names, in Chinese, Tibetan and English.
Indian officials have dismissed China's criticism of the Dalai Lama's second visit to Arunachal Pradesh in eight years, saying he is a spiritual leader who has a devoted following in the region.The Dalai Lama, who fled to India from Tibet in 1959 following a failed uprising against Chinese rule, says he wants genuine autonomy for his remote homeland rather than independence.Despite efforts by China and India to improve ties over recent years, deep suspicions persist, especially over their border dispute.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vasu raya » 20 Apr 2017 06:32

Still want to stick to one china policy? all the SAARC nations (except TSP ofcourse) need to be brought under the nuclear umbrella so even if they default on the loan payments to china chasing the development/investment mirage, their land isn't available for grabs, no colonizing efforts nor mil bases etc should be allowed.
Last edited by vasu raya on 20 Apr 2017 06:41, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Suraj » 20 Apr 2017 06:36

What's really important is, when the Dalai Lama next visits Arunachal Pradesh, what will the Chinese do ?
a) Find another six places to rename in their map
b) Rename the same places above to other names, or perhaps swap their names around
The nation wants to know.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby amit » 20 Apr 2017 06:45

Suraj wrote:What's really important is, when the Dalai Lama next visits Arunachal Pradesh, what will the Chinese do ?
a) Find another six places to rename in their map
b) Rename the same places above to other names, or perhaps swap their names around
The nation wants to know.


I suppose we SDREs should shiver and go and hide in our dark places the Chini dragon has roared and breathing fire. What is noteworthy is the kind of coverage our media is giving to this.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 20 Apr 2017 08:03

When the Dalai Lama visited Tawang - G.Parthasarathy, Business Line
The recent visit of the Dalai Lama to Arunachal Pradesh produced a hysterical reaction from China. The foreign office officially protested against the visit. China’s foreign policy mouthpiece, the Global Times, went ballistic, threatening India with dire consequences and asserting that India should remember that it is substantially weaker than China, both economically and militarily. Lecturing and criticising India on a number of foreign policy issues accompanied this.

What China fears

The ‘Middle Kingdom’ evidently feels emboldened to adopt such pressures after it has succeeded in annexing territories across its maritime borders, using coercive diplomatic, economic and military pressures. China has embarked on a determined quest for hegemony beyond its land and maritime borders.

The Chinese termed the Dalai Lama’s visit, particularly to the monastery town of Tawang, a “provocation”. This, despite the fact that it was the sixth visit of the Dalai Lama to Tawang. The Tawang monastery was founded in 1681 with the blessings of the fifth Dalai Lama. It assumes a special place in Tibetan hearts and minds as the sixth Dalai Lama was born in Tawang. China has ruthlessly coerced the Buddhist clergy and people in Tibet into virtual submission. Its remaining fear is that circumstances may arise in which the next Dalai Lama is born in Tawang. The spiritual independence and heritage of the persecuted Tibetans would then remain linked with India.

The McMahon Line was declared as the border between India and Tibet under a tripartite accord signed in 1914. Tawang was on the Indian side of the Line. China repudiated this accord. But following independence, India took control of Tawang in 1951. China, in turn, laid claim to large parts of Arunachal Pradesh, well beyond the borders defined in 1914. Beijing asserted that it never recognised the McMahon Line.

With rhetoric over the border escalating, Prime Minister Zhou Enlai stated in 1956 that while China never recognised the McMahon Line, the Line was an “accomplished fact”. He added that China should “recognise this Line”. In April 1960, he offered to “accommodate” the Indian point of view on the eastern sector if India agreed to address China’s concerns on the “western sector” across the Ladakh-Tibet border, where China had constructed a vital strategic road linking Buddhist-dominated Tibet to the Muslim-dominated Xinjiang region.

Changing borders


India’s borders with China in the western Tibet-Ladakh sector have changed through the 19th century. The stalemate following the Dogra incursion into Tibet, led by General Zorawar Singh in 1841-1842, and the subsequent takeover of Ladakh by the British, resulted in the Johnson Line drawn by the British in 1865, becoming the border with Tibet. Xinjiang was then not a part of China. The borders drawn in the Johnson Line included large parts of Aksai Chin, linking Tibet and Xinjiang. When geopolitical circumstances changed, the British drew the border with China along a new line in 1899, known as the McCartney-MacDonald Line, which gave the Chinese access to Xinjiang. This was informally accepted by China. It leaves the strategic Karakoram Pass under India’s control.

