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Understanding New China after 19th Congress

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 18 Oct 2017 18:21

President Xi Jinping unveils road-map to realise “Chinese Dream” - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
In a sweeping marathon address that lasted over three hours, President Xi Jinping unveiled his vision of China’s future of achieving “moderate” prosperity in the next four years, and emerging as an advanced socialist nation by 2050.

In his “work report” of the past five years read out at the inaugural of the 19th party congress of the Communist Party of China (CPC) on Wednesday, Mr. Xi was unambiguous in declaring that China stood at “new historical juncture,” and would pursue its own path of developing
“socialism with Chinese characteristics”.


This implied that a western style “opening up” was not on Beijing’s radar. Mr. Xi, in the presence of former leaders Jiang Zeming and Hu
Jintao, also underscored that the Chinese path of the development, can be adapted appropriately by developing countries.

Some scholars such as Joshua Cooper Ramo have proposed that the "Beijing Consensus" supporting China’s economic development model can
emerge as alternative to the Washington Consensus of policies advocated by the IMF, the World Bank and the US Treasury.

In his address, Mr. Xi highlighted that the Chinese model was “blazing a new trail for other developing countries to achieve modernisation”.

He added that the Chinese path offers “a new option for other countries and nations who want to speed up their development while preserving their independence…”

In an interview with the state-broadcaster China Global Television Network (CGTN), China commentator Robert Lawrence Kuhn observed that Mr. Xi’s speech recognised the linkage and integration between achieving the goal of a “moderately prosperous society” by 2021 — the centenary of the Communist party of China — and the eventual goal of becoming an advanced nation by 2049 when the People’s Republic of China (PRC) celebrates its 100th anniversary.

He pointed out that Mr. Xi’s address revealed that China will keep developing as a “moderately prosperous society” between 2020 and 2035.
But in the second phase between 2035 and 2050, it will evolve “into an advanced nation and will be a global leader in all categories of human
importance — economics, governance, science and technology and culture”.

In remarks meant to allay fears among neighbouring countries triggered by China’s rise, Mr. Xi invited "peoples of all countries to join China's effort to build a common destiny for mankind and enduring peace and stability".

He said that Beijing will maintain a defensive policy when it comes to national security, and refrain from interfering in the domestic affairs of other countries.

Without referring to the US administration under Donald Trump, Mr. Xi underscored China’s pro-active support for globalisation and combating Climate change. "No country alone can handle all the challenges that mankind faces and no country can retreat into self-isolation," the Chinese President said, listing regional and economic instability, a widening wealth gap, terrorism, major epidemics, cyberspace insecurity, and climate change as major challenges facing humankind.

Mr. Xi substantiated his doctrine of “four comprehensives,” covering deeper all-round reforms, a strict internal vigilance over the CPC, including a relentless anti-corruption campaign, as well as instilling the “rule of law” as the pathway for China’s all-round modernisation.

He announced a new anti-graft law, and the establishment of a national anti-corruption body to achieve these goals. Mr. Xi also declared that a new “Leading Group” within the party would be established to ensure comprehensive governance through the “Rule of Law”.

During the course of the once-in-five years Congress which ends on October 24, the 2280 delegates will elect a Central Committee. In turn, the Central Committee will elect a 25-member Politburo, as well an apex 7-member or more Standing Committee of the Politburo. The General Secretary of the CPC, the highest ranking official of the party — a position currently occupied by Mr. Xi — would be picked from the Politburo Standing Committee’s ranks.

There is considerable speculation on whether Wang Qishan, Mr. Xi ally in the anti-corruption drive would be accommodated in the top-seven leadership rung, despite attaining the unofficial retirement age of 69. Mr. Xi’s continuation in leadership beyond his second term that ends in 2022 is also being keenly watched.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 18 Oct 2017 20:26

XI GIN PIG's speech the Chin equiv to Adolf' s "Mein Kamf".
The Chinese megalomaniac has revealed,if it wasn't known before,his desire and lust to be Fuhrer of the planet. China to be the centre of the world and himself at the centre of China! This monster is a billion times more dangerous than Dear "little rocketman" Kim. XI Gins has cleverly got bumbling buffoon Trump to divert his attention from the real global threat,China.

Mr.Modi has his work cut out as the Empire of the Chins will now go into top gear after the party congress in pursuing its goals relentlessly.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 19 Oct 2017 09:46

President Xi set to consolidate authority - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
Image

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s status as a theoretician, in the same league as the country’s tallest leaders Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping, is likely to be debated during the 19th Party Congress of the Communist Party of China (CPC) which begins its once-in-five-years session on Wednesday.

The Congress will review the work of its predecessor, and newly elected leadership will provide strategic direction for the future.

During a media conference on Tuesday at the Great Hall of the People, the spokesman for the Congress, Tuo Zhen, did not spell out whether an amendment by the outgoing Central Committee of the Party — technically the most powerful body when the Congress in not in session — had recommended that Mr. Xi’s doctrinal contributions be bracketed at par with the theories proposed by Mao and Deng.

“The CPC will amend its Constitution at the upcoming National Congress to represent new governance concepts, thoughts and strategies proposed by the CPC Central Committee with Xi Jinping at its core,” Mr. Tuo said.

Strategic thoughts

He added: “The amendment will include key theories and strategic thoughts presented by a report to be delivered at the Congress.”

Wednesday’s session is expected to begin with the presentation of a “work report” on the outgoing 18th Party Congress. It will be debated by the nearly-2,300 delegates participating in the Congress.

The 19th Party Congress will also separately discuss the work report of the 18th Central Commission for Discipline and Inspection (CCDI) — the Party’s powerful anti-corruption wing. Besides, the delegates, through secret ballot will elect a new Central Committee.

In turn, the Central Committee will elect a 25-member Politburo, as well an apex seven-member Standing Committee of the Politburo.

Central leadership

The General Secretary of the CPC, the highest ranking official of the party — a position currently occupied by Mr. Xi — would be picked from the Politburo Standing Committee’s ranks.

“A new central leadership will be elected at the first plenary session of the 19th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC), after the conclusion of the 19th CPC National Congress,” Mr. Tuo observed.

Analysts say that Mr. Xi’s position as the Party General Secretary, the President as well the Chairman of the Central Military Commission stands confirmed. But there is considerable speculation regarding the remaining six members.

In the last few days, a view has been gaining ground that Wang Qishan, Mr. Xi’s top ally in the war against corruption, instead of retiring due to age, may assume a key leadership role in the new line-up.

Mr. Xi has been the architect of “four comprehensives”, which provide the theoretical foundation for achieving China’s two strategic goals. The first is to build a “moderately prosperous society” by 2021 — the centenary of the CPC.

