Understanding New China after 19th Congress

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chola
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby chola » 26 Sep 2019 10:34

UlanBatori wrote:
chola wrote:a leg up as a society that is homogenous and united that is uniformly well-off? No blackmail quotas and pay-outs to scheduled classes and minorities to start off with. Every penny goes into creating infrastructure for a high tech society set to compete for the future.

I think Nazi Germany tried, and Imperial Japan came close, to achieving such a happy state. Hope cheen does the same without causing the global havoc of those 2.


Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan were pinnacle warrior societies and races that thrived on war.

Cheen is race of SREs who had avoided war during the 40 years of it rise. If Germany had stopped at France and left the (f)UK and Russia alone, I don't think anyone would have stopped them stripping Western Europe of Jews, gypsies and bolsheviks. There is a better than 50-50 chance that Cheen will rid itself of the burden of the rural poor and religious minorities without a major global war. In fact, it is only 50-50 because of the US who might actually fight to protect human rights. Without the US, the chances of global havoc is nearly nil since Cheen won't initiate a fight while it is pre-occupy with cleaning house.

UlanBatori
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby UlanBatori » 26 Sep 2019 22:08

chola:
Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan were pinnacle warrior societies and races that thrived on war.
Cheen is race of SREs who had avoided war during the 40 years of it rise. If Germany had stopped at France and left the (f)UK and Russia alone, I don't think anyone would have stopped them stripping Western Europe of Jews, gypsies and bolsheviks. There is a better than 50-50 chance that Cheen will rid itself of the burden of the rural poor and religious minorities without a major global war. In fact, it is only 50-50 because of the US who might actually fight to protect human rights. Without the US, the chances of global havoc is nearly nil since Cheen won't initiate a fight while it is pre-occupy with cleaning house.

Excellent points. It IS true that at least in the YooEss, majority opinion was probably not terribly unhappy about Hiter's kindness towards Jewish people. The Gypsies etc were not even on people's horizons. Bolsheviks? They applauded Hitler killing those.

And I hadn't though about this point:
Cheen is race of SREs who had avoided war during the 40 years of it rise

True. They prepare for war, they make threats along the lines of vely vely vely vely vely glave consequences, but they make sure their tank treads only run over their own children and their Wrong Way Wong Weis only zoom at round-eye planes, not shoot at them. Very wise.

ramana
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 27 Sep 2019 01:14

chola and UB

For all scholars try to read

The Lessons of History :
Chinese People's Liberation Army at 75 written in 2003.

Its titled Pub75 and is a pdf.
Quite long read.


Basically PLA fought four wars:
1) Liberation war against KMT
2) Korean War
3) 1962 War with India
4) 1979 Vietnam War

And they use massive number of troops to swamp defences and withdraw to safe harbor before retaliation and declare ceasefire.

UlanBatori
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby UlanBatori » 27 Sep 2019 02:09

1979 is the last one they had to actually FIGHT (and lost it). All the rest is against Tibet, against Uighurs. Encroachment in North Indonesian Sea. Base-building in Myanmar. Road-building in Aksai Chin and Pakistan. Nukes to Pakistan. Nukes to North Korea. Missiles to Iraq. Missiles to Iran. Nukes to Saudis (probably). Gwadar port-building. Putting Africa into debt slavery. Losing money in Pakistan. I hear there is also massive encroachment into Siberia. And Arunachal. Termite strategy: they're always there chewing away. When the whole structure is brought down they will be the only well-fed ones.
Gotta admire them. Can't say they don't provide employment for minorities: look at all the roads built in the mountains and deserts!

Rsatchi
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Rsatchi » 27 Sep 2019 11:10

https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-ne ... ZJm2N.html
Given these actions by the Chinese why are we still pussyfooting around Uiyghur issue and HK issues
Should start paying back in the same coin

ramana
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 01 Oct 2019 05:04

wikileaks On Xi Jinping

https://wikileaks.org/plusd/cables/09BEIJING3128_a.html


Wikileaks cable on Xi Profile sometime before he became the Prez. very very interesting and very useful too.

ramana
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 01 Oct 2019 05:05


Summary
-------

1. (C) According to a well connected Embassy contact,
Politburo Standing Committee Member and Vice President Xi
Jinping is "exceptionally ambitious," confident and focused,
and has had his "eye on the prize" from early adulthood.
Unlike many youth who "made up for lost time by having fun"
after the Cultural Revolution, Xi "chose to survive by
becoming redder than the red." He joined the Party and began
mapping out a career plan that would take him to the top of
the system. In our contact's view, Xi is supremely pragmatic
and a realist, driven not by ideology but by a combination of
ambition and "self-protection." Xi is a true "elitist" at
heart, according to our contact, believing that rule by a
dedicated and committed Communist Party leadership is the key
to enduring social stability and national strength. The most
permanent influences shaping Xi's worldview were his
"princeling" pedigree and formative years growing up with
families of first-generation CCP revolutionaries in Beijing's
exclusive residential compounds. Our contact is convinced
that Xi has a genuine sense of "entitlement," believing that
members of his generation are the "legitimate heirs" to the
revolutionary achievements of their parents and therefore
"deserve to rule China."

2. (C) Xi is not corrupt and does not care about money, but
could be "corrupted by power," in our contact's view. Xi at
one point early in his career was quite taken with Buddhist
mysticism, displaying a fascination with (and knowledge of)
Buddhist martial arts and mystical powers said to aid health.
The contact stated that Xi is very familiar with the West,
including the United States, and has a favorable outlook
toward the United States. He also understands Taiwan and the
Taiwan people from his long tenure as an official in Fujian
Province. End Summary.

Introduction
------------

3. (C) A longtime Embassy contact and former close friend of
Politburo Standing Committee Member and Vice President Xi
Jinping has shared with PolOff his first-hand knowledge of
Xi's family background, upbringing, early adulthood, and
political career, as well as his impressions and assessments
of Xi's personality and political views. The information was
acquired in multiple conversations over a two-year period
2007-2009. The contact is an American citizen of Chinese
descent who teaches political science at a U.S. university
(protect), hereafter referred to as "the professor."

Fifteen-Year Relationship with Xi
---------------------------------

4. (C) PolOff's contact ("the professor") and Xi Jinping were
both born in 1953 and grew up in similar circumstances.
According to the professor, they lived with other sons and
daughters of China's first-generation revolutionaries in the
senior leaders' compounds in Beijing and were groomed to
become China's ruling elite. The professor did not know Xi
personally until they had both reached their late teens, when
the professor began to hear about Xi from the professor's
best friend, Zhou Sanhua (protect), who was later sent to the
same village as Xi in Shaanxi province during the Cultural
Revolution. (Note: According to the professor, Zhou
Sanhua's father was a former editor-in-chief of the People's
Liberation Army (PLA) Daily.) By the time the professor and
Xi had returned separately from the countryside, they had
come to know each other personally, initially through Zhou
Sanhua's introduction, and maintained a relationship for the
next 15 years (ca. 1972 to 1987), even though their lives and
careers took markedly different paths.