What Zhou Enlai offered prior to the1962 conflict was acceptance of the McMahon Line in the east in return for India’s acceptance of the McCartney-MacDonald Line. This was a proposal that many believe Prime Minister Nehru would have been well advised to accept. Chinese claims were, however, refuted. India was drawn into a conflict for which the country was ill-prepared militarily and psychologically, thanks to the earlier “Hindi Chini-Bhai Bhai” sloganeering.

China now believes that the military, economic and technological asymmetry between it and India is so great that it need not pay even lip service, or adhere to Zhou Enlai’s proposals, which were reiterated by Deng Xiaopingin 1979. China now expects India to make serious territorial concessions in Arunachal Pradesh (at the very least handing over Tawang and some other strategic areas) in return for anything closely corresponding to the 1899 proposals in the Ladakh sector. It is for this reason that Beijing has refused to even spell out the positions where the ‘Line of Actual Control’ arising from the 1962 conflict lie. One can expect no change in this position in the foreseeable future.
×
Bolstering India’s case

The main reference points that India can use to bolster its case lie in the very well negotiated April 2005 agreement on the “Political Parameters and Guiding Principles for Settlement of the India-China Boundary Question”. Article VI of the agreement states that the boundary should be “along well-defined and easily identifiable natural geographical features, to be mutually agreed upon between the two sides”. Article VII states: “In reaching a boundary settlement, the two sides shall safeguard due interests of their settled populations in the border areas.” Both these articles render Chinese claims on Tawang and areas on the Indian side of the McMahon Line in Arunachal Pradesh largely untenable. But China is not going to be influenced by words alone. The border dialogue between the two countries thus has to be focused on strengthening confidence-building measures to maintain peace along the borders. But we should never forget that the Chinese are supreme realists and will not hesitate to use military power when expedient. New Delhi has been steadily reducing the share of its defence budget. It now is barely 1.6 per cent of GDP. Is India doing enough to ensure that China cannot prevail in any standoff along our borders? This needs much greater attention from our parliamentarians.

It would be foolish to cut our noses to spite our faces by discouraging trade and investment ties with China. However, we should have no doubt that in its quest for hegemony in Asia, China will give no diplomatic space to countries like Japan, India and Vietnam to enhance their economic influence. This is reason enough for us to avoid seeking membership of the Chinese-dominated Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership. China’s recent unprecedented abstention in the UN Security Council in the face of an American diplomatic onslaught on Russia on developments in Syria, shows that Beijing can dump even major allies when it suits its interests. Dealing with a hegemonic China is going to require considerable courage, skill and attention.

The writer is a former High Commissioner to Pakistan

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 20 Apr 2017 12:14

China may use old maps to justify new names in Arunachal Pradesh - Saibal Dasgupta & Indrani Bagchi, ToI
Responding to the Dalai Lama's recent Tawang visit, the Chinese government has released “standardised“ Chinese names of six towns in Arunachal Pradesh. Rewriting Tibetan names like Bum La into Mandarin, China aims to hit out at Tibetans and at the same time challenge India's claim over Arunachal, which it regards as `South Tibet'.

The Chinese foreign ministry said on Wednesday that some more standardised names of Arunachal towns will soon be made public.

Though Beijing tried to pass off the “renaming“ as a routine exercise, Xiong Kunxin, professor of ethnic studies at Minzu University of China in Beijing, contradicted the foreign ministry by saying that the renaming exercise was aimed to “reaffirm Chinese sovereignty“ over the area. Indian experts said despite China's latest move, India's control over the northeastern state was indisputable.

The ministry of civil affairs in Beijing issued an order on April 14, saying, “The official names of the six places using the Roman alphabet are Wo'gyainling, Mila Ri, Qoidengarbo Ri, Mainquka, Bumo La and Namkapub Ri.“ China has “standardised“ official names for six places in Arunachal Pradesh, days after lodging strong protests with India over the Dalai Lama's visit to the frontier state.

