Analyzing CPEC

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anupmisra
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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby anupmisra » 07 Jul 2018 06:27

arun wrote:A Blast from the past.

“Pagal Sehgal” aka Ikram Sehgal

Misconceptions about CPEC


Does he still fondly remember his sojourn in India as a POW?

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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 19 Jul 2018 15:56

Fully Posted on the Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat

After Pak, China is trying to build an economic corridor to Myanmar
BEIJING: China and Myanmar are close to signing an agreement on the establishment of a China-Myanmar economic corridor along the lines of the controversial China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC)). Once launched, the project will unleash a huge influx of Chinese funds to Myanmar, which can further weaken the Indian influence on the eastern neighbor.
REQUEST FOR HELP : I cannot Copy and Paste Articles in Times of India and Economic Times. Request Advice - Thanks in Advance.

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Falijee » 23 Jul 2018 19:41

X posted from Terroristan

C.P.EC Collateral Damage Of Paki Financial Crisis :roll:

Many CPEC projects in doldrums as NHA faces financial crisis
July 23, 2018

ISLAMABAD: A number of road projects related to the $52 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) are said to be in doldrums as the National Highway Authority (NHA) faces financial crisis.
Not only the NHA, but the whole accursed country is in a financial squeeze !
Sources told Dawn that contractors have stopped work on several CPEC projects after their cheques worth over Rs5 billion had bounced a couple of days ago.
And the cheque bouncing will have a "multiplier effect" down the Paki food chain :twisted:
It is for the first time that CPEC projects faced such a situation because of financial reasons.
You have to take this statement with a grain of salt !
The projects which have been hit by the situation include Hakla-Dera Ismail Khan, Western Route of CPEC and all sections of Karachi-Lahore Motorway (KLM).
According to the sources, seven packages of Hakla-DIK measuring 400km roads all projects of KLM have been affected. The firms whose cheques have bounced include SKB, ZKB, Noman Construction, ACGC Chinese, Sardar Ashraf D Baloch, China Railway 17 Group and Matracon. The sources said that not only the CPEC projects but local industries related to construction and a large workforce of engineers and labourers have also been hit by the situation.
. And this in turn will have an effect on family livelihood etc etc !
When contacted, NHA spokesman Kashif Zaman said the authority issued cheques of Rs5bn on June 29 to the firms against the sanction by the government.He said cheques worth Rs1.5bn were cleared by the same day and “the remaining cheques that were deposited the next day could not be cleared”.Mr Zaman said the matter had been taken up with the government and hopefully it would be resolved soon.
The IMF will take a long hard look at the "whole CPEC business" before they agree to release US Dollars to the hungry Pakis :twisted:
When asked about suspension of work by the contractors, he said: “The progress on the project had not been affected. Same is true for Hazara Motorway and other sections.” He said most of the projects in question would be completed by December 2018.
In Pakiland, talk is cheap !
However, it has been learnt that the CPEC projects would be delayed further if the situation continues and outstanding dues of contractors are not paid. :D


PS: Some readers are blaming "all weather friend" China for this ! Not knowing that there is "no free lunch" :twisted:

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Falijee » 24 Jul 2018 05:33

X posted !

Chinese Embassy In Islamabad Reacts To Negative Article On CPEC In The Wall Street Journal .

Statement by Chinese Embassy in Pakistan
July 23, 2018

The report from the Wall Street Journal severely deviates from the facts. As a major pilot project of Belt and Road Initiative, China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) has achieved great progress in the last 5 years. CPEC has effectively alleviated energy crisis and infrastructure shortage which are considered as two bottlenecks in Pakistan's development, and played a positive role in maintaining the relatively high economic growth in Pakistan. As an early harvest :roll: project in CPEC, the Lahore Orange Line project has been widely welcomed by the Pakistani government and people, creating a large number of job opportunities. After the completion, it will greatly ease the traffic congestion in Lahore and provide people with affordable energy-saving transportation.
The buzz word of "early harvest" crops up again :mrgreen:
The report stated that CPEC led to the debt crisis of Pakistan. This is a highly irresponsible statement that fails to reflect the reality. According to data released by the Pakistani government, 42% of foreign debt of Pakistan is from multilateral financial institutions, 18% of the debt is from Paris Club. Chinese preferential loans only account for only 10% of whole foreign debt, and offer a much lower rate than commercial bank loans. From this perspective, even if there is a so-called "debt trap", the initiator is not China. As to the people who fabricated the lie that the so-called "debt trap" in Pakistan is caused by CPEC, if they are unable to offer tangible assistance to Pakistan, they can at least try to put the sincere cooperation between other countries in perspective.
The debt trap policy is already achieved in Sri - Lanka and other nations !
The cooperation under CPEC has always adhered to the principles of mutual benefit, equality and reciprocity, follows the golden rules of extensive consultation, joint contribution and shared benefits. The planning and implementation of the CPEC has been discussed by the both sides in the open. No country is dominating the process. Both sides have an equal say. Firmly promoting CPEC is an across-party national consensus in Pakistan and received the wholehearted support from the Pakistani people. We believe that the CPEC will be advanced in a steady manner in accordance with the consensus reached by China and Pakistan without being disturbed by other factors. We hope that relevant media reports could respect the truth, take off their tinted glasses, and make more objective, unbiased and all-sided reports. Their readers deserve the true story.
The Paki traders and domestic manufacturers are expressing the fear that cheap Chini goods would flood the local market !

The Chini Statement is more like a damage control exercise, IMO !

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Neshant » 24 Jul 2018 16:27

We gonna find out soon enough if it's a debt trap - as just about all OBOR projects turn out to be.

The proof will be self evident when China demands Pakistan hands over these (grossly over-priced) infrastructure projects to China as debt repayment.

.

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby chetak » 24 Jul 2018 22:16

twitter

Former Iran Foreign Minister Kharrazi says at Tsinghua forum that Iran ultimately wants to connect Chabahar to Gwadar

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby chetak » 27 Jul 2018 09:32

It may be more likely that the chinese have decided to change horses in the middle of the stream. For the paki army to go after nawaz sharif as brutally as it did, something very significant has happened between NS and the jehadi army generals.

NS may not get out of prison alive. If this happens, the autopsy report will say "natural causes", for sure.


China bet big on Nawaz Sharif. Now it has a lot riding on the outcome of #PakistanElections2018:

[url-https://www.dailyo.in/politics/pakistan-election-pakistan-tehreek-e-insaf-imran-khan-cpec-china-pakistan-relations-nawaz-sharif/story/1/25663.html]Why China is watching Pakistan elections closely[/url]




Why China is watching Pakistan elections closely

Beijing has said it will work closely with the new government in Islamabad.