Long-term goal

The second is to build an advanced socialist society by 2049 when the People’s Republic of China (PRC) completes 100 years of its formation.

Mr. Tuo underscored that the 19th Party Congress is of “vital importance as it is being held when China is striving to clinch final victory in building a society of moderate prosperity in all respects and the development of socialism with Chinese characteristics had entered a crucial period”.

Mr. Xi is not the first Chinese leader to make a numerically elaborated doctrinal contribution for advancing Chinese society. Zhou Enlai, the first Prime Minister of the People’s Republic of China is credited for theorising on ‘four modernisations’ — a blueprint which was later elaborated by Deng Xiaoping.

Mr. Tuo said that the 19th Party Congress would recognise theoretical contributions made by some of the previous leaders. He made a special reference to the theory of ‘Scientific Outlook on Development’, framed by former President Hu Jintao and ‘Three Represents’ by Jiang Zemin which, at the turn of the century, made a successful case for “opening up” the CPC to other members, including representatives of the business elite.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 20 Oct 2017 12:36

Despite all the hooplah and cult flying of the great
wise leader" XI GINs, warnings are emanating from China itself about the financial bubble which may burst at any moment.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/201 ... aturation/
China risks 'Minsky Moment' as debt reaches saturation
President Xi Jinping vows to achieve a 'great socialist economy' but critics fear the middle income trap lies ahead

Ambrose Evans-Pritchard
19 OCTOBER 2017 • 7:45PM
China’s central bank has warned in the clearest language to date that extreme credit creation and trouble in the shadow banking system could lead to a full-blown financial crisis.

Zhou Xiaochuan, the governor of the People’s Bank (PBOC), spoke of “fierce market reactions” and a possible Minsky Moment, the tipping point when credit cycles break and euphoric booms collapse under their own weight.

It had long been assumed that this particular form of crisis cannot happen a state-run financial system where the banks are under Communist Party control.

Mr Zhou told China Daily that asset speculation and property bubbles could pose a “systemic financial risk”, made worse by the plethora of wealth management products, trusts, and off-books lending. He warned that corporate debt had reached disturbingly high levels...

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 20 Oct 2017 17:56

Xi’s theory to be codified - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
Chinese state media signalled on Thursday that President Xi Jinping could join the league of Mao Zedong and the Deng Xiaoping — the country’s tallest leaders — for making major theoretical contributions for the advancement of socialism.

Xinhua reported that Mr. Xi’s ‘Thought on Socialism with Chinese Characteristics for a New Era’ has been codified
, according to some members of the outgoing apex Standing Committee of the 25-member Politburo.

“The Thought is the biggest highlight of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China (CPC) and a historic contribution to the Party’s development,” said Zhang Dejiang, member of the Politburo, on Wednesday.

Inclusion in Constitution

Mr. Xi’s ‘Thought’ could be included in the Constitution. During a media conference on Tuesday at the Great Hall of the People, the spokesman for the Congress, Tuo Zhen, said: “The CPC will amend its Constitution at the upcoming National Congress to represent new governance concepts, thoughts and strategies proposed by the CPC Central Committee with Xi Jinping at its core.”

Two other members of the Politburo’s Standing Committee — Yu Zhengsheng and Liu Yunshan — also praised Mr. Xi for adapting Marxism to the Chinese context attuned to building “socialism with Chinese characteristics”.

Mr. Xi’s theory builds on and further enriches Marxism-Leninism, the Mao Zedong Thought, the Deng Xiaoping Theory, the Theory of Three Represents, and the Scientific Outlook on Development, according to a report delivered at the opening of the Congress, Xinhua reported.

”As China enters a new era, the CPC must write a new chapter of 21st century Marxism...” Xinhua quoted Chen Shuguang, a professor with the Party School of the CPC Central Committee, as saying.

Mr. Xi’s predecessors, Hu Jintao and Jiang Zemin, have not been given personal credit for their ideological contributions.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby anupmisra » 20 Oct 2017 20:31

Neutered! Eleven survives to tell the tale.

Xi Jinping foiled coup by ex-Chinese political heavyweights: Official

Chinese President Xi Jinping has foiled a coup by former political heavyweights who were at the receiving end of his high-profile anti-graft campaign, a top Chinese official has revealed.
Xi...has saved the party by foiling a coup plot by his detractors
Liu made the stunning disclosure at a meeting on the sidelines of the going once-in-a-five-year congress of the CPC here, according to Hong Kong's South China Morning Post.
Among those named was the former party boss of megacity Chongqing, Sun Zhengcai, once a front-runner for a place in the inner circle - the Politburo Standing Committee, who along with his wife were summarily removed by Xi.
Sun's fall from grace in July reminded many of the dramatic downfall of one of his predecessors in both Chongqing Bo Xilai, five years ago, ahead of the previous party congress.
This is the first time an official disclosed it.
"Xi Jinping, with the historical responsibility as a proletarian revolutionist ... cleared up huge risks for the party and the country" (wha...!!)


"Let a hundred flowers blossom"- Mao

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/wor ... 154960.cms

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ramana » 20 Oct 2017 21:37

SSridhar, I would like a link to the entire speech and an analysis by you. Atul Aneja is fluff and CHindu is his paymaster. So can't trust it.

My initial impressions are:

Xi has averted the Gorbachev moment. Forceful removal. Doklam was about that.
Xi has finally put a Chinese face on Socialism.
This is like Empress Wu ordering making the Buddha with Chinese characteristics.
Yes Xi's thought is important to understand and not through filters by CHindu.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby KLNMurthy » 21 Oct 2017 02:15

SSridhar wrote:President Xi set to consolidate authority - Atul Aneja, The Hindu


"Four comprehensives"? Reads more like Four Crashingly Obvious Platitudes.

This is the great eleven gin punk whose vision is so brilliant that we all have to shiver and cr*p in our dhotis?

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 21 Oct 2017 08:20

ramana, we now know that there was a serious attempt to dislodge Xi and it was overcome. The 19th CPC Congress, so far as I have read about the developments, has been a ringing endorsement of Xi. Nothing surprising as all the potential opposition has been assiduously eliminated. I am currently in this region and I see the same analysis.

Here, we have to note that the opposition to Xi came not from an opposing political ideology, but from affectees of the sweeping purge that Xi launched. He demanded complete loyalty and every suspect was ensnared through the "suspect's" mishu (secretary), the usual Chinese strategy. Action against massive levels of corruption have been cleverly used as an instrument to consolidate Xi's position.

