Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-2014)

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Falijee
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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Falijee » 23 Jun 2015 16:18

Outrage over Muslim gender ban in French grocery store

A Muslim-owned grocery store in the southeastern French city of Bordeaux has prompted outrage after putting up a sign imposing male and female-only days for customers.

The shop displayed a sign in the window :shock: asking “sisters” to come on Saturdays and Sundays, and “brothers” to visit on weekdays.

France is slowly becoming another Saudi Arabia! the authorities should take swift action, next thing, there will be demand for imposition of Sharia Law

Tareq Oubrou, the imam of the city’s main mosque, was shocked by the shop sign.

“Even during the era of the prophet there were no such rules,” he told France 3 TV. “It’s a bit strange to try to apply [gender separation] in a culture where equality has been firmly established. Maybe the shop owner’s choice was personal, rather than theological.”


Can these 'leaders' be believed ; obviously, this is 'Taqiya' in action

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby arun » 23 Jun 2015 20:48

arun wrote:
arun wrote:Unhealthy propensity of Mohammaddens to view just about everything through the green tinted glasses of Mohammaddenism on display. Headline in The Hindu:

Suryanamaskar against Islam: Muslim law board : "Surya namaskar should not be made mandatory in government schools," because Muslims bowed only before ‘Allah.’.

Taken from here:

The Hindu

Meanwhile Satirical News website, Faking News, responds with a spoof news article titled “5 more things after Surya Namaskar which Muslim bodies have found to be anti-Islamic, and seek exemption from” :

5 more things after Surya Namaskar which Muslim bodies have found to be anti-Islamic, and seek exemption from



Frequent attempts to provide Mohammaddenism a burqua / burka by claiming that acts of Mohammadden Terrorism have nothing whatsoever to do with that religion meets with the Mohammadden opposition to Yoga on religious grounds to spawn a Twitter post with the sarcastic message "Terrorism has no Religion but Yoga has a Religion":

Image

From below Twitter post:

Clicky


Mohammadden group All India Muslim Personal Law Board (AIMPLB) continues to fulminate against Yoga and also the singing of our National Song, Vande Mataram, article by PTI from the Hindu datelined today reports:

AIMPLB slams govt over Yoga

That calls for this sacarstic comment to be reposted:

Image

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Anindya » 24 Jun 2015 06:25

AIMPLB is no different from Jamaat & jihadis - after all, according to them, genocidal Tipu was a saint of saints...

Jammu and Kashmir : Radical Islamists up in arms against yoga

"Yoga is a religious exercise cum prayer of a particular community in which besides physical exercises, some religious practices of this particular community are intermixed. During yoga some words are recited which contradicts the basic faith of Islam," said Zahid Ali, spokesperson of Jama'at-e-Islami Jammu and Kashmir.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby sanjaykumar » 24 Jun 2015 08:20

Mullah thinks living in the 21st century may do the same.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby member_28638 » 24 Jun 2015 13:21

Can India do this to the rabid mad mullahs and their followers?

===================

Terror citizenship laws: Government introduces to Parliament bill to strip dual nationals of citizenship
By political reporter Dan Conifer

The Federal Government has introduced into Parliament its bill that would see dual national terrorists forfeit their Australian citizenship.

Immigration Minister Peter Dutton tabled the bill this morning, telling the House of Representatives it would help bring citizenship laws up-to-date.

"It is now appropriate to modernise provisions concerning loss of citizenship to respond to current terrorist threats," Mr Dutton said.

"The world has changed so our laws should change accordingly."

...

The legislation would see people automatically renounce their citizenship under section 33 of the Citizenship Act if they engage in terrorist acts, training, recruiting or financing inside or outside Australia.

The new section 35 would see citizenship automatically cease if a person serves a declared terrorist organisation overseas, or is found guilty of offences including treason, espionage, terrorism and foreign incursions.

...

"We have said that we will do whatever is necessary to fight terror abroad and at home. We've said that we support the principle of the extension of denying Australian citizenship to dual citizens if they take up arms against Australia," Mr Shorten said.

"What matter in national security is having laws that actually work."

...

"Obviously, as far as I'm concerned, as far as I think most Australians are concerned, people who leave this country to fight for terrorist groups overseas, that hate us and are targeting us, have committed the modern form of treason and perhaps we need a modern form of banishment to deal with such people."

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-06-24/g ... nt/6569570

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Tuvaluan » 24 Jun 2015 19:22

India does not allow dual citizenship, so it cannot strip people of citizenship by definition.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Avinash R » 24 Jun 2015 19:42

^If the mawalis join the Islamic State then according to the Citizenship Act they lose their Indian citizenship as they have "voluntarily acquired the citizenship of another country"


>Termination of citizenship.- (1) Any citizen of India who by naturalization, registration otherwise voluntarily acquires, or has at any time between the 26th January, 1950 and the commencement of this Act, voluntarily acquired the citizenship of another country shall, upon such acquisition or, as the case may be, such commencement, cease to be a citizen of India: http://indiancitizenshiponline.nic.in/c ... ipact1.htm

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Tuvaluan » 24 Jun 2015 19:59

That is true. Thanks, Avinash.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Rahul M » 24 Jun 2015 20:09

islamic state is not a recognized country.

Avinash R
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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Avinash R » 25 Jun 2015 07:30

^Even Afghanistan under Taliban was not recognized by the most of the world but that didn't change the facts on the ground.

Similarly Islamic state is a de-facto state.When mawalis emigrate there the islamic state makes them burn their passport and pledge allegiance to the Islamic state https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpJtj9wSt8I That is more than enough to strip the citizenship of the mawalis

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby arun » 25 Jun 2015 09:58

“Female slaves captured in war are given away as "prizes" to fighters who show the have mastered the Koran.” by Mohammadden group seeking to establish a Mohammadden religion based State aka Caliphate.

Cannot say that this disgusting practice of sexual slavery followed by Mohammadden religion inspired group ISIS / ISIL comes as a great surprise as the Mohammadden Holy Book the Koran aka Quran supports sexual slavery of Non-Mohammadden’s who are referred to as “what your right hands possess” or in Arabic “Ma malakat aymanukum”. The Mohammadden religion based justification for this depravity is posted on Page 11 of this thread:

Clicky

Now the link to the article which started this post:

New low: ISIS reportedly gives away sex slaves as 'prizes' in Koran contest

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Multatuli » 25 Jun 2015 16:16

IS 'executes 23 Kurds' in village near Syria's Kobane

Islamic State group fighters executed at least 23 Syrian Kurds, among them women and children, in a village south of the border town of Kobane on Thursday, a monitor said.

