Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby gauravsh » 18 Jun 2020 23:56


Europe needs money as of now and they ain't getting from Trump. So their only bet is China. I doubt even if the so called 5G alliance that UK wants, will lead upto anything. If they need alternatives to Huawei or ZTE they already have in form of Nokia and Ericsson. Why don't back them up ?

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby chanakyaa » 25 Jun 2020 07:01

Just when you thought the modern financial system was approaching a slow death, some economist (i.e. someone who does not produce anything other than hot air) comes with a clever idea of extending the life of sick patient. Weimer Republic did this exactly 100 year ago. Now governments around the world will print whenever and whatever magnitude as they like (pick a currency 1 Trillion, 10 Trillion, why not 100 Trillion). No need to borrow. Slowly the battle field is shifting from interest rate/debt to foreign currency.

How to create money without borrowing it....And, if you don't borrow, you never have to pay for it...that's clever
...message from Stephanie Kelton, a member of the Democratic Party's economic task force whose new book, The Deficit Myth, argues that money spent by Congress does not need to be "paid for" with taxes or borrowing.
...
We would have a much harder time falling into panic mode if the CBO wasn't producing that graph that shows the debt-to-GDP ratio increasing very sharply because of the deficits. You just have a commitment to provide fiscal support to the economy without the national debt rising.


MMT: NOT MODERN, NOT MONETARY, NOT A THEORY
Modern monetary theory (MMT) has a new champion, and a new bible. Stephanie Kelton, economics professor at SUNY Stony Brook, is the author of The Deficit Myth: Modern Monetary Theory and the Birth of the People's Economy...

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ricky_v » 25 Jun 2020 08:37

https://www.realcleardefense.com/articles/2020/06/23/putins_new_nuclear_doctrine_115405.html
In June 2020, Russian President Vladimir Putin issued an edict on “On the foundations of state policy in the field of nuclear deterrence.”[1] This is a first because the previous versions of this document were classified[2] and previous unclassified Russian written doctrinal pronouncements on nuclear weapons use at the Presidential level were part of longer documents on military doctrine.

Moreover, Putin is making unprecedented (for a doctrinal document) nuclear first use threats while simultaneously denying Russia’s policy provides for such a course of action.

Paragraph 4 of Putin’s 2020 decree states, “The state nuclear deterrence policy is of a defensive nature and is directed at supporting the capabilities of nuclear forces at a level sufficient to ensure nuclear deterrence and to guarantee the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the state and to deter a potential adversary from aggression against the Russian Federation and (or) its allies in the event of the emergence of armed conflict by preventing the escalation of military activities and ending them on conditions acceptable to the Russian Federation and (or) its allies.

Putin’s decree contains four announced conditions for nuclear weapons use, all of which involve first use of a nuclear weapon. It states:

The conditions which determine the possibility for the use by the Russian Federation of nuclear weapons are:
a) the receiving of creditable information concerning the launch of ballistic missiles attacking the territories of the Russian Federation and (or) its allies;
b) the use by an enemy of a nuclear weapon or other types of weapons of mass destruction against the territories of the Russian Federation and (or) its allies;
c) enemy actions against critically important state or military facilities of the Russian Federation, the disablement of which will lead to a disruption of retaliatory operations of the nuclear forces;
d) aggression against the Russian Federation involving the use of conventional weaponry, which threatens the existence of the state itself.

Third, the use of “nuclear forces” rather than “strategic nuclear forces” in the provision related to non-nuclear attacks on nuclear and command and control facilities (paragraph 19 [C]) opens up the possibility of a nuclear response to a non-nuclear attack on a vast number of Russian military facilities, airbases, naval ships and Army bases and units. This is because dual capability (conventional and nuclear capability) is almost universal in Russia.[25] The Russians are trying to effectively use the threat of nuclear escalation to negate our conventional and cyber capabilities. If they impose this targeting constraint upon us, we lose the war.

Alexei Arbatov and fellow Duma Deputy Petr Romashkin suggested that under Putin’s nuclear doctrine, Russian first use of nuclear weapons would be appropriate in response to contingencies like NATO’s past military action in Kosovo.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ricky_v » 25 Jun 2020 09:12

https://www.imf.org/en/News/Articles/2020/06/03/sp060320-remarks-to-world-economic-forum-the-great-reset
Remarks to World Economic Forum
Kristalina Georgieva, Managing Director, IMF
So, what would it take for historians to look back at this crisis as the moment of a Great Reset?