25-07-2018
Ananth KrishnanANANTH KRISHNAN @ananthkrishnan

China is watching closely as Pakistan comes out to vote on July 25 and counting happens on July 26 because Beijing believes its $62 billion China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) could be at stake.

When China launched the "flagship" of its massive Belt and Road Initiative, it was banking on CPEC transforming Pakistan and providing a boost to the Nawaz Sharif government.

In fact, an internal assessment conducted before Sharif's dismissal by Renmin University of China concluded that a government under the former chief minister would best ensure the project's progress, expressing concern about his weakening domestic position after the Panama Papers revelations.

"If there are no exceptions, the chances for PML-N (Sharif's party) to reassume power are high, and the continuation of the government can guarantee the continuation and support of the government to CPEC," the 2016 report said.

That assumption, however, was proved wrong. During the campaign, Imran Khan of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) criticised the outgoing government over lack of transparency in many CPEC projects and alleged corruption.

Details that have come to light recently have underlined the extraordinarily favourable terms that Pakistan has agreed to. A Wall Street Journal report on July 22 revealed that Chinese power companies had been given a guarantee of an astounding 34 per cent annual return on their investments in CPEC projects, to be paid by the Pakistan government in dollars.

This even as Pakistan's finances have teetered on the brink of a crisis, with suggestions that the new government will be forced to seek an International Monetary Fund bailout and its foreign exchange reserves dwindling.

On the eve of the election on Tuesday, China's Foreign Ministry said it believed no matter what the election results, it would work with the new Pakistani government closely.

Foreign ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang said: "We believe the construction of CPEC will move forward according to the consensus reached by the two sides and will not be affected by other factors."

China would work with the new government to ensure that was the case, he said. "We would like to work together with the new government to deepen practical cooperation and move forward our all-weather strategic partnership," he said.

Beijing also defended the CPEC against the criticism. "The CPEC is a framework for strategic cooperation with eyes on long-term development of the two countries. It will help Pakistan develop and elevate cooperation between the two sides."

He added: "The corridor has played an important role in advancing the social and economic development of Pakistan. It enjoys the full support of Pakistani people and the government."

That, however, hasn't appeared to be the case during the hard-fought election campaign where China's projects, unusually, came under the spotlight

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby anupmisra » 27 Jul 2018 17:32

chetak wrote:Snippets...

China bet big on Nawaz Sharif.

"If there are no exceptions, the chances for PML-N (Sharif's party) to reassume power are high, and the continuation of the government can guarantee the continuation and support of the government to CPEC," the 2016 report said.

During the campaign, Imran Khan of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) criticised the outgoing government over lack of transparency in many CPEC projects and alleged corruption.

A Wall Street Journal report on July 22 revealed that Chinese power companies had been given a guarantee of an astounding 34 per cent annual return on their investments in CPEC projects, to be paid by the Pakistan government in dollars.


And now this...word of "advice" from the chini blothels:

Chinese media's "advice" for Imran Khan
Sounds more like a directive to me.

Global Times, a widely criculated English Daily in China, said in an article that new government in Pakistan would continue continue contributing to promote the CPEC despite "Western media" hyping Imran Khan's reservations about the project". (Refer to WSJ article)
"It is also foreseeable in the future that Western countries and media will continue to make an issue of the corridor and Chinese investment in Pakistan in an attempt to drive a wedge between China and Pakistan. The new Pakistan government should be particular wise to this," said an article in the paper. (Ouch!)


https://www.thenews.com.pk/latest/34701 ... imran-khan

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Neshant » 28 Jul 2018 17:14

US/China Trade War : Analysis with Richard Duncan

https://www.scmp.com/business/companies ... istory-and

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby arun » 01 Aug 2018 17:17

CNBC Exclusive: CNBC Transcript: U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo Speaks with CNBC’s Michelle Caruso-Cabrera Today

Published 6:29 PM ET Mon, 30 July 2018

WHEN: Today, Monday, July 30, 2018

WHERE: CNBC's "Closing Bell"

The following is the unofficial transcript of a CNBC EXCLUSIVE interview with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera on CNBC's "Closing Bell" (M-F 3 – 5PM) today, Monday, July 30th. The following is a link to video of the interview on CNBC.com: https://www.cnbc.com/video/2018/07/30/s ... tml?play=1 ……………

MICHELLE CARUSO-CABRERA: One of the countries that's really gorged on One Belt, One Road is Pakistan. So much so they've taken on all kinds of debt. They might actually have to go to the IMF, the International Monetary Fund, for a bailout because they've taken on so much Chinese debt. The IMF is funded by U.S. taxpayer dollars. Many other countries as well, but if they go to the IMF for a bailout, there's a chance that U.S. taxpayer dollars are going to go towards Chinese directed companies as-- as part of that bailout. Are you concerned about that? Are you monitoring that?

MIKE POMPEO: So two thoughts. First, there's new leadership in Pakistan and we welcome engagement with them in a way that we think will benefit each of our two countries. Second-- make no mistake-- we will be watching what the IMF does. There's no rationale for IMF tax dollars-- and associated with that, American dollars that are part of the IMF funding-- for those to go to bail out Chinese bondholders or-- or China itself.


From here:

CNBC Clicky

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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 04 Aug 2018 03:12

X Posted on the Terroristan and OBOR, Chinese Strategy and Implications Threads

This is an Eight Page Article and so just posting a Link.

China’s Empire of Money Is Reshaping Global Trade
Xi Jinping’s new “Belt and Road” initiative is designed to promote economic development and extend China’s influence. Bloomberg Markets reports on the massive project’s impact along the Silk Road.
China is building a very 21st century empire—one where trade and debt lead the way, not armadas and boots on the ground. If President Xi Jinping’s ambitions become a reality, Beijing will cement its position at the center of a new world economic order spanning more than half the globe. Already, China has extended its influence far beyond that of the Tang Dynasty’s golden age more than a millennium ago.
The most tangible manifestation of Xi’s designs is the new Silk Road he first proposed in 2013. The enterprise morphed into the “Belt and Road” initiative, a mix of foreign policy, economic strategy, and charm offensive that, nurtured by a torrent of Chinese money, is rebalancing global political and economic alliances.

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby arun » 04 Aug 2018 09:57

X Posted from the Pakistani Economic Stress Watch Thread.

Former IMF Executive Director representing the US writes an article titled “Pakistan, the United States, and the IMF”.

Informs that the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan “According to IMF data, the fund has had 21 programs with Pakistan since 1958, 14 of which since 1980.” The Islamic Republic is one hell of a serial, repeat and persistent borrower from the IMF.