The new names will be shown in the international diplomatic arena as proof of China's claims, sources said.China might even pull out old maps and records to show that these names existed for hundreds of years.

“At present, it has scant historical record to support its claims besides the fact that the 6th Dalai Lama was born in Arunachal's Tawang, and that the Tawang monastery was linked to monasteries in China in the past,“ P Stobdan, China expert and former diplomat, said. He further said China was trying to get India to concede that it would never ever exercise its control over the 14th Dalai Lama in future, a move they had made successfully with Mongolia in recent months.

India has, in recent months, boosted the defences in Arunachal Pradesh. Stobdan also said the Chinese response came after Beijing made an assessment of how popular Dalai Lama's visit was to that state. “The standar disation came amid China's growing understanding and recognition of the geography in South Tibet. Naming the places is a step to reaffirm China's territorial sovereignty to South Tibet,“ the state-backed Global Times quoted Xiong in an article on Wednesday .


What is likely to happen is that India and China may get into a cartographic battle if China forces international institutions and websites and search engines to use the Chinese words. Chinese foreign ministry refused to accept suggestions from reporters that the renaming was a retaliatory measure linked to the recent controversy over the Dalai Lama's visit to Arunachal Pradesh. The move comes after China summoned India's envoy in Beijing Vijay Gokhale to protest the Dalai Lama's visit.

“About why we choose this time to announce standardisation of names, China is now doing the second census of names of localities and an important part of it is to standardise names in ethnic languages,“ Lu Kang, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman said. :rotfl:

“In the next step we will also step up our study of those names in Tibetan ethnic languages and in the next step we will announce more standardisation of these names,“ he added. But Lu agreed that naming had “supported“ China's territorial claims. “These names reflect from another side that China's territorial claim over South Tibet is supported by clear evidence in terms of history , culture and administration,“ he said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Neela » 20 Apr 2017 18:06

SS, Suraj - Sirs
SEZs in PoK & claims in AP - both our territory and we have to defend our right to these places.
Shouldn't China be put on the defensive?
What kind of measures can India take esp on Chinese territory.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Suraj » 20 Apr 2017 23:15

Step 1: no agreement on Chinese requirements . EVERYTHING is negotiable . 'Tibet / Xinjiang are part China' : something to be discussed . 'One China' : to be decided .

Even if GoI refuses to show enough spine to engage with Tsai Ing-Wen's government in Taiwan or arm Vietnam, it should repudiate all prior agreements and instead say it's for negotiations to decide .

The Chinese will blow a gasket of course . But is their normal state of being . The reason for this positioning is to give us additional maneuvering room . This is essential Sun Tzutiapa, as shiv puts it - when you are weaker, refuse to agree and instead waffle and waffle as you build strength . You only agree from a position of strength . Until then give any number of nutty reasons for not agreeing .

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Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 20 Apr 2017 23:58

Donald Trump launches trade probe targeting Chinese steel

WASHINGTON: United States' President Donald Trump launched an investigation on Thursday to determine whether Chinese and other foreign-made steel threatens U.S. national security, raising the possibility of new tariffs and triggering a rally in U.S. steel stocks.

U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross cast the decision to initiate the probe as a response to Chinese exports of steel into the United States reaching the point where they now have 26 percent of the market. Chinese steel imports are up nearly 20 percent in the early months of this year alone, he said.

The unusual step of launching an investigation comes as Trump is pressuring China to do more to rein in an increasingly belligerent North Korea. When Chinese President Xi Jinping visited Trump in Florida earlier this month, Trump raised the possibility of using trade as a lever to coax China to do more.

Ross told reporters that Chinese steel exports have continued to rise "despite repeated Chinese claims that they were going to reduce their steel capacity when in fact they have been increasing it consistently ... It's a very serious impact on the domestic industry," Ross said at a White House briefing with reporters.
Trump signed a directive asking for a speedy probe under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 at a White House event that included chief executives of several U.S. steel companies. The law allows the president to impose restrictions on imports for reasons of national security.

News of the move triggered a rally for steel stocks, including Steel Dynamics Inc, AK Steel, US Steel, Nucor, Cliffs Natural Resources, and Allegheny Technologies.