From the perspective of the IMF, we have seen a massive injection of fiscal stimulus to help countries deal with this crisis, and to shift gears for growth to return. It is of paramount importance that this growth should lead to a greener, smarter, fairer world in the future.

Governments can put in place public investments—and incentives for private investments—that support low-carbon and climate-resilient growth.
I am particularly keen to take advantage of the low oil prices we see today, to eliminate harmful subsidies and introduce a carbon price that would work as an incentive for future investments.

Second, let me talk about smarter growth. We know the digital economy is the big winner of this crisis. But we must not allow the digital divide to widen so that some countries and communities fall further behind. This would bring more pain than gain in the future.

So, it is critical that institutions like the IMF support investments that will shrink the digital divide—working in partnership with the World Bank and others.

We also need to think carefully about how to make sure the jump in growth and profitability in the digital sector leads to benefits that are shared across our societies.

We know that—if left to its own devices—this pandemic is going to deepen inequality. That has happened in prior pandemics.

We can avoid this if we concentrate on investing in people—in the social fabric of our societies, in access to opportunities, in education for all, and in the expansion of social programs so we take care of the most vulnerable people. Then we can have a world that is better for everyone.

https://www.weforum.org/great-reset
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/06/now-is-the-time-for-a-great-reset/
Klaus Schwab
Founder and Executive Chairman, World Economic Forum
Every country, from the United States to China, must participate, and every industry, from oil and gas to tech, must be transformed. In short, we need a “Great Reset” of capitalism.

The Great Reset agenda would have three main components. The first would steer the market toward fairer outcomes. To this end, governments should improve coordination (for example, in tax, regulatory, and fiscal policy), upgrade trade arrangements, and create the conditions for a “stakeholder economy.”

This means, for example, building “green” urban infrastructure and creating incentives for industries to improve their track record on environmental, social, and governance (ESG) metrics.

Image

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ricky_v » 30 Jun 2020 21:40

https://www.defensenews.com/congress/2020/06/29/us-could-buy-turkeys-russia-made-s-400-under-senate-proposal/
The U.S. would be able to buy Turkey’s Russian-made S-400 air defense system under legislation proposed in the Senate last week. The proposal is one powerful lawmaker’s attempt to alleviate the impasse between Washington and Ankara over the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

Senate Majority Whip John Thune, R-S.D., has proposed an amendment to the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act that would allow the purchase to be made using the U.S. Army’s missile procurement account.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ricky_v » 02 Jul 2020 08:08

https://www.rt.com/russia/493482-russia-vote-constitution-preliminary-results/
Exit polls after the Russian constitutional vote show 71 percent of the country supported the proposed amendments while just over 28 percent were opposed. The changes are major updates to Russia's most important legal document.

In theory, it would allow President Vladimir Putin to run for office two more times, potentially staying in power until 2036.

Other changes include the regular indexation of pensions for inflation and a guaranteed minimum wage above subsistence level; the definition of marriage as a union between one man and one woman; a ban on top government officials from holding foreign passports; and restricting future presidents to serving only two terms. There was some controversy about the new constitution also including a mention of God, in regards to the country’s heritage.

The newly-amended constitution also marks a slight shift away from the hyper-presidential system, introduced by former President Boris Yeltsin in 1993. By redistributing some powers to other government organs, both Russia's lower and upper houses of parliament now have the opportunity to propose and approve of certain officials.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ricky_v » 01 Aug 2020 06:05

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-53409521#:~:text=The%20world%20is%20ill%2Dprepared,the%20end%20of%20the%20century.
Image
Falling fertility rates mean nearly every country could have shrinking populations by the end of the century.

And 23 nations - including Spain and Japan - are expected to see their populations halve by 2100.

As a result, the researchers expect the number of people on the planet to peak at 9.7 billion around 2064, before falling down to 8.8 billion by the end of the century.

Japan's population is projected to fall from a peak of 128 million in 2017 to less than 53 million by the end of the century.

Italy is expected to see an equally dramatic population crash from 61 million to 28 million over the same timeframe.

They are two of 23 countries - which also include Spain, Portugal, Thailand and South Korea - expected to see their population more than halve.

China, currently the most populous nation in the world, is expected to peak at 1.4 billion in four years' time before nearly halving to 732 million by 2100. India will take its place.

The UK is predicted to peak at 75 million in 2063, and fall to 71 million by 2100.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Mukesh.Kumar » 02 Aug 2020 12:53

An interesting article on how the Internet is being carved up into different beings and what Jio means for the future of the internet.