Revolutionary Fathers
---------------------

5. (C) Xi's father, Xi Zhongxun, was a communist guerilla
leader in northwest China in the 1930s, when Mao and the CCP
leaders reached Yan'an at the end of the Long March. Xi
Zhongxun was one of the few local leaders to survive later
purges, siding with the Mao Zedong faction and rising quickly
through Party ranks to become a Vice Premier in the 1950s
while still in his thirties. According to the professor, Xi
Zhongxun was the youngest Vice Premier among the early
generation of CCP leaders. Despite his association with
Mao's group, said the professor, Xi Zhongxun was also "good
friends" with Deng Xiaoping and was "actually closer to Deng
than to Mao."

BEIJING 00003128 002 OF 006



6. (C) The professor's father was also an early revolutionary
and contemporary of Mao, from a neighboring county to Mao's
in Hunan province. The professor's father participated in
the revolution periodically but also spent time in Japan and
Hong Kong, distinguishing himself as a labor leader. In
1949, according to the professor, his father agreed to return
to Beijing at Mao's insistence and became the PRC's first
Minister of Labor and a member of the first Chinese People's
Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) Standing Committee.

7. (C) Despite Communist Party rhetoric regarding the
creation of a "classless" society, the professor described,
the pre-Cultural Revolution society and leadership compounds
in which he and Xi Jinping grew up were, ironically, the
"most precisely class-based mini-society ever constructed."
Everything was determined by one's "internal party class
status," the professor asserted, including the kindergarten
one attended, the place where one shopped, and the type of
car one could own. All of these "benefits" were determined
by Party rank, such as Politburo Standing Committee member,
Vice Minister, or Central Committee member. One's every
action, every day, was in some way an indication of one's
"class" status, the professor stated. The children of this
revolutionary elite were told that they, too, would someday
take their rightful place in the Chinese leadership. All of
this came to an end in the Cultural Revolution, the professor
said, but consciousness of membership in an entitled, elite
generation of future rulers has remained among most of the
members of this class.

Cultural Revolution and Return to Beijing
-----------------------------------------

8. (C) Both Xi Zhongxun and the professor's father were
purged during the Cultural Revolution and spent time in
prison, according to the professor. (Note: Xi Zhongxun was
purged in the early 1960s, several years before the Cultural
Revolution began, but things got worse for him and his family
once the Cultural Revolution started.) The professor's
father was falsely accused of supporting Liu Shaoqi and spent
most of the Cultural Revolution years (1966-1976) in prison.
Both Xi Zhongxun and the professor's father were later
rehabilitated when Deng Xiaoping returned to power. Xi was
rehabilitated by Deng in 1978 and was appointed by Deng as
Party Secretary in Guangdong in the 1980s.

9. (C) In the early 1970s, the circle of youthful friends,
including Xi Jinping and the professor, managed to return to
Beijing from the countryside. The professor described
themselves as "fugitives" of one kind or another. The
professor himself served prison time and spent "years on the
run" due to his father's status as a "counter-revolutionary."
At this time, the professor said, he knew Xi, but they did
not spend a great deal of time together.

10. (C) The professor said that he and others found
dramatically different ways to "survive" the aftermath of the
Cultural Revolution. While the professor and his closest
circle of friends descended into the pursuit of romantic
relationships, drink, movies and Western literature as a
release from the hardships of the time, Xi Jinping, by
contrast "chose to survive by becoming redder than the red."
(Note: The professor commented that, in a continuation of
his attempt to deal with the Cultural Revolution, the
professor eventually decided to "flee" China and pursue
graduate study -- and a new life -- in the United States.)
Unlike the professor and others who shared his Cultural
Revolution experience in rural villages, Xi turned to serious
politics upon his return to Beijing, joining the CCP in 1974
while his father was still in prison. The professor and his
friends were reading DeGaulle and Nixon and "trying to catch
up for lost years by having fun," while Xi was reading Marx
and laying the foundation for a career in politics. Xi even
went off to join a "worker-peasant-soldier revolutionary
committee" (note: a label given provincial governing units
during the Cultural Revolution), after which the professor
had presumed he would never see Xi again. It was an "open
secret," the professor said, that it was through the
"worker-peasant-soldier revolutionary committee" that Xi got
his "bachelor's education." The professor said Xi's first
degree was not a "real" university education, but instead a
three-year degree in applied Marxism. (Note: Xi's official
biography provides no information on Xi between his
assignment to Yanchuan county, Shaanxi province, in 1969, and
1975, when, it states, he became a student at Tsinghua
University, graduating in 1979.)

Neighbors, 1977-1982
--------------------


BEIJING 00003128 003 OF 006


11. (C) When Xi and the professor's fathers were
rehabilitated following the Cultural Revolution, the
professor said, their respective families were relocated to
the "Nanshagou" housing compound in western Beijing, directly
across from Diaoyutai. The professor opened his Nanshagou
apartment door one day in 1977 and there was Xi, standing
across the hall from him. The two friends lived directly
across from one another and, the professor said, talked
almost daily for the next five years. Xi became a PLA
officer "and wore his uniform every day," while the professor
became a student at Beijing Shifan Daxue (Beijing Normal
University). There were many prominent leaders in Nanshagou,
including Wang Daohan, Jiang Zemin's mentor. Jiang
frequently rode his bike there, and Jia Qinglin (currently
Politburo Standing Committee member) also had a connection to
Wang from that time, the professor said.

Sporadic Contact, 1982-1987
---------------------------

12. (C) From 1982 to 1987, the professor only saw Xi
periodically, most memorably during a visit to Xiamen in the
mid-1980s, where Xi was serving as a local official, and in
1987 when Xi visited the professor in Washington, D.C. In
Xiamen, Xi treated the professor like royalty, but they did
not spend much time together during the professor's visit
there, and Xi said very little of substance. The professor,
in turn, hosted Xi in Washington, D.C., where the professor
was a graduate student. Xi's 1987 visit to the United States
was the last time the two men met face to face. The last
time the professor spoke with Xi was when his father, Xi
Zhongxun, passed away several years ago, at which time the
two spoke briefly over the phone when the professor called to
offer his condolences. Xi was serving as the Party Secretary
of Zhejiang Province at the time.

Xi's Family
-----------

13. (C) Xi was the middle child in a family of three children
that included an older sister and a younger brother, all of
whom were apparently from his father's second marriage,
according to the professor. Xi's older sister, Xi An'an, at
some point left China for Canada, and as far as the professor
knows, still resides there. Xi An'an's husband was in the
PLA, the professor said. Xi's younger brother, Xi Yuanping,
moved to Hong Kong when it was under British rule. The last
time the professor saw Xi Yuanping was in the 1980s, at a
time when Xi's father Xi Zhongxun was still Party Secretary
in Guangdong province. The brother had become both obese and
very wealthy, the professor said, sporting "expensive jewelry
and designer clothing." The professor has lost contact with
him since. (Note: Unofficial biographies published in Hong
Kong claim Xi had other siblings as well.)