Administration officials said there are national security implications from imports of steel alloys that are used in products such as the armor plating of ships and require a lot of expertise to create and produce.

The move is another step in Trump's "America First" policies in which he has tried to boost U.S. manufacturers and preserve American jobs.

The Commerce Department will have 270 days to complete the probe. Ross said he expected it to be done much sooner. Trump's directive asked that the investigation be conducted with all deliberate speed. Ross, a former steel executive, said the investigation was "self-initiated."

The American Iron and Steel Institute, which lobbies on behalf of the industry, said it supports the White House move.

"Massive global steel overcapacity has resulted in record levels of dumped and subsidized foreign steel coming into the U.S. and the loss of nearly 14,000 steel jobs," said institute President Thomas Gibson in a statement.

"The administration launching this investigation is an impactful way to help address the serious threat posed by these unfair foreign trade practices."

Cheers Image

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby AdityaM » 21 Apr 2017 01:24

In case the Koreas go hot into conflict, wouldnt it be the perfect opportunity for china to play its own mischief with India without attracting any world attention which would be pre-occupied with koreas

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby rpartha » 21 Apr 2017 01:33

China would be stupid to open another front in south with India when they have to deal with SoKo, US and Japan in their door step... On the other hand, India can actually attack Pakistan and take over the Gilgit province :D

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby sanjaykumar » 21 Apr 2017 03:10

I do hope Gilgit Baltistan will not be reincorporated into Jammu and Kashmir.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ArjunPandit » 21 Apr 2017 03:19

Surely, India can respond to renaming of Tsangpo, and Xizang

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby anupmisra » 21 Apr 2017 03:42

Falijee wrote:Chinese Tit For Tat ; Re: Dalai Lama's Arunchal Pradesh Visit

China names areas in region disputed with India to assert claims


So, what's the big deal? I am sure the chinese will not throw a fit if India were to rename a few towns, cities and regions in Tibet according to their original historical/Sanskrit tags. Perhaps even rename Aksai Chin according to the Vedas and Puranas. They will be cool with that, right? Two can play at this game.

Hari varsa is probably represented by western Tibet.
Uttara-Kuru varsa is the region to the north of the Pamirs. It probably includes the north-western parts of Xinjiang province of China.
The river Sita (Sito of Hiuen Tsiang) corresponds to the Yarkand River
The Pushkaradvipa has been identified by some as the region lying between China and Mangala (perhaps China and Mongolia)
Bhadrasva varsa probably corresponds to the major part of Xinjiang province of China and the region lying to its east.

Indian Foreign Ministry could quote this as a source:
https://truthdisclosed.wordpress.com/ta ... d-puranas/
https://truthdisclosed.wordpress.com/ta ... world-map/


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Apr 2017 07:38

China’s Arunachal move ‘illegal’ - Suhasini Haidar, The Hindu
India on Thursday rejected China’s move to rename six towns in Arunachal Pradesh, giving them new Chinese names in its official record.

“Assigning invented names to the towns of your neighbour does not make illegal territorial claims legal,” said Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) spokesperson Gopal Baglay. “Arunachal Pradesh is and will always be an integral part of India,” he added.


‘Clear evidence’

Mr. Baglay was responding to questions about an announcement by the Chinese Ministry of Civil Affairs that said it would “standardise” the names of towns in Arunachal, which China refers to as ‘South Tibet’, as Wo’gyainling, Mila Ri, Qoidêngarbo Ri, Mainquka, Bümo La and Namkapub Ri respectively, on its version of the map that India contests.

Going further, the Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Lu Kang even said that the names reflected, “China’s territorial claim over South Tibet is supported by clear evidence in terms of history, culture and administration.”

Dismisses claim

The government dismissed China’s claim clearly on Thursday, with Urban Development Minister Venkaiah Naidu accusing Beijing of trying to “get some sort of publicity” from the notice on renaming towns.

“We are an independent country, we are a sovereign country, Arunachal Pradesh is totally part and parcel of India and every inch of Arunachal’s land belongs to India. China has no business to name any of the districts,” Mr. Naidu said
at a press conference on Thursday.

Escalation of tensions

Beijing’s move is being seen as an escalation of tensions by China that has been angered by the government’s decision to allow the Dalai Lama to visit the Tawang monastery this month.

