Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

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chetak
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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby chetak » 10 Jun 2017 02:37

eklavya wrote:
ramana wrote:I think May was deluded by Opinion polls and Labour's supposed decline.
The shift of young people to Labour is the surprise.
And SNP decline is another surprise.

She is not going to be displaced.


Actually she lost due to her own incredibly inept campaign. Defeat from the jaws of victory, etc. Plus the campaign exposed her lack of political acumen, wit and charisma. She really is as dull, clueless and a bullying bigot as most people imagine.

She is now toast. The only question is when the butter and jam will be applied. She will be gone before autumn. If the Tories want to salvage a future, they need to bring back George Osborne, who advised Cameron against holding the Brexit referendum.


She would have lost anyway.

The anti brexit voters who probably had not voted earlier in the referendum and later regretted it and those who thought that brexit was a bad decision have chosen to speak now and have actually weakened May's hand in forthcoming and crucial negotiations with the EU.

she now has to go to the EU, hat in hand, as it were, personally weakened and britain politically diminished.

this may also weaken britain's negotiating position on bilateral trade discussions across the board.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby eklavya » 10 Jun 2017 02:42

KJo wrote:Help me understand.

May had absolute majority and was PM. Why the hell did she choose to have mid term elections? I read somewhere it would help her in Brexit, but how? She had a majority and could do anything she wanted. Now she has to beg the coalition members.


The old girl got greedy for untrammelled power and thought she would increase her majority to 100+.

I have no idea why people thought she would negotiate a more sensible Brexit with a massive majority. If anything, she would have gone down a reckless hard Brexit path: she is economically illiterate.

Now that the Tories are in a minority, they will have no choice but to listen to more sensible voices that wish to retain single market access. If the Eurosceptics in the Tory party object, there will be another election in which the Tories will be annihilated. The young people who didn't vote in the Brexit referendum are finally making their voices heard. As someone said: "the future has spoken".

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby eklavya » 10 Jun 2017 02:49

chetak wrote:she now has to go to the EU, hat in hand, as it were, personally weakened and britain politically diminished.

this may also weaken britain's negotiating position on bilateral trade discussions across the board.


Chetak,

Theresa May's defeat has given Britain the chance to fashion a sensible Brexit, where single market access is maintained, even if it means free movement of people, ongoing contributions to the EU budget, etc.

If she had obtained the brute majority she was hoping for, she would almost certainly have delivered the hardest of hard Brexits, which would have been a spectacular disaster for the UK economy.

The reality is that Britain holds no cards anyway, and most sensible people in Britain know it. If Britain loses single market access, the consequences for the UK economy will be quite disastrous.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby chetak » 10 Jun 2017 03:22

eklavya wrote:
chetak wrote:she now has to go to the EU, hat in hand, as it were, personally weakened and britain politically diminished.

this may also weaken britain's negotiating position on bilateral trade discussions across the board.


Chetak,

Theresa May's defeat has given Britain the chance to fashion a sensible Brexit, where single market access is maintained, even if it means free movement of people, ongoing contributions to the EU budget, etc.

If she had obtained the brute majority she was hoping for, she would almost certainly have delivered the hardest of hard Brexits, which would have been a spectacular disaster for the UK economy.

The reality is that Britain holds no cards anyway, and most sensible people in Britain know it. If Britain loses single market access, the consequences for the UK economy will be quite disastrous.


among other things, free movement of people was something that the brits did not want.

If that's something that's going to be left in, then why bother to leave the EU at all??

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby ramana » 10 Jun 2017 04:37

Ekalavya What is single market access in UK parlance?

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Re: Indo-UK news

Postby Cosmo_R » 10 Jun 2017 05:09

Lisa wrote:
shiv wrote:Pardon the stupid question but what happened in the election?


Simple, Conservatives lost their majority and now need 4 more seats to secure a working majority (322 seat are needed in all they have 318). A party from Northern Ireland which has traditionally aligned itself with the Tories will give them 10 more seats, ie a majority of 6. That all folks.

P.S. Theresa May is an idiot.


I thought it was 326 seats for the majority

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby ramana » 10 Jun 2017 05:20

Total 650
Need 326.
May got 318
DUP got 10
So total is 328
So margin of 2

Irony is she had 331 before going to elections.