India, Jio, and the Four Internets

Image

The authors thesis is that you cannot ignore geopolitics/ geoeconomics in the future of the internet. Already the world is split into at least four different zones of influence. This play around Jio is finalizing this and going to affect the future of telecom and IT industry.

One of the more pernicious mistruths surrounding the debate about TikTok is that this will potentially lead to the splintering of the Internet; this completely erases the history of China’s Great Firewall, started 23 years ago, which effectively cut China off from most Western services. That the U.S. may finally respond in kind is a reflection of reality, not the creation of a new one.

What is new is the increased splintering in the non-China Internet: the U.S. model is still the default for most of the world, but the European Union and India are increasingly pursuing their own paths.


The Indian Counterweight
It is increasingly impossible — or at least irresponsible — to evaluate the tech industry, in particular the largest players, without considering the geopolitical concerns at stake. With that in mind, I welcome Jio’s ambition. Not only is it unreasonable and disrespectful for the U.S. to expect India to be some sort of vassal state technologically speaking, it is actually a good thing to not only have a counterweight to China geographically, but also a counterweight amongst developing countries specifically. Jio is considering problem-spaces that U.S. tech companies are all too often ignorant of, which matters not simply for India but also for much of the rest of the world.

Still, Facebook, Google, Intel, Qualcomm, et al should proceed with their eyes wide-open: they are very much a means to an end for a company and a country that is on its own path. That is not to say these investments are not a good idea — I think they are — but India’s path is perhaps a more populist and nationalistic one than many Americans would prefer. Still, it is less antagonistic to Western liberalism than the Chinese Communist Party, and again, an important counterweight.

The only question left, then, is whither Europe, and frankly, the picture is not pretty:

The Four Internets

What differs Europe’s Internet from the U.S., Chinese, or Indian visions is, well, the lack of vision. Doing nothing more than continually saying “no” leads to a pale imitation of the status quo, where money matters more than innovation.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby m_saini » 04 Aug 2020 11:18

This is going to be one of the major challenges for India in the coming future.

Up to a Third of Bangladesh Is Underwater

Bangladesh has been especially hard it: The floods have left between 24% and 37% of the country underwater, the New York Times reports. The consequences have been horrific, with 4.7 million people across the country displaced, 984,819 houses inundated, and 129 people killed, according to government data.

Without urgent action to draw down carbon emissions and curb the climate crisis, more severe monsoon seasons are surely on the horizon. Along the Bangladeshi portion of the Brahmaputra River, for instance, water has stayed at a dangerously high level for over 30 consecutive days, which is the longest streak of this kind in the region in more than 20 years. And if global temperatures rise to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, one study from climate experts at the Bangladesh University of Engineering found, then flooding along the river will get even worse, with floods that currently only occur once a century occurring 24 times per century.


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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Kati » 24 Oct 2020 05:42

Policy paper
Joint Statement on UK-U.S. Financial Regulatory Working Group Meeting
Published 22 October 2020

UK and U.S. participants held the third meeting of the UK-U.S. Financial Regulatory Working Group (Working Group) virtually on October 20, 2020.

The Working Group was formed in 2018 to deepen bilateral regulatory cooperation with a view to the further promotion of financial stability; investor protection; fair, orderly, and efficient markets; and capital formation in both jurisdictions.

This Working Group meeting was the first since the United Kingdom left the European Union. Cooperation between the UK and United States continues to be important, particularly in light of COVID-19 and the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union.

Participants included officials and senior staff from the U.S. Department of the Treasury and HM Treasury, and from the U.S. and UK independent regulatory agencies, including the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Office of Comptroller of the Currency, Securities and Exchange Commission, the Bank of England, and the Financial Conduct Authority. U.S. and UK participants shared views on issues in their respective areas of responsibility.

The Working Group meeting focused on five key themes: (1) the economic response to, and potential financial stability impacts of, the COVID-19 crisis, (2) international cooperation and 2021 priorities, (3) cross-border rules and overseas recognition/equivalence/substituted compliance regimes, (4) sustainable finance, and (5) financial innovation.

At the meeting, UK and U.S. participants discussed the economic response to, and potential financial stability impacts of the COVID-19 crisis. Participants also discussed the outlook for financial regulatory reforms and future priorities, including possible areas for deeper bilateral and multilateral regulatory cooperation to further facilitate safe and efficient financial services activity between U.S. and UK markets, and provided updates on certain aspects of their respective domestic frameworks.