"Islamic State forces shot dead at least 23 people in the Kurdish village of Barkh Butan, including women and children and residents who had taken up arms to fight," the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.

http://news.yahoo.com/executes-20-kurds ... 29781.html

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Altair » 26 Jun 2015 16:19

Jumma ki raath hai...Allah bachaye sabko Koran se.. :roll:
An attacker carrying an Islamist flag killed one person and injured several others at a gas factory in eastern France.
SAINT-QUENTIN-FALLAVIER, FRANCE: A decapitated head covered in Arabic writing was found at a US gas company in southeast France on Friday, police sources and French media said, after two assailants rammed a car into the premises, Reuters reported.
"It is indeed a terrorist attack," said French President Francois Hollande in a statement. He said a suspect had been arrested and identified.
Police sources said the decapitated head was found at the factory site, along with a flag bearing Islamist inscriptions. The attack, in which one person was killed and at least one was injured, bore the hallmarks of Islamist militants, they said.


KUWAIT CITY: Eight people have been killed in an attack at a Shiite mosque in the Kuwaiti capital during the main weekly prayers, witnesses and security officials said. The attack was carried out by a suicide bomber, news agency AFP quoted a security official as saying.

"It is a suicide bombing," the official said.

Witnesses gave a similar account, saying a suicide bomber entered the Al-Imam al-Sadeq mosque in Kuwait City during the weekly noon prayers.

The Islamic State group has claimed similar bombings targeting Shiite mosques in Saudi Arabia and Yemen in recent weeks.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 26 Jun 2015 17:14

reports of at least 19 tourists killed in a tourist resort in Tunisia.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Anindya » 26 Jun 2015 18:01

Apologies for getting us away from real dangers like Yoga - but, are there 4 attacks now - France, Tunisia, Syria & Kuwait - or am I getting the number wrong?

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 26 Jun 2015 18:04

You may be getting the number wrong- there was also a major attack by Al-Shabab today, in Somalia. So 5.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Arjun » 26 Jun 2015 18:07

Kuwait and France.... :eek:

The Pachys are out of containment !!

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby arun » 27 Jun 2015 09:40

Anindya wrote:Apologies for getting us away from real dangers like Yoga - but, are there 4 attacks now - France, Tunisia, Syria & Kuwait - or am I getting the number wrong?


Varoon Shekhar wrote:You may be getting the number wrong- there was also a major attack by Al-Shabab today, in Somalia. So 5.


The number of Mohammadden Terrorist attacks on the Mohammadden Sabbath of Friday aka Juma during the Mohammadden holy month Ramadan aka Ramzan is 4 not 5.

They are the Green on Green Intra-Mohammadden Religion based sectarian slaughter which resulted in a Mohammadden place of worship used by Shia sect getting attacked during prayer time by Sunni sect co-religionists in Kuwait posted by Altair. The death toll in this incident has now climbed to 27 with 227 injured:

Islamic State suicide bomber kills 27, wounds 227 in Kuwait mosque

The second is the Mohammadden Terrorist attack also posted Altair about and the beheading in France posted by Altair.

The third is the Mohammadden Terrorist attack targeting fellow Abrahamic Christist religion Tourists in Tunisia posted by Varoon Shekhar without a weblink to the story which I now add:

Tunisia attack on Sousse beach 'kills 39'

The fourth is the Mohammadden Terrorist attack targeting African Union peacekeeping soldiers from fellow Abrahamic though Christist majority country of Burundi, news of which was also posted by Varoon:

Al-Shabab Attack Kills Scores of AU Soldiers

Regards attack in Syria, while it is certainly a Mohammadden Terrorist attack occurring during Mohammadden Holy month of Ramzan aka Ramadan, it does not count as it was not carried out on the day of the Mohammadden Sabbath of Friday aka Juma. The attack was carried out on Thursday.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Multatuli » 27 Jun 2015 10:40

Isil suicide bomb attack on Shia mosque in Kuwait kills 27 people

ISIL media claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing at a Shia mosque in Kuwait which killed 27 people and injured hundreds yesterday morning.

The attack, when the Al-Imam al-Sadeq Mosque was packed with thousands of worshippers during Friday prayers, was the worst terrorist incident in a Gulf state for more than 30 years.

A young man walked into the mosque and detonated an explosive belt strapped to his body.

...

A statement appeared purporting to be from "Wilayat Najd" of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil) - Najd Province being in neighbouring Saudi Arabia.

It said the attack on the "rejectionists" - a sectarian term used by hardline Sunni groups for Shia - was because they were spreading their teachings in Kuwait. It called the mosque "a temple of the apostates". The country is majority Sunni but has a large Shia minority.

...

Earlier this week Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil) jihadists threatened "a calamity for kuffars" over the fasting month of Ramadan, at the same time releasing a gruesome new video of unorthodox execution methods.

...

The attacks should be on "kuffars" (infidels), "Crusaders, Shias and Apostates", he says.

"Be keen to conquer in this holy month and to become exposed to martyrdom," he says.


http://www.independent.ie/world-news/mi ... 33793.html


Deadly attack on Tunisia tourist hotel in Sousse resort

At least 37 people, mostly tourists, killed in attack on beach near Imperial Marhaba hotel

...

Speaking in Brussels, the British prime minister, David Cameron, offered “our solidarity in fighting this evil of terrorism”.

“The people who do these things, they sometimes claim to do it in the name of Islam,” Cameron said. “They don’t. Islam is a religion of peace.” He said the attackers acted from “a twisted and perverted ideology we have to confront with everything we have”.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/j ... y-attacked


One decapitated in 'terrorist' attack on France gas factory

A suspected Islamist pinned the severed head of his boss to the gates of a US-owned gas factory in France Friday in what President Francois Hollande called a "terrorist" attack.

The alleged assailant, identified as 35-year-old married father-of-three Yassin Salhi, also smashed his vehicle into the Air Products factory, causing an explosion.

...

The victim was found with Arabic inscriptions scrawled on him and Islamic flags were also found on the site at the small town of Saint-Quentin-Fallavier, some 40 kilometres (25 miles) from Lyon.

The head of the victim, a 54-year-old local businessman, was "hung onto the fence surrounded by two Islamic flags bearing the Shahada, the profession of (Muslim) faith," said French prosecutor Francois Molins.

http://news.yahoo.com/decapitated-body- ... 1292.html#

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby arun » 27 Jun 2015 12:43

“Black Friday”? ………………….. Would not “Green Friday” be a better fit?

'Black Friday' triple attacks prompt London to beef up security at major events

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby member_29064 » 27 Jun 2015 13:13

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... acker.html

Yassin Salhi: Everything we know about the suspected Grenoble attacker

It has been confirmed that the suspected attacker under arrest is Yassin Salhi, who was under surveillance between 2006 and 2008

The suspect arrested in connection with the attack on a factory in south-eastern France has been named as Yassin Salhi.

His wife and two others have been arrested - earlier in the day, she had apparently called Europe 1 radio station that she had been calling him with no answer.

She told the station: "I know my husband. We have a normal family life. He goes to work and comes home. He doesn't pick up the phone when I call, it goes to the answer machine," she added.