Marriage and Divorce
--------------------

14. (C) Xi Jinping's first marriage was to Ke Xiaoming, the
daughter of China's 1978-1983 ambassador to Great Britain, Ke
Hua. According to the professor, Ke Xiaoming was elegant and
well educated. The couple initially lived with Xi's parents
in the Nanshagou housing compound, but as his father's
political fortunes rose, his parents moved to a new house in
"East" Beijing, near the Drum Tower and close to the houses
of Deng Xiaoping and Yang Shangkun, leaving the young couple
to themselves in the Nanshagou apartment. The couple fought
"almost every day," the professor said, and the marriage
ended when Ke Xiaoming returned to England and Xi refused to
go with her. The professor remarked that he thought Xi's
"distant" quality contributed to the couple's divorce. He
noted that he had watched Xi "drift" further and further from
Ke Xiaoming, until she finally left for England. There was,
"of course," no way that Xi would go with her, the professor
said. Xi later married a famous PLA singer.

Xi's Early Career: Single-Minded Pursuit of Power
--------------------------------------------- -----

15. (C) According to the professor, Xi was always
"exceptionally ambitious" and had his "eye on the prize" from
the very beginning. Once Xi had returned from his education
in the worker-soldier-peasant revolutionary committee, he
carefully laid out a career plan that would maximize his
opportunities to rise to the top levels of the Party
hierarchy, first becoming a PLA officer in the late 1970s and
then serving in a variety of provincial leadership positions,
progressively rising through the ranks. By 1979, Xi was on
the staffs of the State Council and the Central Military
Commission (CMC), serving as an assistant to the CMC
Secretary General and later Minister of National Defense

BEIJING 00003128 004 OF 006


(1982), General Geng Biao, a revolutionary comrade of his
father's. The professor said he had the impression that Geng
Biao had helped Xi Jinping get the PLA job, and that Xi
Zhongxun had, in turn, given Geng's daughter a position in
Guangdong when he was Party Secretary there.

16. (C) According to the professor, Xi subsequently became
even more serious in plotting a career path to the top. By
all appearances, with his father having been politically
rehabilitated and rapidly regaining his power, Xi Jinping
could have continued to rise quickly in the Central Party
apparatus. Xi, however, reasoned that in the long run,
staying in Beijing would limit his career potential. Xi told
the professor that staying with Geng Biao would eventually
shrink his power base, which would ultimately rest primarily
on his father's and Geng's networks and political support.
Moreover, in time, people would turn against him if he stayed
in the Center.

17. (C) So in a calculated move to lay the basis for a future
return as a Central leader, Xi asked for a position in the
countryside and, in 1982, became a local official in
Shijiazhuang, the capital of Hebei province. Xi later became
the Deputy Party Secretary in Zhengding county, also in
Hebei. Xi told the professor at the time that he "would be
back one day." (Note: Xi later served for many years in
Fujian province, becoming Governor in 2000, then moving to
Zhejiang province in 2002 to be Party Secretary, and then to
Shanghai as Party Secretary in 2007. He was elevated to the
Politburo Standing Committee at the 17th National CCP
Congress in October 2007 and was appointed Vice President at
the National People's Congress in March 2008.)

18. (C) Xi told the professor at the time that going to the
provinces was his "only path to central power." Xi thought
it was important to know people in the Central Organization
Department and to keep his eyes on the Center, even as he
worked his way up the ladder as a local official. According
to the professor, Xi "had promotion to the Center in mind
from day one." Xi knew how to develop personal networks and
work the system, first using his father's networks and later
building his own.

Xi the Person
-------------

19. (C) The professor offered his personal assessment --
based on their similar upbringing and his long association
with Xi during his formative years -- of Xi's personality and
political views. Although he had not seen Xi in person in
more than 20 years, "one cannot entirely escape one's past,"
he asserted, and "Xi does not want to." The professor on
repeated occasions painted a portrait of Xi Jinping as an
ambitious, calculating, confident and focused person who in
early adulthood demonstrated his singleness of purpose by
distinguishing himself from his peers and turning his
attention to politics even before the Cultural Revolution had
concluded. The professor marveled that Xi joined the
Communist Party while his father still languished in a Party
prison for alleged political crimes. At the time, the
professor and his friend Zhou felt "betrayed" by Xi's embrace
of the CCP, but both realized this was one way to "survive."
Xi chose to "join the system" to get ahead. Although Xi
never said so explicitly, he sent a message that, in China,
there was a better way forward than what the professor had
chosen: namely, do not give up on the system. Xi was
reserved and detached and "difficult to read," said the
professor. He had a "strong mind" and understood power, but
"from day one, never showed his hand."

20. (C) Unlike those in the social circles the professor ran
in, Xi Jinping could not talk about women and movies and did
not drink or do drugs. Xi was considered of only average
intelligence, the professor said, and not as smart as the
professor's peer group. Women thought Xi was "boring." The
professor never felt completely relaxed around Xi, who seemed
extremely "driven." Nevertheless, despite Xi's lack of
popularity in the conventional sense and his "cold and
calculating" demeanor in these early years, the professor
said, Xi was "not cold-hearted." He was still considered a
"good guy" in other ways. Xi was outwardly friendly, "always
knew the answers" to questions, and would "always take care
of you." The professor surmised that Xi's newfound
popularity today, which the professor found surprising, must
stem in part from Xi's being "generous and loyal." Xi also
does not care at all about money and is not corrupt, the
professor stated. Xi can afford to be incorruptible, the
professor wryly noted, given that he was born with a silver
spoon in his mouth. It is likely that Xi could, however, be
"corrupted by power."


BEIJING 00003128 005 OF 006


Xi's Political Instincts and Biases
-----------------------------------

21. (C) In the professor's view, Xi Jinping is supremely
pragmatic, a realist, driven not by ideology but by a
combination of ambition and "self-protection." The professor
saw Xi's early calculations to carefully lay out a realistic
career path as an illustration of his pragmatism. The most
permanent influences shaping Xi's worldview were his
princeling pedigree and formative years growing up with
families of first-generation CCP revolutionaries in Beijing's
elite residential compounds. These influences were amplified
by Xi's decision in his early twenties to join the CCP and
then the PLA. Xi solidified these views and values during
his subsequent very successful 30-year career as a Party
official, the professor concluded.

22. (C) Xi is a true "elitist" at heart, according to the
professor, and believes that rule by a dedicated and
committed Communist Party leadership is the key to enduring
social stability and national strength, as in the
(self-perceived) elite-dominated society of his youth, knit
together by family ties, elders and male authority. After
years of conversations with Xi, and having shared a common
upbringing with him, the professor said, he is convinced that
Xi has a genuine sense of "entitlement," believing that
members of his generation are the "legitimate heirs" to the
revolutionary achievements of their parents and therefore
"deserve to rule China." For this reason, the professor
maintained, Xi could never be a "true member" of current
President Hu Jintao's camp, even if Xi did not give any
indication of opposition to Hu Jintao now. Xi and other
first-generation princelings derisively refer to people with
non-Party, non-elite, commercial backgrounds like Hu Jintao
as "shopkeepers' sons," whose parents did not fight and die
for the revolution and therefore do not deserve positions of
power.