Hubris.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby shiv » 10 Jun 2017 08:47

How come I am not seeing articles in India about the greatness of British democracy?

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby Atmavik » 10 Jun 2017 08:49

shiv wrote:How come I am not seeing articles in India about the greatness of British democracy?


They r busy covering US news. Bartania is so 90's era to them.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby KJo » 10 Jun 2017 08:50

ramana wrote:Total 650
Need 326.
May got 318
DUP got 10
So total is 328
So margin of 2

Irony is she had 331 before going to elections.

Hubris.



Well put ramana Saar. So my initial question was she had 331 and so a majority. What was she looking to get from this election?
At most a "bigger" majority? Risk is loss of majority which happened in the end. Who are her advisors??

It seems like lose-lose onlee.
I guess Islam wins in the end.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby ramana » 10 Jun 2017 12:27

Have you read 'March of Folly'?

It's about how societies make fatal errors due to group think, biases etc.

May's calling early elections did not fatally harm her as in BMP in 2004. She has formed the govt again with more conservative DUP.
Election has finished off UKIP.
SNP is also wounded and Scottish exit can is kicked forward.
Net I think she is ok if not stronger.
In multi party system you be one stronger if opponent gets weaker.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby Philip » 10 Jun 2017 12:38

This was a catastrophic boo-boo on May's part.Possibly the biggest own goal ever in British politics of the last century. With a majority in her hand,Cameron's surprise Brexit defeat still ringing in British ears,the non-elected occupant of No.10 was just too arrogant,thinking that she was the successor to Mrs.T .Even if she got an increased majority in the house,her main aim was not to strengthen her Brexit position with the EU,but to sack her powerful cabinet colleagues like BoJo,etc.! She wanted a vice-like grip on her party to rule the roost like a dictator at home,with political pygmies in her cabinet.That was her real agenda,She now has to eat very humble pie and the odds are that she won't last out the year.

When the British people had already voted for Brexit,and the hard core of the Tory party firmly in favour of the same.there was no need for a few more seats to give her arm more strength in dealing with the EU.The EU look upon Britain as a sick joke,waiting to show it the upturned finger when negotiations begin.It is Britain who is going to be the big loser eventually,who will get shafted when they refuse to pay the EU 100B .May's general attitude after becoming PM has been strident,rigid,lacking in warmth,like a corporate boss,whereas Corbyn has come across as a genial grandfatherly individuakl who cares about people.attracting huge crowds while on the campaign trail.May's media campaign and frequent about turns in policy and refusal to debate with Corbyn,etc.,were fatal.

The N.Irish DUP are a diff. kettle of fish.conservative in nature they might be,making an alliance not too difficult,but they will demand an arm and a leg from May for their support which will be evaluated by the day. Larry the Downing St. No. 10 cat may be welcoming in a new resident very soon.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/po ... 82891.html
Election latest: Theresa May tries to move on after humiliating result as critics begin to circle
Sources tell The Independent PM's move to embrace Northern Ireland's DUP could make problems for her in Westminster

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Re: Indo-UK news

Postby Lisa » 10 Jun 2017 13:08

Cosmo_R wrote:
Lisa wrote:
Simple, Conservatives lost their majority and now need 4 more seats to secure a working majority (322 seat are needed in all they have 318). A party from Northern Ireland which has traditionally aligned itself with the Tories will give them 10 more seats, ie a majority of 6. That all folks.

P.S. Theresa May is an idiot.


I thought it was 326 seats for the majority


Speaker has 1 vote and Sinn Fein have 7 votes (they do not vote), ie 8 votes are not used. Therefore only 322 needed for majority not 326.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby Philip » 10 Jun 2017 13:13

(LIttle) Britain back of the "Q" in the line at the White House!

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/uk- ... 82746.html

Britain's shock election result has cast the special relationship into serious doubt
When Obama predicted Britain would go to the back of the queue he was right

David Usborne
Theresa May and Donald Trump meet beside a bust of former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in the Oval Office of the White House on January 27, 2017 Getty
Up and down the avenues of New York City, billboards on bus stops and hotspot stations implore its denizens to cross the Atlantic for their holidays with pictures of favourite destinations like Edinburgh Castle, always with the recurring slogan about Britain being GREAT.