"We are normal Muslims. We do Ramadan. We have three children and a normal family life," she said.


so a 'normal' muslim is a potential terrorist after all. anything new?! but no, he was just a one-off crackpot!

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby member_29064 » 27 Jun 2015 13:16

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... st.html?fb

Pakistani mob kills two children including a baby and their grandmother after 'blasphemous' Facebook post

A seven-year-old and her baby sister were killed alongside their grandmother, police said, after another member of the Ahmadi sect was accused of blasphemy

A mob killed a seven-year-old and her baby sister along with their grandmother, a member of the Ahmadi sect, after another follower was accused of posting blasphemous material on Facebook, police in Pakistan said.

The dead were part of a religious sect, who consider themselves Muslim but believe in a prophet after Mohammed. A 1984 Pakistani law declared them non-Muslims and many Pakistanis consider them heretics.

The incident is the latest instance of growing violence against minorities in Pakistan.

Police said the violence late on Sunday in the town of Gujranwala, 220 km (140 miles) southeast of the capital, Islamabad, started with an altercation between young men, one of whom was an Ahmadi accused of posting "objectionable material".

"Later, a crowd of 150 people came to the police station demanding the registration of a blasphemy case against the accused," said one police officer who declined to be identified.

"As police were negotiating with the crowd, another mob attacked and started burning the houses of Ahmadis."

The youth accused of making the Facebook post had not been injured, he said.

According to AP, police official Zeeshan Siddiqi said the rioting in the city of Gujranwala erupted after claims an Ahmadi had posted a blasphemous photo of the Kaaba - the cube-shaped structure in the Grand Mosque in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, that observant Muslims around the world face in prayer five times a day.

The photo allegedly contained nudity.

Mr Siddiqi said the victims died of suffocation and that another woman miscarried during the riots and was in hospital.

Under Pakistani law, Ahmadis are banned from using Muslim greetings, saying Muslim prayers or referring to his/her place of worship as a mosque.

Salim ud Din, a spokesman for the Ahmadi community, said it was the worst attack on the community since simultaneous attacks on Ahmadi places of worship killed 86 Ahmadis four years ago.

"Police were there but just watching the burning. They didn't do anything to stop the mob," he said. "First they looted their homes and shops and then they burnt the homes."

The police officer said they had tried to stop the mob.

Accusations of blasphemy are rocketing in Pakistan, from one in 2011 to at least 68 last year, according to the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan.

About 100 people have been accused of blasphemy this year.


terrorists at the favourite paki past-time again!

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Singha » 28 Jun 2015 07:48

The man suspected of an attack on a factory in France sent a selfie where he posed with the severed head of his boss, security sources say.
Yassin Salhi, 35, reportedly sent the photo to a Canadian mobile phone number via the WhatsApp messaging service after Friday's attack near Lyon.
His boss Herve Cornara's head was found alongside Islamic flags.
The suspect is accused of ramming a vehicle into an area containing flammable liquids, causing a blast.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Altair » 28 Jun 2015 21:01

This will be a 4th of July to watch out for. Any attack on mainland US by IS even 10% on the scale of 9/11 will change the world order again.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby A_Gupta » 28 Jun 2015 21:40

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... acher.html
"Meet The Middle East’s Atheist Preacher"

Mohammed’s show is part of a proliferation of pro-atheist channels, magazines and blogs across the Middle East is arguably the latest iteration of Arab Spring. When Arab youth once sought to overthrow regimes, they now are embracing small, more tangible gains like freedom of expression.

The rise of self-proclaimed Islamic State appears to have worked to atheists’ advantage. They argue ISIS shows the danger of those who adhere to strict interpretation of old text. And, they note the contrast of the brutality of ISIS and the pluralistic society they propose.

“The end goal, for them, is a place were people can be free from religious authority,” said Dr. Nadia Oweidat, a non-residential fellow at New American Foundation who researches liberal Islamic thought and countering violent extremism.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby RoyG » 28 Jun 2015 22:06

Altair wrote:This will be a 4th of July to watch out for. Any attack on mainland US by IS even 10% on the scale of 9/11 will change the world order again.


How baba? The US has already raped the middle east to the point of exhaustion. World order hasn't changed since the 70's.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby A_Gupta » 28 Jun 2015 22:48

Opinion: Religion of peace is not a harmless platitude.
http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/coffeehous ... platitude/

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Murugan » 29 Jun 2015 08:20


Altair
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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Altair » 29 Jun 2015 10:00

RoyG wrote:
Altair wrote:This will be a 4th of July to watch out for. Any attack on mainland US by IS even 10% on the scale of 9/11 will change the world order again.


How baba? The US has already raped the middle east to the point of exhaustion. World order hasn't changed since the 70's.


Lot has changed since 9/11. Bombing from 15000 feet will not solve any problem. US knows this. They cant put boots on ground either. The only other option is coup and let people fight among themselves. The House of Saud and the royal family will find the nearest lamp post and what happened in Egypt and Libya will look like a movie teaser trailer. US definitely did not put all its eggs in a single basket. The Iran Nuke deal had to have a greater moolah.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby hanumadu » 29 Jun 2015 10:22

Apologies if posted. Posting in full.
http://expatlog.com/2014/10/31/leaving-islam/

Leaving Islam – irreconcilable differences

“Last week was Eid ul Fitr, the muslim day of celebration that marks the end of Ramadan. I should have been happy but I couldn’t find it in me. How can I celebrate being muslim when so much ignorance, barbarity and pain takes place in my name? Being muslim no longer fills me with serenity, only shame.
Journal entry, August 2014

In my previous post I owned up to the deep disquiet I’ve been feeling about my faith; how I suppressed it, and how I tried to recapture my earlier conviction through reading and research.
Ironically, my quest only unearthed more reasons to hold it in question. This wasn’t a dip in devotion – it was a derailment.

The world’s first islamophobic muslim?
Again and again I reminded myself not to judge Islam by the conduct of its adherents but something was turning deep inside me. The unceasing barbarity of beheadings, habitual stoning and severe subjugation of women made me question myself and my beliefs, and the doubts I was secretly wrestling with caused me to feel apart from other Muslims, the differing views we held over things like veiling, music and gender segregation increasingly seemed part of a greater, more sinister, whole.
I worried I was letting prejudice colour my thinking but was powerless to stop my rising blood pressure every time I read about another honour killing, child bride or hostage beheading, or the disdain that soured my heart on hearing their Quran-backed justifications. It is Islam, rightly or wrongly, that serves as the ideological and religious source of the greatest atrocities being committed in the world today. How in a ‘religion of peace’ 1.6 billion strong could such crimes continue?

