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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 20 Mar 2017 18:22

China warns India over invite to Dalai Lama to Buddhist meet - PTI
China today warned India not to go against its "core concerns" to avoid disruption in bilateral ties after New Delhi invited the Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama to an international Buddhist seminar in Bihar.

"In recent days the Indian side, in total disregard of China's stern representation and strong opposition, insisted on inviting the 14th Dalai Lama to attend the international conference on Buddhism held by the Indian government," Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying told reporters here.

"China is strongly dissatisfied and firmly opposed to it," she said.

"We urge the Indian side to clearly see the anti-China splittist nature of the Dalai group and honour its commitment on Tibet and related questions, respect China's core concerns and avoid China-India relations from being further disrupted and undermined," she said.

The 81-year-old Dalai Lama inaugurated an international seminar on Buddhism on March 17 in Rajgir in Bihar's Nalanda district, about 100 km from the capital Patna.

Buddhist monks and scholars from various countries participated in the seminar 'Buddhism in 21st Century'.

Earlier this month, China had objected to India permitting the Dalai Lama to visit Arunachal Pradesh which it regards as Southern Tibet.

China is strongly opposed to the Dalai Lama visiting disputed areas, Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang had said.

"China's position on eastern section of China-India border dispute is consistent and clear. The Dalai clique has long been engaging in anti-China separatist activities and its record on the border question is not that good," he had said.

China views the Nobel Peace laureate, who fled into exile in India after a failed uprising against Chinese rule in 1959, as a dangerous separatist.

China in the past held talks with him for reconciliation after he fled from Tibet. But no such talks were held after President Xi Jinping took over as the new leader in 2012 and Beijing kept pressure on various countries not to host him.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Prem » 21 Mar 2017 02:13

China Turns Top Mid-Range Missiles Toward Taiwan

http://dailycaller.com/2017/03/20/china ... z4btt65dzd

The Chinese military has turned its highly-accurate mid-range precision missiles towards Taiwan, the island’s defense minister confirmed Monday.The People’s Liberation Army Rocket Force has moved DF-16 missiles into position for strikes on Taiwan, Defence Minister Feng Shih-kuan said in an address to the legislature’s Foreign Affairs and National Defense Committee. Feng said that he was confident Taiwan “has adequate weaponry to shoot it down outside its borders,” reports the South China Morning Post.The DF-16, a product of China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp, is a highly-accurate, road-mobile, mid-range ballistic missile with a reported strike range of approximately 620 miles, reports the China Daily. The PLAAF trained with modified DF-16s during this past Spring Festival.Xu Guangyu, a retired general and now a strategy researcher, suggested that the DF-16 missile fills “the gap that previously existed with the absence of a medium-range ballistic missile in the PLA’s arsenal.” The missiles can strike targets along the first island chain, which runs from Japan to Taiwan to the Philippines.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Mar 2017 16:00

Duterte's 'can't stop China' comment raises concern - Straits Times
Just before he left for Myanmar on Sunday, President Rodrigo Duterte said, when asked about a news report that the Chinese are planning an environment monitoring station on Scarborough Shoal, that "we cannot stop China from doing these things".

"We can't take on China. The Americans couldn't. They were too afraid. Now, (the Americans) want us to go to war (with China). It would be a massacre," he later told reporters in Naypyitaw.

His comments are a far cry from when he declared, when he was running for president in 2015, that he would ride a jet ski to Scarborough to plant the Philippine flag there. Later, shortly after he took office last June, he said that the remark was merely "hyperbole to stress a point that we will not give up anything there".

But now, with China pouring billions' worth of trade and investments into the Philippines, Mr Duterte seems to be singing a different tune, and it is not sitting well with pundits who see another "Mischief" episode unfolding.


In 1994 and 1995, China built a small structure on stilts over Mischief Reef, in the Spratlys chain of islands, shoals, reefs and rocks in the southern half of the South China Sea, just 217km from the coast of the Philippines' Palawan island. At the time, Beijing reassured Manila that the structure - a platform topped by four octagonal structures, with a Chinese flag waving overhead - was merely a fishermen's shelter.

Two decades later, that shelter has become an island fortress.

Justice Antonio Carpio, the Philippines' top legal expert on the South China Sea disputes, said Mr Duterte has the constitutional obligation to defend it, even if he thinks his military is ill-equipped.

"Any statement that the Philippines cannot stop China from building on Scarborough Shoal actually encourages China to build on Scarborough Shoal," he said.

The judge added that Manila can always file a strong diplomatic protest. Mr Duterte could also send in his navy with a clear warning to Beijing that an attack will trigger a treaty that calls on the United States to come to the Philippines' aid.

More than any other feature in the South China Sea that the Philippines claims, Scarborough Shoal stirs up the most intense feelings among Filipinos, who refer to this large coral atoll as "Panatag" (calm), because of the way the Chinese moved on it. China seized control of the shoal from the Philippines in 2012. It has restricted access to it since then, barring Filipino fishermen from the area, often chasing them away with water cannon and helicopters.

There is also the matter of whether the US will let China build anything on Scarborough Shoal.

Turning it into an island will allow the Chinese to complete a "strategic triangle", along with bases on Woody Island in the Paracels near Vietnam and in the Spratlys, which will give it total control over the 3.2 million sq km South China Sea.

Said Mr Heydarian: "The key question at this point is: Does China think that because it is offering huge economic incentives, the Philippines is willing to go soft on its territorial claims and sovereign rights in the Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea?"

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Mar 2017 20:37

Chinese projects stuck due to Prachanda's pro-India policies: State Chinese media - PTI
Ahead of Nepal Premier Prachanda's fence-mending visit to China this week, state-run media here has slammed him saying that ties have fallen to a "low ebb" with most of the Chinese projects stuck due to his "pro-India" policies.

An article in the state-run Global Times said for quite some time Prachanda, the Prime Minister and the chairman of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), had been friendly toward China.

The article recalled his past close association with China as well as his anti-India rhetoric.

However, since assuming office for the second time as Prime Minister in August last year he has visited India twice and warmly welcomed President Pranab Mukherjee in Kathmandu last November, the article noted.

"Given Prachanda's pro-India foreign policy, the Sino- Nepalese relationship has fallen into low ebb," it said.


Prachanda, who succeeded 'pro-China' Prime Minister K P Sharma Oli, will embark on a five-day visit to China from March 23 during which he will attend the Boao Forum for Asia Annual Conference.

He is also expected to meet Chinese President Xi Jinping, who last year skipped Nepal during his South Asia tour, apparently upset over lack of progress over much-advertised projects like China-Nepal rail linkages and instead met Prachanda in Goa on the sidelines of the BRICS summit.

For China, the fall of the Oli regime was a big disappointment and a setback to its planned big push into Nepal through Tibet with rail and highway linkages to expand its influence in the landlocked country which was dependent on India for all its supplies, according to analysts.