Making their wee speeches at an election-watch party at the British Consulate in Manhattan – distracting guests from the fine Indian buffet and news of returns on the BBC – UK diplomats meanwhile rehearsed the required line about “no two nations having more in common” and so on, complete with the usual chuckling reference to the time we set fire to the White House.

Well, I don’t know. Barely anyone in the country beyond the bounds of the Consulate and possibly a smattering of British-themed fish-n-chip pubs paid the blindest bit of attention to the political tremors going on in ye olde country. This would be on account of their having a few of their own to contend with. Comey commands the headlines here, not Corbyn or Clegg.

And Britain, after all, is confusing. Americans have seen more of Nigel Farage than they have of Theresa May, because of his past palling around with Donald Trump. They will watch a bit of Wimbledon and, who knows, they might take that trip. Because, GREAT should really read CHEAP, when you consider the fresh battering the pound took early Friday against the dollar. :rotfl:

What may sink in about the UK election results is a vague sense of additional unease about the state of the world at a time when everyone surely needs less of it. Britain has been the most important sinew in the post-World War II bond of democracy and economic prosperity between the US and all of Europe. That that connection seems in various ways to have frayed is good news for no one.

Barack Obama has some responsibility for making the special relationship somewhat less so. It wasn’t just the flap over removing Winston Churchill from the Oval office. (The old boy’s back now, of course, in all his dulled-bronze and glowering splendour.) He deliberately turned America’s gaze east and south towards Asia and in so much as he paid heed to Europe it was more to Merkel than to Cameron or Brown. Maybe after Brexit, he considered that smart.

It was Obama who warned Britain that leaving Europe would mean it going to the back of the queue for a new trade deal with America. He was widely criticised for it and even blamed for stoking anti-Leave sentiment ahead of Britain’s referendum. But there is no reason to assume he was wrong or that when negotiations for such a deal begin, the Trump administration will be anything but tungsten-tough in its stance. You saw what Trump told Germany about selling too many cars in America. Flipping trade flows to America’s advantage is the heart of brand Trump.

And as much as Trump appears to dislike regional trade treaties – he wants to tweak Nafta with Canada and Mexico and has put the kibosh on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, TPP – it remains the case that when it comes to looking eastward the priority for his trade negotiators will be the putative Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) with the European Union even if for the moment talks have stalled. Britain, presumably, won’t be part of it.

Put together the irritations in the US-UK relationship amount to a malaise, meanwhile. Some are multi-lateral in nature. Let’s leave aside consideration of whether Britain departing the European Union will make it a bigger or lesser force in the world, even if it’s hard to make an argument in support of the former. But which British leader would have ever imagined being lectured outside Nato headquarters by a sitting American president about defence spending levels while at the same time hearing nothing from him about the Alliance’s mutual defence provisions?

Will Jeremy Corbyn, the Bernie Sanders of the U.K., reshape his nation's politics? http://nyer.cm/WxcGPC6 #TNYarchive
12:07 PM - 9 Jun 2017

We meanwhile have the highly unusual spectacle of Britain publicly squabbling with the US in the sphere of intelligence-sharing – for years at the very heart of the security relationship between them – because of the apparent leaking by US officials to the American media of details of the police investigation in the immediate aftermath of the Manchester arena bombing. Trump promised to deal with that but only because stopping leaks is something of a fetish with him.

Still more dispiriting was Trump’s toxic sniping at the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, straight after the terror attack just a week ago at Borough Market. You may recall, he suggested that the leader of the nation’s capital had been “pathetic” in his response to the crisis. He willfully took Khan’s words out of context by suggesting he’d said Londoner’s shouldn’t be alarmed by what had happened and did it via Twitter, naturally. “It was stunning for all us in America, and indefensible,” former CIA and National Security Agency head Michael Hayden sputtered in The Guardian. Khan was himself withering in return. “I don’t know how to tell you this, but I really don’t care…I really couldn’t be bothered about what Donald Trump tweets.”

There are more tests to come. Khan was also asked about that other small matter on the horizon – a state visit by Trump to Britain for tea with the Queen and whatever else May lays on for him. If May is the host, of course. Maybe put him on a polo horse. Or in the Tower of London. Khan said it should not happen and there are many, in Parliament and elsewhere, who share the sentiment. When the time arrives, Trump’s visit, unless a way is found to shelve it, is likely only to highlight how strained the so-called special relationship has become.