23. (C) Xi knows how very corrupt China is and is repulsed by
the all-encompassing commercialization of Chinese society,
with its attendant nouveau riche, official corruption, loss
of values, dignity, and self-respect, and such "moral evils"
as drugs and prostitution, the professor stated. The
professor speculated that if Xi were to become the Party
General Secretary, he would likely aggressively attempt to
address these evils, perhaps at the expense of the new
moneyed class.

24. (C) Xi at one point early in his career was quite taken
with Buddhist mysticism, according to the professor. In
comments Xi made to the professor, including during the
professor's visit to Xiamen while Xi was serving as an
official there, Xi displayed a fascination with Buddhist
martial arts, qigong, and other mystical powers said to aid
health, as well as with Buddhist sacred sites such as
Wutaishan. The professor said he does not know whether Xi
was actually religious, or whether he was simply looking for
a way to aid his health and well-being. Regardless, the
professor said, he was extremely surprised by how much Xi
knew about the subject and Xi's seeming belief in
supernatural forces.

Familiarity with the West and Taiwan
------------------------------------

25. (C) Based on personal experience, the professor noted, Xi
is very familiar with the West, with a sister in Canada, an
ex-wife in England, a brother in Hong Kong, many friends
overseas, and prior travel to the United States. As far as
the professor can discern, Xi's family and friends have had a
good experience in the West. The professor contrasted Xi's
experience and attitudes toward the West with those of people
sent to the United States by their work units, such as the
nationalist and sometime anti-U.S. Tsinghua University
scholar Yan Xuetong. Xi was the only one of his immediate
family to stay behind in China, the professor noted,
speculating that Xi knew early on that he would "not be
special" outside of China.

26. (C) Xi is favorably disposed toward the United States,
the professor maintained, and would want to maintain good
relations with Washington. The professor said Xi has "no
ambition" to "confront" the United States. During Xi's visit
to Washington, D.C., in 1987, he told the professor that he
had no strong impressions of the United States. Although Xi
was not particularly impressed by the United States, he had
nothing bad to say about it either. Xi took a detached
stance, as if observing from a distance, viewing what he saw
as just a normal part of life, not strange, the professor
said.


BEIJING 00003128 006 OF 006


27. (C) Xi also knows Taiwan and the Taiwan people very well,
the professor said, noting that Xi was in Fujian province for
more than twenty years. Attracting Taiwan investment to
Fujian was an important part of his accomplishments as a
Xiamen official.
HUNTSMAN
HUNTSMAN



UlanBatori
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby UlanBatori » 02 Oct 2019 07:01

Hong Kong Protests: First protestor shot. "Teen-Aged".
Officers used tear gas, pepper spray, water cannons and rubber bullets to disperse the huge crowds, while some protesters hurled back tear gas canisters, petrol bombs and bricks.
A video of the shooting incident appears to show a protester swinging at a police officer with a metal rod, and the officer firing a weapon at close range.
The wounded teenager was taken to Princess Margaret Hospital for treatment, according to Hoi-kwan. A spokesperson for Princess Margaret Hospital told ABC News that an injured patient was admitted Tuesday in critical condition.

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Atmavik » 02 Oct 2019 07:12

The "eye of sauron" needs to fixed on HK and not Cash mere. can we bring this up at UNHRC ?

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby UlanBatori » 02 Oct 2019 07:57

Did they even HAVE an Article 370, hain? :((

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Vayutuvan » 02 Oct 2019 10:51

ramana wrote:chola and UB ...
And they use massive number of troops to swamp defences and withdraw to safe harbor before retaliation and declare ceasefire.


"quantity has its own quality" - Mao, head of dushTa chatushTaya

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Atmavik » 02 Oct 2019 11:18

UlanBatori wrote:Did they even HAVE an Article 370, hain? :((


one country two systems.

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 08 Oct 2019 22:50

October 11 thru 13 2019, China and India will have the second Informal Summit at Mammalapuram, TN.
The first summit was in April 2018 at Wuhan.
This is a follow-up to that summit.

In diplomatic terms its lightning speed as back to back summits within two years.

Would not be surprised if they formalize this into annual summits in future.



Please put all news of the summit here.

Eg...

Peregrine wrote:India, China should jointly uphold peace and stability, resolve disputes through dialogues: Chinese ambassador PTI
HIGHLIGHTS

- Chinese Ambassador Sun Weidong said both India and China should go beyond the model of "management of differences" and work towards actively shaping bilateral relations

- "At the regional level, we should resolve disputes peacefully through dialogue and consultations and jointly uphold regional peace and stability” he said.


NEW DELHI: India and China should resolve disputes peacefully through dialogues at the regional level and jointly uphold peace and stability, Chinese Ambassador Sun Weidong said ahead of the second informal summit between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Xi Jinping.

The preparation for the summit coastal town of Mamallapuramon near Chennai have come under the shadow of the Kashmir issue as both sides are yet to announce the dates for Xi's India visit though it is learnt that he will arrive in Chennai on Friday for a nearly 24-hour long trip.

In an exclusive interview to PTI, the Chinese envoy said both India and China should go beyond the model of "management of differences" and work towards actively shaping bilateral relations through accumulation of positive energy and forging greater cooperation for common development.

"At the regional level, we should resolve disputes peacefully through dialogues and consultations and jointly uphold regional peace and stability, " he said, noting that China-India ties transcend the bilateral dimension and assumed global and strategic significance.

"The two sides should strengthen strategic communication, enhance political mutual trust, give full play to the irreplaceable guidance of the two leaders in bilateral relations, and ensure the accurate transmission and solid implementation of the consensus reached by the two leaders, " said the envoy.

The ties between India and China came under some strain after India announced withdrawal of Jammu and Kashmir's special status and bifurcated the state into two Union territories. China criticised India's decision and its foreign minister Wang Yi even raised it at the UN General Assembly last month.

Days later, Chinese ambassador to Pakistan Yao Jing said that China was working for Kashmiris to help them get their fundamental rights and justice, comments which have not gone down well with New Delhi.

The first informal summit between Modi and Xi took place in picturesque Chinese lake city Wuhan in April 2018, months after a 73-day long face off between the armies of the two countries in Doklam tri-juction in Sikkim sector raised fears of a war between the two Asian giants.

In the summit, Modi and Xi decided to issue "strategic guidance" to their militaries to strengthen communication and build trust and understanding.

In Mamallapuramon summit, the focus of the talks is likely to be on steps to ensure mutual development and expanding overall ties.

"We should go beyond the model of differences management, actively shape bilateral relations and accumulate positive energy. We should enhance exchanges and cooperation, promote convergence of interests and achieve common development, " the Chinese envoy said.

On the decades-old boundary question, the envoy said it is normal for neighbours to have differences and the key is to properly handle them and find solution through dialogue and consultation.