Untangling the mess
Mired in conflict and confusion, clarity came from an unexpected quarter. It was Karen Armstrong, whose biography of Muhammad I’d hungrily devoured in my early days as a convert, that helped me sort through my tangled thoughts. In “The Spiral Staircase” her autobiographical account of disenchantment with and eventual departure from the Catholic faith, she gave expression to the amorphous thoughts swirling in my own head.
It was a relief to hear someone in a different situation had the same questions, the same misgivings and disappointments. It helped me separate my questions from their controversial context, the equivalent of finding a piece of driftwood to cling to in a pitching, roiling sea.

Defending ignorance
For a long time I had told myself (and anyone else who would listen) that those who kill and maim with bombs and draconian customs weren’t real Muslims (no doubt they’d think the same of me), that their interpretation of the Qur’an was counter to what Islam is about, and I wholeheartedly believed it.
I’d explain how Islamic extremists twist the Quran to fit their agenda. ‘It needs to be understood in context’ I’d assert, ‘you cannot simply lift sentences out and apply them to whatever you choose.’ But when I came to re-examine my own beliefs I realized they didn’t stack up.
When you read the Quran, one of the striking things about it is its lack of context – there’s not much to anchor the text historically and it flips from one subject to another and back again. I still remember my disappointment when I failed to find anything in it that brought me to reverential tears as it has often been claimed to do for others.

The search for truth
To discover the context, Muslims say, you have to read the Qur’an in conjunction with the ahadith – the collections of Muhammad’s words and deeds that form the foundation of Sharia law and Islamic practice, graded for veracity by the reliability of their chain of transmission.
But I had rejected this avenue long before. Given the well-documented Muslim tendency to forge stories about Muhammad that supported political positions or religious practices of the time, coupled with the late emergence of the hadith collections relative to the time Muhammad was supposed to have lived, it’s impossible to regard them as reliable.
Without the ahadith, which fill volumes and volumes of books, Islam is pared down considerably. I had just the Qur’an to go by. ‘No matter’, I thought, ‘I’ll just stick to the parts that are unequivocally clear, the parts that reflect the essence of Islam.’ If only it were that simple…

The search for understanding
Muslims claim the Quran exists today exactly as it was revealed to Muhammad: the original, untampered word of Allah. Reading a translation doesn’t count as reading the Qur’an – they believe the linguistic interpretation involved in the act of translation alters its meaning. So my efforts to understand its content in this way were considered erroneous; Arabic recitation, irrespective of comprehension, was more important.
It seemed absurd that – ablutions completed, hair tucked out of sight – I’d take down my silk-swathed Qur’an from atop the wardrobe to painstakingly mouth syllables that held no meaning for me and this was somehow better than poring over my Yusuf Ali translation in my PJ’s on a weekend morning, underlining passages and scribbling notes in the margins, and deepening my understanding.
And for something so insistently Arabic, there are a lot of non-Arabic elements – not only from the Bible and Torah, but various historical religious manuscripts and Jewish apocryphal and rabbinic literature. There are words that not only are not Arabic, but have no meaning in any known language. Muslims have generally agreed on their meaning, but it’s an agreement based on convention not linguistic analysis; and in some cases they can’t agree at all. For all the mistrust of translations, no one seems concerned that even the Arabic is uncertain.

Your guess is as good as mine
Perhaps the greatest indictment to a Qur’an unchanged by man is the ambiguity of the earliest manuscripts. The Arabic alphabet consists of twenty-eight letters, twenty-two of which rely on dots known as diacritical marks to distinguish them from at least one other letter, as you can see below:

One symbol could be three different letters: ba (ب) with a dot under it, ta (ت) with two dots above it, and tha (ث) with three dots above it; nun (ن) is also pretty similar. Diacritical marks are essential to understanding Arabic, but most are missing from the earliest manuscripts of the Quran, so the word of God has since been subject to extensive human guesswork.
That, and googling ‘contradictions in the Quran’, were the straws that broke the camel’s back. I never thought I’d be leaving Islam, but staying makes me feel like a fraud.

When is a muslim not a muslim?
Laying aside the fact that ‘unequivocally clear’ Quranic text is scarce, to what degree can I cherrypick a belief system and still call myself an adherent? Surely by taking only the parts I chose and reassembling them into a different whole, I was creating something new – it may be ‘based upon’ but it is not ‘actual’. And who’s to say that the sections I cherrypicked are any more or less intrinsic than the ones those Islamic extremists are acting upon?
Continuing to identify as muslim feels like a deceit when I refute so much of the accepted dogma. There’s no room to breathe in a religion that won’t accept criticism, and clings relentlessly to the practices and beliefs of a 7th century desert society, and in doing so makes a mockery of their own assertion that the Qur’an is a guidance for all time. Polls by the Pew Research Center indicate that in many Muslim countries, the population is overwhelmingly in favor of veiling for women, the death penalty for leaving Islam and stoning as punishment for adultery; anti-Semitism is rampant. Islam is becoming the antithesis of what I thought it stood for.
So goodbye Islam, it’s been educative and interesting but this is where we part as I continue my journey on a path you can’t follow.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby arun » 29 Jun 2015 21:30

X Posted from the “Oppression of Minorities In Pakistan” thread.

Uniformed Jihadis of the Punjabi dominated Military of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan follow tactics adopted by a foreign army of occupation seeking to subdue an alien population and use a weapon that is both a disproportionate use of force and an inaccurate one prone to create collateral non-combatant damage against the Un-uniformed Jihadi’s of the TTP who are Pathan. All this Green on Green Intra Mohammadden violence during what Mohammadden’s claim is the holy month of Ramazan aka Ramadan.

What a contrast between how the Punjabi dominated Military of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan which makes such a fetish of being Mohammadden fighting fellow Mohammaddens, albeit Pathan’s rather than Punjabi’s, and the Indian Army which in conducting operations within India is every mindful of the possibility of civilian collateral damage and thus chooses the weapons it uses to reflect proportionate force with greatest feasible accuracy:

23 militants killed in North Waziristan, Khyber Agency airstrikes

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Prem » 29 Jun 2015 22:21

Cameron - IS militants are plotting 'terrible' UK attacks

LONDONABAD: Prime Minister David Cameron warned on Monday that Islamic State militants based in Syria and Iraq were planning specific attacks against Britain and posed an existential threat to the West.Cameron was speaking after a gunman killed up to 30 British tourists in an attack last Friday that British politicians have described as the single worst assault on their nationals since the bombing of the London underground in 2005.“It is an existential threat because what is happening here is the perversion of a great religion and the creation of this poisonous death cult is seducing too many young minds,” Cameron told BBC radio. :eek: “There are people in Iraq and Syria who are plotting to carry out terrible acts in Britain and elsewhere and as long as IS exists in those two countries we are at threat,” said Cameron.Britain’s international terror threat is currently set at “severe,” its second highest level, and a rung which means an attack is “highly likely.” Police say they have launched one of their largest counter-terrorism operations in a decade after the murders in Tunisia.Writing in The Daily Telegraph newspaper, Cameron signalled he wanted authorities to take a tougher line against extremists in Britain to do more to challenge what he said were their unacceptable views.“We must be more intolerant of intolerance – rejecting anyone whose views condone the extremist narrative,” Cameron wrote.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby member_28638 » 29 Jun 2015 22:45

Islam is a peaceful and nonviolent religion!