Some will meanwhile try to discern some greater electoral meaning from the shock outcome of the British vote. Did May’s failure to distance herself more from Trump harm her? Should Corbyn have gone the full Bernie Sanders? And what about for America and its current political maelstrom? Does the faltering of the hard-Brexit Tories spell an ebbing of the populist tide for Trump, who continues to play the isolationist-America First card with his base?

What we do know is that no one is doing very much to get the Anglo-American partnership happy again. Britain has Europe to worry about. And with the Russia-Trump investigation taking on a more menacing mien every day, America has America to worry about. Britain may be GREAT (and cheap) but who is going to make the Anglo-American relationship great again?


PS:Watch Britain in the future pleading with Mother India to restore our ancient ties .Should we ask May and co. whether they would like to become an Indian colony? in any case our desi-origin UK politicos from Jalandhar are doing "bloody well"!

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby eklavya » 10 Jun 2017 13:56

chetak wrote:
among other things, free movement of people was something that the brits did not want.

If that's something that's going to be left in, then why bother to leave the EU at all??


Chetak, 48% voted to Remain in the EU (which includes free movement), and what Brexit means precisely was never defined for the 52% that voted to Leave. Which is why Maybot kept/keeps repeating like a cheap Chinese toy: "Brexit means Brexit". Which means what? All of us poorer? Our children's prospects diminished?

I'm willing to wager that a significant minority of the 52% that voted Leave would accept free movement as the "price" for single market access. Let's vote on it if necessary.

You may not have noticed that the richest parts of London saw a huge swing to Labour (as a protest against Maybot's disastrous interpretation of the Brexit vote), despite a manifesto that included huge tax rises. Kensington of all places went to Labour :mrgreen:

About the only issue on which there is consensus across the mainstream (Con, Lab, Lib, SNP, etc) political spectrum is that the 3 million plus EU citizens currently in the UK can stay. That itself suggests that free movement ought to be politically deliverable.

The issue with Theresa May is that she is obsessed like a madwoman with the immigration statistics. Her vision and perception are narrow and she has surrounded herself with inept and useless political advisers: Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/06 ... or-tories/

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby eklavya » 10 Jun 2017 14:11

ramana wrote:Ekalavya What is single market access in UK parlance?


Essentially no barriers to trade: tariff or non-tariff. No border inspections / customs. Facilitate seamless integration with EU manufacturing supply chains. Free trade in services, including financial services.

https://www.ft.com/content/1688d0e4-15e ... af20d5575e

The EU single market: How it works and the benefits it offers

Brexit vote has thrown up big questions about future trading

March 31, 2017

© AFP
Britain’s vote to leave the EU has thrown the country’s trading relationship with Europe into doubt. That in turn opens up big questions about the future of the UK economy, which sends almost half of its exports to the bloc.

Here the Financial Times considers how the market works and what leaving it might mean.

The status quo: rights and regulations

Access to the single market requires acceptance of all four EU freedoms — of movement of goods, capital, services, and people.

The single market is predicated on the belief that these four freedoms drive prosperity.

The EU is a customs union. Its members impose common tariffs on imports from non-EU countries and can trade freely with each other.

Members automatically benefit from trade deals that the EU strikes with other countries but cannot set their own tariffs.

To create a fair internal market, the EU is committed to a common regulatory framework to prevent one company — or country — from gaining competitive advantage by getting rid of regulations.

Countries must promise to implement common rules and to recognise each other’s standards.

This means that companies everywhere in the bloc can then sell their products and services throughout the EU.

These policies are designed to both reduce trade costs and open up markets.


A visual explainer to the EU


Quantifying the impact of the single market

A Treasury paper found that trade in goods was 73 per cent higher between EU member states than would have been the case in a free trade area (where no tariffs but other barriers remain), while trade in services was 16 per cent higher.

An analysis by the OECD of membership of the European Economic Area, found trade in goods was 60 per cent higher than if trading partners simply relied on World Trade Organisation rules.

Trading with the EU post Brexit

In theory, the UK should be able to relatively easily negotiate a free-trade deal with the EU for goods, because it already complies with current regulations and there are no tariffs in force at present.