Participants took stock of ongoing public and private sector efforts in relation to benchmark transition, and provided updates on their respective cross-border rules, overseas recognition, equivalence, and substituted compliance regimes. Participants also welcomed the announcement of the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the Bank of England and CFTC regarding supervisory cooperation in relation to UK and U.S. central counterparties that operate on a cross-border basis.

Participants also acknowledged the success of this summer’s UK-U.S. Financial Innovation Partnership meeting and discussed further actions to deepen UK and U.S. ties in financial innovation, their respective approaches to digital payments, and cross-border data issues.

On insurance, participants discussed implementation of the U.S.-UK Covered Agreement, next steps for the U.S.-UK Insurance Project, and the UK and U.S. insurance regulatory responses to the COVID-19 crisis. Sustainable finance was also a topic of discussion at the Working Group, with the UK discussing its future priorities, including its climate-related financial sector work and regulatory and supervisory approach to climate change, along with private sector-led disclosure efforts. U.S. participants outlined private sector efforts to mitigate climate-related risks.

Participants also took stock of the Working Group’s achievements to date and recognized that the UK-U.S. financial regulatory relationship and Working Group discussions will be entering a new phase after the UK’s transition out of the European Union is complete. Participants identified follow-up work for the Working Group on the above topics and other priority issues. Participants will continue to engage bilaterally on these topics, as well as other topics of mutual interest ahead of the next Working Group meeting, which is expected to take place in the first half of 2021.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby chanakyaa » 03 Dec 2020 08:52

Some of the major stages through which money has evolved are as follows: (i) Commodity Money (ii) Metallic Money (iii) Paper Money (iv) Credit Money (v) Plastic Money....and now Digital Money.

The world’s biggest economies and their central banks have announced they are working on CBDCs: the US Federal Reserve, the Bank of Canada and the European Central Bank are trailing behind the People’s Bank of China, which already is testing its CBDC with more than fifty thousand citizens.

Bank of International Settlements: Central bank digital currencies

Central bank digital currencies: foundational principles and core features (PDF)

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby vijayk » 03 Dec 2020 21:08

chanakyaa wrote:Some of the major stages through which money has evolved are as follows: (i) Commodity Money (ii) Metallic Money (iii) Paper Money (iv) Credit Money (v) Plastic Money....and now Digital Money.

The world’s biggest economies and their central banks have announced they are working on CBDCs: the US Federal Reserve, the Bank of Canada and the European Central Bank are trailing behind the People’s Bank of China, which already is testing its CBDC with more than fifty thousand citizens.

Bank of International Settlements: Central bank digital currencies

Central bank digital currencies: foundational principles and core features (PDF)


we need this too ... We can track how terror/agitations are being funded

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby sudarshan » 05 Dec 2020 07:46

X-post from mil thread (why was this posted there in the first place)?

bharathp wrote:about time this happened:
https://www.indiatvnews.com/news/india/india-says-unga-fails-to-acknowledge-rising-hatred-violence-against-buddhism-hinduism-sikhism-669103

Calling out the "selectivity" at the United Nations in condemning acts of violence against religions, India has said the UN General Assembly has failed to acknowledge the rising hatred and violence against Buddhism, Hinduism, Sikhism and underlined that the culture of peace cannot be only for "Abrahamic" religions.


Calling out the "selectivity" at the United Nations in condemning acts of violence against religions, India has said the UN General Assembly has failed to acknowledge the rising hatred and violence against Buddhism, Hinduism, Sikhism and underlined that the culture of peace cannot be only for "Abrahamic" religions.

Addressing the UN General Assembly session on 'Culture of Peace' on Wednesday, First Secretary in India's Permanent Mission to the UN Ashish Sharma said there are “disconcerting trends” in the world of today.

While India fully agrees that anti-Semitism, Islamaphobia and anti-Christian acts need to be condemned and the country also firmly condemns such acts, he pointed out that UN resolutions on such important issues speak only of these three Abrahamic religions together.

“This august body fails to acknowledge the rise of hatred and violence against Buddhism, Hinduism and Sikhism also,” Sharma said.

“Culture of peace cannot be only for Abrahamic religions. And as long as such selectivity exists, the world can never truly foster a culture of peace,” he said.

Asserting that the UN is not a body which should take sides when it comes to religion, Sharma said if “we are indeed selective”, the world will end up proving American political scientist Samuel Huntington's 'clash of civilisations'.

“What we are trying to build here is an ‘alliance of civilisations’, not set up a clash. I call on the UN Alliance of Civilisation to act likewise and speak for all, not just a select few,” he said.