Today's article was critical of Prachanda for the fall of the Oli government and for failing to push projects.

"It is widely believed in Nepal that Prachanda has toppled the pro-China government led by Oli under New Delhi's manipulation and paved the way for the Nepali Congress to build a pro-India government in the future," the article said.

Prachanda and Sher Bahadur Deuba of the Nepali Congress "both vowed that they would carry out the deals signed with Beijing during Oli's China visit last March, but actions speak louder than words", the article said.

"Until today, no substantial progress has yet been made," it said.

"Prachanda will transfer his power to Deuba soon after May 14, when the local-level elections will be held. Even if Prachanda would ink some vital deals with Beijing, they will most likely face the same fate of those signed during Oli's China visit -- being suspended by Deuba," the article stated.

However, although the tour takes place towards the end of his second term as Nepal's Prime Minister, it is undoubtedly good news for ties between Beijing and Kathmandu, the article said.

"Nevertheless, in order to win more support for his party in the upcoming local elections and dispel the accusation of being pro-India, Prachanda might sign some critical agreements with Beijing this time," it noted.

Among the pacts that he may sign are the construction of Sino-Nepal railway, upgrading the China-Nepal Araniko Highway and the road linking the Gyirong Port in China's Tibet Autonomous Region and Kathmandu as well as a Sino-Nepalese free trade deal, the article said.

"Yet when examining whether a foreign government or party is friendly to China, implementation of the agreements is more important than signing the deals," it said.

"Several projects in Nepal involving Chinese companies, such as Upgrade Kathmandu Ring Road Second Phase Project, the Pokhara International Airport, the Gautam Buddha International Airport in Lumbini and the West Seti Hydropower Project have been consistently blocked for various reasons," it noted.

China has every reason to require the Nepalese government to safeguard the interests of Chinese investors and contractors, the article contended.

The article also said "Beijing, New Delhi and Kathmandu ought to abandon the outdated zero-sum mindset, set aside their disputes, agree to disagree, start to seek common interests and strive for prosperity."

"Prachanda's term is about to come to an end. A China tour at this point and possible deals with the Chinese side can be a significant sign of improvement in the bilateral relationship," it said.

No matter which political party comes to power, China would like to advocate cooperation. China is always ready to help Nepal to develop its economy and achieve prosperity, the article said.

"Nepal can become another 'iron friend' of China in South Asia," it said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Mar 2017 20:46

If India doesn't stop vigilance on neighbours, China will have to fight back: Media - PTI
India is trying to undermine China's efforts to maintain close ties with Nepal, Sri Lanka and Bhutan, the official media here said today and warned New Delhi that Beijing will fight back if its core interests are violated.

"...It is India that has been treating South Asia and the Indian Ocean as its backyard with a hard-line manner. Its uneasiness toward Beijing's growing influence in the region is obvious," an article in the state-run Global Times said, referring to critical reports in the Indian media about Chinese Defence Minister Chang Wanquan's visit to Sri Lanka and Nepal.

"For instance, New Delhi is one of the crucial reasons why China and Bhutan, which is controlled by India economically and diplomatically, have not yet established diplomatic relations," the article said.

"India's vigilance against China has also affected Sri Lanka and Nepal's relations with Beijing. Even if they are trying to balance between the two giant neighbours, New Delhi still regards their neutrality as a pro-Beijing policy," it said.


"China hopes India can understand the pursuit of China and regional countries for common development, and be part of it. However, New Delhi doesn't share this thinking, instead seeking to balance China," it said.

"If such tendencies in India continue, China will have to fight back, because its core interests will have been violated. This is not what we hope for, but the ball is in India's court," it said. {So, relations with countries around is another 'core interest' for China apart from Tibet, Taiwan and Indo-China Sea? China keeps on adding to its list of 'core interests' and demanding that everyone accede to it.}

The article also said whenever a top leader from India's neighbouring countries visits China, the Indian media would hype that India is losing them or "China's emerging weight in South Asia will be New Delhi's new threat".

"Most of India's peripheral countries are also Beijing's neighbours. Promoting stable relations with surrounding nations plays a vital role in any country's own domestic development. New Delhi should stop being extremely sensitive toward each and every move between China and its neighbours," it said.

"Sri Lanka and Nepal are actually looking forward to joint projects with China, given their poor infrastructure," it said, adding when an increasing number of Chinese companies get established in these countries, it is inevitable for Beijing to boost defence collaboration with them to "protect not only China's, but also the region's interest".

"So far, the Indian government is confused when it comes to policies toward China. It seems that New Delhi is attempting to find a way, including intensifying its communication with the Dalai Lama, to display its strength and leverage in order to put pressure on or counterbalance Beijing," it said referring to participation of the Tibetan spiritual leader in an international Buddhist seminar in Bihar.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ranjan.rao » 21 Mar 2017 23:29

Core interest is the flavor of the month

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 22 Mar 2017 10:53

Dalai Lama sets the tone for his Northeast trip - The Hindu
Making another outreach to the Chinese people on Tuesday, the Dalai Lama, Tibetan spiritual leader, appreciated their interest in Buddhism.

The moves comes against the backdrop of his much-publicised visit to Northeast India, including Arunachal Prades
h, which the Chinese government has opposed.

“The Chinese hardliners consider me a troublemaker, but the general Chinese people are very positive. For the past few years, every week some Chinese from mainland China come to see me. Whenever we meet, the Chinese Buddhists cry,” he told a news agency.

The spiritual figure is expected to travel to Guwahati by March-end to begin the Northeast trip. From Guwahati, the Dalai Lama is expected to travel to Tawang, where he will hold a series of ceremonies.

The trip to Tawang has already drawn opposition from Beijing with the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs criticising the plans because of China’s territorial claims over the region. China’s criticism also drew a response from Congress MP Shashi Tharoor, who said it was invalid.

“We are not recognising the Dalai Lama as a political leader. But we do recognise him as a spiritual leader. So China’s stand is irrelevant. If we want to invite a major Buddhist leader to a conference, then it is our privilege,” Dr. Tharoor said.


‘Negative persona’


At a public function in New Delhi on Tuesday, Foreign Secretary S. Jaishankar said India-China relationship had a negative public persona in India.

The response of Mr. Jaishankar underlines the continued differences between India and China over a number of issues including territorial claims, counter-terror measures and Tibet.

Mr. Jaishankar obliquely referred to India-China differences on terrorism and said, “Nothing has globalised more than terrorism, yet responses to it remain very tactical, national; therefore remain very limited.”

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 22 Mar 2017 19:59

Japan navy inducts second helicopter carrier Kaga as it pushes against China's influence in Asia - Reuters
YOKOHAMA: Japan's second big helicopter carrier, the Kaga, entered service on Wednesday, giving the nation's military greater ability to deploy beyond its shores as it pushes back against China's growing influence in Asia.