But Neil Williams, chief UK economist at Hermes, said that any deal would probably still take several years to agree “just to end up close to square one”.

For the service sector, which accounts for about 80 per cent of the UK economy, the negotiations will be much harder. Most existing trade deals exclude services and the deals with the EU that do include services also require free movement of people and common regulations.

Even assuming some sort of free-trade deal is done, other non-tariff barriers could be expected to add costs for business.

Complying with rules of origin

These are an important component to preferential trade deals. They are designed to prevent products from countries not covered by the deal from entering the trading bloc.

If only some of the UK’s exports are covered by the free-trade deal, companies will have to check individual goods to see whether they are compliant. This is “particularly cumbersome for small and medium enterprises”, Rebecca Driver, director of Analytically Driven, said.

Multiple regulatory regimes

Over time, EU rules will diverge from UK rules. UK companies wishing to export to the EU will need to comply with both sets of rules.

Border inspections

On a practical level, without full membership of the single market and mutual recognition of standards, companies will face border inspections.

In the era of just-in-time delivery and integrated supply chains where even a day’s hold-up can cause problems, this is likely to be of more importance than it was historically.

All these factors collectively add up to an increase in barriers to trade with Europe that the victorious Leave campaign hopes would be offset by other benefits of leaving.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby eklavya » 10 Jun 2017 14:16


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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby chetak » 10 Jun 2017 16:18

UK Election 2017: Theresa May to form fragile govt after poll debacle, uncertainty over Brexit talks





UK Election 2017: Theresa May to form fragile govt after poll debacle, uncertainty over Brexit talks
Jun, 09 2017

British Prime Minister Theresa May will form a government supported by a small Northern Irish party after her Conservative Party lost its parliamentary majority in an election debacle days before talks on Britain's EU departure are due to begin.

A stony-faced May, speaking on the doorstep of her official Downing Street residence, said the government would provide certainty and lead Britain in talks with the European Union to secure a successful Brexit deal.

May said she could rely in parliament on the support of her "friends" in Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party after her governing Conservatives failed to emerge as clear winners.

Confident of securing a sweeping victory, May had called the snap election to strengthen her hand in the European Union divorce talks. But in one of the most sensational nights in British electoral history, a resurgent Labour Party denied her an outright win, throwing the country into political turmoil.

EU leaders expressed fears that May's shock loss of her majority would delay the Brexit talks, due to begin on 19 June, and so raise the risk of negotiations failing.


Her Labour rival Jeremy Corbyn, once written off by his opponents as a no-hoper, said May should step down and he wanted to form a minority government.

But May, facing scorn for running a lacklustre campaign, was determined to hang on. Just after noon, she was driven the short distance from Downing Street to Buckingham Palace to ask Queen Elizabeth for permission to form a government — a formality under the British system.

With 649 of 650 seats declared, the Conservatives had won 318 seats and Labour 261 followed by the pro-independence Scottish National Party on 34.

The shock result thrust Northern Ireland's centre-right DUP into the role of kingmaker, with its 10 seats enough to give the Conservatives a fragile but workable partnership.

"Our two parties have enjoyed a strong relationship over many years and this gives me the confidence to believe that we will be able to work together in the interests of the whole United Kingdom," May said.

This was likely to involve an arrangement in which the DUP would support a Conservative minority government on key votes in parliament but not form a formal coalition.

But with the complex talks on the divorce from the EU due to start in 10 days, it was unclear what their direction would now be and if the so-called "Hard Brexit" taking Britain out of a single market could still be pursued.

After winning his own seat in north London, Corbyn said May's attempt to win a bigger mandate had backfired.

"The mandate she's got is lost Conservative seats, lost votes, lost support and lost confidence," he said. "I would have thought that's enough to go, actually, and make way for a government that will be truly representative of all of the people of this country."

Brexit risks

"We need a government that can act," EU Budget Commissioner Guenther Oettinger told German broadcaster Deutschlandfunk. "With a weak negotiating partner, there's a danger that the (Brexit) negotiations will turn out badly for both sides."

The EU's chief negotiator said the bloc's stance on Brexit and the timetable for the talks were clear, but the divorce negotiations should only start when Britain is ready. "Let's put our minds together on striking a deal," Michel Barnier said.

But there was little sympathy from some other Europeans.