"Over the past decades, no single bullet has been fired at the China-India border area, and peace and tranquility has been maintained. Boundary question is only part of China-India relations, " Sun said.

"We need to keep it in the larger picture of China-India relations and do not let the boundary dispute affect the normal development of bilateral relations, " he said.

The envoy said China and India should strengthen communication and coordination on international and regional affairs.

"The uncertainty of the international situation poses common challenges to both China and India. Strengthening solidarity and cooperation between us is an opportunity for our respective development and the world at large, " he said.

"I am convinced that China and India have the vision and capability to chart a course of common development and win-win cooperation among emerging countries and contribute to the building of a community with a shared future, " he added.

Talking about issues relating to trade, Sun said China has long been India's largest trading partner and India is China's largest trading partner in South Asia, adding since the beginning of the 21st century, bilateral trade has grown from less than $3 billion to nearly $100 billion, an increase of about 32 times.

"More than 1,000 Chinese companies have increased their investment in industrial parks, e-commerce and other areas in India, with a total investment of $8 billion and 200,000 local jobs created, " he said.

At the same time, he said there is huge potential and broad prospects for expanding economic and trade cooperation.

"China encourages Chinese companies to invest in India and hopes that India will provide a more fair, friendly and convenient business environment for Chinese companies to operate in India," he added.
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Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Peregrine » 08 Oct 2019 23:49

ramana Ji : WILC0 AND X Post on the Terroristan Thread
ramana wrote:October 11 thru 13 2019, China and India will have the second Informal Summit at Mammalapuram, TN.
The first summit was in April 2018 at Wuhan.
This is a follow-up to that summit.

In diplomatic terms its lightning speed as back to back summits within two years.

Would not be surprised if they formalize this into annual summits in future.



Please put all news of the summit here.

Eg...

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 09 Oct 2019 01:41

So topics for the Mammalapuram Summit could be:

- RCEP
- $52B trade deficit
- FATF Blacklist/Suar etc.
- Data Localization
- 5G
- Chinese participation in infrastructure projects.

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 10 Oct 2019 04:52

Two stories

1) Modi-Xi Summit at Mamallapuram Shores

The historic coastal town of Mamallapuram on the scenic East Coast Road in Tamil Nadu is the venue for the second India-China informal summit between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping, scheduled to be held from October 11-13.

During the summit, besides holding talks, the leaders are likely to make a visit to the ancient monuments in the coastal town. The monuments there have been classified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. During the first informal summit in Wuhan, the leaders had made a visit to the Hubei provincial museum.

Elaborate security arrangements will be in place around the hotel and roads which lead to the coastal town. The two leaders are likely to visit several monuments in Mamallapuram, including the Pancha Rathas, Shore Temple and Arjuna’s Penance.


2) Xi-Modi may announce additional CBMS


India and China are likely to announce additional confidence building measures to strengthen relationship between the two countries when Chinese president Xi Jinping and Prime Minister Narendra Modi meet in Mahabalipuram later this week.

But no new agreements are expected to be signed, a government official has said.

The timing of Xi’s visit to India, scheduled on October 11-12, is important as it is is taking place right after his meeting with Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan in Beijing and concurrently with the crucial meeting of Trade and Economic Ministers from countries negotiating the ambitious Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) pact including the ASEAN, India, China and three others in Bangkok.

“The objective of the India-China Summit in Mahabalipuram is the same as that of the first bilateral Informal Summit in Wuhan in April 2018. The aim is to build contacts at the highest level. We do not expect any MoU or agreement signing,” the official told BusinessLine.

While on paper the agenda of the meet appears simple, it is actually nuanced and complex with both countries eager to push their interests. China, which is fighting a long and fierce trade war with the US, is keen that India agrees to ambitious market opening commitments at the RCEP so that it has tariff-free entry into the country’s market and has uninhibited access to the entire bloc which also includes the ASEAN, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

“New Delhi has not yet been able to agree to the steep demands for market access being put forward by most of the RCEP members including China. Xi is likely to try and convince Modi to take the plunge,” a Delhi-based trade expert said.

The reason for India's indecision at RCEP is the fact that almost all industrial sectors ranging from plastics and chemicals to steel and engineering goods are against lowering of tariffs, especially from China, as they fear a surge in cheap imports. Farmers and the dairy industry, too, are up in arms against opening up of their sectors.

At the bilateral meet, India is likely to use the opportunity to press for the full implementation of the earlier set of confidence building measures agreed to between the two leaders which included bridging of the yawning trade gap between the two countries. Although the trade gap, in Beijing’s favour, has come down to $ 53 billion in 2018-19 from over $60 billion a year before, it still accounts for almost a third of India’s total trade deficit with the world. “After the Wuhan meet, China had agreed to import a number of items from India such as sugar, soyabean and buffalo meat, but more progress is required in the talks. Indian officials will take up the pending trade issues with Chinese officials who will accompany the Chinese President,” another official said.

The reason why Mahabalipuram, near Chennai, was chosen as the venue for the talks is the fact that it is a world heritage site and there has been a historical connect between Southern India and China. “There used to be a lot of trade with China during the rule of the Pallava and Chola dynasties. President Xi is interested in history and culture. And Mahabalipuram also has appropriate logistics facility. So, it was felt that it would be an ideal venue,” the official said.


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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 10 Oct 2019 22:50

Today is 10 October China's national day!!!

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Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Peregrine » 11 Oct 2019 01:59

X Posted on the Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat

Modi-Xi summit to focus on how to move beyond differences: Chinese media – PTI
HIGHLIGHTS

- China's official media said President Xi Jinping's meeting with PM Modi would focus on how to forge a cooperative partnership between the two countries

- Xi is scheduled to leave Beijing for Chennai early on Friday

- He will meet PM Modi at Mamallapuram tourist centre

BEIJING: As Chinese President Xi Jinping heads to India on Friday for his 2nd informal summit with Prime Minister Narendra Modi, official media in China said, their meeting would focus more on how to move beyond the historical and present differences to forge a cooperative partnership.

Xi is scheduled to leave Beijing for Chennai early on Friday and reach the city by late noon to be in time for his 2nd informal meeting with PM Narendra Modi at the nearby picturesque Mamallapuram tourist centre

About the summit, Chinese vice foreign minister, Luo Zhaohui told the media on Wednesday that, officials of both sides have made meticulous preparations for the summit through close interactions.

"Now the solid ground has been laid. With the joint efforts of the two sides President Xi's visit to India will be a full success and set the tone and direction for further growth of bilateral ties and lead to new progress and fruitful results in exchange of cooperation between the two sides," he said.

"Since it is an informal meeting, the two leaders will have a relaxed and comfortable atmosphere to have free exchange of views without fixed topics," he added.

Quick Edit: India, China remain far apart on core issues

Also no agreements were expected to be signed.

Starting from Friday evening, PM Modi and President Xi were expected to have several meetings, mostly accompanied just by their translators to discuss the way forward for the Sino-India ties which faced numerous headwinds, especially over Beijing's backing to Pakistan's shrilled campaign against India over the revocation of Article 370, removing the special status of Jammu and Kashmir.