Accompanied by a military band, Maritime Self Defence Force commanders took possession of the 248 metre (813.65 ft) long vessel at the Japan Marine United shipyard in Yokohama near Tokyo, where it was docked next to its sister ship the Izumo.

"China is attempting to make changes in the South China Sea with bases and through acts that exert pressure is altering the status quo, raising security concerns among the international community," Vice Minister of Defence Takayuki Kobayashi said at the ceremony attended by about 500 people

Japan's two biggest warships since World War Two are potent symbols of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's push to give the military a bigger international role. They are designated as helicopter destroyers to keep within the bounds of a war-renouncing constitution that forbids possession of offensive weapons.

In its biggest show of naval power in foreign waters in more than 70 years, Japan plans to dispatch the Izumo in May on a three-month tour through the South China Sea
, sources with knowledge of the plan told Reuters earlier.

The addition of the Kaga means Japan will be able to mount overseas operations more often in the future. It will be based in Kure in western Japan, which was home to Japan's most famous World War Two battleship, the Yamato. The Izumo operates from Yokosuka near Tokyo, which is also where the US Seventh Fleet's carrier, the Ronald Reagan, is based.

The Japanese ships can operate up to nine helicopters each from their decks. They resemble the amphibious assault carriers used by U.S. Marines, but lack their well deck for launching landing craft and other vessels.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 23 Mar 2017 18:12

China reaches out to West Asia - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
China is in the middle of a complex diplomatic dance with West Asia, by engaging rivals such as Syria, Saudi Arabia, Israel and Iran, all at the same time.

On Tuesday, visiting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Chinese President Xi Jinping announced an “innovative comprehensive partnership” between both countries.

China-Israel ties

China’s focus in the “partnership” is on maximising absorption of Israel’s technology in hi-tech and other advanced domains. That dovetails well with the ‘Made in China-2025’ strategy of transitioning China’s manufacturing to the advanced level by leveraging the Internet, Big Data and robotics among the key tools.

In that endeavour, China is pursuing the industry 4.0 model pioneered by Germany. In his remarks as paraphrased by Xinhua, President Xi singled out “innovation cooperation” as the motor driving overall ties with Israel.

In turn, Mr. Netanyahu narrowed down on clean energy, agriculture, investment, finance and medical services among the top priority areas.

Israel hopes to participate in the Belt and Road Initiative — fast becoming a litmus test defining the health of any nation’s ties with China.

Unperturbed by the complex web of rivalries and friendships, the Chinese are also aiming high in building ties with the region’s controversial heavyweight, Saudi Arabia.

Last week Saudi Arabia’s King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud was in Beijing.

With energy, and infrastructure investments by China as the centre, the two countries ended up signing agreements and letters of intent worth around $65 billion involving investment, energy, space and other areas.

Strong relationship

Xinhua quoted Mr. Xi as saying that China will support the Kingdom’s “Saudi Vision 2030” plan — a blueprint for reducing Riyadh’s dependence on oil, and reliance on other drivers of the economy such as infrastructure development — where China is a world leader — apart from health, education and tourism.

Closer ties with Riyadh have not diluted China’s strong relationship with Iran, Saudi Arabia’s archrival, highlighting Beijing’s non-zero sum approach to the region.

China and Russia have been active partners preventing “regime change” in Syria, which is also strongly backed by Iran.

As China’s interests permeate deeper, what role should Beijing play in fractious web of international diplomacy in the region? Global Times , a tabloid affiliated with the flagship People’s Daily group has advised in an op-ed on Wednesday that China should distance itself from a deeper involvement in West Asia’s foggy smoke-and-mirrors politics.

“The complexity of Middle East affairs should be fully recognised. China’s ability to influence the region still lags behind the U.S., the EU and even Russia. China is faced with a complicated geopolitical situation, and the Middle East is not in the core area of China’s diplomatic interests,” opines the daily.

It adds: “Under such circumstances, China should continue its present stance and work firmly on economic cooperation. To strengthen its economic power and partnership in a low-profile manner is the right strategy for China's Middle East policy.”

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 28 Mar 2017 06:41

India’s LPG offer to Nepal to check China’s influence - Sanjay Dutta, ToI
After winning hearts in UP through rapid implementation of 'Ujjwala'- the project for providing free cooking gas connection to poor houses -- the Modi government on Monday moved to win over Nepal by offering to assist in launching a similar scheme.

At a meeting with Nepal's supply minister Deepak Bohara here, oil minister Dharmendra Pradhan also accepted Kathmandu's request to consider a pipeline for supplying cooking gas and extend the proposed Rs 200-crore product pipeline further inside Nepal's territory.

At the heart of Pradhan's offer on Ujjwala, acknowledged as a major factor in fuelling BJP's rise in UP, lies an attempt to build on CM Yogi's substantial following across the border to reignite the 'roti-beti' paradigm in bilateral relations. "India and Nepal have had fuel supply agreement since 1974. Supplying fuel to Nepal is not a business proposition for India. It is our responsibility," Pradhan assured Bohara before IndianOil and Nepal Oil Corporation renewed their fuel supply agreement for five years.

It also indicates New Delhi's subtle attempt to counter China's growing influence in Nepal, which had seen a rise in anti-India sentiment during last year's economic blockade by minority Madhesis- Nepalese of Indian origin- disrupting supplies from India and sparking fuel shortage.

Miffed by the blockade, the then Nepal government signed a trade and fuel supply pact with China. But the Himalayan logistics involved in carting fuel from China has made the option economically unviable. The renewed agreement makes India the sole supplier but accommodates Nepal in other areas.


Army chief General Bipin Rawat to visit Nepal for defence cooperation - PTI, Economic Times
Indian Army chief General Bipin Rawat will arrive here [Kathmandu] on a four-day official visit to Nepal on March 28 during which he is scheduled to call on the country's top leadership and hold talks on stepping up bilateral defence cooperation.

Rawat will meet President Bidya Devi Bhandari, Prime Minister Prachanda, Defence Minister Bal Krishna Khand and his Nepali counterpart General Rajendra Chhetri during his visit from March 28 to 31, Kathmandu Post reported.

A special function will be organised at the President's Office where Bhandari will confer the honorary chief title on Rawat, the report said.

The army chiefs of both the countries have a tradition of exchanging their honorary titles to mark their special relations.

Rawat, who became the chief of the Indian Army on December 31 last year, will also visit the Indian pension paying camps in Pokhara and Muktinath areas.


Serious efforts are being made on the Nepal front.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 29 Mar 2017 06:49

Beijing’s stooge: Ulfa finds China haven, opposes Dalai Lama plan - Prabin Kalital, ToI
Two years after declaring its "friendship" with China, the banned anti-talks faction of the United Liberation Front of Asom (Ulfa-I) has advised the Dalai Lama against visiting the Northeast and not to say anything against Beijing during his trip. Ulfa-I leader Paresh Baruah is known to be hiding in China and had sought China's help to attain Assam's "sovereignty".