Sharma recalled the shattering of the iconic Bamyan Buddha by fundamentalists in Afghanistan as well as the terrorist bombing of a gurdwara in the war-torn country in March where 25 Sikh worshipers were killed and the destruction of Hindu and Buddhist temples and minority cleansing of these religions by countries.

He told the 193-member General Assembly that such acts call for condemning violence and attacks against Buddhist, Hindu and Sikh religions also.

“But the current member states refuse to speak of these religions in the same breath as the first three ‘Abrahamic’ religions. Why is this selectivity?” he asked. Sharma noted that overall, Hinduism has more than 1.2 billion followers, Buddhism has over 535 million followers and Sikhism around 30 million followers across the world.

“It is time that attacks against these religions are also added to the earlier list of the three Abrahamic religions when such resolutions are passed,” he said.

Key UN General Assembly resolutions over the years have categorically condemned and voiced concern over increase in “anti-Semitism, Christianophobia and Islamophobia in various parts of the world”.

However, violence against other religious minorities “get little more than a slap on the wrist”, a sentiment shared by several other countries also, sources said.

Sharma told the General Assembly session that India is not just the birthplace of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism, but is also the land where the teachings of Islam, Judaism, Christianity and Zoroastrianism have taken strong root and where the Sufi tradition of Islam has flourished.

“Today, every one of the world’s major religions has a home in India,” he said. Sharma said for millennia, India has provided shelter to waves of those persecuted in foreign lands, and allowed them to thrive in India.

“And our tradition of inter-culture dialogue goes right to the time when ancient Indian thinkers had a flourishing dialogue with the ancient Greeks.

India is not just a culture, but a civilisation in itself,” he added.

Underlining that culture of peace is the cornerstone of the foundation of a global order of peace and tolerance, he said India has tried to foster this culture through tolerance, understanding, respect for differences, respect for other religions and cultures, respect for human rights, gender equality -- all this under the overarching umbrella of pluralistic ethos and democratic principles.

India on Wednesday co-sponsored a resolution presented by Bangladesh titled, 'Follow-up to the Declaration and Programme of Action on a Culture of Peace'.

The resolution reiterates that the objective of the effective implementation of the Programme of Action is to strengthen further the global movement for a culture of peace. It invites member states to continue to place greater emphasis on and expand their activities promoting a culture of peace at the national, regional and international levels and to ensure that peace and non-violence are fostered at all levels.


hard hitting points! about time India took on the role of protector of Dharma for the world over.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby sudarshan » 05 Dec 2020 08:03

^ Yay, I like :). There's a lot more that India could be talking about though.

Europeans and Americans like to see themselves as some kind of beacons of religion and culture. They are anything but.

The Abrahamic traditions are all Asian. When it comes to religion, there is no "western vs. eastern." It's all Asian, all of the traditions which survive today (except in small pockets, in Africa or remote S. America). With religion, there is only west Asian vs. east Asian. From Alaska to Wellington, Santiago to Tokyo, it is Asian notions of religion, spirituality, and morality which rule the world. European traditions (Thor and Odin, Perun, Zeus, Poseidon, Jupiter, and Mars) are all dead and gone. Nobody cares if the Wiccan way grows from 1000 followers to 3000 in a decade, hence earning the title of "fastest growing religion!" The Egyptian way is gone as well.

While Asians agonize over the two or three centuries of colonization by Europe, the Asian colonization of Europe (spiritual), and through Europe - the Americas and Oceania, has lasted more than a thousand years so far, and is still going strong.

Europeans and Americans like to get over these uncomfortable facts by claiming "the Jews killed Jesus." So what? The Americans killed Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln was the messiah of the oppressed. His message of emancipation didn't resonate with the Americans. So they killed him. It is worth pointing out that Lincoln's assassin was undeniably an American.

Sounds ridiculous? That's essentially what the western world did with the Jesus narrative. Jesus was a Jew, he lived and preached among the Jews, and one of his disciples betrayed him. Of course this disciple was a Jew, what else could he be, given that everybody around Jesus was a Jew? The Europeans were nowhere in the picture. So if a group of Africans or Asians adopt Lincoln as their own messiah and guilt-trip the Americans for killing him, that would be - same difference?

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby pravula » 05 Dec 2020 08:40

Romans were very much around...

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby sudarshan » 05 Dec 2020 08:50

pravula wrote:Romans were very much around...


Thanks! That would be the trap. The European Romans were doing - what - to Jesus?

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby sudarshan » 06 Dec 2020 03:48

^ No response yet?