============================

Chibok girls 'forced to join Nigeria's Boko Haram'

By Tulip Mazumdar BBC Panorama

Some of the Chibok schoolgirls kidnapped in Nigeria have been forced to join Islamist militant group Boko Haram, the BBC has been told.

Witnesses say some are now being used to terrorise other captives, and are even carrying out killings themselves.

The testimony cannot be verified but Amnesty International says other girls kidnapped by Boko Haram have been forced to fight.

Boko Haram has killed some 5,500 civilians in Nigeria since 2014.

Two-hundred-and-nineteen schoolgirls from Chibok, are still missing, more than a year after they were kidnapped from their school in northern Nigeria. Many of those seized are Christians.

Three women who claim they were held in the same camps as some of the Chibok girls have told the BBC's Panorama programme that some of them have been brainwashed and are now carrying out punishments on behalf of the militants.

Seventeen-year-old Miriam (not her real name) fled Boko Haram after being held for six months. She was forced to marry a militant, and is now pregnant with his child.

Recounting her first days in the camp she said: "They told to us get ready, that they were going to marry us off."

She and four others refused.

Human cost of Boko Haram

219 of the Nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped from Chibok by Boko Haram in April 2014 are still missing.

They are among at least 2,000 women and girls abducted by Boko Haram since the start of 2014 (Amnesty figures)

Since the start of 2014 Boko Haram has killed an estimated 5,500 civilians in north-east Nigeria (Amnesty figures)

Who are Boko Haram?

Chibok: What we know a year on

Why Boko Haram remains a threat

"They came back with four men, they slit their throats in front of us. They then said that this will happen to any girl that refuses to get married,"

Faced with that choice, she agreed to marry, and was then repeatedly raped.

"There was so much pain," she said. "I was only there in body… I couldn't do anything about it."

While in captivity, Miriam described meeting some of the Chibok schoolgirls. She said they were kept in a separate house to the other captives.

"They told us: 'You women should learn from your husbands because they are giving their blood for the cause. We must also go to war for Allah.'"

She said the girls had been "brainwashed" and that she had witnessed some of them kill several men in her village.

"They were Christian men. They [the Boko Haram fighters] forced the Christians to lie down. Then the girls cut their throats."

It is not possible to independently verify Miriam's claims. But human rights group Amnesty International said their research also shows that some girls abducted by Boko Haram have been trained to fight.

"The abduction and brutalisation of young women and girls seems to be part of the modus operandi of Boko Haram," said Netsanet Belay, Africa director, research and advocacy at Amnesty International.
'They had guns'

The Chibok schoolgirls have not been seen since last May when Boko Haram released a video of around 130 of them gathered together reciting the Koran. They looked terrified.

Amnesty International estimates more than 2,000 girls have been taken since the start of 2014. But it was the attack on the school in Chibok that sparked international outrage.

Michelle Obama made a rousing speech a few weeks after their abduction, demanding the girls' return.

Millions of people showed their support for the #bringbackourgirls campaign. The hashtag was shared more than five million times.

Boko Haram has been trying to establish an Islamic State in the region, but it has recently been pushed back by a military force from Nigeria and its neighbours. Hundreds of women and girls have managed to escape during these raids.

Anna, aged 60, is one of them. She fled a camp in the Sambisa forest in December where she was held for five months. She now sits beneath a tree close to the cathedral in the Adamawa state capital of Yola. Her only possessions are the clothes she ran away in.

She said she saw some of the Chibok schoolgirls just before she fled the forest.

"They had guns," she said.

When pressed on how she could be sure that it is was the Chibok schoolgirls that she'd seen, Anna said: "They [Boko Haram] didn't hide them. They told us: 'These are your teachers from Chibok.'

"They shared the girls out as teachers to teach different groups of women and girls to recite the Koran," Anna recalled.

"Young girls who couldn't recite were being flogged by the Chibok girls."

Like Miriam, Anna also said she had seen some of the Chibok schoolgirls commit murder.
Conversion attempt

"People were tied and laid down and the girls took it from there… The Chibok girls slit their throats," said Anna.

Anna said she felt no malice towards the girls she had seen taking part in the violence, only pity.

"It's not their fault they were forced to do it." she added. "Anyone who sees the Chibok girls has to feel sorry for them."

Exposing women to extreme violence seemed to be a strategy used by Boko Haram to strip them of their identity and humanity, so they could be forced to accept the militants' ideology.

Faith (not her real name) aged 16, who is Christian, described how Boko Haram fighters tried to force her to convert to their version of Islam.

"Every day at dawn they would come and throw water over us and order us to wake up and start praying."

"Then one day they brought in a man wearing uniform. They made us all line up and then said to me: 'Because you are always crying, you will must kill this man.'

"I was given the knife and ordered to cut his neck. I said I couldn't do it.

"They cut his throat in front of me. That's when I passed out."

Faith said she had seen at least one Chibok schoolgirl who had been married off to a Boko Haram militant during her four months in captivity.

"She was just like any of the Boko Haram wives," she explained. "We are more scared of the wives than the husbands."
Long road to recovery

With hundreds of women and children recently rescued from Boko Haram strongholds in the Sambisa forest, the Nigerian government has set up a programme to help escapees.

Many fled captivity, only to discover that some or all of their family members had been killed by Boko Haram. Others have been cast out from their communities, who now consider them "Boko Haram wives".

Dr Fatima Akilu is in charge of Nigeria's counter-violence and extremism programme. She is currently looking after around 300 of the recently rescued women and children.

"We have not seen signs of radicalisation," she told us. "But if it did occur we would not be surprised."

And she added: "In situations where people have been held, there have been lots of stories where they have identified with their captors."

Dr Akilu said beatings, torture, rape, forced marriages and pregnancies were common in Boko Haram camps.

"We have a team of imams… that are trained to look out for radical ideas and ideology.

"Recovery is going to be slow, it's going to be long… It's going to be bumpy."

As the hunt for the Chibok schoolgirls continues, and questions are raised about what state they will be in if they ever return home, those who have managed to escape are beginning the mammoth task of coming to terms with their experiences.

"I can't get the images out of my head," said Anna, breaking down in tears. "I see people being slaughtered. I just pray that the nightmares don't return."

For others, the nightmare is continuing every day. Miriam is expecting her baby any day now.

"I hope that the baby is a girl," she said. "I would love her more than any boy. I'm scared of having a boy."

Miriam's future is bleak. She is terrified her "husband" will find her and kill her for running away. Her community has also rejected her.

"People consider me an outcast," she said.

"They remind me that I have Boko Haram inside me."