Regards CPEC aka Conning Pakistan to Enrich China, Sobel has this to say:

“The fund must also ensure that its resources are not used to bail out unsustainable Chinese CPEC lending. The fund needs to have at its fingertips comprehensive data on all CPEC lending—its terms, maturities, and parties involved. Chinese lending should be on realistic terms and consistent with Pakistan’s sustainability. Otherwise, China should reschedule or write down its loans, sharply reducing the value of its claims.”

Pakistan, the United States, and the IMF

Sound advise but then the Mohammadden Terrorism Fomenting Islamic Republic of Pakistan are known to lie about economic details and indeed the IMF was itself was victim. IMF Press release of April 28, 2000 regards “misreporting of fiscal data to the IMF between 1997 and 1999” follows:

IMF NEWS BRIEF NO. 00/23 : IMF Executive Board Reviews Pakistan Misreporting, Remedial Steps

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Neshant » 05 Aug 2018 18:45

IMF needs to know the terms of the CPEC loans before disbursing it's own loans.

If the the IMF does not clarify all the terms now, they are going to be in for a surprise.

Specifically which party gets seniority on claims to state revenue and/or assets.

It sure looks like a China-Pakistan plan to take out big loans and later default on the IMF in the same way Greece will do with their IMF loans eventually. Except Greece is a NATO member and China-Pakistan ain't.

IMF better be sure they can collect on the collateral that has been pledged before handing over the loans.

Pakistan is positioning itself as a condom for China to do bad things overseas both financial and criminal.

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby arun » 12 Aug 2018 09:02

X Posted from the “Baluchistan: The Story of Another Pakistan Military Genocide” thread to the Terroristan and CPEC threads though technically the PRC funded Saindak Copper-Gold Mine is not a part of CPEC.

Baloch fighter dares China before blowing himself in a fidayeen attack :

"We have told China multiple times to shun plundering Baloch resources and refrain from becoming part of any Pakistani designs. We have asked China time and again to take their engineers and workers out of Balochistan. However, China never paid heed to our justified demands", said Rehan Baloch in a video message issued from an undisclosed location in Balochistan.

In his message, Rehan accused that 'with China's help, Pakistan has intensified its offensive against Baloch nation and thousands have been killed and their villages destroyed in Pakistani military operations.

"China has also been providing arms, ammunition, funds and communication devices to Pakistan to use against Baloch national struggle. This is a serious crime both legally and morally with China's help. Pakistan has intensified its offensive against Baloch nation and thousands have been killed and hundreds of villages have been destroyed. During Pakistani military operation thousands of Baloch have been forced to leave their ancestral land to become refugees in Iran, Afghanistan and Middle East", said the young Baloch fighter, who appeared holding an automatic weapon.

"Through this act, I want to make China and its people realize that whosoever will try to meddle in Baloch issue without Baloch nation's consent, it will face the wrath of the Baloch nation," he added.

"It cannot be possible at all for a foreign country to plunder the precious natural resources and wealth of Baloch nation without any resistance when our people are deprived of basic necessities, China should immediately withdraw its investment and forces from Balochistan or else they will continue to face Baloch youth", said Rehan Baloch.


Clicky

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby venug » 13 Aug 2018 16:25

Don't know if posted before:
China's Road through Pakistan
Chinese believe CPEC/BRI as 1000 year opportunity to reassert Chinese power and displace US... They also think CPEC will help contain common enemy India


Its a "hit many birds with one stone strategy", even thought it is economically short sighted


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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 17 Aug 2018 14:50

X Posted on the Terroristan Thread

Pakistan should ‘renegotiate’ some CPEC terms, agreements - Bilal Memon

KARACHI: Islamabad should renegotiate some of the terms and agreements under the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), the country’s business community says, as the new government prepares to tackle economic challenges and the pressure to reap benefits of the multi-billion dollar project.

CPEC is part of China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and involves billions of dollars worth of energy and infrastructure projects including the development of Gwadar Port in Balochistan, arguably Pakistan’s most neglected and underdeveloped province. While the previous government hailed and sold the project as a ‘game-changer’, onlookers as well as stakeholders feel details of the agreements under CPEC remain opaque, raising questions on the extent of the benefit to Pakistan and the simultaneous debt burden on the South Asian economy.

With the country’s economic managers now facing a headache over the balance of payments’ position amid depleting foreign currency reserves, the business community feels this would be the right time to revisit some of the finer details of CPEC agreements as Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf’s (PTI) government prepares to take over to navigate the way forward.

“There is a need to renegotiate returns of power producers,” Ehsan Malik, chief executive of the Pakistan Business Council (PBC), told The Express Tribune. “The question needs to be asked if the new government can sustain this (high guaranteed returns).”

Under the framework agreement, Pakistan has set up a revolving fund and is required to deposit 22% of the value of power generated by CPEC energy projects to protect Chinese companies from the adverse effects of inter-corporate circular debt.

On the issue of investments and loans extended by Beijing and Chinese companies, Malik said Pakistan needs to make realistic projections and compile a comprehensive record of financial flows in a centralised manner to understand its debt burden and address its sustainability concerns. “There have been no projections and very little transparency. A financial close for the next 10 years needs to be developed by the central bank.”

Arif Habib, chairman of Pakistani conglomerate Arif Habib Group, feels the financial close of some projects under CPEC has remained slow, adding to cost escalation and inefficiency.

Additionally, while CPEC brings with it a number of benefits for Pakistan, including cheaper power, Gwadar Port’s transit fees could have been higher, said Habib.

His comments come in the wake of reports last year that 91% of the revenue to be generated from the Gwadar Port would go to China with Pakistan bagging the remaining share for the next 40 years.

However, Ahsan Iqbal, Pakistan’s former minister for planning, development and reform, and the man who spearheaded CPEC negotiations with China during the previous government’s tenure, said a higher transit fees could make Gwadar Port uncompetitive. “If we increase the fees, the Chinese would increase the cost of port handling, which will make it uncompetitive,” said Iqbal in an emailed response to The Express Tribune. “No new concessions have been given to China in Gwadar. The Chinese were given the same treatment offered to the Singapore Port Authority for running Gwadar Port.

“Instead of increasing the fees, turnover should be increased to make the port an attractive destination.”

However, Iqbal agreed that some CPEC projects were facing delays due to fulfillment of procedural requirements. “They took time in securing NOCs and Environment Protection Agency clearances. (However) almost all priority energy projects have achieved financial close.” While projects under CPEC continue, the business community has also argued moving labour-intensive and export-based Chinese industries to Pakistan.