However, two things would stand out; whether Xi will be accorded the same status as Mao and whether Xi would anoint a successor. These will determine the future course of events. One has no doubt that the former would happen but not the latter. It is already clear that the Politburo and the PSC will be stuffed with his cronies. The grand vision, the over-emphasis on CPC, the 'core leader' status that he has thrust on himself (Mao & Deng), and the lack of successionship all point to a long term that Xi has chosen for himself. He has been systematic at this from c. 2012.

As I see it, Xi will get Mao's status (he is almost there even today) and Xi is determined to continue beyond his second term. Both are ominous signs for the region and beyond.

The timeline that Xi has announced, namely 2035 & 2050 should be read in conjunction with the other timeline that Xi announced in c. 2012 when he assumed power and ushered in 'Chinese Dream'. At that time, he said that by 2021 (the 100th anniversary of CPC) the per capita income would be doubled to USD 10,000 and by 2050 (100th anniversary of PRC) PRC would become a "fully developed, rich, and powerful" nation. That was the economic agenda he set for himself. Per capita is currently USD 8200 (per World Bank). Xi is well on his way to his goal. The c. 2050 timeline is common to both Xi's 2012 announcement and the announcement he made a couple of days ago at the 19th Congress of the CPC. The timelines must be seen in the context of what Xi said in February 2017 in China's National Security Convention (which I analyzed here): China wants a new World Order that would be just and China wants to build it. Two, China wants a new security architecture and China wants to build it.

However, the c. 2035 timeline is new. It is for internal consumption, but it could well be a signal to the US as well. The biggest fear of many Chinese leaders has been the disloyalty of the PLA or a revolt by the 'reactionaries' among the masses. We all know that there is a great disparity in income and living standards between the coastal people and those of the hinterland and again between people of the east and the west. This gives rise to hundreds of agitations/revolts which, of course, do not get reported. The c. 2035 timeframe is the exhortation to CPC to resolve the internal issues. This is what he means by claiming that having gained overwhelming momentum in its fight against corruption, the Party is determined to secure a sweeping victory over the greatest threat to the Party. It must be Xi's hope that initiatives like BRI would resolve the problem. That's why he confidently says, "By 2035, . . .Chinese people’s livelihoods would improve further, while the income disparity between people living in rural and urban areas would be reduced". But, he needs CPC's unflinching support internally even as he concentrates internationally. CPC will be needed to infuse even more nationalism as time approaches for an inevitable war. That's the essential import of his three-and-a-half-hour message, IMHO. The emphasis on CPC everywhere is more bad news for HongKong.

You are right about putting Chinese characteristics to Buddhism. Empress Wu had to do it because the Chinese Emperors & Empresses could not be seen bowing to a high Lama. This is retrofitting Marx-Lenin-Mao-Xi theories to what has been happening in China. Such efforts are always sweetened to the Chinese masses by claiming that by c. 2050, "China would see its economic, political, spiritual, social and environment civilization at an advanced level and become an influential country in the world. Chinese people would be able to keep their heads up". This is to assure the Chinese masses that China would achieve its triple concepts of the Chinese Emperor (or modern-day President-cum-General Secretary) being the 'Son of the Heaven' (tianzi) to rule the 'Middle Kingdom' (zhongguo) and be responsible for everything under the Heaven (tianxia) He makes it clear explicitly when he says that by c. 2050, "Chinese people will basically enjoy 'common property'.” The reference to 'common property' is this world under benign Chinese overlordship.

Forgot to add: IMO, the 2035 timeline suggests that PRC feels confident of taking on US at that time and defeating it. I conclude this because Xi says that the modernization of the national defense and armed forces should be completed by 2035. However, it may want to avoid a war and assume sole pole leadership without that. It gives itself additional 15 years i.e. until c. 2050 to achieve that. That's how I read it. China may have a set of parameters by which it measures how rapidly the US is going downunder and may decide accordingly by c. 2035.

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 23 Oct 2017 14:41

In a win for Xi Jinping, PLA hails resolution of Doklam stand-off
BEIJING: In a significant move, and one that underscores President Xi Jinping's increasing clout, the People's Liberation Army expressed satisfaction over the recent border settlement with India at the end of the 10-week Doklam stand-off, saying that it was "safely resolved".

Speaking at a press conference on Sunday, Liu Fang, staff officer at the office of International Military Cooperation of the Central Military Commission (CMC), China's top military body, referred to "the Indian military passing the border line into China's territory".

China's defence and other ministries "worked very closely many times" during negotiations with the Indian side, Liu said on the sidelines of the Communist Party Congress, which meets once in five years to formulate policies and choose the next generation of leaders.

"Of course, it is safely solved right now," she said. "We reiterated very clearly Chinese position and all of these actually contributed to the peaceful resolution of China-Indian cross border conflict," she said.

Liu said the PLA has established regular channels of communications with the military of several countries which has proved to be very useful.

China was expanding its circle of friends+ that cover not only the big powers but also the neighbouring countries.

"We have built many dialogues and dialogue mechanisms with many countries at the right levels," Liu said adding, "We don't work on a single point but we connect all the points together. We are expanding a net of cooperation."

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 23 Oct 2017 14:44

As Xi further pushes China’s reach, the world pushes back

BEIJING: No part of the world seems too small, too near or too far for China's globe-trotting president, Xi Jinping.

He has traveled to the tiny Pacific islands of Fiji, toured the neighboring nations of Central Asia and signaled his interest in Antarctica with a visit to Tasmania, off Australia's southern coast. This month, he sent Chinese warships to dock in London, a reminder of how much has changed since British gunboat diplomacy humiliated China in the 19th century.

Xi is pushing a vision of national rejuvenation during the current Communist Party congress, which is expected to give him a second five-year term by Wednesday. And central to his ambitions is a far-reaching drive to restore China to what he considers its rightful place as a global power.

"Xi's aggressive diplomacy largely comes from his own aspirations, beliefs and strategic requirements," said Shi Yinhong, a professor of international relations at Renmin University.

Xi has already enjoyed remarkable success expanding Chinese influence, not only in Asia, but also in Africa, Europe and as far away as South America. He has benefited from President Donald Trump's election, which has made it easier for him to present China as a stable, responsible alternative to an erratic, inward-looking US.

Yet signs of friction in different parts of the world raise questions about how long China's winning streak can continue, and point to the challenges that Xi faces in a second term as he presses the assertive brand of foreign policy he favors.

In Australia, the government is vexed by what it sees as Beijing's interference in domestic politics. In Europe, politicians are raising an alarm over heavy-handed trade tactics aimed at acquiring foreign technology. In Southeast Asia and Africa, there are complaints about a new era of Chinese colonialism.

China's ties with two regional heavyweights — Japan and India — remain strained, and Xi faces an unusually precarious situation on the Korean Peninsula, with both the North and the South defying him, one building a nuclear arsenal and the other deploying American missile defenses.