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-33259003

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby A_Gupta » 30 Jun 2015 03:53

How does one come up with this?
Professor Ernest Gellner observed that Islam is more compatible with modernism and democracy than any of the other great faiths.

http://www.dawn.com/news/1191271/quo-vadis-pakistan

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby A_Gupta » 30 Jun 2015 04:24

This passage from Professor Ernest Gellner (1925-1995) is worth reading (and sharpening your points of disagreement or agreement):
http://ontology.buffalo.edu/smith/cours ... llner2.htm

Now let me consider the other major interesting phenomenon of our age, the victory and success of Islam. In the social sciences, one of the commonest theses is the secularisation thesis, which runs as follows. Under conditions prevailing in industrial- scientific society, the hold of religion over society and its people diminishes. By and large this is true, but it is not completely true, for there is one major exception, Islam. In the last hundred years the hold of Islam over Muslims has not
diminished but has rather increased. It is one striking counter-example to the secularisation thesis. Like the failure of Marxism, it is a fascinating intellectual problem that serves as a background to the more practical, moral and political problems which are the concerns of this symposium.

I would tentatively and in all humility attempt to offer you an explanation. The Western perception of the strength of Islam is distorted by the fact that the West has largely noticed this fact in connection with the Khomeyni revolution. Although the Iranian revolution is, unquestionably, the most dramatic manifestation of the social and political vigour of Islam, it is in some interesting ways untypical, which
somewhat distorts the perception. The social and political vigour of Islam is something which long antedates that particular revolution and ought not to be identified with it.

What is the sociological explanation of this counter-trend? I would suggest that two things need to be considered, the nature of high religions and the crisis of underdevelopment. Let me begin with the second.

Underdevelopment is the condition of a society which endures political humiliation as a result of a technological, and hence economic and military, inferiority. The uneven distribution of the benefits, if such they are, of modern technology in production and military hardware, has led to a curious kind of imbalance over the last two centuries, in which the early beneficiaries of technological power had their relative power enormously increased, and the later beneficiaries of course were temporarily disadvantaged. This is a key characteristic of the last two centuries. What is the characteristic reaction of a society to underdevelopment?

I think the paradigm of the reaction is the tension between Westernisation and populism. Many European countries have gone through this reaction, but it finds its supreme expression in the Russian literature of the 19th century. There are two ways that this reaction can be expressed. You can
say, "Well, those Western ******** are very strong and powerful, we've got to pinch their fire, we've got to turn their weapons against them." Then of course you try to identify what the secret of their power is. Is it constitutionalism? Is it democracy? Is it science? The details of the diagnosis vary, but the outcome is that you try to redress the balance by emulating your enemy. A sensible strategy, but with one psychic disadvantage, the repudiation of your own local tradition, which is psychologically painful. It is not easy to say, "What our fathers and grandfathers did was deeply mistaken." Some Westernisers bring themselves to do it, but it is nevertheless painful.

The alternative is to say, "Not only are those Westerners ********, but virtue is on our side." If you cannot idealise the government, which is usually difficult to do because they are caught between traditionalism and compromise with the past, you idealise some kind of local folk culture.

In the case of Russians of course it was the idealisation of the simple peasant soul. The simple peasant faith was seen to contain great virtue which compensated for its possible technological ineptness. Of course one can see with hindsight why Marxism was so tempting for Eastern Europe and
for Russians because it did both things at the same time. It combined total mysticism and idealisation of the ultimate virtue in the human essence, with a promise not only to emulate the West but to overtake it without the weaknesses which were going to bring the West down. It was a deadly combination, and it was no doubt attractive. Yet in the end it proved disastrous, not only for the reasons I stated, but because its recipes for social organisation were incompatible with the preconditions for efficiency in the fourth or fifth industrial revolution, in an age of very rapid technological advance and computerisation.

That is my general analysis of the dilemma of underdevelopment which the entire world went through. You can include the French Enlightenment in the underdevelopment crisis. What the thinkers of the French Enlightenment were thinking is, "Why do those ********, that nation of shop-keepers
across the Channel, keep beating us ?" The answer was, "They've got some secret about social organisation which has escaped the French." So, although the notion of underdevelopment did not then exist, it really was the same kind of situation.

What then is the distinctive feature of Islam amongst the high religions?

I think all high religions, by a high religion I mean a religion equipped with a scripture, a doctrine, and a professional core of interpreters, tend to suffer from a tension between the high variant and the folk
variant. This takes a very specific form in Islam. The high variant is the faith of the scholars, unitarian, pure and puritan, spiritualist, anti-mediationist and anti-hierarchical. Their's is an egalitarian religion stressing the unity of God, the symmetry in the relationship between believer and God, with an ethic of rule observance rather than an ethic of loyalty to particular individuals. There is such a strong distrust of mediation, that there is a special name for the sin of associationship and of the use of mediators. By contrast, folk religion is more oriented towards mystical practices, hierarchy and a kind of surrogate priesthood in the form of cultish living saints.

If I read Muslim history correctly, within the history of Islam, from whenever it shook down after the early first centuries under the impact of the West, there was a tension between these two. Sometimes they lived in harmony, interpenetrating each other. Often the tension was expressed in the form of revivalist movements attempting to establish the true faith of the scholars against the corrupt version of the folk. Then came the impact of the West. Of course this occurred at different times and in different regions, as early as the Napoleonic invasion in Egypt, as late as the French invasion of Morocco in 1912, and even later in places like the Yemen.

Under the impact of Westernisation, Muslim society can reform itself without facing the dilemma which the Europeans faced, namely either to westernise or to idealise the folk culture. This is because it can invoke its own high tradition which is always respected, but usually not fully implemented, honoured in the breach, but not always in the observance.

Muslims like to think that the high tradition goes back to the Prophet and his companions. I find this historically implausible, because I think that the circumstances in which they worked were different. But what is unquestionably true is that there is a genuine well-established old local tradition, and that it has many of the features which make it suitable for conferring what you may call international dignity: a very low level of magic, low ritualisation, egalitarianism and all kinds of features which
make it compatible with modern conditions, and in particular the conditions of self-correction and industrial, economic and scientific catching up. Islam is more compatible with this than are the more
hierarchical, ritual-ridden aspects of other religions. In brief, the Islamic World escapes the dilemma which, in my argument, pervades other societies caught in the trap of temporary underdevelopment.

Islam revives in the name of its own high tradition, not in the name of either the West or in the name of a populist idealisation of the folk culture. Muslims leave the latter to Western romantics; they do not
themselves practise this and what they idealise is the old high tradition, in which case it appears as fundamentalism.

The definition of the term "fundamentalism" has a double edge, a double frontier. What fundamentalism says is that religion, its doctrines and its prescriptions are to be taken seriously; they mean what they say, neither more nor less. The doctrine of firm interpretation has of course two negations.