While Luo struck a highly positive note, a surprisingly candid editorial in the state run China Daily on Thursday said it remains to be seen what the two leaders can accomplish in the next two days.

"The belated official announcement of Xi's visits to the country's two South Asian neighbours, (India and Nepal) only 48 hours ahead of the informal meeting, was proof that Beijing and New Delhi cherish the opportunity to improve bilateral ties through the personal chemistry between their top leaders," the editorial said.

"That both Beijing and New Delhi announced the meeting will take place, quashed the earlier speculation that the two leaders would postpone any meeting and sent the reassuring message that they want nothing to get in the way of constructive engagement," it said.

"Xi's meeting with PM Modi in the southern Indian city of Chennai on Friday and Saturday is expected to focus more on the two countries' historical and present differences, and how to move beyond them to realise their cooperation potential," it said.

"While it remains to be seen what Xi and PM Modi can accomplish in Chennai, the potential of greater bilateral engagement certainly supports a relationship that is far more positive than one that is just stable," it added.

China this week appeared to have softened its stand on Kashmir, with foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang while replying to a question on the issue omitted references to UN and UN Security Council (UNSC) resolutions.

China whose traditional stand on Kashmir issue was that it should be peacefully resolved between India and Pakistan, started referring to UN and UNSC resolutions, after Pakistan foreign minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi's visit to Beijing days after India revoked article 370 on August 5.

China also backed Pakistan's call for an informal UNSC meeting on Kashmir, which ended without any statement, and its foreign minister Wang Yi in his address to the UN General Assembly said "no actions that would unilaterally change the status quo should be taken".

Geng's comments this week raised hopes of China softening its stance ahead of the Chennai summit, but Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan's visit along with army chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa and their meeting with Xi has drastically changed Beijing's stance.

It is still a mystery why China worked out the visit of Khan just ahead of Xi's trip to India.

In his meeting, Xi assured Khan that the friendship between China and Pakistan is "unbreakable and rock-solid" despite changes in the international and regional situation.

He also said, "China is paying close attention to the Kashmir situation and the facts are clear".

A joint press release issued at the end of Khan's visit said China was “paying close attention to the current situation in Jammu & Kashmir and reiterated that the Kashmir issue is a dispute left from history, and should be properly and peacefully resolved based on the UN Charter, relevant UN Security Council resolutions and bilateral agreements."

"China opposes any unilateral actions that complicate the situation. Parties need to settle disputes and issues in the region through dialogue on the basis of equality and mutual respect," it said.

India reacted sharply to Xi's references on Kashmir with the external affairs ministry saying, Beijing is "well aware" of New Delhi's position and it is not for other countries to comment on its internal affairs.

Indian government sources also said there was no question of any discussion on the issue as it is India's sovereign matter but added that PM Modi will update Xi on the matter if there is a query.

On Thursday, Geng, however, treaded cautiously, declining to go into China's stand on Kashmir in detail.

Asked at a media briefing whether the Kashmir issue would figure in Xi-Modi talks, Geng said, "China's position on the Kashmir issue is consistent and clear”.

"On President Xi and Prime Minister Modi's meeting, we will release information in due course," he added
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 11 Oct 2019 02:23

Folks try to catch Doordarshan English and Tamil editions to get a good analysis!

I am going to watch on Youtube if power cuts are restored in Northern California.

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 11 Oct 2019 02:33

It is still a mystery why China worked out the visit of Khan just ahead of Xi's trip to India.

{To answer that read Xi statement. Imran Khan is worried that China and India will come to an agreement on Kashmir and that cuts out Pakistan. And recall Imran Khan is a guest of Chinese PM and not Chinese President. So its a lesser level visit but Imran Khan managed to inveigle a statement from Xi!. Wonder which globalists leaned on China to allow this visit? China did try to make it less level visit by sending the invite from the PM. This has to be understood.}


In his meeting, Xi assured Khan that the friendship between China and Pakistan is "unbreakable and rock-solid" despite changes in the international and regional situation.

He also said, "China is paying close attention to the Kashmir situation and the facts are clear".


A joint press release issued at the end of Khan's visit said China was “paying close attention to the current situation in Jammu & Kashmir and reiterated that the Kashmir issue is a dispute left from history, and should be properly and peacefully resolved based on the UN Charter, relevant UN Security Council resolutions and bilateral agreements."

"China opposes any unilateral actions that complicate the situation. Parties need to settle disputes and issues in the region through dialogue on the basis of equality and mutual respect," it said.

India reacted sharply to Xi's references on Kashmir with the external affairs ministry saying, Beijing is "well aware" of New Delhi's position and it is not for other countries to comment on its internal affairs.

Indian government sources also said there was no question of any discussion on the issue as it is India's sovereign matter but added that PM Modi will update Xi on the matter if there is a query.

On Thursday, Geng, however, treaded cautiously, declining to go into China's stand on Kashmir in detail.

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Anantha » 11 Oct 2019 05:32

China uttering Kashmir Kashmir today a few times on paper. China watchers may know this is a template statement. Expect chinese to do opposite in reality, to sell paxis down the river. It is the economy stupid. China badly needs India not take US side while it is fighting a trade war.
Expect fresh trade deals between India and China few weeks from now.

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby SSridhar » 11 Oct 2019 07:17

ramana wrote:
It is still a mystery why China worked out the visit of Khan just ahead of Xi's trip to India.

{To answer that read Xi statement. Imran Khan is worried that China and India will come to an agreement on Kashmir and that cuts out Pakistan. And recall Imran Khan is a guest of Chinese PM and not Chinese President. So its a lesser level visit but Imran Khan managed to inveigle a statement from Xi!. Wonder which globalists leaned on China to allow this visit? China did try to make it less level visit by sending the invite from the PM. This has to be understood.} . . . On Thursday, Geng, however, treaded cautiously, declining to go into China's stand on Kashmir in detail.


IMO, there is no mystery in China working out Imran Khan Niazi's trip to Beijing ahead of Xi's summit visit to Mahabalipuram.

Of late, India has not accommodated any visit by a leader to India which also included Terroristan on the itinerary. India is particular that this de-hyphenation must be permanent. Xi and his planners would be aware of this. Including Nepal on the tour programme was all right. But, China has always been particular in the symbolism of hyphenation between us and Terroristan in the past. The only way out for China, therefore, was to invite Pakistan to Beijing ahead of Xi's trip to India.

I also do not believe that some other country would have brokered this hurried visit by IK Niazi to Beijing. China and Terroristan are so joined at the hip (and elsewhere too) that they do not require someone else to broker this. There was a time when Zardari used to go every month to China.

Advertently or inadvertently, CPoKEC projects are stuck for several reasons. Added to that are the issues of economic meltdown of Terroristan and the political uncertainty and risks that have increasingly plagued Terroristan since 1947 (except during military interludes). Whether IK Niazi would use that gun pointed at his own head as a leverage against China is a moot point. Bajwa, being such an admirer of China and most likely on its pay-off list along with Corps Commanders, may not allow IK Niazi to squeeze China, as they used to do with the US on various issues. Terroristan cannot arrogantly say, "The Chinese need us more than we need them". But, the truth may be that they both need each other badly.