In a series of statements, China reacted sharply to the Dalai Lama’s travels in Arunachal Pradesh, all of which is Indian territory that China continues to dispute.

“This is definitely an upping of the ante by China,” said expert Alka Acharya, cautioning, “We will have to watch closely where this decision to announce new names would lead next.”

When asked if the growing Chinese reactions on Arunachal Pradesh would have an impact on border talks between the two neighbouring countries, the MEA spokesperson said, “There is an established boundary mechanism that has made some progress. And we would expect that the boundary question would be addressed in a mutual and honourable manner.”

Mr. Baglay added that China had not officially conveyed any decision on the ‘renaming’ to the Indian embassy or the MEA.

Next round of talks

The next round of boundary talks between Chinese State Councillor Yang Jiechi and National Security Advisor (NSA) Ajit Doval is expected to take place later this year in Delhi, and Mr. Doval is expected to attend the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) group’s NSA-level meeting to be held in Beijing in July.

External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj will attend the BRICS ministerial meeting before that in June.

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Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 21 Apr 2017 15:00

India will pay dearly if it uses Dalai Lama card: Chinese media

NEW DELHI: In a sure sign that it is still rattled by the Dalai Lama's recent visit to Arunachal Pradesh, Beijing today used its state media to warn India that it will end up "paying dearly" if it continues playing "the Dalai Lama card".

Further, after India said that China "inventing names to towns" in Arunachal doesn't make its claims to the territory legal, Beijing hit back at India saying the northeastern state isn't India's "simply because the Dalai Lama says so".

"New Delhi would be too ingenuous to believe that the region belongs to India simply because the Dalai Lama says so," said an op-ed in the Global Time, the Chinese Communist Party's foreign policy news outlet.

The lingering border dispute between India and China involves about 90,000 square kms of territory in Arunachal Pradesh. China calls Arunachal 'South Tibet'.

Two days ago, China announced that it has "standardised" official names for six places in Arunachal in a "legitimate action". China's move came on the heels of a visit by the Dalai Lama to Arunachal. Beijing protested strongly about the visit.

"Putting the Dalai Lama into its toolbox against China is another trick played by New Delhi lately...It is time for India to do some serious thinking over why China announced the standardized names in South Tibet at this time. Playing the Dalai Lama card is never a wise choice for New Delhi. If India wants to continue this petty game, it will only end up in paying dearly for it," the op-ed said.

The article also alleged that China is making efforts to solve the territorial dispute but India isn't.
"India seems to have become trapped in its stubbornness to measure its strength with China. But territorial disputes cannot be settled by comparing which side is stronger or which country has more leverage. Otherwise, there is no need for Beijing to sit down with New Delhi at the negotiating table," the Global Times piece said.

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anupmisra
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby anupmisra » 21 Apr 2017 17:13



I suppose the chinese government wants to only communicate through their media. Did the Indian "media" respond to this "threat" by the chini media?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Apr 2017 18:09

Nepal scaled down drills with China due to India: Chinese media - PTI
Nepal has scaled down the size of its first-ever military exercise with China after facing strong opposition from India, state-run Chinese media claimed today.

The 10-day joint military exercise, code-named 'Sagarmatha Friendship 2017', commenced in Nepal from April 16.

"It was said the two countries initially planned to hold a battalion-scale military exercises. However, facing a strong opposition from India, Nepal had to compress the size of the military exercise and change the venue to a military school," an article in the state-run Global Times said.

"For Nepal, the joint military exercise has a deeper significance. For starters, it shows that Nepal moves forward in its pursuit of a balanced diplomacy among major powers. Since the 1990s, balanced diplomacy has become the basic principle of Nepal's foreign strategy, which is established based on Nepal's nationalism and anti-Indian sentiment," the article said.

Chinese official media has been expressing its frustration over the fall of pro-China Nepalese Prime Minister K P Sharma Oli who was replaced by Prachanda.

For China, the fall of the Oli regime was a big disappointment and a setback to its planned big push into Nepal through Tibet with rail and highway linkages to expand its influence in the landlocked country which was dependent on India for all its supplies, according to analysts.

Prachanda sought to improve ties with India much to the chagrin of Beijing.