Security forces believe Ulfa-I will try to create trouble in the run-up to the Dalai Lama's visit in the first week of April. All districts have been put on high alert. In an open letter, the outfit's chairman Abhizeet "Asom" Barman — believed to be London-based physician Mukul Hazarika — warned the Tibetan spiritual leader that his plan to visit Tawang "despite China's objections" was "unwise" and "a cause of great concern to us". China had warned of "severe damage" to India-China ties when the Dalai Lama announced his visit to Tawang, which it claims is part of its territory.

A security official said they had details of his Baruah's exact hideout in Ruili town, in Dehong prefecture of southern China's Yunan province. "He is an expert at pitching his tent on foreign soil — first in Bhutan, then in Bangladesh and Myanmar, and now in China," the official said.

China had warned of "severe damage" to India-China ties when the Dalai Lama announced his visit to Tawang, which Beijing claims is part of its territory.

Should the Dalai Lama come to Assam, Barman wrote, "nothing against China will be uttered by you in private or in public because China has always been a friendly neighbour of ours. We won't tolerate India's view to be propagated from Assam's soil". Barman suggested it was possible to turn the visit "into an opportunity" for "peace and something meaningful in your legacy". This opportunity, according to Barman, was acknowledging "India's occupation of Assam".

Barman wrote that "as a Tibetan politician", the Dalai Lama was no stranger to Assam and her history and requested him to "reciprocate the kindness and generosity bestowed upon you in 1959" —when he crossed the international bordervia Khenzimana Pass in Tawang before moving to Bomdi La, and then to Tezpur, Assam, from where he went to Dehradun.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 29 Mar 2017 17:54

China hopes Oppo flag row will be resolved 'properly' - PTI
China said today that it hopes the Indian authorities would "properly" resolve the issue of a Chinese official at smartphone maker Oppo allegedly insulting the Indian flag and safeguard the rights of the firm.

"We have noted the relevant reports. Company officials are in touch with the local police," Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Lu Kang told a media briefing here.

"We hope that it will be resolved properly. The Chinese government always asks its Chinese enterprises and staff overseas to abide by local law, regulations and respect local practices and customs," he said while replying to a question on the incident in Noida, Uttar Pradesh, which lead to protests by staff and public yesterday.

Workers at Oppo's Noida unit staged a protest yesterday after one of its Chinese officials allegedly threw the Indian flag in a dustbin.

The officials of the Chinese firm offered an unconditional apology after the district authorities and Deputy Labour Commissioner intervened in the matter.


Lu said, "We also hope that the legitimate rights of the Chinese enterprise and staff will be safeguarded under law."

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 30 Mar 2017 18:20

India using Kashmir to oppose Silk Road project: Chinese media - PTI
India sees China's Silk Road initiative+ as a geopolitical competition and is using the Kashmir issue as an "unfounded excuse" to oppose the ambitious project, Chinese state media alleged and asked New Delhi to "abandon" its "cliche mentality".

"The official reason the Indian government rejected the offer to join the initiative (Silk Road) is that it is designed to pass through Kashmir. However, it is just an unfounded excuse as Beijing has been maintaining a consistent position on the Kashmir issue, which has never changed," one of the two articles on India by state-run Global Times said.

"India sees the Belt and Road initiative as a geopolitical competition," the article said, criticising India for hindering Beijing's push into South Asia and the world with multi-billion Silk Road project which is also known as the 'Belt and Road' (BR).

"Whether to continue to boycott or join the Belt and Road remains a conundrum for New Delhi," it said adding that, India is the only one which can help itself.

The article said that India should give up its "biased" view on the BR initiative.

"It is high time to abandon the cliche mentality of associating everything with geopolitics. India will surely see a different world if it does," the article said.

Referring to India's reservations to attend the BR summit called by Chinese President Xi Jinping, the article said it may be an "embarrassing occasion" for India as the meeting is backed by "China's peripheral countries, notably Russia, Indonesia, Kazakhstan and Pakistan".

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi recently said 20 heads of state will attend the summit, together with over 50 leaders from international organisations, over 100 ministerial officials and more than 1,200 guests from around the world.

The article referred to a comment by foreign secretary S Jaishankar during his visit here last month to co-chair the upgraded India-China strategic dialogue, saying India is examining China's invitation to attend the summit and "how a country whose sovereignty has been violated can come on an invitation".

In the meantime, however, state-run Chinese media stepped up campaign to pressurise India to join the summit.

China apparently is keen about India's participation in the summit as the project struggled to make headway in the region except the $46 billion China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) where both Beijing-Islamabad are putting all efforts to show early harvest.


Media reports here said that Xi plans to invite his US counterpart Donald Trump to attend the meeting during their first summit early next month in Florida.

BR consisted of maze of roads, including CPEC, Bangladesh-China-India-Myanmar Economic (BCIM) Corridor and 21st Maritime Silk Road besides road network to connect China with Eurasia.

The article also said, "it seems that the mainstream opinion throughout India is that the connectivity brought about by BR initiative is geopolitically significant. Therefore, India cannot allow the initiative to expand further into South Asia".

"This could also explain why the BCIM has seen no progress since its proposed by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in 2013, and also why New Delhi has been keen on Japan's investment in the Iranian port of Chabahar," it said.


"New Delhi may also feel embarrassed as Moscow has actively responded to the Belt and Road initiative and will build an economic corridor with China and Mongolia," it said, adding Russia and Iran seeking to join the CPEC putting "India in a more awkward position".

It said, "Beijing has expressed, on various occasions, its anticipation to see New Delhi join the grand project and to make concerted effort with India in building economic corridors involving China, India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh and Myanmar".

Another article in the same daily said a "benign" competition between India and China may help development in South Asia but they should avoid "cut-throat" rivalry.

"The so-called dragon-elephant contention is perhaps a blow against strategic mutual trust between Beijing and New Delhi, but may be conducive to development in South Asia," it said.

Accusing India of not being "generous" to its neighbours
, it said "a yawning infrastructure funding gap in South Asian countries creates space for China and those nations to strengthen economic cooperation".

"Bangladesh and China signed 27 deals worth billions of dollars during President Xi Jinping's visit last year," it said, adding China's BR initiative has received an increasing amount of attention from Bangladesh.

"Only by investing more resources in regional integration and extending the benefits from India's rapid economic growth to other South Asian countries can New Delhi maintain its influence in the region," it said.

"Benign competition between China and India will be conducive to development in South Asia. The question remaining is how to avoid cut-throat competition as Beijing and New Delhi jostle for influence. India and China should seek common ground while strengthening cooperation with South Asian countries to promote regional integration," it said.