“The government could argue relocating Chinese industries to industrial zones in Pakistan,” said Habib, adding that the export-based companies could take advantage of various incentives.

Malik echoed the same view, but with words of caution. “Labour-intensive industries face a higher cost in western and eastern China. You get apparel-making industries to move to Pakistan as long as it is a win-win.

“We have to realise that any incentive offered under CPEC needs to result in a net increase – be it a net increase in jobs or foreign exchange reserves or a net increase in production. Simply getting Chinese industries to move and giving them incentives at the expense of present businesses will not benefit the country.”

Malik said the PTI is well-positioned to make its case. “The PTI remains a better organised party that understands business, and is well-informed.” The PBC chief said the combination of “astute leadership” and the fact that PTI will enjoy a stronghold in two of the four provinces and easy sailing in the third will augur well for its negotiations.

Comments : 1. Let us see if Terroristan can Successfully Practice "TAQIYYa AND KITMAN with CHINA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQMyzfkXw0A



2. I am sure that by doing so Terroristan will ENTICE the USA to repay the Chinese Debt.

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Bart S » 17 Aug 2018 20:13

x-posting from OBOR thread. The Pakis of course have gone a step further in terms of letting the Chinese control all their telecommunications and get deeply enmeshed in their military and government, so this is hardly necessary for the Chinese when it comes to them.

https://www.scmagazine.com/fireeye-warn ... lfXj8CwKw1



FireEye warns China's Belt and Road Initiative will spark uptick in cyberespionage
Researchers speculate the project will spawn cyberespionage activity on regional governments along these trade routes and will likely include the emergence of new threat groups.
Researchers speculate the project will spawn cyberespionage activity on regional governments along these trade routes and will likely include the emergence of new threat groups.
FireEye researchers are cautioning Malaysian organizations to be on the lookout for elevated cyberespionage attacks that could result from recent political developments concerning China's Belt & Road Initiative.

The “One Belt, One Road” or "Belt and Road Initiative" (BRI) is an ambitious, multi-year, $1 trillion USD endeavor to build land and maritime trade routes across Asia and parts of Africa into Europe to project China's influence across the greater region, according to an internal FireEye report provided to SC Media.

Researchers speculate the project will spawn cyberespionage activity on regional governments along these trade routes and will likely include the emergence of new threat groups and nation-state actors considering the geopolitical interests that will be affected by the endeavor.

“Malaysia's new government has called for renegotiation of the terms of some Belt & Road projects, which is likely to generate some uncertainty in parties interested in the outcome of these projects and other regional developments,” Sandra Joyce, vice president and head of global intelligence operations at FireEye. “We expect espionage activity against Malaysian organizations will increase in an attempt to gain insight into current events,” said in a release prepared for the firm's customers.

Joyce added that Malaysian organizations both in the public and private sector should take steps to strategically manage their risk by understanding who their potential enemies are and how they would likely target them.

Researchers speculate threat actors may look to use announcements on BRI progress as a lure material for phishing attacks and other future intrusions and have already witnessed indication of cyberespionage activity in areas concerning the project is increasing from regional and unattributed actors.

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Manish_P » 21 Aug 2018 10:06

'Chinese only’ colony coming up in Pakistan

China is building a city for 5,00,000 Chinese nationals at a cost of $150 million in Gwadar as part of China-Pakistan Economic Corridor. This will be the first such Chinese city in South Asia.

Only Chinese citizens will live in this gated zone, which basically means that Pakistan will be used as a colony of China.


Will the chinese take care of the sanitation and cleaning all by themselves?
(Using chinese prisoners perhaps)

Can't risk any jihadi fundoos getting inside and turning it into a kill-box eh

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Aditya_V » 21 Aug 2018 10:17

POK is well forested, by cutting all trees within 10KM of the LOC, Pakis can generate a lot of revenue from wood, why don't they do that! or atleast IMF insist on it.

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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 27 Aug 2018 23:49

X Posted on the OBOR, Chinese Strategy and Implications Thread

India natural partner in Belt and Road: China

India is a natural partner in China's Belt and Road project and should not be paranoid about its key artery in the disputed Kashmir as it won't affect Beijing's neutral stance, a top Chinese government official said on Monday.

"Historically, India was an important country on the ancient Silk Road and it is fair to say that India was a natural partner in the ancient (Silk Road) and (is one) in the Belt and Road initiative," China's Assistant Foreign Minister Zhang Jun said here.

India has opposed Belt and Road's flagship project China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) as it cuts through the disputed Kashmir.

"China has repeatedly stressed that CPEC is an economic initiative. Implementing CPEC does not change China's position on Kashmir," Zhang said.

China is building a huge network of roads, highways, ports and sea lanes to connect Asia with Europe. Many countries including India suspect the project is a China's geostrategic ploy.

"Let me say a few points. First, India is an important neighbour of China. Both China and India are emerging economies and developing countries. Under the leadership of our leaders, China and India relations have exhibited a very good momentum of growth and entered a phase of development.

"I think we can all recall that since April, it has been only three months, President Xi and Prime Minister Modi met in Wuhan, in Qingdao, and in Johannesburg in South Africa.

"Three important meetings between of the two leaders and they have reached important understandings which added fresh and strong impetus to our bilateral ties," Zhang added.

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby chetak » 27 Aug 2018 23:57

@Peregrine saar,

These statements from the usually inscrutable hans are almost at panic levels.

eleven must be hurting real bad with internal dissensions building up and external loss of face from malayasia and surely some others contemplating similar actions.

The paki press has quietened somewhat after imran khan niazi has occupied the PM's gaddi.

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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 28 Aug 2018 00:27

chetak wrote:@Peregrine saar,

These statements from the usually inscrutable hans are almost at panic levels.

eleven must be hurting real bad with internal dissensions building up and external loss of face from malayasia and surely some others contemplating similar actions.

The paki press has quietened somewhat after imran khan niazi has occupied the PM's gaddi.
chetak Ji :

Totally agree with you and here is India's "Mouth Breaking" - Munh Toad - Response :

Fully Posted on the Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat Thread

With Eye on China’s Belt Road Initiative, India to step up economic partnerships with Eastern, Southern Europe
NEW DELHI: Amid Chinese inroads in Eastern Europe as part of its Belt Road Initiative, India is putting in plans in place to boost its economic partnership with the erstwhile Communist States and Southern Europe.
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Peregrine
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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 28 Aug 2018 22:06

X Posted on the Chinese Strategy and Implications & Terroristan Threads

China defends ‘New Silk Road’ against debt complaints – AP

BEIJING: Chinese officials on Monday defended Beijing’s initiative to build a “New Silk Road” of railways and other infrastructure across Asia against complaints it leaves host countries with too much debt after Malaysia canceled two high-profile projects.