"Yet another own goal, after Cameron now May, will make already complex negotiations even more complicated," tweeted Guy Verhofstadt, the former Belgian premier who is the European Parliament's point man for the Brexit process.


May's predecessor David Cameron sought to silence Eurosceptic fellow Conservatives by calling the referendum on EU membership. The result ended his career and shocked Europe.

German conservative Markus Ferber, an EU lawmaker involved in discussions on access to EU markets for Britain's financial sector, was scathing.

"The British political system is in total disarray. Instead of strong and stable leadership we witness chaos and uncertainty," he said, mocking May's campaign slogan.

Sterling tumbled as much as 2.5 percent on the result while the FTSE share index opened higher. The pound hit an eight-week low against the dollar and its lowest levels in seven months versus the euro.

"A working government is needed as soon as possible to avoid a further drop in the pound," said ING currency strategist Viraj Patel in London.

"Dreadful campaign"

Conservative member of parliament Anna Soubry was the first in the party to disavow May in public, calling on the prime minister to "consider her position".

"I'm afraid we ran a pretty dreadful campaign," Soubry said.

May had unexpectedly called the snap election seven weeks ago, even though no vote was due until 2020. At that point, polls predicted she would massively increase the slim majority she had inherited from Cameron.

May had spent the campaign denouncing Corbyn as the weak leader of a spendthrift party that would crash Britain's economy and flounder in Brexit talks, while she would provide "strong and stable leadership" to clinch a good deal for Britain.

But her campaign unravelled after a policy u-turn on care for the elderly, while Corbyn's old-school socialist platform and more impassioned campaigning style won wider support than anyone had foreseen.

In the late stages of the campaign, Britain was hit by two Islamist militant attacks that killed 30 people in Manchester and London, temporarily shifting the focus onto security issues.

That did not help May, who in her previous role as interior minister for six years had overseen cuts in the number of police officers. She sought to deflect pressure onto Corbyn, arguing he had a weak record on security matters.

"What tonight is about is the rejection of Theresa May's version of extreme Brexit," said Keir Starmer, Labour's policy chief on Brexit, saying his party wanted to retain the benefits of the European single market and customs union.

Analysis suggested Labour had benefited from a strong turnout among young voters.


The campaign had played out differently in Scotland, the main faultline being the SNP's drive for a second referendum on independence from Britain, having lost a plebiscite in 2014.

SNP leader and First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said it had been a disappointing night for her party, which lost seats to the Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats.

Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson said Sturgeon should take the prospect of a new independence referendum off the table.


Published Date: Jun 09, 2017 08:01 pm

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby chetak » 10 Jun 2017 16:30

are the huns eager to extract revenge for their WWII thrashing?? :wink:


Angela Merkel urges speedy Brexit talks after UK election


MEXICO CITY: German Chancellor Angela Merkel urged Britain Friday to quickly launch Brexit talks with the European Union after Prime Minister Theresa May suffered a harsh election setback.

"We are ready for the negotiations. We want to do it quickly, respecting the calendar," Merkel said during a visit to Mexico.

She said talks with Britain on its withdrawal from what will now be the 27-member EU would start "in the coming days."

"We were waiting for the election in Britain, but in the next few days these talks will begin. We will defend the interests of the 27 member states, and Britain will defend its own interests," she told a press conference.


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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby rsingh » 10 Jun 2017 18:57

Attention (please read it in French "atansion") UK has only two years to negotiate. If negotiations are not concluded within this period Les Anglaise will be kicked out unceremoniously.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby chetak » 10 Jun 2017 20:46

twitter



The UK is truly a great country. Its voters have done the impossible and committed suicide twice in the matter of a year

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby IndraD » 10 Jun 2017 21:00


how cute last heard UK police has eyes and ears on mosques and madrasas..! Voice is of Stacey Dooley ..she is known to make tapes on hate preachers and radicals in UK.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby ramana » 11 Jun 2017 07:17

shiv wrote:How come I am not seeing articles in India about the greatness of British democracy?


Winston Churchill speaking about Ramsay MacDonald govt said "This govt will go down unwell, unsung, and moreover unhung!"