It is very clear seeing the recent spate of articles, which vary in the entire spectrum, from almost beseeching India to join to all the way threatening it with dire consequences if it didn't and variations in between, that China is in trouble with its OBOR initiative and it desperately wants CPEC to succeed as well as Indian participation. Indian stand against both is making it frustrated & angry.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 30 Mar 2017 19:27

"The Chinese back down only when they meet hard steel",old adage.India should stay firm to all Chinese machinations and impose huge eco duties on all Chinese goods,etc. The massive $50B trade imbalance only helpsChina beef up its military and allows it to gift Pak with more arms and N-capability.

In the Indo-China Sea,the US ,says this piece,will get little support because of China's policy towards the ASEAN bloc.In another td. I showed how China was trying to wean away Thailand by giving it 3 sub for the price of two. In any spat with China,India too should remember that it will have to go it alone.NO nation will come to our aid and if any think that the US will,they are delusional. India ahs to massively beef up its armed forces,especially the IN,and counter the Chinese innovatively my diplo-military means. The two issues of Tibet and Taiwan must be exercised by India. India home of Buddhism,must therefore be the custodians of Tibetan Buddhism and therefore Tibet as well. Recognising the Tibetan govt. in exile and supporting the Dalai lama to the hilt,must be India's policy. We should also make ourselves known as the global centre of Buddhism,by promoting India as the epicentre of global Buddhist affairs.

Arms sales to Vietnam,ASEAN nations ,etc. of cutting edge wares like BMos, Prahaar,Prithvi,whatever tactical missiles are allowed under the MTCR,should be actively pushed. We should also help any nation threatened by China to set up its own nuclear tech base with Indian N-plants,etc.
Since China has started squatting in Gwadar, India should similarly acquire a naval/air base in Vietnam and possibly the Philippines.Indian naval asets must be on a permanent patrol in the Indo-China Sea.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ranjan.rao » 30 Mar 2017 21:10

CPEC is turning into a ponzi scheme. The chinese may not want to sink their money and want to link booming indian economy with it. We should join CPEC if China returns COK

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vina » 30 Mar 2017 21:28

It is very clear seeing the recent spate of articles, which vary in the entire spectrum, from almost beseeching India to join to all the way threatening it with dire consequences if it didn't and variations in between, that China is in trouble with its OBOR initiative and it desperately wants CPEC to succeed as well as Indian participation. Indian stand against both is making it frustrated & angry.


Face it. The only market in "South Asia" for Chinese goods is in India and China has pissed India off. What are the "alternatives" . Pakistan ? It is a bottomless hell hole that is going to gobble up every single $ the Chinese put in and give back ZERO at best and return it with serious instability in Xinjiang , like the US which fed Pakiland for Afghanistan discovered as blow back. Bangladesh ? No way, barely stable and too small a market. Sri Lanka ? Haa. Haa.. Burma ? Again, can serve "strategic" purpose to needle India, but no return on hard cash!

Europe , Russia etc ,will get more protectionist with Chinese goods. The stage is set geopolitically. Under Modi, India has gone back to focusing on manufacturing , GST will create an integrated market and producer base . Cost of capital is coming down , slack capacity still exists in industry. The Chinese really have no place to dump here either. They have pissed of the East Asians and S.E Asians. The Chinese hubris is going to come back and haunt them. They can have the loser Duterte. How much can Phillipines absorb Chinese exports ? If the US and EU crack down and start putting up barriers like Trump has done , it is NOT going to look pretty for the Chinese economy.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Karthik S » 30 Mar 2017 21:36

ranjan.rao wrote:CPEC is turning into a ponzi scheme. The chinese may not want to sink their money and want to link booming indian economy with it. We should join CPEC if China returns COK


May be pragmatic idea, but I'd be happy if pigeon and his gang are thinking about taking back COK and POK. We have made enough compromises for last many centuries.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby sudeepj » 30 Mar 2017 21:46

SSridhar wrote:China hopes Oppo flag row will be resolved 'properly' - PTI
Lu said, "We also hope that the legitimate rights of the Chinese enterprise and staff will be safeguarded under law."


Thieves of IP appealing to rule of law.. :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ranjan.rao » 30 Mar 2017 23:26

Karthik S wrote:
ranjan.rao wrote:CPEC is turning into a ponzi scheme. The chinese may not want to sink their money and want to link booming indian economy with it. We should join CPEC if China returns COK


May be pragmatic idea, but I'd be happy if pigeon and his gang are thinking about taking back COK and POK. We have made enough compromises for last many centuries.

Karthik thats similar to "whats better than a gulabjamun? two gulabjamuns :D :D :D "
That said, that seems to be a long stretch. Not happening even in Modi's next term. But then who knows? In this thing I would love to be proven wrong.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby GShankar » 30 Mar 2017 23:46

ranjan.rao wrote:
Karthik S wrote:
May be pragmatic idea, but I'd be happy if pigeon and his gang are thinking about taking back COK and POK. We have made enough compromises for last many centuries.

Karthik thats similar to "whats better than a gulabjamun? two gulabjamuns :D :D :D "
That said, that seems to be a long stretch. Not happening even in Modi's next term. But then who knows? In this thing I would love to be proven wrong.


Based on our current strengths, we need to wait for the opportune moment. And example could be something happens between lizard and other neighbors in east w.r.t one of those islands. Then if we make a move, they'll be looking at a "2-front" thing. Can happen anytime (who knows..).

we just have to be ready.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby rpartha » 31 Mar 2017 00:31

Hope I am posting this in the correct thread... If not Moderators please excuse me and feel free to delete it...

India trying to see whether they can connect Tawang via a railway line...

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 922529.cms

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ranjan.rao » 31 Mar 2017 04:01

GShankar wrote:
ranjan.rao wrote:Karthik thats similar to "whats better than a gulabjamun? two gulabjamuns :D :D :D "
That said, that seems to be a long stretch. Not happening even in Modi's next term. But then who knows? In this thing I would love to be proven wrong.


Based on our current strengths, we need to wait for the opportune moment. And example could be something happens between lizard and other neighbors in east w.r.t one of those islands. Then if we make a move, they'll be looking at a "2-front" thing. Can happen anytime (who knows..).

we just have to be ready.

that would WW3 kinda scenario. For all practical purposes, if india attacks china, we should expect pakis to act in the interest of their masters (either willingly or danda from chinas). All these freebies are paid as an insurance against indian attack.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby GShankar » 31 Mar 2017 04:37

well, if the paki masters themselves are busy and unable to engage, pakis will keep the tail between their legs. Unless they want to give us the right excuse to take back pok and liberate sindh and blauchistan that is.