"Nepal's dependence on India in political, economic, cultural and other aspects as well as India's ambition to make Nepal its sphere of influence has made most people in Nepal fear losing their national independence as Sikkim did," the article claimed.

"Holding joint military exercises with China can contribute to deterring ethnic separatism in Nepal," it said without elaborating.

China has expressed its backing for Nepal's new constitution which was strongly resisted by Madhesis over fears that it marginalised their political and constitutional rights.

"It is a normal development for China to hold a military exercise with Nepal as Nepal is China's friendly neighbour. There are many countries which have held joint military exercises, including India, with China. South Asia is a terrorism-prone region. Now that China and Nepal have developed closer economic relations, Nepal hopes to join China's Belt and Road initiative, for which regional security and stability is a necessity," it said.

The joint military exercise shows that the "bilateral diplomatic relations have expanded from political, economic and cultural to the field of military defence. But for China, this is just one aspect of the overall national security outlook proposed by Chinese President Xi Jinping".

"Nepal has taken a cautious attitude to avoid provoking India. The drill does not violate the Treaty of Peace and Friendship inked by Nepal and India in 1950," it said.

"Due to geographic, political, economic, historic, religious and cultural factors, India has wielded much bigger influence over Nepal than China. Nepal cannot cut its economic ties with India," it said.

India views small South Asian countries such as Nepal and Bhutan as its "sphere of influence and a strategic buffer zone against China".

"It sees their relations with China from a geopolitical standpoint and a Cold-War mentality," it said.

"Given the rise of nationalism in India, especially the prevalence of nationalistic sentiments among India's diplomatic circles, Prime Minister Narendra Modi has taken a tough China policy since assuming office. India is concerned about China's economic cooperation with South Asia and the region around the Indian Ocean and wants to push back China's influence," it claimed.

Over the past two years, "India has raised a couple of unreasonable requests toward and imposed pressure on China, dragging the Sino-Indian relations into a vicious cycle".

If New Delhi does not change its mentality, it will be "paranoid" about every cooperation between China and South Asian countries, it said.

"China has a clear-cut approach toward China-Nepal-India trilateral relations. It hopes Nepal can become a bridge between China and India. By pushing forward the China-Nepal-India economic corridor, it can boost development in all three countries. No matter how India views cooperation between China and Nepal, such cooperation will continue to expand, as it fits the interests of both peoples," it said.

Nepal's President Bidhya Devi Bhandari is in India on her first overseas tour. She arrived on a five-day trip to India on April 17.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 21 Apr 2017 18:15

And it also sees Nepal and Bhutan as countries that are threatened by the middle kingdom, celestial empire, empire of heaven, silk road and string of pearls mentality. India wants to keep that overbearing ideology out.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Cosmo_R » 21 Apr 2017 18:44

Sorry, paywall

"Chinese state-backed hackers have recently targeted South Korean entities involved in deploying a U.S. missile-defense system, says an American cybersecurity firm, despite Beijing’s denial of retaliation against Seoul over the issue.

In recent weeks, two cyberespionage groups that the firm linked to Beijing’s military and intelligence agencies have launched a variety of attacks against South Korea’s government, military, defense companies and a big conglomerate, John Hultquist, director of cyberespionage analysis at FireEye Inc., said in an interview.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/chinas-sec ... 1492766403

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby tandav » 21 Apr 2017 19:42

Given Chinese interest in improved friendship with India and its kind interest in historic names, It is obvious that the Chinese want us to help them start naming places in the proposed Indo-Tibet-China peace park so it reflect more accurately its Indian history, mythology and status. Not much is known of the prebuddhist nature of Tibet, but the ancient religion of the Bon people in Tibet is a form of Shiva worship.