Still, in a marathon opening speech last week, Xi showed no sign of retreat and hinted at even bigger spending to vault China to world greatness: more for the military to make it a first-class fighting outfit with global reach, and more for his overseas infrastructure program, the "One Belt, One Road" initiative, which he sees as a way to win friends around the world.

Deng Xiaoping, the architect of China's economic reforms," set a policy of keeping a low profile in international affairs and biding time. But more than his predecessors, Xi is abandoning that approach — and encountering pushback.

In Germany, a sharp increase in Chinese investment has prompted complaints that China is closing its markets even as it goes on a buying spree abroad, especially of valuable technology companies. Policymakers are considering options for retaliating.

There are also concerns that China is trying to divide the European Union by cultivating poorer countries like Hungary and Greece and using them to block policies supported by richer countries that hurt Beijing.

Rising powers always face resistance. But in China's case, that pushback comes not just from the West but also from neighbors who remember the tributary system of its imperial past — or are wary of its Communist political system despite its embrace of capitalism decades ago.

Xi has made inroads in Southeast Asia, gaining influence in Myanmar, Malaysia and Thailand. But improving ties with Myanmar's civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, have been offset by the deep popular mistrust of China in that country.

In Malaysia, Beijing's investments in infrastructure have been met with accusations that the nation is selling off its sovereignty. And in Thailand, a rail project important to a new trade route from southern China has been delayed.

In Vietnam, China's efforts to take advantage of Trump's neglect have fallen short, said professor Alexander L. Vuving of the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu. "Xi's pressure in the midst of a weakening US commitment has forced some concessions but it has also deepened Hanoi's mistrust of Beijing," he said.

Even in the Philippines, where the strongman president Rodrigo Duterte has cozied up to Beijing and distanced himself from the US, Xi has not enjoyed a complete victory. American drones and spy planes have been more decisive in Duterte's battle against Islamic militants than the rifles donated by China.

"The quantities of arms sent are not significant compared to the amount needed by the armed forces and the police," said Roilo Golez, a former congressman. "Five thousand rifles are very minimal and token."

Xi has sometimes succeeded in positioning China as a responsible power by stepping up when Washington has stepped back — speaking up for globalization at Davos, or in favor of the Paris climate change accord.

"People are paying far more attention to China's influence operations than I have seen before," said Dan Blumenthal, director of Asian studies at the American Enterprise Institute.

Beijing has struggled to sway global opinion without resorting to heavy-handed methods or threats that can be counterproductive.

In Australia, which China has sought to use as a kind of pilot zone to test methods that could be adopted in the US and Europe, Xi has already encountered a backlash.

China has encouraged Chinese businessmen to give to political campaigns, recruited Chinese students to press its policies in classrooms and mobilized local Chinese-language news media.

In a thinly disguised warning this month, Australia's intelligence chief, Duncan Lewis, described such activities as "a threat to our sovereignty, the integrity of our national institutions and the exercise of our citizens' rights."

Analysts say Australia has been a tempting target because China is its biggest trading partner, and it is home to large populations of Chinese immigrants and students, who provide critical financial support to its universities.

But the government is now considering new limits on campaign contributions, restrictions on foreign investments and tougher counterintelligence laws. Australia is also seeking to strengthen security ties with India and Japan.

"The Chinese party-state has overplayed its hand in trying to influence Australia's choices," said Rory Medcalf, head of the national security college at the Australian National University.

Concern about political interference by China is also growing in New Zealand, where a Chinese official recently advised Chinese-language journalists to coordinate coverage with China's official press.

"I never imagined the level of instruction was that direct," said Anne-Marie Brady, a professor of Chinese politics at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, who recently published a research paper on Beijing's efforts in New Zealand.

Shi, the international relations professor, said Trump's "negative attitude toward liberal world trade and climate change" had emboldened Xi to take a more active role on the global stage.

But he added that China's efforts to influence opinion and policy in other countries were a natural extension of its growing stature in the world, and not just a result of Xi's leadership. He said China has greater "financial and human resources" available now — and greater ambitions.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 23 Oct 2017 21:40

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-10-2 ... nese-dream

Interesting take: my take on this - if this is Xi's fundamental premise, they will become moderately poorer by 2049. Japan had this same great plan earlier where they thought they can fundamentally export infra to all parts of the world and become a profitable country like companies take off to foreign lands. It never worked for them and its not likely to work for China either.

We need to capitalise on this and make them pour good money over bad concrete.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 25 Oct 2017 12:33

XI Gins,"Pig or Peg?",must decide,though "peg" is a most familiar and treasured word amongst drunks and alcos.The latest megalomaniac from the land of Chin,simply has not learnt from his past.Like his counterpart in Turkey,the would-be Sultan of all he can survey,XI Gins is so cocksure about his popularity,power and determined to leave a "legacy" of Chin victorious around the world for posterity,

Xi Jinping: has China’s strongman forgotten the perils of power?
His suffering as a teenager under the excesses of Maoism has not stopped the president pursuing unassailable authority

China's Communist party enshrines Xi Jinping ideology in constitution – video
Tania Branigan
Tuesday 24 October 2017 23.49 BST
Xi Jinping, who now enjoys a position in the Communist party pantheon below only Mao Zedong, spent his adolescence as far from power as can be imagined. For seven years he toiled in a poor, remote village in China’s Shaanxi province, unblocking sewage pipes, carrying heavy loads across the hills and sleeping in a flea-infested cave dwelling. He was lonely, bored, hungry, exhausted and anxious about his future. The experience shaped him for life, but not as one might expect.

Xi Zhongxun, the Chinese president’s father, was a Communist party veteran celebrated in later life as one of the “immortals”. But when Mao unleashed the Cultural Revolution in 1966, he was brutally persecuted. Xi Jinping’s elder half-sister died in the turmoil and the teenage Xi, along with 17 million peers, was sent to labour in the countryside. Those years have become Xi’s creation myth.

Xi Jinping becomes most powerful leader since Mao with China's change to constitution
Read more
It is a potent political narrative. Despite his distinguished family heritage, Xi understands what life is like for those at the bottom of society, in a way that few politicians in the west or even his recent predecessors could. He has suffered, and he has risen above it. “When I arrived ... I was anxious and confused ... When I left, at 22, my life goals were firm and I was filled with confidence,” he has written. His experience helps to account for his genuine popularity, as well as his discipline and drive.

Yet a man whose family was so deeply scarred by the excesses of Maoism is dismantling the changes designed to safeguard his party and country against further such disasters. After the Cultural Revolution, Mao’s successors resolved that never again should one person hold such power. Deng Xiaoping, and other survivors such as Xi’s father, sought to institutionalise politics. Their ideas were not codified, but they were crucial in limiting the power of the leader by setting a term limit and ensuring authority was exercised collectively.