The point is that we are not strong enough to take unilateral action by ourselves. Even the chinese attacked in 1962 when rest of the world powers were distracted.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby shashankk » 31 Mar 2017 15:27

http://defencenews.in/article/China-is-heaving-in-anger--Threatens-India-with-strict-action-if-Dalai-Lama-visits-Tawang-251289

China will be forced to take measures against India and that will affect co-operation and ties between us," Ma said in no uncertain terms. He described the Dalai as "no innocent monk" but a "very shrewd and political one, whose aim is to enhance split politics. India should not help him in his efforts.

"China is heaving in anger already and India should heed that. It is a developing country and China will try its best to help it achieve its goals but by giving its permission to the Dalai's visit, India is breaking China's trust!" Ma said. He stressed that India had signed a bi-lateral agreement to recognize the Tibetan Autonomous Region as part of China, so why now allow a secessionist leader to a disputed land?

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Apr 2017 10:04

More on that 'Chinese anger' :D

Permitting Dalai Lama in Arunachal is India’s mistake: China - Saibal Dasgupta, ToI
Unable to block the upcoming visit of the Dalai Lama to Arunachal Pradesh, China is now emphasising that India is committing a major mistake in allowing him to visit the border state.

"This will have serious damage on bilateral relations {How about China's occupation of Indian land of Shaksgam Valley or transfer of nuclear weapons or missiles to Pakistan, or blocking India in ASEAN, UNSC, NSG, 1267 Committee, CPEC through Indian lands etc? Don't they damage seriously bilateral relations? Or, is it Chinese contention that because of the lopsided military & economic equations, these issues can be trampled upon?} (sic)," Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Lu Kang warned on Friday. "China firmly opposes the Dalai Lama carrying out any activity in the relevant region and we have expressed our concerns to the Indian side," he said.

China's protest highlights the dichotomy in its stand on the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor where Chinese construction companies are building infrastructure in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir, a region claimed by India. Beijing says India need not worry about CPEC work because it will not affect its policy on the Kashmir issue. "On the eastern section of the China-India border, China's position is clear and constant. The Dalai clique has long been engaging in separatist activities with unglorious record (sic) ... But despite this India still invited the Dalai Lama to visit the region," Lu said.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Apr 2017 10:09

Indian response for the Chinese anger should be on the following lines: "India has a consistent position on Tibet. We cannot allow issues that cannot be worked out for the moment to stop us from moving forward. The two countries have a great potential which should not be disturbed. As the two biggest emerging economies, they have vast common interests on establishing a new global financial order, tackling climate change and other major issues. Now China and India have come to a critical period to further upgrade bilateral ties. If the Chinese side takes care of India’s concerns, the Indian side will respond accordingly and address China’s concerns elsewhere. In this way, both countries can shake off the nagging chains left by colonialists and better work together to promote common development, achieve respective rejuvenation and herald the arrival of the Asian Century. India supports China and other countries over separatism. These issues are important, but bilateral cooperation are more important. The discussions about Tibet are going on. It takes time."

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Apr 2017 11:05

Dalai Lama to visit Tawang: China likely to harden its stance on Arunachal - Dipanjan Roy Cahudhury, Economic Times
As the Dalai Lama heads to Tawang on Monday, China is expected to strongly protest India's decision to allow the Tibetan spiritual head to visit Arunachal Pradesh. This is in keeping with its focus on the three Ts - Tibet, Taiwan and Turkestan - that have been the cornerstone of its policy.

The Chinese Communist Party is expected to further harden its stand on the three Ts ahead of the party congress in October that hopes to endorse another four-year term for President Xi Jinping.

Why is China so sensitive about Tawang and Tibetan cause? China's argument is that since the sixth Dalai Lama Tsangyang Gyatso was born in Tawang, it is close to the hearts and religious sentiments of the Tibetan people, and India should make this concession on Tawang. The current Dalai Lama fled to India via Tawang in the late 1950s.

According to Tibetan Buddhism, the Dalai Lama may be born anywhere but his seat is at the Drepung Monastery in Lhasa, Tibet. The Tawang monastery, known as the Galden Namgey Lhatse Monastery in Tibet, was founded by Lama Lodre Gyatso in 1680-81 according to the wishes of the fifth Dalai Lama, Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso. It is also the seat of the Karma-Kargyu sect. The Chinese Communist party has been of opinion that without controlling Tawang it cannot have legitimacy over Tibet.

India, however, has not given the Dalai Lama any privilege which was not accorded to him earlier. The only difference is that India used to sometimes quietly oblige when China raised red flags over Dalai Lama's presence in certain parts of India and certain meetings. However, India has made a beginning in a more assertive policy on Tibet and is not being apologetic about its hosting the Tibetan government-in-exile in India.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ranjan.rao » 02 Apr 2017 00:18

SSridhar wrote:Indian response for the Chinese anger should be on the following lines: "India has a consistent position on Tibet. We cannot allow issues that cannot be worked out for the moment to stop us from moving forward. The two countries have a great potential which should not be disturbed. As the two biggest emerging economies, they have vast common interests on establishing a new global financial order, tackling climate change and other major issues. Now China and India have come to a critical period to further upgrade bilateral ties. If the Chinese side takes care of India’s concerns, the Indian side will respond accordingly and address China’s concerns elsewhere. In this way, both countries can shake off the nagging chains left by colonialists and better work together to promote common development, achieve respective rejuvenation and herald the arrival of the Asian Century. India supports China and other countries over separatism. These issues are important, but bilateral cooperation are more important. The discussions about Tibet are going on. It takes time."

+100
Shridhar, would you know why China changed its position on Arunachal. I remember in Vajpayee days China accepted Arunachal as part of India. It was changed after the change in govt.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Apr 2017 08:45

China asks India for caution, restraint on Tawang rail link - PTI
China today asked India to exercise "restraint" on its plan to link the strategic border district of Tawang in Arunachal Pradesh with a railway network+ , saying any "unilateral action" might "complicate" the unresolved border issue.

"We hope that the Indian side can exercise caution, show restraint and refrain from unilateral actions that might further complicate the question so as to create a sound condition for enhancing mutual trust between China and India and promoting proper resolution of the boundary question," the Chinese foreign ministry said.

"China's position on eastern section of the China-India boundary is consistent and clear. At present, the two sides are working to resolve the territorial dispute through negotiation and consultation," the ministry told PTI in a written reply following a query about reports that India was exploring possibilities to link Tawang with a railway network+ .


China has in recent days upped its rhetoric on claims to Arunachal Pradesh, which it says is Southern Tibet, and even warned India of "serious damage" to ties if New Delhi allows Tibet's exiled spiritual leader the Dalai Lama to visit the state.

The ministry yesterday warned New Delhi that the visit of the Dalai Lama+ , the highest figure in Tibetan Buddhism, will "come down to India to make a choice".

Tawang, which happens to be the birthplace in 1683 of the sixth Dalai Lama, is at the centre of Tibetan Buddhism and a friction point between India and China relations.