Looks apt for the situation now.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby panduranghari » 11 Jun 2017 16:52

chetak wrote:twitter
The UK is truly a great country. Its voters have done the impossible and committed suicide twice in the matter of a year


Could you point to this tweet? Thanks.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby chetak » 11 Jun 2017 17:02

panduranghari wrote:
chetak wrote:twitter


Could you point to this tweet? Thanks.


Here you go

https://twitter.com/MalikAshok/status/873009841572204545

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby UlanBatori » 11 Jun 2017 17:23

The darn thing is that if Mays had come to power with a 2/3 majority, that would have pretty-much guaranteed Scotchstan Brexit and maybe Occupied Ireland also getting Azadi, both with French/German assistance. Just like Ryan's Daughter. Now I am not so sure.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby VishalJ » 11 Jun 2017 18:46


Singha
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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby Singha » 11 Jun 2017 21:45

queen victoria had a fairly hefty diet

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... curry.html

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby Avtar Singh » 12 Jun 2017 01:12

Blairites; T BLiar, mandy mandels etc.. crushed... ... CORBYN IS ALIVE
kinnocks... and all these over fed rats living in mansions courtesy of the tax payer..
salaries and pensions from european institutions

scottish party and nonsense of breaking the UK dead in the water

remainers cheer wont last.. there is only one brexit and that is HARD (whatever that means)
who will ensure this; EUROPEANS, will cut off their noses to spite their face...

after a few years of being mucked around the british will get fed up and fall out
there will be no good deals on offer

"magic money tree" CONS... funny how when their buddies..corporates/banksters/the shitty
need bailing out there is a forest the size of the amazon full of magic money trees
but never for the poor, the tide has turned on the CONS

britain will get back to some socialism..
caring for old/poor, educating the young without american type debt burdens giving workers some power and wages
the nhs will be safe from that bearded devil branson

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby rsingh » 12 Jun 2017 01:42

Once in power, socialists tend to forget about plight of common people. just my observation.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby UlanBatori » 12 Jun 2017 02:36

The catch as always is this:
giving workers some power and wages

Who exactly will buy British products (same with Oirope) is the question, given the flood of Chinese competition (and hopefully Indian competition). (A few of ) The Oiropeans saw the writing on the wall some years back and were giving diplo-sermons saying that the Oiropean Advantage was Quality. But this is :rotfl: as anyone knows who has bought an oiropean-built Glamour Mobile and had to call a taxi to get home.
The Japanese left the Oiropeans mucking in the dirt in terms of quality, circa 1985. The British have maintained some aura of Ingenuity, I have to grant that. But even that is now mostly gone.

Anything that Bosch or Siemens or Pfizer can make, Mitsubishi, Kubota, AliBaba.com and Indian companies can also make. Cheaper and not much worse.
The Chinese tsunami has completely flooded the low-quality mass market segment, and their better products are far better deals than Oiropean-built things.

This is the reality for which I don't have an answer. There are simply more, poorer (in same Euro/Dollar terms) people in China and India, than there are in Oirope and Bilayat. The Open Markets for which they clamored have, well, opened.

Perhaps the world is heading for Segmented Economies with walls around each. Asia trades inside Asia. Russia trades inside Russia. America trades inside America. Europe trades inside Europe. Africa trades with Africa, Australia with Australia (and NZ). England belongs nowhere so they trade within England.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby chanakyaa » 12 Jun 2017 07:55

UlanBatori wrote:The darn thing is that if Mays had come to power with a 2/3 majority, that would have pretty-much guaranteed Scotchstan Brexit and maybe Occupied Ireland also getting Azadi, both with French/German assistance. Just like Ryan's Daughter. Now I am not so sure.

Seeing the financial/economic impact of the Brexit vote, it would be extremely bold, even with a majority vote, for any party to go ahead with the Brexit. Pound is down approx. 20%. Hung parliament may be a good excuse for the Br!t$hits to blame the population for Brexit defeat. A friend of mine who is a long time resident of YooKay, said that even people with decent salaries are feeling the pinch as the overall salary levels have been relatively low reflecting strength of the pound. Those desperately desiring for some country to leave the E-U, may have wait a little longer.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby Singha » 12 Jun 2017 09:35