The point is - the European (and by extension - American/ Australian etc.) narrative on Xtianity is self-serving, and masks some truths which are extremely uncomfortable to them. A little bit of needling on it will cause great khujli. The needling can take the form of a blatant provocation (like above), with somebody or the other among their side taking the bait (exactly like our friend above). Then nudge the dialogue towards ever greater discomfort and realization of their submissive role in giving up their ancestral faiths and accepting an Asian import.

The Romans (Europeans) were the ones who killed Jesus. Undeniable fact. "But the Romans later repented and were among the first to embrace Xtianity!" Great! So the Romans (Europeans) repented, gave up their barbarous European ways and took up a civilized Asian construct. How can that not cause khujli to the superior European mind? The Roman submission is especially uncomfortable, since modern Europe lives to a large extent in the shadow of imperial Rome. The Greek submission is even more uncomfortable, since Rome herself basically copy-catted Greek culture. All western European languages still use the Latin alphabet. And many Latin and Greek loan words. Scratch any European language, you will see a good bit of Latin and/or Greek beneath the surface. Even the relatively independent German - for example, the German word "Kaiser" (for emperor - remember Kaiser Wilhelm II?) is basically the Latin word "Caesar." As for eastern Europe, the Cyrillic script is a mix of Greek and Latin letters, and on top of that, many east European languages continue to use the Latin script.

What a peaceful takeover that was! All that the Asian side had to do was to present their case, and the Europeans immediately saw the error of their ways, such was the moral superiority of Asia over Europe, that Europe gave in without a fight!

"No, that's not quite right, there was conflict...."

Great! So Europe fought back, but lost the fight to Asia! Even better. It is also a fact that Europeans themselves destroyed their older temples and shrines and built Churches in their place.

Self-serving, but factually wrong narratives, can be manipulated to cause great discomfort, with a little bit of pisko. India, take note.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby sudarshan » 06 Dec 2020 04:07

Also very glad that the Bamiyan Buddhas were mentioned. That was a tragic act, and India needs to step up and take ownership of the outrage. These Buddha statues were really ancient, in fact, one of the best descriptions of these statues comes from Hsuan Tsang, who visited them back in the 7th century (~650 AD) - nearly 1500 years ago. Hsuan Tsang's entry point into India back then, is in Afghanistan now. Now that the statues are gone, these kinds of ancient descriptions are all that are left, to conceptualize how they would have looked in their glory.

Hsuan Tsang crossed the Hindu Kush mountains to get to India (they weren't called that back then, obviously). And the name of those mountains is something that India again can exploit to the hilt, to highlight what the world to the west of India, inflicted on India for 1200 years.

Oh, the other thing that India can do, is to drop this pretense of the "English alphabet." There is no such thing. The letters I'm typing in now are Latin/ Roman letters. And any numerals I use are Hindu numerals. The many schools in India which use English as the medium, need to start emphasizing these facts to students from a young age. Many times when goras ask me "what dialect of Indian do you speak?" and I tell them it's a language - they ask "does it have a script?" And I make sure to tell them - "very much so - unlike English!" That gets some raised eyebrows - "never heard of A-B-C buddy?" At which point I remind them that A-B-C is the Latin alphabet, and that no European so-called language has its own script, except Greek (even the Latin script is to some extent derived from the Greek one). Superiority quickly turns to chagrin....

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Shanmukh » 06 Dec 2020 22:47

sudarshan wrote:There is no such thing. The letters I'm typing in now are Latin/ Roman letters. And any numerals I use are Hindu numerals. The many schools in India which use English as the medium, need to start emphasizing these facts to students from a young age. Many times when goras ask me "what dialect of Indian do you speak?" and I tell them it's a language - they ask "does it have a script?" And I make sure to tell them - "very much so - unlike English!" That gets some raised eyebrows - "never heard of A-B-C buddy?" At which point I remind them that A-B-C is the Latin alphabet, and that no European so-called language has its own script, except Greek (even the Latin script is to some extent derived from the Greek one). Superiority quickly turns to chagrin....


Actually, even the Greek alphabet came from the Phoenician alphabet. Greek alphabet is also a modified version of the Phoenician alphabet, which is of Asian origin - comes from the Syria-Lebanon area.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby sudarshan » 07 Dec 2020 00:24

Shanmukh wrote:Actually, even the Greek alphabet came from the Phoenician alphabet. Greek alphabet is also a modified version of the Phoenician alphabet, which is of Asian origin - comes from the Syria-Lebanon area.


I looked it up, and you're right. Good point to keep in mind. I don't push too far on language issues, since one never knows when the "Indo-European" nonsense will pop up. Maybe in a few years, when the DNA evidence solidifies against AIT, it will allow the deliverance of some potent nose-cuts against the "linguists."