The officials said President Xi Jinping’s signature foreign policy initiative is creating assets that are needed by developing countries but might take time to pay off.

The deputy chairman of the Cabinet planning agency, Ning Jizhe, rejected what he said were foreign news reports that blamed the initiative for debt problems. “People’s livelihoods and economic development have been boosted,” Ning said at a news conference. “No ‘debt trap’ has been created.”

Other governments welcomed Xi’s initiative in 2013 in a region the Asian Development Bank says needs more than $26 trillion of infrastructure investment by 2030 to keep economies growing.

The initiative, called “One Belt, One Road” in Chinese and the “Belt and Road Initiative” in English, is a business venture, not aid. Chinese officials say financing is on commercial terms. Beijing wants to attract non-Chinese investors but that has happened only on a few of the hundreds of railway, power plant, highway and other projects.

Some governments including the United States, Japan and India worry Beijing is trying to build a China-centered structure that will erode their influence. Some Chinese-led projects have run into complaints that they are too costly and give too little work to local contractors. Some governments including Thailand, Tanzania, Sri Lanka and Nepal have scrapped, scaled back or renegotiated projects.

This month, Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad canceled projects including a $20 billion railway he said his country cannot afford. Last December, Sri Lanka sold control of its port of Hambantota to a Chinese state-owned company after falling behind in repaying $1.5bn in loans from Beijing.

Examples of “China's Action in case the Debtor Nations are unable to Repay – Service their Chinese Debt:

Sighting land

1. The penalty that Sri Lanka had to pay was land, swapped along with operational control of the Hambantota Port, in exchange for the debt that they could no longer service.

2. In 2011, the government of Tajikistan announced that they had just concluded a deal with the government of China, ceding control of 1,100 square kilometres of mountainous land to the Chinese under the garb of settling a centuries-old border dispute. The agreement had been reached in 1999, but finalised precisely at a time when Tajikistan’s debt difficulties began. The territory represents one per cent of the country’s total land area.

Chinese authorities choose projects “very carefully” and examine host country finances to make sure they can repay loans, said a deputy commerce minister, Qian Keming. However, he said they would welcome the participation of developed countries and international organizations to improve transparency and guarantee “high quality” projects.

“These physical facilities will play a long-term role,” said Qian. “But we don’t necessarily see a return in the short run.” A deputy foreign minister, Zhang Jun, said “Belt and Road” officials were preparing to appoint an advisory board of former political leaders, academics and experts. He said an “international commercial expert committee” was appointed this week to give legal advice.

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Neshant
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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Neshant » 29 Aug 2018 11:18

Sounds like the rent is coming due on all those overpriced CPEC/OBOR white elephant projects that are running in the red.

_____

Proposal ready to resolve Kashmir issue: Pakistan minister

Pakistan minister for human rights Shireen Mazari described the proposal as a "model for conflict resolution", adding that she had been working on it for quite some time.

"We will circulate it among all the stakeholders, including the prime minister and cabinet ministers. If the draft is approved, we will move forward on it", Mazari said.



https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/wor ... 585494.cms

ArjunPandit
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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby ArjunPandit » 29 Aug 2018 14:43

^^pakis have everything ready since ages. Wait for them to hear launching a kashmiri a balochi and a muhajir into space with djinn tech..in space of course...

Peregrine
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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 02 Sep 2018 17:03

X Posting on Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat & OBOR, Chinese Strategy and Implications

China's 'Silk Road' project runs into debt jam

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China's President Xi Jinping says trade with Belt and Road countries has exceeded $5 trillion

China's massive and expanding "Belt and Road" trade infrastructure project is running into speed bumps as some countries begin to grumble about being buried under Chinese debt.

First announced in 2013 by President Xi Jinping, the initiative also known as the "new Silk Road" envisions the construction of railways, roads and ports across the globe, with Beijing providing billions of dollars in loans to many countries.

Five years on, Xi has found himself defending his treasured idea as concerns grow that China is setting up debt traps in countries which may lack the means to pay back the Asian giant.

"It is not a China club," Xi said in a speech on Monday to mark the project's anniversary, describing Belt and Road as an "open and inclusive" project.

Xi said China's trade with Belt and Road countries had exceeded $5 trillion, with outward direct investment surpassing $60 billion.

But some are starting to wonder if it is worth the cost.

During a visit to Beijing in August, Malaysia's Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said his country would shelve three China-backed projects, including a $20 billion railway.

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China's "new Silk Road" envisions the construction of railways, roads and ports across the globe

The party of Pakistan's new prime minister, Imran Khan, has vowed more transparency amid fears about the country's ability to repay Chinese loans related to the multi-billion-dollar China-Pakistan Economic Corridor.

Meanwhile the exiled leader of the opposition in the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, has said China's actions in the Indian Ocean archipelago amounted to a "land grab" and "colonialism", with 80 percent of its debt held by Beijing.

Sri Lanka has already paid a heavy price for being highly indebted to China.

Last year, the island nation had to grant a 99-year lease on a strategic port to Beijing over its inability to repay loans for the $1.4-billion project.

- 'Ambiguous partner' –

"China does not have a very competent international bureaucracy in foreign aid, in expansion of soft power," Anne Stevenson-Yang, co-founder and research director at J Capital Research, told AFP.

"So not surprisingly they're not very good at it, and it brought up political issues like Malaysia that nobody anticipated," she said.

"As the RMB (yuan) becomes weaker, and China is perceived internationally as a more ambiguous partner, it's more likely that the countries will take a more jaundiced eye on these projects."
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China's President Xi Jinping (C) says the initiative is 'not a China club'

The huge endeavour brings much-needed infrastructure improvements to developing countries, while giving China destinations to unload its industrial overcapacity and facilities to stock up on raw materials.

But a study by the Center for Global Development, a US think-tank, found "serious concerns" about the sustainability of the sovereign debt in eight countries receiving Silk Road funds.

Those were Pakistan, Djibouti, Maldives, Mongolia, Laos, Montenegro, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan.

The cost of a China-Laos railway project -- $6.7 billion -- represents almost half of the Southeast Asian country's GDP, according to the study.

In Djibouti, the IMF has warned that the Horn of Africa country faces a "high risk of debt distress" as its public debt jumped from 50 percent of GDP in 2014 to 85 percent in 2016.

Africa has long embraced Chinese investment, helping make Beijing the continent's largest trading partner for the past decade.