>> Who exactly will buy British products (same with Oirope) is the question

they have a massive trade in invisibles like financial services and insurance
raw and processed food is another euro strength as most of the produce is good quality and geographically branded like cheeses, wines, spirits, meat, confections - as you know whether japani, sinic or indic people crave imported luxury goods
luxury textiles , leather , fashion , shoes
pharma industry is very strong
auto industry is strong in parts like germany and france
machine tools and production machinery is strong
media
MNCs like nestle in FMCG have a global footprint
chemicals and plastics
retail sector
aerospace is another huge sector
parts of eu are still viable in shipbuilding
some are good in natural resources like norway
population are stable or declining - no youth bulge to worry about - they can keep on automating to cope and keep costs in control

so long as asians worship white skin and white products, europe will always have a vast market for its goods and services.

for all the gloom and doom tell me which euro country barring maybe greece has seen a permanent decline in the std of living in the last 10 years after 2008 ? iceland defaulted and its doing fine.....plenty to eat and drink....PIIGS - PIIS seem to be done ok despite high unemployment in spain. perhaps the Govts have plenty of money from centuries of colonial loot to support ? the rich in europe(minus UK/ireland) are taxed more heavily so that generates a lot of money. and people in economically weak parts of EU like poland are migrated enmasse to stronger markets .... no H1 F1 tamasha.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby Atmavik » 12 Jun 2017 09:55

^^ fashion is a big rip offf. the french make a killing on it. but SHQ ko kaun samhjaye. maybe patanjali will come out with a parfume

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby Yagnasri » 12 Jun 2017 10:03

We need Madhuri perfume/saree range that will be automatically acceptable to SHQs. Otherwise, we are all doomed with credit card bills with unpronounceable French rubbish.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby LokeshC » 12 Jun 2017 10:18

The French badly badly need tons of deodorant. Every time I go there, I run into so much body odor. Unbelievable really.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby Singha » 12 Jun 2017 11:07

all these are sour grapes!

my thesis stands. the demise of EU is overrated. perhaps a military entity able to pounce on others, but ultimately what is the purpose of all the arms of a nation state? - to ensure the peace and continued prosperity of its citizens - which they have done for decades now.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby JohnTitor » 12 Jun 2017 12:09

UlanBatori wrote:Perhaps the world is heading for Segmented Economies with walls around each. Asia trades inside Asia. Russia trades inside Russia. America trades inside America. Europe trades inside Europe. Africa trades with Africa, Australia with Australia (and NZ). England belongs nowhere so they trade within England.

Whilst the UK is going through a tough time, make no mistake about it. Even if no one helps them out the US will. People of a language stick together. Trump may be difficult but he wont be president forever. In some ways the UK can be seen as the US' 51st state.

People who think that Britain will somehow vanish into oblivion are fooling themselves. Sure standards of living might fall and the West in general is in decline but it will be slow and based on history it won't be silent.

I have often heard the argument that Indias huge young population will be an advantage. Personally, I don't think it is as simple as that. The west is automating at a very rapid pace. There was a textile factory that was relocated to the UK from Asia. But it was fully automated with just a couple guys running the entire thing. As the west automates low cost labour wont be able to compete.

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Re: Indo-UK News & Discussions- June 2017

Postby JE Menon » 12 Jun 2017 14:19

In my opinion, having lived and travelled extensively over long periods of time within the EU, reports of the demise of Europe are exaggerated, though probably not greatly. There are certainly signs of calcification, eye and teeth issues, but there's a shitload of fight in them yet - and I would agree with GD on his comments. About the competitiveness of China and others there is zero doubt. When the time comes though, and it is coming as UB points out in terms of segregated economies, the EU (and to some extent the US and other countries') malaise with regard to the Chinese export situation will be solved through (a) deregulation of economies, and (b) imposition of clear tariff and non-tariff barriers. And that will be that. The world won't be a prettier place, but business will be fantastic for those used to tariff circumvention. The overall situation will be evened out somewhat is my thinking.

And whatever one might say, the Europeans have, since WWII, gotten their own people to a level of material wellbeing unparalleled in history. There are things we can learn from them. A lot of things. And we must. If there is a country we must all watch carefully from that perspective, I think it is the Netherlands. It has achieved a balance of adherence to tradition, high degree of social liberalism, combined with a weird sort of economic conservatism and very forward looking education. (Don't start now about the red light district and the weed. You will be missing the wood for the grass).


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