Xi has ripped up this unwritten rulebook. He is in charge, full stop. This week he became the only living leader since Mao to have his ideology enshrined in the party constitution under his name. His ideas are recorded as “Xi Jinping Thought”, on a par with Mao Zedong Thought, rather than Deng’s slightly less elevated “Theory”.

As one analyst joked recently, the five most important people in China are “Xi, Xi, Xi, Xi and Xi”. It looks increasingly likely that the norm of the leader stepping down after two five-year terms is on the way out. Many believe Xi plans to remain in power after 2022, whether by formally retaining the party leadership or by exercising his authority behind the scenes.

Is Xi or isn't Xi? Quiz: who said it - Xi Jinping or Mao Zedong?

Comparisons to Mao are overblown, though there are some parallels in Xi’s approach: his demands for ideological purity, his call for China to play a leading role on the world stage and, above all, his personal appeal to the masses. Unlike Mao, he seeks the tacit support of the people, rather than their active intervention.

Xi has none of Mao’s love of disruption, only his insistence on dominance. He believes wielding his authority and that of the party more strictly can solve the multiplying problems that previous administrations failed to get to grips with, from rampant corruption to environmental damage. In Xi’s vision, greater control will end stagnation and abuse – the alternative is stasis or, worse, an end to party rule.

The leaders before Xi drew a simple lesson from the Cultural Revolution and from preceding disasters like the Great Leap Forward: strongmen breed instability and must be prevented at all costs. Xi appears to have reached a radically different conclusion: at least in this “new era”, stabilising China requires the concentration of power. It just needs to be concentrated in the right, incorruptible hands – his

Philip
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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 25 Oct 2017 12:43

Philip wrote:XI Gins,"Pig or Peg?",must decide,though "peg" is a most familiar and treasured word amongst drunks and alcos.The latest megalomaniac from the land of Chin,simply has not learnt from his past.Like his counterpart in Turkey,the would-be Sultan of all he can survey,XI Gins is so cocksure about his popularity,power and determined to leave a "legacy" of Chin victorious around the world for posterity,but such megalomania and the establishment of a cult of the "fuhrer",history reminds us of that Greek word "hubris". Time for it to strike XI Gins and bring him down sev. "pegs" if not crashing down!
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/ ... s-of-power
Xi Jinping: has China’s strongman forgotten the perils of power?
His suffering as a teenager under the excesses of Maoism has not stopped the president pursuing unassailable authority

China's Communist party enshrines Xi Jinping ideology in constitution – video
Tania Branigan
Tuesday 24 October 2017 23.49 BST
Xi Jinping, who now enjoys a position in the Communist party pantheon below only Mao Zedong, spent his adolescence as far from power as can be imagined. For seven years he toiled in a poor, remote village in China’s Shaanxi province, unblocking sewage pipes, carrying heavy loads across the hills and sleeping in a flea-infested cave dwelling. He was lonely, bored, hungry, exhausted and anxious about his future. The experience shaped him for life, but not as one might expect.

Xi Zhongxun, the Chinese president’s father, was a Communist party veteran celebrated in later life as one of the “immortals”. But when Mao unleashed the Cultural Revolution in 1966, he was brutally persecuted. Xi Jinping’s elder half-sister died in the turmoil and the teenage Xi, along with 17 million peers, was sent to labour in the countryside. Those years have become Xi’s creation myth.

Xi Jinping becomes most powerful leader since Mao with China's change to constitution
Read more
It is a potent political narrative. Despite his distinguished family heritage, Xi understands what life is like for those at the bottom of society, in a way that few politicians in the west or even his recent predecessors could. He has suffered, and he has risen above it. “When I arrived ... I was anxious and confused ... When I left, at 22, my life goals were firm and I was filled with confidence,” he has written. His experience helps to account for his genuine popularity, as well as his discipline and drive.

Yet a man whose family was so deeply scarred by the excesses of Maoism is dismantling the changes designed to safeguard his party and country against further such disasters. After the Cultural Revolution, Mao’s successors resolved that never again should one person hold such power. Deng Xiaoping, and other survivors such as Xi’s father, sought to institutionalise politics. Their ideas were not codified, but they were crucial in limiting the power of the leader by setting a term limit and ensuring authority was exercised collectively.

Xi has ripped up this unwritten rulebook. He is in charge, full stop. This week he became the only living leader since Mao to have his ideology enshrined in the party constitution under his name. His ideas are recorded as “Xi Jinping Thought”, on a par with Mao Zedong Thought, rather than Deng’s slightly less elevated “Theory”.

As one analyst joked recently, the five most important people in China are “Xi, Xi, Xi, Xi and Xi”. It looks increasingly likely that the norm of the leader stepping down after two five-year terms is on the way out. Many believe Xi plans to remain in power after 2022, whether by formally retaining the party leadership or by exercising his authority behind the scenes.

Is Xi or isn't Xi? Quiz: who said it - Xi Jinping or Mao Zedong?

Comparisons to Mao are overblown, though there are some parallels in Xi’s approach: his demands for ideological purity, his call for China to play a leading role on the world stage and, above all, his personal appeal to the masses. Unlike Mao, he seeks the tacit support of the people, rather than their active intervention.

Xi has none of Mao’s love of disruption, only his insistence on dominance. He believes wielding his authority and that of the party more strictly can solve the multiplying problems that previous administrations failed to get to grips with, from rampant corruption to environmental damage. In Xi’s vision, greater control will end stagnation and abuse – the alternative is stasis or, worse, an end to party rule.

The leaders before Xi drew a simple lesson from the Cultural Revolution and from preceding disasters like the Great Leap Forward: strongmen breed instability and must be prevented at all costs. Xi appears to have reached a radically different conclusion: at least in this “new era”, stabilising China requires the concentration of power. It just needs to be concentrated in the right, incorruptible hands – his

Philip
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Posts: 17598
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 25 Oct 2017 12:47

Even pravda asks the big Q ,"of what?"

China's Xi Jinping officially opens new era. Of what? :rotfl:
China is determined to create a legal system of a socialist state in the coming years. To accomplish the goal, China will reform its constitution, Chairman of the People's Republic of China Xi Jinping said at the opening of the XIX Congress of the Communist Party of China.

China's Xi Jinping officially opens new era. Of what?.

According to Xi Jinping, in the near future, China will deal with the goal of creating a state with an effective and highly developed legal system that would act as a prime condition for successful development of the country. "We should firmly follow the path of socialism, improve the legal system of Chinese socialism - I am talking about the constitution that plays a central key role," the Chinese leader said.