On Monday, a number of African leaders will gather in Beijing for a summit focused on economic ties which will include talks on the "Belt and Road" programme.

- 'Not a free lunch' -

China bristles at criticism.

At a daily press briefing on Friday, foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying denied that Beijing was saddling its partners with onerous debt, saying that its loans to Sri Lanka and Pakistan were only a small part of those countries' overall foreign debt.

"It's unreasonable that money coming out of Western countries is praised as good and sweet, while coming out of China it's sinister and a trap," she said.

Stevenson-Yang said China's loans are quoted in dollar terms, "but in reality they're lending in terms of tractors, shipments of coal, engineering services and things like that, and they ask for repayment in hard currency."

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Sri Lanka has already paid a heavy price for being highly indebted to China

Standard & Poor's said Beijing structures the infrastructure projects as long-term concessions, with a Chinese firm operating the facility for a period of 20 to 30 years while splitting the proceeds with the local counterpart or government.

The head of the International Monetary Fund,Christine Lagarde, raised concerns about potential debt problems in April and advocated greater transparency.

"It's not a free lunch, it's something where everybody chips in," she said.

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anupmisra
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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby anupmisra » 03 Sep 2018 11:29

Something is not right with this marriage (of convenience).

Pakistan calls for more transparency over CPEC

China’s massive and expanding “Belt and Road” trade infrastructure project is running into speed bumps as some countries begin to grumble about being buried under Chinese debt.
But some are starting to wonder if it is worth the cost.
The ruling Pakistan Tehreek-i-Insaf, whose chief Imran Khan was installed prime minister in August after an election victory, has vowed more transparency amid fears about Islamabad’s ability to repay Chinese loans related to the multi-billion-dollar China-Pakistan Economic Corridor.
Meanwhile the exiled leader of the opposition in the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, has said China’s actions in the Indian Ocean archipelago amounted to a “land grab” and “colonialism”, with 80 per cent of its debt held by Beijing.
Sri Lanka has already paid a heavy price for being highly indebted to China. Last year, the island nation had to grant a 99-year lease on a strategic port to Beijing over its inability to repay loans for the $1.4bn project.
But a study by the Centre for Global Development, a US think-tank, found “serious concerns” about the sustainability of the sovereign debt in eight countries receiving Silk Road funds. Those were Pakistan, Djibouti, Maldives, Mon­golia, Laos, Montenegro, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan.
Not a free lunch
China bristles at criticism. At a daily press briefing on Friday, foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chun­ying denied that Beijing was saddling its partners with onerous debt, saying that its loans to Sri Lanka and Pakistan were only a small part of those countries’ overall foreign debt.


Comong from a baki newspaper, this amounts to a confession.

https://www.dawn.com/news/1430623/pakis ... -over-cpec

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby anupmisra » 03 Sep 2018 16:49

Why we shouldn’t sign Phase II of Pak-China FTA
Paki demands for equal-equal know no bounds.

In the first phase, Pakistan gave concessions on 5,686 tariff lines to China; while China gave concessions on 6,418 tariff lines. Chinese exports to Pakistan grew from $4.2 billion to around $12bn, whereas Pakistan’s exports to the country only moved up marginally from $0.6bn to $1.6bn.
Besides the terms of trade under the FTA, several other barriers to trade should be discussed, including sanitary and phytosanitary measures and technical barriers to trade. These were not reviewed before the first phase of the agreement was signed.
Since Pakistan cannot become a member of the ASEAN, as member nations have reservations about its entry, China cannot grant the same trade favours to Pakistan which it has given to its ASEAN trading partners.
Furthermore, the Asia Pacific Trade Agreement, under which China continues to grant favourable trade terms to Bangladesh and India, is hampering Pakistan’s exports to China.
Moving on to the second phase of FTA negotiations with China. China wants zero import duties on 6,000 tariff lines instead of the original 2,600. This will be disastrous for Pakistan. Unfortunately, we do not have enough export surplus to ask for similar concessions from China.
Pakistan’s major export product is cotton and its made ups.
Another important export item is rice...China does not import basmati rice— the variety we produce in surplus.
When it comes to leather, China imports more from Thailand and Vietnam than from us.
China is importing marble, chrome and hides from Pakistan and selling finished products worldwide at much higher rates.
Thus, we do not have valuable commodities to export to China for the next three to four years, until we achieve high growth rates of cotton and rice.
To narrow the trade deficit with China, one option is to ask it to relocate its labour-intensive industries to Pakistan :roll:
Chinese imports of finished consumer products must be curbed through regulatory duties and quota barriers. They should be persuaded to assemble these products in Pakistan
Pakistan should be allowed to participate freely in Chinese exhibitions and trade fairs. Pakistani products must be given equal importance in such fairs. :roll:


https://www.dawn.com/news/1430640/why-w ... -china-fta

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby anupmisra » 03 Sep 2018 16:53

Elderly man tortured, humiliated for allegedly defecating in Mirpur mosque

A 55-year-old man was brutally tortured and humiliated in a village of district Mirpur of Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK) for allegedly defecating in a local mosque, police said.
The man was also accused of stealing wires, bulbs as well as taps from the mosque and its ablution area.
Subsequently, his head, moustaches and eyebrows were shaved, and he was forced to wear a dog's collar and to bark like a dog, according to police. He was also paraded in the streets of the village while wearing a garland of shoes.


https://www.dawn.com/news/1430724/elder ... pur-mosque

Peregrine
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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 04 Sep 2018 18:28

X Posted Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat & OBOR, Chinese Strategy and Implications Threads

‘Debt colonialism’ fears as China puts $60bn into Africa – Didi Tang

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President Xi claimed that there were no strings attached to the money

China has pledged $60 billion in loans and investments in Africa, strengthening its grip on the continent in a show of financial firepower and strategic intent.

The package, announced by President Xi at a gathering of African leaders, includes loans, credit lines and direct investment as well as a commitment to write off some debt owed by the poorest nations.

China has been criticised for debt colonialism, making loans that it knows states cannot repay then using the debt as leverage to secure land or strategic infrastructure.

China’s investment in Africa in the past decade has been prodigious and financing has more recently been accompanied by more troops; last year it opened its first overseas military base in Djibouti, east Africa.

The financial package includes $20 billion in credit, $15 billion in aid, interest-free loans and concessional loans, a $10 billion fund for China-Africa development, $10 billion in investments by Chinese companies and a $5 billion fund for African imports. Mr Xi also pledged to set up a security fund to provide military aid and support for intelligence and anti-terrorist efforts.