India and China are in discussion to resolve their border dispute that covers the 3,488-km-long Line of Actual Control (LAC). While Beijing claims Arunachal as part of Southern Tibet, India asserts that the dispute also covers the 'Aksai Chin' area, which was occupied by China during the 1962 war.

The ministry said the two sides have "agreed that pending final settlement, both sides will work together to properly manage the dispute" and preserve peace in the border areas.

The Chinese reaction today to the possible rail network and the Dalai Lama's visit to Tawang was the third time in recent weeks the foreign ministry has aired its objections.

Tawang has immense strategic value to India due to its location. The hilly region close to the Sino-India border was also in the news earlier this month when Dai Bingguo, a former Chinese Special Representative for India-China border talks, said the border dispute can be resolved if New Delhi accepts Beijing's claim over Tawang.

"If the Indian side takes care of China's concerns in the eastern sector of their border, the Chinese side will respond accordingly and address India's concerns elsewhere," Dai had told the Chinese media in an interview.

But the proposal was rejected as impractical by Indian officials as Tawang is an integral part of Arunachal Pradesh and has sent representatives to Parliament in every election since 1950.

Lian Xiangmin, Director of contemporary research of China's state-run Tibetology Research Centre, last month said, "Tawang is part of Tibet and Tibet is part of China. So Tawang is part of China. There is not much problem here."

India, giving a push to its strategic interests, is exploring the feasibility to link Tawang with a rail network. The government has asked Minister of State for Railways Manoj Sinha and Minister of State for Home Affairs Kiren Rijiju, who is also a Member of Parliament from Arunachal West seat, to explore the feasibility of a rail network in the remote area.

The two ministers will tour the state to study the viability of connecting Tawang with Bhalukpong - the last station of the Railways on Assam-Arunachal Pradesh boundary at a distance of 378 kms - and to commence the final location survey of a new broad gauge line connecting the two cities.

It takes 18 hours from Guwahati in Assam to reach Tawang by road. Guwahati is the nearest major city and Tawang residents depend on it for medical emergencies.

The other broad gauge railway line that will be part of their survey will be the 249-kilometre North Lakhimpur-Bame- Silapathar section, which is between Pasighat airport and Rupa in Arunachal.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 03 Apr 2017 12:11

Judgment day soon for China-backed Myanmar project - Mike Ives, NYT
A government-appointed commission is to soon make a recommendation on the fate of the $3.6 billion, China-financed Myitsone Dam in Myanmar. The decision is a daunting test for Aung San Suu Kyi, who risks angering China, the region’s economic powerhouse, if she cancels the project, or the public if she lets it go forward.

Key test for Suu Kyi

Analysts say the commission’s report would provide her the political cover to kill an unpopular white elephant that she inherited from Myanmar’s former military government. But getting out of the deal would be difficult. If her government cancels the project outright, it could have to repay some $800 million that the state-owned Chinese developer says it has already spent on the project.

If Myanmar offers China other dam projects in return, a compromise her government has floated, they are likely to impinge on disputed ethnic areas where they could threaten the peace talks she has championed since her political party came to power last year.

The Myitsone Dam is among the largest of many Chinese-financed energy and mining projects approved by the military junta that ruled Myanmar until 2011. It is especially contentious because it would be the first dam to cross the Irrawaddy River, the mythic cradle of civilisation for Myanmar’s ethnic Burman majority.

While officials said the dam would provide Myanmar much-needed cash and electricity, critics said it would cause irreparable harm to the river, destroy fish stocks downstream and displace thousands of villagers. But perhaps the most incendiary objection was that under the deal struck by the ruling generals, 90% of the dam’s electricity could go to China.

As protests spread to Myanmar’s cities, Ms. Suu Kyi had spoken out against the dam.

In 2011, the military-backed transitional government yielded to public pressure and suspended the project, the decision coming as a shock to Chinese officials and businessmen.

The Myitsone was meant to be the first and largest of seven dams planned by the Chinese developer. It would generate more power than the entire country produces now, according to some estimates, but would still not cure the country’s chronic energy shortages.

One reason for that, experts say, is that there is no grid connecting the dam to Myanmar’s major towns and cities.

To repay or to shift?

The dam’s developer, State Power Investment Corp., has already spent $800 million on feasibility and technical studies, bridges, electrical grid updates and other supporting infrastructure, a person familiar with the dam contract said. The money was borrowed from commercial banks, he said, so the cost keeps growing as the loans accrue interest.

Officials close to Ms. Suu Kyi have said that negotiations were under way for Myanmar to pay China, or apply the money to other projects, if the dam is not built.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 03 Apr 2017 12:46

Dalai Lama to Taiwan, India stands up to pressure from Beijing - Indrani Bagchi, ToI
As China ramps up its rhetoric against the Dalai Lama's upcoming trip+ to Arunachal Pradesh, an unfazed India said China has been shifting its position on Tawang, making its current position less credible. The Dalai Lama kicked off his 10-day visit to the northeast on Saturday, which will take him to numerous destinations in Arunachal Pradesh on what is a purely religious sojourn.

According to his office, he will consecrate a new Tara temple in Lumla on Tuesday, followed by discourses and teachings in Dirang and Bomdila as well as in capital Itanagar. All these areas have recently entered China's claim, but it is the spiritual leader's stay and teachings in the Tawang monastery from April 5-7 that is the focus of the Chinese government's ire.

The Dalai Lama's visit and his teachings will serve to establish more clearly his spiritual sway over these Buddhist centres. Tawang monastery is second only to Lhasa in importance, and the fact that the Dalai Lama will be consecrating new temples, conducting initiation ceremonies and delivering benevolence will only cement his, and therefore India's, authority over these regions.

A cursory look at the Dalai Lama's schedule over the next 10 days shows the significance of the visit. His official schedule says he will "give teachings on Kamalashila's The Middling States of Meditation (gomrim barpa) and Gyalsey Thokme Sangpo's Thirty-Seven Practices of a Bodhisattva (laklen sodunma)" at Yiga Choezin. On April 7, he will confer the Rinzin Dhondup Initiation at Yiga Choezin.

"We have never conceded locus standi to China on Arunachal Pradesh," said Ashok Kantha, former ambassador to China and head of the Institute of Chinese Studies (ICS). Countering the Beijing narrative, officials said China has shifted its positions on Tawang over the years to the extent that its current line lacks credibility. China withdrew beyond the MacMahon Line after defeating India in the 1962 conflict, leaving Arunachal Pradesh and Tawang in Indian possession. Neither Chou En Lai in his discussions with Nehru in 1960 nor Deng Xiaoping in 1985 referred to Tawang at all.

Jayadeva Ranade, China analyst, said the first time Tawang entered the official discussion was in 2005, by Dai Bingguo who was the special representative for boundary discussions until 2013. "In 2007, the Chinese identified Monyul (Tawang, Kameng and Dirangzon), lower Zoyul (Lohit valley) and Loyul (territory up to Walong) as central areas of interest to them," he said.