The first is a Western one which says that religion does not really mean what it says, and is in fact just a kind of symbolic expression. Talking to uneducated people like peasants and fishermen in Galilee, the founder of the dominant Western faith had to use simple language because if he talked modern philosophy they would not have understood him. But he really meant the latest philosophic fashion. So you get Christianity which in this sense tends to be vulgarised. In each generation it gets restated, and the basic message is: the doctrine does not mean what it says, it really means what the latest prophet has been saying, in simple language so that a simple fisherman can understand it.

The other one of course is esotericism: the doctrine of the hidden meaning, that there is a special secret way that the religion is stratified.

Islamic fundamentalism fought on both these fronts. On the one hand, it opposed that alliance between itself and its folk use of mediators, while on the other hand it enhanced the stratification of an
inner truth and an outer truth. If my diagnosis is correct, that the strength of Islam comes from this fundamentalism and self-correction in terms of a literal doctrine taken seriously, a kind of combination of simple and elegant unitarianism in theology with a firm set of rules for social life, why should the most dramatic manifestation of fundamentalism have appeared in Iran? It seems to go against the thesis, because of the sects established by the fissions in the early history of Islam, Shi'ism is of course in theological terms, furthest to the right, most given to a cult of personality, and to ritualism.

My answer to this is that although the cult of personality, combined with the cult of martyrdom, was very useful in the act of political mobilisation practised by Khomeyni, it was rapidly dropped in the course of success. What Khomeyni in fact did was Sunnify Islam. I have studied Khomeyni's works in the translation of his Welsh convert and acolyte Algar, and it seems to me very clear that the social and political doctrine of the kind of Islamic republicanism you get in Khomeyni's thought is a shift from a cult of personality to a cult of law, in other words a shift towards Sunnism.

Khomeyni does not deny the authority of the hidden Imams, but politically speaking he pensions them off. They are really politically irrelevant. What matters about religion is the implementation of the law. When the Imam comes back, of course, the authority will be his and he will take on government, but until he comes back the law must be implemented by those most competent to do so. Who else can do this but the lawyers? They will implement the law neither more nor less severely before or after his coming. His coming is almost a political accident. Khomeyni has rude things to say about such things as the cult of saints. So without actually abolishing the cult of personality there has been a kind of transfer or movement to a cult of the law away from the cult of personality, which I took to be the crucial distinguishing line between Sunnism and Shi'ism.

Let me now come back to the contrast with Marxism. Once again I have an interesting little disagreement, it is a matter of stress really, with Professor Keane. Professor Keane rightly pointed out that Islam is not just faith; it is an ordering of social life. Yes indeed, but it is an ordering of social life that does not fully sacralise it. In the regulation of economic life, for instance, Islam provides a set of hand rails so that people know where they are but it does not actually say that economic life in itself is sacred.

In other words, Muslims have a sphere of the profane to which they can retreat at times of less and maximum religious zeal. When it had the opportunity to play at the world of religion, Marxism deprived humanity of that zone precisely by sacralising the economic. If it had ritual and symbolic objects, they were the tractors, the images of muscular workers, huge socialist dams and so on. Economic life provided the sacraments for that religion. But when economic life in the end turned out to be both squalid and markedly less efficient, then Marxism collapsed. I think one of the most important factors in the final self-destruction of the Soviet Union was the discovery that Western capitalism could indeed be overtaken, but not by them; the people who were doing it were the Confucianists of East Asia and not the Marxists of the Euro-Asian centre. That discovery was crucial in causing the loss of faith which led to the self-dismantling of a system which had not provided a zone in which people could retreat when they wanted to work out their way.

Islam does provide for such a zone, which is one of the things which makes it a workable modern religion. It combines firm guidance in an idiom compatible with modern backgrounds, with a respect for the type of social division which is essential for a viable society.


I think poor Professor Ernest Gellner was totally misguided. The problem with Islam is that its self-correction largely consists of persecuting those who would make any deviation from orthodoxy. The cult of personality of the Prophet Muhammad (that what he said and did is the absolute standard for all time) is far less flexible than the folk religion of saint cults of Islam. The contrast with Hindus is marked - Lord Rama is "Adarsh Purush" and is an avataar, not a mere man; and yet Hindus will always debate - should he have taken Sita with him into exile? did he unnecessarily humiliate Surpanakha? should he have shot Vali while Vali was wrestling with Sugriva? should he have made Sita undergo agni-pariksha? -- and this questioning is never blasphemy.

Hindu ritual coexists with the practice of advanced technology, e.g., the project director of the GSLV project goes to Shiva temple every morning. Gellner seems to believe ritual reflects a closed state of mind, reflecting a primitive state of belief. Carl Sagan's reading of Isa Upanisad as "demon-haunted world" comes to mind as a similar error.

The Mussalmans who created Pakistan also thought the same as Gellner, that their Islam was naturally democratic, while the Hindus could never have a democracy, it was just logically impossible.

"What matters about religion is the implementation of the law" - we have seen the huge problems that gives rise to in the Islamic nations. Their religion should not be anywhere near the law or near politics.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Tuvaluan » 30 Jun 2015 05:04

My answer to this is that although the cult of personality, combined with the cult of martyrdom, was very useful in the act of political mobilisation practised by Khomeyni, it was rapidly dropped in the course of success. What Khomeyni in fact did was Sunnify Islam. I have studied Khomeyni's works in the translation of his Welsh convert and acolyte Algar, and it seems to me very clear that the social and political doctrine of the kind of Islamic republicanism you get in Khomeyni's thought is a shift from a cult of personality to a cult of law, in other words a shift towards Sunnism.


I am not sure what the professor is going on about here. "sunnism" just seems to be the rules in the Quran, and the shias also accept Quran except for the but about Mohammed being the last prophet that is a core doctrine of the sunnis. Why should it be surprising that Khomeini moved towards a more literal interpretation of the Koran, and why should that be "sunnism" rather than just regular-shade-of-koranic-green islam? Don't get it. Islam and Christianity are basically cults of personality, with no proof that these personalities even existed or were just embellishments of some ordinary cult figure a few millenia ago, so why is this professor pretending that Islam or shia Islam is something special on that front? The Quran itself prescribes the "law" as in Shariat, and this guy is making a big deal out of the obvious. huh.

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby arun » 30 Jun 2015 21:35

Green on Green Intra-Mohammadden sectarian based killings in Yemen sees 28 Shia Mohammaddens getting blow up by Sunni Mohammaddens during Mohammadden holy moth of Ramadan aka Ramzan:

28 dead in IS-claimed attack on Shias in Yemen

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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby Anindya » 01 Jul 2015 15:24

Lebanese Journalists Call To Recognize Connection Between Terrorism And Islam

and also Nadim Koteich: The ISIS Murderers Belong To Islam, Rely On Islam’s Texts

The following are excerpts from an English version of Nadim Koteich’s article, published January 13, 2015 on the “Now Lebanon” website:[2]

“These killers are us. They are our religion at its most extreme. Condemnations are no longer sufficient. They were never enough in the first place, and they never bore any weight except as an entry point to more advanced steps.