The XIX Congress of the Communist Party of China will last through October 24; it is devoted to results of the work of the party over the past five years. It is expected that the personnel configuration of higher party bodies - the standing committee of the Politburo, the Politburo itself and the Central Committee on the whole - will be changed.

The head of the School of Oriental Studies at the Higher School of Economics, Professor, Doctor of Historical Sciences Alexei Maslov told Pravda.Ru about the goals, tasks and hidden intrigues of the XIX Congress of the Chinese Communist Party.

"Firstly, China confirmed that it is going on a socialist way, and China is entering a new era of its development.

"In fact, Xi Jinping said that China does not abandon any of its ideologies, remains a socialist country, and the role of the Communist Party strengthens, like Xi Jinping said in the report. At the same time, China is ready to be flexible with respect to changing reality in the world, so the country will be changing.

"Secondly, China is determined to develop a socialist democracy and will oppose any attempts to plant Western democracy in the country. Thirdly, China is ready to develop discussions within the party, but it will oppose any attempts to rock the boat, especially via the Internet. In other words, the Chinese authorities will strengthen control over social networks.

"Fourthly, China said that it should build a society of medium prosperity by 2035. This coincides with the completion of the reform of the Chinese army by 2035, when it should become one of the strongest armies in the world. China is developing further, rebuilding its economy.

"Xi Jinping has announced the need to reformat the party. Is there a struggle looming?" :mrgreen:

"There is a struggle between different groups inside China. In the past, the struggle was conducted between two factions: so-called princes (descendants of the hereditary party aristocracy of China) and Komsomols - an economy-oriented group of people. Nowadays, one can see the struggle unfolding between three, four, or maybe even five groups.

"Yet, Xi Jinping has not taken the side of any of those groups. On the one hand, he says that China continues developing socialist democracy while the liberalisation of China's economy continues as well. Earlier, China, for example, spoke about open ports. Perhaps, Hong Kong and Shanghai will be transferred to the ports of free trade. This is what Beijing was trying to avoid before, considering such a move a legacy of colonialism, when those ports were exempt from taxes in the 19th century.

"Afterwards, China started working on a community of countries of one destiny. This means that China is building a bloc, although Xi Jinping advocates anti-bloc thinking. The countries of one destiny follow the idea of one belt, one road. This bloc includes more than 70 countries that have signed an agreement with China to join the Chinese project. China opposes the supremacy of one state, but it will financially and economically support the countries in the community that it is creating.

"Now China has come up with an international agenda, rather than abstract statements, as it was at the XVIII Congress. The Chinese have designated the date: the year 2035. To a certain extent, this can be regarded as a move to build a new line of continuity. The most important intrigue, which is now unfolding, is the new structure of Politburo's standing committee, but no one knows what is going to come out of it." :rotfl:

Interviewed by Lada Korotun
Pravda.Ru
Читайте больше на http://www.pravdareport.com/world/asia/ ... hina_xi-0/

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 25 Oct 2017 15:29

Philip wrote:Even pravda asks the big Q ,"of what?"

China's Xi Jinping officially opens new era. Of what? :rotfl:
China is determined to create a legal system of a socialist state in the coming years. To accomplish the goal, China will reform its constitution, Chairman of the People's Republic of China Xi Jinping said at the opening of the XIX Congress of the Communist Party of China.

China's Xi Jinping officially opens new era. Of what?.

According to Xi Jinping, in the near future, China will deal with the goal of creating a state with an effective and highly developed legal system that would act as a prime condition for successful development of the country. "We should firmly follow the path of socialism, improve the legal system of Chinese socialism - I am talking about the constitution that plays a central key role," the Chinese leader said.

The XIX Congress of the Communist Party of China will last through October 24; it is devoted to results of the work of the party over the past five years. It is expected that the personnel configuration of higher party bodies - the standing committee of the Politburo, the Politburo itself and the Central Committee on the whole - will be changed.

The head of the School of Oriental Studies at the Higher School of Economics, Professor, Doctor of Historical Sciences Alexei Maslov told Pravda.Ru about the goals, tasks and hidden intrigues of the XIX Congress of the Chinese Communist Party.

"Firstly, China confirmed that it is going on a socialist way, and China is entering a new era of its development.

"In fact, Xi Jinping said that China does not abandon any of its ideologies, remains a socialist country, and the role of the Communist Party strengthens, like Xi Jinping said in the report. At the same time, China is ready to be flexible with respect to changing reality in the world, so the country will be changing.

"Secondly, China is determined to develop a socialist democracy and will oppose any attempts to plant Western democracy in the country. Thirdly, China is ready to develop discussions within the party, but it will oppose any attempts to rock the boat, especially via the Internet. In other words, the Chinese authorities will strengthen control over social networks.

"Fourthly, China said that it should build a society of medium prosperity by 2035. This coincides with the completion of the reform of the Chinese army by 2035, when it should become one of the strongest armies in the world. China is developing further, rebuilding its economy.

"Xi Jinping has announced the need to reformat the party. Is there a struggle looming?" :mrgreen:

"There is a struggle between different groups inside China. In the past, the struggle was conducted between two factions: so-called princes (descendants of the hereditary party aristocracy of China) and Komsomols - an economy-oriented group of people. Nowadays, one can see the struggle unfolding between three, four, or maybe even five groups.

"Yet, Xi Jinping has not taken the side of any of those groups. On the one hand, he says that China continues developing socialist democracy while the liberalisation of China's economy continues as well. Earlier, China, for example, spoke about open ports. Perhaps, Hong Kong and Shanghai will be transferred to the ports of free trade. This is what Beijing was trying to avoid before, considering such a move a legacy of colonialism, when those ports were exempt from taxes in the 19th century.

"Afterwards, China started working on a community of countries of one destiny. This means that China is building a bloc, although Xi Jinping advocates anti-bloc thinking. The countries of one destiny follow the idea of one belt, one road. This bloc includes more than 70 countries that have signed an agreement with China to join the Chinese project. China opposes the supremacy of one state, but it will financially and economically support the countries in the community that it is creating.