In 2006, former Chinese envoy to India Sun Yuxi went back on the 2005 agreement on guiding principles, by denying an important component of the deal to leave populated and settled areas undisturbed. Interestingly, it was Dai Bingguo who rekindled the old debate of a vaguely worded land swap in recent weeks.

Kantha said the Chinese stridency on Tawang and Arunachal Pradesh is a move away from the 1993 agreement between the two sides, "which made the LAC (line of actual control) the basis for negotiations. This was reiterated in five subsequent agreements. The Chinese are now moving away from this"
. In addition, China's "objections" to rail link to Tawang was specious, Indian officials said. In recent years, India has regularly rejected Chinese demarches on this issue. Meanwhile, the Chinese have continued to harden their positions. They have refused to allow pilgrimages via Demchok in Ladakh citing "disputes", on territory again occupied by India. While China participates in border trade at Nathu La, it refuses to do so at Shipki La, again citing 'dispute'.

With China intensifying its pressure on India across a broad spectrum of issues - from blocking India in the NSG to colluding with Pakistan on tactical nuclear weapons - India is quietly, but surely pushing back. India has effectively junked reiteration of the one-China policy for over six years now, foreign minister Sushma Swaraj sharply connecting it to China's acceptance of a "one-India" policy. New Delhi has increased its interactions with Taiwan, making it more visible.

The Dalai Lama, whose very existence is anathema to the Chinese official system, is more visible in official circles, including in a recent advertisement of the MP government, in the Rashtrapati Bhavan, in Karnataka and now in the sensitive Arunachal Pradesh.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 04 Apr 2017 12:28

China shouldn't interfere in India's internal affairs: Rijiju on Dalai Lama's visit - PTI
Amid persistent Chinese objections to the Dalai Lama's trip to Arunachal Pradesh, India said on that no "artificial controversy" should be created around the Tibetan spiritual leader's visit.

External affairs ministry also asserted that the government has clearly stated on several occasions that the Dalai Lama is a revered religious leader, who is deeply respected by the Indian people.

"No additional colour should be ascribed to his religious and spiritual activities and visits to various states of India," the ministry said in a release.

The government, therefore, urges that no "artificial controversy" should be created around his present visit to Arunachal Pradesh, it said.


"India never interferes in the internal affairs of China. We expect that China should not interfere in our internal matters either," Rijiju said and added that the people of Arunachal Pradesh desire to maintain a good neighbourly relationship.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby GShankar » 04 Apr 2017 12:41

Appreciate Rijiju saying this. But this should be delegated to an entry level spokesperson in Foreign ministry.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Kashi » 04 Apr 2017 13:07

GShankar wrote:Appreciate Rijiju saying this. But this should be delegated to an entry level spokesperson in Foreign ministry.


Rijiju telling China to piss off is a symbolism that China (and the world) cannot miss- he's an elected MP from Arunachal Pradesh after all.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby KLNMurthy » 04 Apr 2017 13:20

This is speculation on my part but I have a feeling that leadership and guidance of Kashmir azadi movement has passed from paki hands directly into China's hands, at least ever since India raised concerns about CPEC in Indian territory of POK.

I say this because the azadi movement seems better run and more disciplined. We only hear about attacks on security personnel these days, which could be portrayed as "legitimate freedom fighting " and not terrorism per se. Of course there are hardly any Hindus left in the Valley to attack and kill, but sustained and systematic attacks on security forces require a good deal of training, equipment and discipline.

For another thing, it is remarkable how effective the azadi movement has been in setting down roots in the nation's capital. The way in which JNU and Ramjas and some of the other colleges of Delhi have been weaponized to break India shows a very high caliber of strategic planning and execution. The only thing that is keeping them from being totally successful is an unexpected level of deep and fierce patriotism on the part of a good many of the young who are supposedly selfish and preoccupied with only material things.

All in all, it's not quite the style or quality of Pakis that we have come to recognize and enjoy.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Arjun » 04 Apr 2017 13:34

Kiren Rijiju wrote:We respect Beijing's 'One-China' policy and we expect China to reciprocate

Hmm...even better would have been to say that we respect the One-China policy as long as they respect One-India.

TKiran
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby TKiran » 04 Apr 2017 16:18

I was educated by some body in this forum that we stopped respecting "one China policy" after 2010 or so. Why Kiren Rijiju is saying something else now? Indians don't have any strategic culture I know, still I want to know, what is the position of NDA 2 with respect to "one China" policy? Could anyone edumacate me?

SSridhar
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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 04 Apr 2017 17:05

Kiren Rijiju is the right person to refute the Chinese claim.

Of course, India uses a hierarchy of people to 'suitably' convey its messages, like, for example, the youngest Indian diplomat in the UN normally replying to the rantings of Ms. Maleeha Lodhi in the UN etc. But, this one demanded Mr. Rijiju to rebut the Chinese.

On the 'One-China policy' issue, India has stopped referring to this in the joint communiques between India & China. This used to be a regular feature. That said, I agree that we lack strategic culture. We cannot compare AP & Taiwan for various reasons. The Chinese media equates POK with Taiwan and says that "India should be pragmatic and cooperate in the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) despite it passing through Pakistan-occupied Kashmir, in the same way Beijing doesn’t object to New Delhi having economic ties with Taipei". Even this is untenable for various reasons. But, Indian ministers must learn to speak just enough and not elaborate reasons unless the strategy has been worked out well with our Foreign Office & PMO.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby A_Gupta » 04 Apr 2017 17:30

More editorials decrying Indian slowdown of RCEP:
https://www.bloomberg.com/politics/arti ... trade-pact

Commerce Minister Nirmala Sitharaman has said India is committed to the RCEP, as has the country’s foreign ministry. But there is quiet grumbling over India’s stance. Rossow has spoken to officials from one RCEP nation who expressed deep frustration over India’s position and asked for advice on how to handle New Delhi.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby KLNMurthy » 05 Apr 2017 01:51

shashankk wrote:http://defencenews.in/article/China-is-heaving-in-anger--Threatens-India-with-strict-action-if-Dalai-Lama-visits-Tawang-251289

China will be forced to take measures against India and that will affect co-operation and ties between us," Ma said in no uncertain terms. He described the Dalai as "no innocent monk" but a "very shrewd and political one, whose aim is to enhance split politics. India should not help him in his efforts.

"China is heaving in anger already and India should heed that. It is a developing country and China will try its best to help it achieve its goals but by giving its permission to the Dalai's visit, India is breaking China's trust!" Ma said. He stressed that India had signed a bi-lateral agreement to recognize the Tibetan Autonomous Region as part of China, so why now allow a secessionist leader to a disputed land?


"Heaving in anger" is a phrase for which the phrase "shivering in my dhoti" has been waiting all its life. :rotfl:

What jackasses these chinese are.


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