“They are not enough, especially when what follows them amounts to no more than idiotic expressions suggesting that a crime like the Charlie Hebdo massacre is not an expression of ‘the true Islam.’ In an effort to divorce Islam from responsibility for other crimes, some have said that the Islamic State (ISIS), Jabhat al-Nusra, Asa’ib Ahl Al-Haqq, Hizbullah, Boko Haram, Somalia’s Al-Shabab, the Taliban, and hundreds of other armed groups also do not represent true Islam.

“So what is this true Islam that those who condemn crimes committed in the name of Islam are supposed to be bestowing upon us? Beyond condemnation, what confrontation with the criminals have the proponents of true Islam been engaged in since the defeat of the Mu’tazila – the defeat of rationality in Islam 1,100 years ago?

“It doesn’t matter which Islamic text, whether it is Koranic or jurisprudential, or a text recounting the sayings of the Prophet Muhammad; the killers do not kill for nothing, they kill in the name of books, fatwas, ayahs, and age-old tradition. All of these things are inseparable parts of true Islam. They will remain Muslims as long as they pronounce the shahada and as long as the religious institution doesn’t dare to modernize the criteria for being a Muslim.

“These killers are us. They are our religion at its most extreme. They are our true Islam taken to its furthest extent, and they are not beyond the scripture. If the West says in one united voice ‘we are Charlie’ we should say ‘we are ISIS.’

“As Muslims, what should we do with Ayat as-Sayf, the fifth verse of Surat at-Tawbah, one of the last Koranic chapters delivered to the Prophet in the city of Medina, and thus of central importance with regard to the structure of Islamic rulings and the system for the relationship with the other? The ayah says: ‘Then, when the sacred months have passed, slay the idolaters wherever ye find them, and take them (captive), and besiege them, and prepare for them each ambush. But if they repent and establish worship and pay the poor-due, then leave their way free. Lo! God is Forgiving, Merciful.’

“With this in mind, was the ayah not instrumental in building Islam’s military glory? Didn’t Islam become a vast empire of might, dominion, high renown, money and power? Was this ayah not the central compass that directed the wars of the Muslims, from the preparations for the conquest of Mecca to jihadist pamphlet ‘The Neglected Duty,’ by Muhammad abd-al-Salam Faraj, one of the clearest and most dangerous pieces of jihadist literature ever written? For those who are unfamiliar with Faraj, he was the emir of the Al-Jihad group that assassinated Anwar Sadat in the name of the very same true Islam.

“What kind of ruling can there be against ‘idolaters’ in the 21st century and what should we make of the ruling to slay them ‘wherever [we] find them’ now that we have international law and the nation state? Where do today’s Muslims draw the line between Islamic jurisprudence and law?

“As Muslims, what should we do with the 20th verse of Surat at-Tawbah, which is dedicated to our relationship with Christians and Jews? The text is as follows: ‘Fight those who do not believe in God or in the Last Day and who do not consider unlawful what God and His Messenger have made unlawful and who do not adopt the religion of truth from those who were given the Scripture – [fight] until they give the jizyah willingly while they are humbled.’

Peregrine
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Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 01 Jul 2015 21:14

ISIS suicide bombers attack army checkpoints in Egypt; 60 killed

CAIRO: At least 60 Egyptian soldiers were on Wednesday killed as heavily-armed ISIS militants launched a wave of simultaneous attacks on army checkpoints, including three suicide bombings, in one of the biggest assaults in the restive Sinai Peninsula.

"More than 70 terrorist elements waged simultaneous attacks against five security checkpoints in North Sinai," army spokesperson brigadier general Mohamed Samir said in a statement on his Facebook page.

Fighting between the dreaded militants and the soldiers is ongoing, with army and police currently chasing the attackers using ground and air force, security sources said.

The attack, which occurred in Sheikh Zuweid city of North Sinai, included suicide car bombings and heavy weapons that damaged large parts of the checkpoints, the sources said.

There were conflicting reports of casualty figures, with the sources saying at least 60 soldiers were killed while Samir put the number of those killed and injured so far much lower - at 10.

The toll could not be immediately verified in the aftermath of the major attack.

The militants also took soldiers captive and seized weapons and several armoured vehicles, officials said.

The Islamic State's Egypt affiliate, Sinai province, claimed responsibility for the attacks, it said in an online statement.

"In a blessed raid enabled by God, the lions of the caliphate have simultaneously attacked more than 15 checkpoints belonging to the apostate army," the Sinai-based militant group Ansar Beit el-Maqdes, which changed its name after pledging allegiance to the IS, said.

The group said it attacked over 15 security sites and had carried out three suicide bombings. The outfit has claimed responsibility of many attacks against security forces in north Sinai.

23 militants were killed in the attacks, the military said in a statement.

The attacks come two days after the assassination of the Egypt's general prosecutor Hisham Barakat in a car bomb attack here and a day after President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi vowed to step up a two-year crackdown on militants.

Egypt's North Sinai has witnessed many violent attacks by militants since the January, 2011 revolution that toppled the ex-president Hosni Mubarak.

The attacks targeting police and military increased after the ouster of Islamist ex-president Mohamed Morsi in 2013 by military following massive protests against his rule.

Over 600 security personnel have been reported killed since then.

The military has launched security campaigns in the area, arrested suspects and demolished houses that belong to terrorists, including those facilitating tunnels leading to the Gaza Strip.

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arun
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Re: Islamism & Islamophobia Abroad - News & Analysis (9-8-20

Postby arun » 02 Jul 2015 07:47

When it comes to the pursuit of statecraft between Mohammadden majority countries, all notions of there being peace during the Mohammadden Holy Month of Ramadan aka Ramzan go out of the window notwithstanding Mohammadden’s claiming that theirs is “The Religion of Peace” and that the fasting month ought to be a time of peace and introspection.

X Posted from the STFUP thread the current contretemps pitting the Islamic Republic of Pakistan against her overwhelmingly Mohammadden neighbours, Iran and Afghanistan.

arun wrote:Brotherly Iran lobs mortar shells on the Islamic Republic of Pakistan. While article is datelined today, Wednesday July 1st, the event is reported as having taken place on Monday June 29th:

Iran border guards fire mortar shells in Panjgur

Besides Iran lobbing mortars there has been an armed clash on the Durand Line today between the Uniformed Jihadi’s of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan and Brotherly Afghan security forces resulting in fatalities.

Clearly the Ramadan season is not showing evidence of brotherly peace breaking out.

Turkeys wire service, Anadolou Agency citing Afghan Interior Ministry spokesman Sediq Sediqqi:

9 killed in clashes on Afghan-Pakistani border


Brotherly Iran continues to lob mortars for the second night in a row during Mohammadden holy month of Ramadan aka Ramzan onto the Islamic Republic of Pakistan:

Border violation: Iranian forces fire shells into Panjgur again


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