However, I feel that China is caught in a cleft. Having never been an admirer of Chinese diplomacy, I feel that China's alternating statements on Kashmir indicate how deeply they are caught. It is truly difficult for any country to antagonize India (as Turkey found out recently and Malaysia will soon find out, but of course they are smaller ones), much less China, which is facing very strong headwinds that have the potential to become a typhoon.

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 11 Oct 2019 11:04

SS,
I was thinking of George Soros Imran Khan meeting in Washington.
And the fact many private equity leaders are on talking terms with Xi Jinping.

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Manish_Sharma » 11 Oct 2019 14:43

SSridhar wrote:
.....
However, I feel that China is caught in a cleft. Having never been an admirer of Chinese diplomacy, I feel that China's alternating statements on Kashmir indicate how deeply they are caught. It is truly difficult for any country to antagonize India (as Turkey found out recently and Malaysia will soon find out, but of course they are smaller ones), much less China, which is facing very strong headwinds that have the potential to become a typhoon.


What is compulsion of current GoI to engage china and not retaliate in same crass manners of chinese?

After all we are having 60+ billion $ imbalance with them making us their customers......

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby dnivas » 11 Oct 2019 19:17

India is giving it right back to China.. We are just not seeing it

https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3793353

Indian officials attend Taiwan's National Day banquet ahead of Xi Jinping's arrival

Indian government dignitaries and scholars alike attended a National Day of Taiwan dinner party held by the Taipei Economic and Cultural Center (TECC) at New Delhi's Hyatt Regency Delhi on October 9 — the eve before Chinese President Xi Jinping arrived in India for his 2nd informal summit with Indian President Narendra Modi.

Despite speculation that Indian officials would be restricted from participating considering the timing of the event, many still arrived unhindered, according to CNA. Attendees included MPs of the Indian People's Party and its national spokesperson, Meenakshi Lekhi, as well as ambassadors from Germany, Paraguay, and other countries.

=============
Now that's a total FU to China in the face days before he lands. SO am glad india is playing these subtle games as well

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 11 Oct 2019 21:12

Manish, Can we give it a rest till we hear form NaMo?*

This is the second informal summit between the two leaders.
A lot of important things are riding on this meeting.

* Sometimes good to read up on SSridhar who is our resident expert.
Others are busy now.
Go watch Doordarshan TV to get informed.

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Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Peregrine » 11 Oct 2019 22:07

X Posting on the Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017) Thread

Bonhomie on display as PM Modi hosts XiJinping for second informal summit: Highlights

PM Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping took a tour of the iconic monuments at Mamallapuram, sipped coconut water at the magnificent Panch Rathas complex and enjoyed cultural performances at the beautifully lit-up Shore temple as they kicked off their second informal summit on Friday. Here are the highlights of the first day of Xi's two-day India visit:

* Chinese President Xi Jinping was accorded a red carpet welcome at the Chennai airport today and was treated to Tamil cultural performances by folk dancers as well as Bharatanatyam artistes while scores of children greeted him by waving Indian and Chinese flags. He later drove to seaside resort town of Mamallapuram for his informal summit with PM Modi.

* PM Modi, who had reached Mamallapuram ahead of Xi by a chopper, received the Chinese leader at the Arjuna's Penance monument. Donning a striking Tamil traditional 'karai veshti' (dhoti with a border in green), angavastram (a shawl), and a half sleeve white shirt, the Prime Minister shook hands with Xi as the two leaders exchanged pleasantries. PM Modi's outfit drew praise from several quarters, with Pattali Makkal Katchi S Ramadoss and Karnataka culture and tourism minister C T Ravi hailing PM for promoting the local culture.

* The two leaders proceeded to take a tour of the iconic relief structure Arjuna's Penance, an intricately carved ancient sculpture dating back to the Pallava dynasty and Krishna's Butter Ball - a big round boulder perched on a slope. Later, the
Prime Minister offered a tender coconut to the visiting foreign dignitary and the two leaders relished the drink at the magnificent Panch Rathas complex.


* PM Modi and Xi then enjoyed a thrilling cultural performance at the centuries old Shore Temple, basking in the rich heritage of India. The programme showcased the Indian classical dance forms of Kathakali and Bharatnatyam to fast-paced Carnatic music, highlighting the region's magnificent roots.

* After the cultural gala, the Prime Minister hosted Xi for a scrumptious dinner comprising sambhar, a mouthwatering south Indian recipe made of lentils and also a favourite of the Tamils, besides other delicacies. The meal also included 'thakkali rasam,' made of tomato and 'imli' and 'kadalai (chick pea, generally) korma', besides halwa as the premier dessert.

* The Prime Minister gifted Xi a Nachiarkoil - a branched Annam Lamp and aThanjavur painting of dancing Saraswathi. The lamp is exclusively made in Nachiarkoil town by the local community known as Pathers. The painting is three feet high, four-feet wide, weighs about 40 kgs and took 45 days to complete.

* The meeting between the two leaders is a follow up to the inaugural summit which was held in Wuhan from April 27 to 28 last year. "Taking forward the Wuhan Spirit, the Mahabalipuram meet will provide an opportunity to the Chinese President and PM Modi to continue their discussions on overarching issues of bilateral, regional and global importance and to exchange views on deepening India-China Closer Development Partnership," the external affairs ministry had said in a statement.

* On Saturday, the two leaders will have a one-on-one meeting at the Fisherman's Cove resort which will be followed up by delegation-level talks. After the talks, Modi will host a lunch for Xi, and the Chinese leader will leave for Chennai airport at 12.45 pm. PM Modi and Xi will engage for a total period of six hours during their two-day summit.

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 12 Oct 2019 04:57

Thanks.

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby UlanBatori » 12 Oct 2019 08:13

Interesting. How did Eleven react to sambar and rasam I wonder. Many visits to Pakistan in between India-China summit!

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Peregrine » 12 Oct 2019 20:27

UlanBatori wrote:Interesting. How did Eleven react to sambar and rasam I wonder. Many visits to Pakistan in between India-China summit!
UlanBatori Ji :

A reliable source has advised me that Eleven was "Moaning" Ah So in Japanese the next Morning! :rotfl:

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Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Peregrine » 12 Oct 2019 20:36

X Posted on the Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat Thread

PM Modi accepts Xi's invitation for third informal summit in China – ANI

HIGHLIGHTS :
- President Xi extended the invitation during the second informal summit in Mamallapuram

- The dates and location of the summit are yet to be decided

- During the second summit, both leaders held "heart-to-heart" and "candid discussions like friends" on a series of issues
CHENNAI: Prime Minister Narendra Modi has accepted the invitation of President Xi Jinping to visit China for a third informal summit next year.

President Xi extended the invitation during the second informal summit in Tamil Nadu's Mamallapuram.