Chinese investments in Africa this century involve mining concessions and the building of ports, railways and roads. They have opened up natural resources including oil, diamonds and metals to power China’s industrial sector. They have also created markets for cheap Chinese-made goods, increased China’s global reach and cemented its position as a superpower.

Mr Xi announced the money at the opening of the third Forum on China-Africa Co-operation in Beijing, attended by all 54 nations on the continent except Swaziland, the last still to recognise Taiwan and with which China has no diplomatic relations.

In 2015 Mr Xi also pledged $60 billion, which he says has been honoured. It has been spent on projects such as a $4 billion railway line from Nairobi to Mombasa on the Kenyan coast, a hydroelectric project in Ethiopia, cobalt and copper mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, uranium from Namibia, diamonds from Zimbabwe, a port in Cameroon and the construction of a new administrative capital for Egypt. The forum is Beijing’s most public wooing of African leaders. When it began 18 years ago trade between Africa and China was worth $10 billion a year. It is now more than $220 billion. About a million Chinese citizens live and work in Africa.

Since 2000 China has extended $136 billion in loans to African governments and it now does three times more trade on the continent than the US. It may soon overtake the US as Africa’s primary aid donor after President Trump called for donations to be cut by 35 per cent to about $5.4 billion.

Beijing says that it is working to a different model from western powers and dismisses criticism that its spending amounts to colonialism or a debt trap. “China’s co-operation with Africa is clearly targeted at the major bottlenecks to development,” Mr Xi said. “Resources for our co-operation are not to be spent on any vanity projects but in places where they count the most.”

He touted China’s no-strings approach to investment, which western nations have sometimes linked to human rights or democracy. “We will not interfere in Africa’s internal affairs and do not impose our will on Africa,” Mr Xi said. “China will always be Africa’s good friend, good partner, good brother. No one can sabotage the unity between Chinese and African people.”

President Xi opened the meeting by welcoming the forum’s three newest members — the Gambia, Burkina Faso and Sao Tome and Principe — which have cut diplomatic ties to Taiwan.

China’s involvement is not wholly appreciated in Africa, where some leaders say they are being lured into debt or giving too much away. There are also fears that it could fuel nationalism. To assuage these concerns Mr Xi announced social initiatives including food development, public health schemes, training, education and student exchanges and environmental projects to halt desertification.

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Neshant
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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Neshant » 05 Sep 2018 08:59

Peregrine wrote:President Xi claimed that there were no strings attached to the money


:rotfl:

Peregrine
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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 05 Sep 2018 20:14

Peregrine wrote:President Xi claimed that there were no strings attached to the money
Neshant wrote: :rotfl:
Neshant Ji :
President Xi ONLY claimed. He did not GUARANTEE!

As we say in Hindi "Haathi Kay Daant Khaney kay Aur Dikhaney Kay Aur!

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Peregrine
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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 08 Sep 2018 03:11


chetak
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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby chetak » 08 Sep 2018 11:56

X posted from the economy thread.

This may simply be another CPEC/OBOR/BRI tactical ploy to force India's hand to provide nepal unhindered access to Indian seaports. A route that the chinese can themselves use by labelling their goods as made in nepal.

I cannot imagine nepal exports/imports being anywhere near competitive after being hauled 3,300 kms by road to/from some han port for overseas shipment.


China allows Nepal to use land, seaports for trade

China allows Nepal to use land, seaports for trade

China on Friday agreed to allow Nepal to use four of its seaports and three land ports for third-country trade reducing the landlocked country's dependence on India to conduct international commerce.

Nepal will be able to access Shenzen, Lianyungang, Zhanjiang and Tianjin, the latter being the nearest seaport at a distance of around 3,300 kms from the Nepalese border, according to foreign ministry sources here.

Similarly, Nepal has been allowed to use Lanzhou, Lhasa and Xigatse land ports (dry ports) as well. This will provide alternative routes for Nepal to carry out international trade.

Chinese authorities will provide permits to trucks and containers ferrying Nepal-bound cargo to and from Xigatse in Tibet, as per the new arrangement.



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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby jpremnath » 08 Sep 2018 16:16

With the new railway lines and road connection bw China and Nepal, I wonder how we are gonna stop the sudden rush of Chinese goods coming through the porous Indo Nepalese borders. Its high time we put an end to the open border policy and treat them just like Bangladesh or Sri Lanka.

Peregrine
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Analyzing CPEC

Postby Peregrine » 08 Sep 2018 23:00

Govt seeks to reset CPEC priorities - Shahbaz Rana

ISLAMABAD: Amid uneven progress under the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), the PTI government has decided to give a push to neglected areas and declared development of Gwadar as its top priority, rekindling hopes of developing the country’s hinterlands.

“The authorities concerned will urge the visiting high-level Chinese delegation to actively pursue Gwadar `projects,” said sources in the Ministry of Planning and Development.

The Chinese foreign minister and Vice Chairman of the National Development Reforms Commission (NDRC) on Friday began his three-day visit to Pakistan.

“During meetings with the Chinese delegation, the planning minister will urge China to fast track work on the New Gwadar International Airport, Gwadar Free Zone and Port and Gwadar Eastbay Expressway project,” according to the Ministry of Planning officials.

Work on CPEC remained slow during the past eight months because of political transition in the country. Now both the Pakistani and Chinese sides have decided to hold meetings of respective working groups that will be followed by a meeting of bilateral Joint Cooperation Committee (JCC), tentatively scheduled for November in China.

The meeting of the Joint Working Group on transport will also take place in the middle of October in China.

During the last five years, the major focus had remained on construction of two eastern route roads and establishing coal-based power generation plants under CPEC.

The last government neglected the western route of CPEC that can connect hinterlands of Balochistan and Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa. It also could not ensure progress on water and electricity supply projects in Gwadar, without which no industrialisation can take place in the port city.

While taking his first briefing on CPEC on Thursday, Prime Minister Imran Khan stated that the development of western route of CPEC would have developed Pakistan’s under-developed areas. Contrary to a snail’s pace progress on the western route, the eastern route has been completed by over 60%.

“The PTI government has decided to actively pursue projects in Gwadar and industrialisation under CPEC, Main Line railway and Karachi Circular Railway projects,” said sources in the planning ministry.

“The robust development of Gwadar under CPEC is a top priority of the new government with a special focus on rapid industrialisation in the strategically located port city,” said Minister for Planning, Development & Reform Makhdoom Khusro Bakhtiar on Friday.

Bakhtiar presided over a steering committee meeting on the Gwadar Smart Port City Master Plan. The Gwadar Smart Port City Master Plan remains incomplete and work is now expected to be finished by the end of next month.