"Now China has come up with an international agenda, rather than abstract statements, as it was at the XVIII Congress. The Chinese have designated the date: the year 2035. To a certain extent, this can be regarded as a move to build a new line of continuity. The most important intrigue, which is now unfolding, is the new structure of Politburo's standing committee, but no one knows what is going to come out of it." :rotfl:

Interviewed by Lada Korotun
Pravda.Ru
Читайте больше на http://www.pravdareport.com/world/asia/ ... hina_xi-0/


The more I read this, the more I am concerned that these fellas are going the ME way eventually. They are going to have a lot of men who will not be able to gain jobs and can be used as conduits to do pretty much what one wants them to do. The worst will come when the iron curtain is open and then, it will be a huge commotion and will take a lot of time for the people to handle that kind of information surge and sudden feeling of freedom.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 25 Oct 2017 15:38

China's new Politiburo Standing Committee lineup - AP, ToI
Key members of China's Communist Party were determined at the national congress, which is held every five years and concluded this week.
On Wednesday, members of the party's highest body, the Politburo Standing Committee were announced, with President Xi Jinping returning+ for a second five-year term as party general secretary.

Premier Li Keqiang also remains in place as his No. 2, while the other five members are all newcomers taking the place of those who retired due to unwritten age limits.

Here are profiles of all seven committee members, listed by seniority:

XI JINPING

The head of the Communist Party since 2012 and state president since 2013, Xi has established himself as a fervent nationalist and China's most powerful leader since Deng Xiaoping in the 1980s.

Xi, 64, has worked to reassert the party's influence across all sectors, including in schools, the media and the private businesses that are driving China's economy. The son of a communist elder, Xi lived in a cave and performed hard labor during the Cultural Revolution before graduating from prestigious Tsinghua University and being appointed to a series of increasingly prominent provincial posts.

Xi's first five years in power have seen China adopt an increasingly assertive foreign policy, challenging the US military's dominance in Asia. A strengthening of the domestic security services has led to what rights groups say is the worst crackdown on activists, political dissidents and the Uighur and Tibetan minority ethnic groups in decades.

With his new mandate, Xi will likely continue such measures while struggling to keep the economy growing fast enough to satisfy the demands of China's nearly 1.4 billion citizens and their building expectations for improving their quality of life. He's also formed a considerable cult of personality and has seen his personal political theory of "socialism with Chinese characteristics for a new era" enshrined in the party constitution+ .

"History looks kindly on those with resolve, with drive and ambition and with plenty of guts," Xi said in his speech at the opening of the party congress last week. "It won't wait for the hesitant, the apathetic or those shy of a challenge."

LI KEQIANG

Premier since 2013, Li had at one time been a candidate for the top job, but was ruled out in part because of his close connection with previous leader Hu Jintao. Party elders also were reportedly concerned that he might not be tough enough to ensure the party's hold on power and lead China into a more dominant global position.

Despite that, Li's return for a second term on the Politburo appears to display the party's approval of his administrative skills and ability to maintain a balance between different factions.

Li, 62, was born into a family of minor party officials but parlayed his intellectual skills into a seat at prestigious Peking University, where he earned a doctorate in law. He rose through the ranks to lead the Communist Youth League under Hu's tutelage, then was appointed China's youngest governor in 1998 at age 43.

He served as the top official in the provinces of Henan and Liaoning, where he emerged unscathed despite scandals including an AIDS outbreak and rampant organized crime. While nominally in charge of the economy and head of the Cabinet, Li has seen his role diminished under the rule of Xi, who has appointed himself the head of numerous party working groups that have eroded the power of the ministries and other formal offices.

Affable and English-speaking, Li is seen most often in public greeting foreign visitors and paying visits to institutes of learning and high-tech industries. "The people's livelihood is why we govern," Li said in his annual address to the national legislature in March. "At times, one needs to place it on one's heart and carry it on one's shoulders."

LI ZHANSHU

As director of the party's General Office, Li effectively serves as Xi's chief of staff and is a constant presence at his side during state visits and other important occasions. The two men first worked together at the start of their careers as leading officials in adjacent rural townships in Hebei province outside Beijing.

While Xi took on new posts in the country's dynamic southeast, Li remained in Hebei, eventually rising to head the provincial Communist Youth League and hold other top posts. He was then transferred to Xi's native province of Shaanxi and then to Heilongjiang in the far northeast, where he was eventually named governor.

From there he served as party secretary for two years in the poor southern province of Guizhou before being called to Beijing in 2012 as Xi was being made head of the party and given a seat on the Politburo.

Unlike his predecessors, Li, 67, plays a prominent role in foreign affairs, and in 2015 was sent by Xi to Moscow to serve as his special representative in talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin. "I believe you and (President) Xi Jinping are leaders of two great nations, two great politicians who have significant influence in the world," Li was quoted as telling Putin.

WANG YANG

In his current role as vice premier, Wang's most high-profile responsibility is steering talks between the U.S. and China on thorny trade issues. These range from cutting China's excess steel production to easing restrictions faced by foreign businesses trying to tap into the world's second-largest economy.

In these talks, Wang has sought to be charming but also firm, saying the sides need to cooperate and warning that "confrontation will immediately damage the interests of both."

When he was the top leader of Guangdong, China's wealthiest province, Wang's favorite political slogan was "free your thinking." Wang, 62, is widely seen as an economic reformer interested in promoting the private sector and the transformation of China's economy from one reliant on heavy industries to one that's driven by consumption and innovation.

Wang is considered closely aligned with now-retired President Hu Jintao; both are from the eastern province of Anhui. In 2011, as Guangdong party chief, Wang boosted his career when he presided over a compromise with protesters in the fishing village of Wukan, where residents had staged an uprising that made the village an internationally known symbol of grass-roots defiance against the party.

WANG HUNING

Long considered the brains behind Xi's governing philosophy, Wang has served as director of the party's Central Policy Research Office since 2002. First transferred to Beijing from an academic career in his native Shanghai, Wang loyally served Xi's predecessors Jiang Zemin and Hu Jintao in an advisory role, helping define their political outlooks and accompanying them on foreign trips.

Wang and Xi formed a close relationship, and Wang is almost always at the president's side at important events, along with Li Zhanshu and top foreign policy adviser Yang Jiechi. A prolific author and former champion college debater, Wang, 62, is considered a fierce advocate of centralized power and authoritarian rule.

"The legacy of Wang's neo-authoritarianism and its cousin, neo-conservatism, lives on today under the reign of Xi Jinping," wrote American China politics expert Jude Blanchette. "Look at the first five years of Xi Jinping's administration through the neo-authoritarian lens, and we see a consistent theme: clawing power back to Beijing."

ZHAO LEJI

Since 2012, Zhao has run the ruling party's Central Organization Department, which oversees promotions, making him a key figure in Xi's campaign to promote supporters and tighten control over the political hierarchy.

Zhao, 60, is seen as part of Xi's "Shaanxi Gang" of figures with family ties to the western province from which their families originally hail
. Before moving to Beijing, Zhao was party secretary for Shaanxi and, before that, for the remote western province of Qinghai on the Tibetan plateau, where he was born and spent his early career.