Addressing the media after the summit, foreign secretary Vijay Gokhale on Saturday said, "Prime Minister Modi and President Xi also appraised the practice of Informal Summits in a positive light as providing an important opportunity to deepen dialogue and to promote mutual understanding at the Leaders' level in line with the 'Wuhan Spirit' and the 'Chennai Connect'."

"They agreed to continue this practice in the future. President Xi invited Prime Minister Modi to visit China for the 3rd Informal Summit. Prime Minister Modi has accepted the invitation," he added

The dates and location of the summit are yet to be decided.

During the second summit, both leaders held "heart-to-heart" and "candid discussions like friends" on a series of issues.

The Chinese President had landed in Chennai on Friday and held a one-on-one discussion with Modi on various issues in the coastal historic city of Mamallapuram. They also discussed matters related to trade and the economy.

The second day of the summit began with one-to-one talks which lasted for over an hour. They concluded the summit with delegation-level talks.

Upon his arrival, President Xi was accorded a grand welcome by people who lined the streets along with traditional drum players, creating a warm environment which personified the Indian belief of 'Atithi Devo Bhava'.

The first summit was held in Wuhan, China, last year on April 27-28. Xi during the delegation-level talks said that it was the right decision to have this kind of informal summit
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Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Peregrine » 13 Oct 2019 05:20

Xi doesn' traise Kashmir with Modi as they seek to reset ties - Indrani Bagchi
HIGHLIGHTS

-Xi Jinping relayed to PM Modi Pak PM Imran Khan's complaint that India had refused to talk to him, to which Modi chose not to respond

-Briefing journalists after the summit, foreign secretary Vijay Gokhale said "The (Kashmir) issue was not raised and not discussed. Our position is anyways very clear that this
is an internal matter of India."
MAMALLAPURAM: The developments in Kashmir related to New Delhi's decision to do away with J&K's special status was "neither raised nor discussed" during the Modi-Xi summit here as both leaders looked to effect a major reset in relations between the world's two most populous nations.

Briefing journalists after the summit, foreign secretary Vijay Gokhale said Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping had covered a wide range of topics in the six hours of direct discussions but there was no mention of Kashmir. "The issue was not raised and not discussed. Our position is anyways very clear that this is an internal
matter of India, " he said

Asked about China's references to Pakistan ahead of the summit, Gokhale said Xi briefed Modi about Pakistan PM Imran Khan's October 8 visit to Beijing and the Indian PM heard him out.

Gokhale said there was convergence on the challenges of terrorism and radicalisation for large countries with diverse populations. In his post-summit remarks, Modi said the leaders decided to prudently manage their differences and remain attuned to each other's concerns. During official discussions, Xi said he and Modi had candid and "heart-to-heart" conversations like friends.

A detailed statement issued by the Chinese foreign ministry later on Saturday evening was completely silent on Kashmir. In his conversation, Xi gave Modi an unvarnished version of the Pakistan PM's visit, relaying Imran's complaint that India had refused to talk to him. Modi chose not to respond, sources said.

In the run-up to the summit, the Indian side was clear that Modi would not raise the Kashmir issue during the summit, but would be prepared to explain India's August 5 decision in detail if asked by Xi. The Indian government has made it clear to the world that its decision to abrogate Article 370 and reorganise J&K is an internal decision and a sovereign act.

China had reacted sharply to the reorganisation of Ladakh as a Union territory alleging implications for border management. India has asserted, including at the level of the foreign minister, that India would not be raising any additional territorial claims and that China would not be impacted.

Xi’s decision to brief Modi about Imran’s visit could be part of a confidence building exercise with India. Khan’s Beijing visit sparked off a series of apparently contradictory statements by the Chinese foreign ministry, where China was first seen to be favouring a bilateral resolution to Pakistan and, within 24 hours, reversing it to include UN resolutions.

Whether they are part of an evolution in the Chinese position or a tussle between different factions of the Chinese system is not clear. Regardless, the Indian foreign ministry was compelled to respond sharply, to push back against these positions, just hours before Xi was due to land in India.
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SSridhar
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby SSridhar » 13 Oct 2019 07:59

This thread was started with the idea of understanding the internal dynamics of China especially after the historic 19th Congress which raised Xi to a cult figure level on the same pedestal as Mao, and his far reaching and sweeping changes and doctrine.

The rest can be discussed in the Neutering thread.

Thanks.

Rudradev
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby Rudradev » 13 Oct 2019 15:58

Suggest closing and archiving this thread at this point. Some valuable posts were made, but the large number of active China threads currently open leads to diffusion of ideas, news, and viewpoints. Not conducive to an analytical conversation.

ramana
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 15 Oct 2019 02:40

Not happening. There was a purpose to this thread and recent summit proved it.

vishvak
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby vishvak » 15 Oct 2019 10:31

The Nepali democracy dodged a bullet by avoiding the parliament financed by Chinese.

Wonder if some day we will clearly find out who was behind the killing of Nepal s shock killing of royals, and subsequent loosening of controls to allow religious/political conversions.

UlanBatori
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby UlanBatori » 21 Oct 2019 17:50

Internal dynamics: they are as restrictive and secretive as ever. Read carefully blo

The U.S. ambassador to China defended plans to require Beijing's diplomats to report contacts with some Americans and said Monday that Washington is considering additional rules for employees of entities controlled by the ruling Communist Party.

The change comes as the United States, Australia and some other governments are looking at possible Chinese efforts to spy or gain influence in their countries. It follows years of complaints from American and other diplomats about controls on their ability to move around China and to meet with officials and members of the public. Chinese diplomats would be required to report contacts with American educators, researchers and local and state governments under the rule announced Wednesday.

Branstad said by contrast, American diplomats face a more restrictive system that requires them to apply for permission for such contacts, which he said often is refused. Branstad said American diplomats have been blocked from meeting with Chinese law enforcement and other officials and requests to visit universities have been refused. The ambassador said when he and other diplomats planned to visit a coffee shop in the western province of Qinghai during a trip to Tibet, officials visited the shop in advance and ordered employees and customers not to talk to the Americans.

"The State Department finally came to the opinion that to try to improve our access we need to show some reciprocity," Branstad told reporters.

The ambassador said U.S. officials have yet to discuss the rule directly with Chinese authorities. But the Chinese Embassy complained on its Twitter account that the rule violates the Vienna Convention and said China imposes no similar restrictions on American diplomats — a claim that conflicts with Branstad's comments and complaints by diplomats from other countries about curbs on their activities.

UlanBatori
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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby UlanBatori » 21 Oct 2019 21:18

Hmmm!! Leptire Palty leads All-Tee.com too?

Wanton interference in other countries’ affairs will never win. Interfering in other countries’ domestic affairs, instigating a color revolution or even attempts to subvert the legitimate governments of other countries are the real causes of wars and unrest in different regions [around the world].

Without getting into specifics, he decried nations which “wield their big sticks”, such as sanctions, to exert “maximum pressure” on their rivals.


60 years after funding Naxalites they should know... :roll:


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