The minister said, “Pakistan cannot afford to wait any longer as our economy does not have the luxury of time. Industrialisation in this port city is a low hanging fruit, considering its prospect of international connectivity and suitable cost of transportation,” he added.

“We need to structure the Gwadar Industrial Zone with a kind of incentives that yield high rate of return,” he said while emphasising on the industrialisation model that should have an inclusive nature vis-a-vis the private sector.

However, work on the Gwadar Free Zone was also falling behind the schedule, as the authorities concerned have yet to transfer land to the Chinese authorities, which is currently under the control of the Navy and the Coast Guard.

Bakhtiar said Gwadar could be transformed into a transshipment hub to explore opportunities of the blue economy. “We need to have in place all prerequisites for that purpose which should include provision of water, energy, road and railway connectivity,” he added.

There has been criticism in the past on financing modalities of CPEC.

A few days ago, economist Dr Atif Mian had said there was a blanket ban on any objective assessment of CPEC. He said the media also feed the frenzy that CPEC was a “game changer”, which led to development of a big bubble in the port city (currently largely sand) of Gwadar.

Dr Mian said that Pakistani government funded large infrastructure projects through China’s Belt and Road Initiative, which became one of the reasons for external debt rise. The borrowing raised domestic demand “artificially”, making Pakistan more expensive and less competitive globally, according to one of his tweets.

He criticised the idea of borrowing from outside for building infrastructure or institutions. Dr Mian argued that because of this approach Pakistan suffered an extreme version of Dutch Disease.

Through his tweets, he said most of borrowing and spending deals were highly opaque.” No one really knows what’s going on.”

He argued that deals have to be structured properly, with proper macro-prudential framework. “Unfortunately, none of that was done.”


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nam
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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby nam » 09 Sep 2018 01:32

jpremnath wrote:With the new railway lines and road connection bw China and Nepal, I wonder how we are gonna stop the sudden rush of Chinese goods coming through the porous Indo Nepalese borders. Its high time we put an end to the open border policy and treat them just like Bangladesh or Sri Lanka.


Nepal is in the middle of no where. If chinis want to dump in to india, Burma is much more easier and cheaper.

It makes no sense for Chinis to take their goods all the way to Tibet and send it down through Nepal.

We should not publicly react. Work behind the scene to create anti-Chini feeling.Short of opening up bases in Nepal, there is nothing Chinis can do in Nepal to harm us.

Neshant
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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby Neshant » 09 Sep 2018 10:00

Even so, there is a need to move towards an Aardhar card type system to keep track of entry & exit and do away with the open border concept.

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby SSridhar » 11 Sep 2018 12:30



Now, more news on that from both sides.

Pakistan, China refute report about rift over CPEC's 'unfairness'

If they refute then that that means there *IS* rift

Pakistan and China on Tuesday refuted a report in a UK daily that the former is rethinking its role in the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) as it was "unfair", reported newspaper Dawn.

The article was carried by The Financial Times (FT) on Monday and was titled: "Pakistan rethinks its role in Xi's Belt and Road plan". It quoted a key adviser to Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan as saying that CPEC "unfairly benefits Chinese companies," and adding that Pakistan must "put everything on hold for a year so we can get our act together".

A statement issued by Pakistan's commerce ministry said the Pakistan government "rejects the article especially the title." Radio Pakistan, the country's official broadcaster, also reported a government issued statement saying Pakistan and China will continue to work towards implementing ongoing CPEC projects and expand the initiative to new areas of cooperation.

"The statements attributed to adviser to the Prime Minister on commerce and textile have been taken out of context and distorted," the commerce ministry statement said, and it reiterated that CPEC is a "national priority for the government."

The statement from the Chinese embassy called the FT article "ill-intentioned" and "based on distorted and misquoted information."

There was a "firm consensus between China and Pakistan that CPEC is a mutually beneficial project and both governments will carry it forward according to the needs of Pakistan", said China through its embassy in Islamabad.

And far from putting anything on hold, Radio Pakistan said that there are even new areas that the two governments would work on, including "socio-economic development, poverty alleviation, anti-corruption, agricultural cooperation and industrial development." It said this resolve to expand the Pak-China partnership was reached during China's foreign minister's recent three-day visit to Pakistan.

However, Abdul Razak Dawood, Prime Minister Imran Khan's adviser on commerce, textile, industry & production and investment was quoted as saying quite the opposite to The Financial Times.

"The previous government did a bad job negotiating with China on CPEC - they didn't do their homework correctly and didn't negotiate correctly so they gave away a lot," said Dawood.

The Chinese are unfairly going to benefit more than Pakistan, said Dawood further.

"Chinese companies received tax breaks, many breaks and have an undue advantage in Pakistan; this is one of the things we're looking at because it's not fair that Pakistan companies should be disadvantaged," Dawood's quoted as saying.

He went further.


"I think we should put everything on hold for a year so we can get our act together...Perhaps we can stretch CPEC out over another five years or so," Dawood is quoted as saying. {Very damning}

His statements echoed PM Khan's statements from before he became PM. At the time, Khan, didn't always have good things to say about the CPEC project. He'd been mostly worried about what he thinks is the lack of transparency and the possibility of widespread corruption at CPEC's myriad projects.

After becoming PM, it appeared Khan softened his tone on CPEC.

In an interview with a Chinese daily a few days before the country's general elections in July, he said "the corridor project has brought about many positive changes to multiple areas of Pakistan's economy", reported Pakistan's Daily Times, quoting Khan's interview with Chinese language newspaper Guangming Daily.

"The changes prove that the corridor has a positive effect on the development of Pakistan. I believe that the corridor construction in the medium and long term will be firmly guaranteed and will continue to be implemented," Khan said to the Chinese newspaper.

Interestingly, Chinese state-backed media said in July that it sees the new Pakistani government continuing to promote CPEC, despite Western media "hyping Imran Khan's reservations about the project".

China's Gobal Times also warned Khan that Western media which will "try to drive a wedge" between Beijing and Islamabad.

"It's also foreseeable in the future that Western countries and media will continue to make an issue of the corridor and Chinese investment in Pakistan in an attempt to drive a wedge between China and Pakistan. The new Pakistani government should be particularly wise to this," said the article in the media outlet run by People's Daily, the mouthpiece of China's Communist Party.

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Re: Analyzing CPEC

Postby pankajs » 11 Sep 2018 13:36

Bakis are up to their usual trick of trying to get squeeze more than the initial agreed share/due. That's not a bad idea.

It has been the Baki hallmark in all their negotiating with US, IMF and the world. They always have a new regime that promises implementation in return for more goodies.


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