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby CalvinH » 07 Dec 2020 00:26

sudarshan wrote:
Hsuan Tsang crossed the Hindu Kush mountains to get to India (they weren't called that back then, obviously). And the name of those mountains is something that India again can exploit to the hilt, to highlight what the world to the west of India, inflicted on India for 1200 years..


I personally think that Hindu Kush is later Muslim invention to just to rub it on the Indians and glorify Islamic conquests. Koh, Kash are Persian and Dari words for mountain. Kuh is westernized form of Koh. The mountain was always known as Hind-koh or Hind-o-kash. Latter probably meaning the mountain pass to Hind. Most mountains have a Koh in their name in that region.

From there somewhere Hind became Hindu. Need to check the origin of the new definition and description.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Adrija » 07 Dec 2020 17:03

I personally think that Hindu Kush is later Muslim invention to just to rub it on the Indians and glorify Islamic conquests. Koh, Kash are Persian and Dari words for mountain. Kuh is westernized form of Koh. The mountain was always known as Hind-koh or Hind-o-kash. Latter probably meaning the mountain pass to Hind. Most mountains have a Koh in their name in that region.


The name as per the Puranas of the Hindukush is Nishadh; the old name for Suleiman range is Malayawan (literally- mountain forest)

For interest, Gandhamadan (where the Pandavas came across Lord Shiv) is identified as the Karakoram ranges; what is today Afghanistan is Harivarsh (the southwestern part) and Ilavritvarsh (northern part). Meru is identified as the Pamir knot, Turkemnistan as Ketumalavarsh and also Bhaumshilatal (where Agni resides)- interesting as a lot of gas deposits are found there and constantly burn from seepage from the ground... also a phenomenon accurately described in the Vayu Puran while describing the overall geography of Jambudwipa

All references from the book by K S Valdiya (Geography, Peoples and Geodynamics of India in Puranas and Epics)

separately, IIRC, Hindukush literately means Hindu blood/ Hindu slaughter... indication of the countless lives lost while Hindus were enslaved and made to march to Arabia for sale in the slave market there

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby nandakumar » 12 Dec 2020 18:01

News report from WION news.
https://www.wionews.com/world/global-in ... ult-349165
It speaks of a string of defaults by Chinese companies. Some of it is old news. But the latest to default is the joint venture company partnering BMW. The report also speaks of these companies enjoying a triple A rating. If these companies were raising money in the global market then surely the likes of S&P, Moody's would have been involved. How did they give it such ratings?

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Pratyush » 12 Dec 2020 19:52

Double tap self deleted.
Last edited by Pratyush on 12 Dec 2020 19:57, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Pratyush » 12 Dec 2020 19:56

When it comes to rating any PRC company by any American ratings agency.

People should take that rating with a ton of salt.

The rating agencies are deeply compromised. The links are deep and so well entrenched that Trump's efforts to fight a trade war with PRC was defeated not by PRC. But by American companies and wall street interests.

The best part is that many of the people who damaged the American side in the trade war have now been selected for a position in the Biden admin to be sworn in.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Suraj » 13 Dec 2020 02:26

Ratings agencies are not compromised . They’re doing their job when they behave in their described manner . When it comes to sovereign ratings they have always been a political instrument.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby vera_k » 13 Dec 2020 08:34

However, the ratings of PRC companies are based on fake data, since the audits are of dubious quality.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby uddu » 13 Dec 2020 09:02

Suraj wrote:Ratings agencies are not compromised . They’re doing their job when they behave in their described manner . When it comes to sovereign ratings they have always been a political instrument.


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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby chola » 13 Dec 2020 12:21

^^^ Money is pouring into Cheen and will be for the next several years:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-12-12/relentless-china-inflows-spur-call-for-strongest-yuan-since-1993

Relentless China Inflows Spur Call for Strongest Yuan Since 1993

Bloomberg News
December 12, 2020, 6:00 PM EST

Currency could rise to 6 a dollar on strong fund influx: Citi
Foreigners boosted pace of adding Chinese notes this year
The unrelenting pace of inflows heading for China’s bonds and stocks has one yuan bull predicting the currency could strengthen to a level not seen in nearly three decades.

A “flood” of foreign cash will chase yuan-denominated assets in 2021 because they’ll offer far better yield than the rest of the world, according to Liu Li-gang, chief China economist at Citigroup Inc. He predicts the currency could rally 10% to 6 per dollar -- or even more -- by the end of next year. The yuan hasn’t been that strong since late 1993, just before China’s unification of official and market exchange rates triggered a plunge in the currency.