So without much ado I present. Local Tibetan name: and their historical Indian equivalents after some real deep research spanning millenia of Ancient Indian History particularly Shiva .
0) Tibet: Tandavprast (the Prast=Plateau state where Lord Shiva danced and leveled the mountains)
1) Lhasa : KaiLasa (the aboard of lord Shiva bestower of peace)
2) Chengguan/Qamdo: Chandgaon/Kamdeo (Holy moon village / Aboard of the lord of Love)
3) Shigatse : Shivprayag : (The confluence of rivers that pay obeisance to lord Shiva, legend has it that when lord Shiva danced while creating Tandavprast the Nyantara River originated as a Teardrop from the eye of the goddess Laxmi who was entranced by the Lord's dance. Its now locally known as Nyanchu which meets the Brahmaputra river.
4) Zhangmu: Shanmukh/Shanmukesvar : (Named after Kartikeya the Son of Shiva)
5) Yangbajain: Yagnoujjain : (A sage in 3000 BC from Ujjain performed a massive Yagna here for Shiva and heat from the flames still smoulder below the earth and makes a hot spring)
6) Shiquanhe : Shivqutir (the cottage of Lord Shiva)
7) Tsetang: Sindhumukh (Origin of the Sindhu river the origin of Indian civilization)

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby TKiran » 21 Apr 2017 20:39

Guys, IS IT TRUE that GoI has abandoned the "one China" policy officially saying "Tibet has been illegally occupied by China" by the spokesperson of Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India?

If it's true, jingo khush hua... :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Still unbelievable...

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Bhurishravas » 21 Apr 2017 21:51

^^ The spokesperson didnt say China has illegally occupied Tibet. something that he should have.
If the BJP govt doesnt react to China`s needling, it will lose more of its nationalist banner which anyway imho is overly stated.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby sanjaykumar » 21 Apr 2017 22:30

Yes India will dearly for using Dalai Lama. It will have to susbidise independent Tibet with a development budget, defence budget etc.

The Chinese are being solicitous of india's finances. We thank them.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Avtar Singh » 21 Apr 2017 22:36

Firstly who gives a damn what these people say.
Secondly it gives me a chance to introduce a new word...

I think the name for the land of those around India should be changed to
one word;

PakChiniStan acronym PCS, I hope everyone will take it up..
It will identify these people as of 1 land with 1 set of ideals; "terrorism"?

India now only has a 1 front war where the idea should be to cut it all to pieces,
keeping the parts taken from India.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SBajwa » 22 Apr 2017 00:18



For Chinese lurkers! watch here India's foreign minister says that Indians consider the water of Mansarovar the holiest in world.
In Hindi at 3:35 - 3:50.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby IndraD » 22 Apr 2017 00:33

buzz on SM is that road outside Chinese embassy in Delhi could be named after Dalai Lama.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby rpartha » 22 Apr 2017 01:48

sanjaykumar wrote:I do hope Gilgit Baltistan will not be reincorporated into Jammu and Kashmir.


Why? You dont want Gilgit-Baltistan at all or you dont want them to be part of J&K...

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby anupmisra » 22 Apr 2017 01:49

IndraD wrote:buzz on SM is that road outside Chinese embassy in Delhi could be named after Dalai Lama.


Roads are usually named after dead people. Name that road - Free Tibet Road. The mailman who delivers mail to the embassy should be from Arunachal Pradesh.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby sanjaykumar » 22 Apr 2017 04:51

GB belongs to India whether we want it or not. But it should never come under J&K administration.

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Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 22 Apr 2017 15:23

X Posted on the China Watch Thread

China's financial trends are 'dangerous and unsustainable'', says International Monetary Fund

NEW DELHI: Even though the International Monetary Fund (IMF) said today that it may increase its 2017 GDP projection for China - after better than-expected first-quarter growth numbers - it warned that financial trends from that country are "dangerous and unsustainable."

On Tuesday, the IMF raised its 2017 growth projection for China's economy to 6.6 percent from 6.5 percent and soon it may raise it again, said Changyong Rhee, director of the Asia and Pacific Department at the fund.

"In China, the GDP growth rate for the first quarter, which was just released, is 6.9 percent which is higher than we expected.There is upside risk to our current projection," Rhee told reporters at a briefing earlier today.

Still, the IMF said China's financial trends are unstable. The reasons?

"China's economy remains beset by many distortions, such as an excessive role of the state, large resource misallocation in many areas, state owned enterprises that lack budget constraints and financial discipline," said Markus Rodlauer, deputy director of IMF's Asia and Pacific Department.

"When this would unravel in some way or another, nobody can predict," Rodlauer said, adding that for now, in the near term, the trend is somewhat sustainable.

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