The yuan has been on a tear since late May, surging to a more than two-year high as data showed that China’s economy was rebounding from the virus pandemic. Overseas funds have increased their holdings of onshore bonds and stocks by more than 30% this year to records, official data showed, prompted by index inclusions and the country’s wide interest-rate premium over other markets. To slow the advance, Beijing has made it cheaper for traders to bet against the yuan and has relaxed capital curbs to allow more outflows. But those measures have done little to dampen optimism.

...


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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby chola » 13 Dec 2020 12:33

They are experiencing both a rising currency and rising exports at the same time. Usually a rising currency would dampen exports by making too expensive.

Eventually the strong Yuan will impact their exports but right now it makes their imports of raw material cheaper which feeds into their manufacturing engine. They are making an unprecedented 70% of all steel in the world.

https://www.newsweek.com/america-defiance-trump-trade-war-most-china-exports-1552984

Chinese Exports Hit Record High Despite Donald Trump's Trade War

BY TOM O'CONNOR ON 12/7/20 AT 6:39 PM EST

Despite President Donald Trump's trade war with the People's Republic, Chinese exports have hit an all-time high. These record sales come as the West suffers the ravages of a resurgent pandemic, with the U.S. leading the world with more than 280,000 deaths from COVID-19.

Data released Monday by China's General Administration of Customs showed Chinese exports witnessed their biggest boom in nearly three years last month, growing 21.1% as compared to November of last year. The result was valued at some $268 billion, the largest export sales ever recorded by China in a single month, raising the country's trade surplus to $75.42 billion – more than double the figure from this same time last year.

In spite of the pandemic, the U.S. topped the list of importers, with Chinese imports valued at $51.9 billion, up 46% from last November. The Chinese trade surplus with the U.S. rose by more than half to $37.3 billion this November, the same month in which Donald Trump lost the election.
...



https://asia.nikkei.com/Economy/China-to-overtake-US-economy-by-2028-29-in-COVID-s-wake-JCER

China to overtake US economy by 2028-29 in COVID's wake: JCER

Forecasts chart next 15 years for India, Vietnam and other key economies

China is poised to become a high-income country by 2023 and exceed the U.S. GDP later this decade.


MASASHI UEHARA, JCER director and principal economist, and AKIRA TANAKA, senior economist
December 10, 2020 16:16 JST

TOKYO -- The Chinese economy is likely to surpass that of the U.S. in either 2028 or 2029, as the Asian giant emerges from the coronavirus pandemic in a position of strength, a new study by the Japan Center for Economic Research shows.
...


Karma only takes affect in the next life. Not this one.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 14 Dec 2020 05:45

Adrija wrote:
I personally think that Hindu Kush is later Muslim invention to just to rub it on the Indians and glorify Islamic conquests. Koh, Kash are Persian and Dari words for mountain. Kuh is westernized form of Koh. The mountain was always known as Hind-koh or Hind-o-kash. Latter probably meaning the mountain pass to Hind. Most mountains have a Koh in their name in that region.


The name as per the Puranas of the Hindukush is Nishadh; the old name for Suleiman range is Malayawan (literally- mountain forest)

For interest, Gandhamadan (where the Pandavas came across Lord Shiv) is identified as the Karakoram ranges; what is today Afghanistan is Harivarsh (the southwestern part) and Ilavritvarsh (northern part). Meru is identified as the Pamir knot, Turkemnistan as Ketumalavarsh and also Bhaumshilatal (where Agni resides)- interesting as a lot of gas deposits are found there and constantly burn from seepage from the ground... also a phenomenon accurately described in the Vayu Puran while describing the overall geography of Jambudwipa

All references from the book by K S Valdiya (Geography, Peoples and Geodynamics of India in Puranas and Epics)

separately, IIRC, Hindukush literately means Hindu blood/ Hindu slaughter... indication of the countless lives lost while Hindus were enslaved and made to march to Arabia for sale in the slave market there



Thanks for passing on the knowledge. Ramana

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby krishna_krishna » 20 Dec 2020 08:39

Posting this as it has many important lessons on understanding geopolitical events in the world today:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5AFY_ySmQ4


The film is about delivery of F-14 tomcats to Iran by Northrop G. , see how entire cities were build to build capabilities of US control of the world that lasted till 2015 I would say about 30 years. From building cities to training people to other stuff. Now compare this with what China is doing today and what we must do.


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