Like Xi, Zhao is a second-generation party member, and unconfirmed accounts say their fathers were friends. Zhao would be one of the youngest Standing Committee members ever and his age would allow him to serve a full 10 years before party tradition would require he step down. That would help to extend Xi's influence beyond the next leadership change in 2022, when he would be forced to step down as president under term limits.

"Zhao is well positioned on the policy front to carry out several of Xi's long-standing objectives: the alleviation of poverty and the strict enforcement of regulations on party officials," politics specialist Cheng Li wrote in a report for the Brookings Institution.

HAN ZHENG

A trained economist, Han worked his way up the political hierarchy of China's financial hub of Shanghai from a humble start in the chemical industry and at a rubber shoe factory.

He has spent his entire career in Shanghai, advancing over decades to become the city's mayor in 2003 _ then the youngest person to hold that position, at age 48 _ and its Communist Party chief in 2012. In 2007, he also served as deputy to Xi, then the city's party leader, before Xi moved to Beijing.

Han, 63, is known as a business-friendly politician able to rattle off statistics with practiced ease. During his tenure as mayor, Shanghai hosted the 2010 World Expo, which showcased China's rise as a modern industrial power.

But it was also on his watch that a New Year's Eve stampede on Shanghai's scenic Bund promenade killed 36 people at the end of 2014. Earlier in his career, Han emerged seemingly unscathed from a massive corruption scandal centering on Shanghai's pension fund that resulted in the purge of the city's former Communist Party chief Chen Liangyu. Chen was sentenced to 18 years in prison in 2008.

Washington's Brookings Institution said in a report this year that Han was known as "a competent, seasoned financial and economic technocrat" with "market friendly policy orientation in Shanghai."

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 25 Oct 2017 15:56

New PSC members (apart from Xi himself):

  • LI KEQIANG - A Hu Jintao man but has served Xi very well
  • LI ZHANSHU - A Xi man with friendship going a long way back
  • WANG YANG - A Hu Jintao man
  • WANG HUNING - A close Xi man though he has worked also under Jiang Zemin & Hu Jintao
  • ZHAO LEJI - A key Xi man
  • HAN ZHENG - a Xi man

So, four out of the six PSC members are Xi men, one has Xi's confidence (though a Hu man) and one is a Hu Jintao man

It shows that Xi has stuffed the PSC with his men.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 25 Oct 2017 19:35

Expect a silent revolt in the future.If XI Gins cannot deliver on the economy or big for a like OBOR,etc., the snakes will come out of tbe holes.There are supposedly dev. "ghost cities" in China fully built with no people,which kept people employed that's alike Man's great steel production in the "Cultural Rev." where good steel items were melted down in millions of tons to produce useless ingots.

This however means that XI Gins now has the authority to wage an unceasing campaign of bullying Asia,India and the world to a.c. for Chinese overlordship with grave penalties for the same.The latest warning to India to come aboard OBOR or else...
China's mil. exercises with ASEAN is the shape of things to come,attempts to break the anti-China coalition led by the US.Abe's huge win in Japan and the real poss. of Japan dumping its constitutional pacifism and militarising ,with future expeditionary ops will enrage China who will warn Asian countries of the rise of the another Imperialistic Japan.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ramana » 25 Oct 2017 21:51

Philip, Don't rely on other news sources to analyze Xi Jinping.
As BRF we need our own analysis.
We are witnessing a big change in PRC transition.
FSU underwent similar transition form Tsarist Russia->Soviet Union->Russia
China is going through Manchu->KMT->Communist->?
Xi Jinping avoided the FSU economic free fall so far in managing this transition.
He has ensured the PLA is in their barracks and not on a coup mode unlike Gorbachev.
All these are things to note and ruminate.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Rudradev » 25 Oct 2017 22:03

ramana wrote:China is going through Manchu->KMT->Communist->?


-> (Neo)Ming.

One of the important developments of the Ming dynasty was that Buddhism was "Constantinized" and made an essential, symbiotic organ of the imperium. The Mongol Yuans annexed Tibet and made Tibetan Buddhism the state religion of their empire. Under the Mings, in a strategy orchestrated by the reformer Hanshan Deqing, the Tibetan Lamas were thrown out of the imperial court, and Chinese Buddhism was made expressly Sinic and incorporated as a spiritual/theocratic arm of an indigenous Chinese empire (just as Christianity was made expressly Roman about 1000 years before that).

By all accounts Xi very much supports the revival of a Sinicized Buddhism, as an instrument of national cohesion that also resists alien interests like Christianity making inroads into the spiritual vacuum created by erstwhile red purges. Among the three "Core Leaders" of post 1949 China, Mao depended almost entirely on a cult of personality; Deng is revered for his revitalization of the economy. Xi's contribution is to reinstate the imperium with all of its institutions, including a national religion that serves the goals of the state.

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 25 Oct 2017 23:43

Xi Jinping begins China's ‘new era’ with no heir apparent

BEIJING: Chinese President Xi Jinping was re-elected for a second term on Wednesday and appeared set to continue in office beyond the end of this term in 2022 as Communist Party officials also chose new members to the powerful politburo standing committee (PSC) but threw up no heir apparent to Xi. This marks a shift from the party's tradition of identifying the next leader and grooming the person for the task.

Two younger leaders — Hu Chunhua, party chief in the prosperous Guangdong province, and Chen Miner, party head in Chongqing city and a XI protege — widely regarded as possible successors to Xi did not make it to the seven-member PSC, a prerequisite for the party's future general secretary. All the new PSC members are old enough to reach the retirement age of 68 by 2022.

Premier Li Keqiang retained his post though there was some speculation among diplomats and foreign investors that he might be replaced. Xi might appoint an executive vice-premier to take some of his workload, political circles said. The post is expected to go to Shanghai party boss Han Zheng who has not joined the PSC.

The PSC members, listed in order of their rank within the party, are general secretary Xi, Premier Li Keqiang, Li Zhanshu, Wang Yang, Wang Huning, Zhao Leji and Han Zheng.

Notably absent from the PSC was graft-buster Wang Qishan, 69, who led the anti-corruption campaign and played a key role in expanding Xi's influence across different sections of the party. He bowed out of the PSC due to an unwritten rule setting the retirement age at 68. The post is expected to go to Xi protege and party personnel department head Zhao Leji.

Xi also tightened his grip over the military with two appointments to the Central Military Commission, which he heads. A new entrant is General Xu Quliang, 67, who served in Fujian province where Xi spent many years as a party official. An existing member, General Zhang Youxia, 67, a former Air Force commander, has been given a second term. Like Xi, Zhang is the son of a revolutionary from Shaanxi province and regarded as his childhood friend.

Party officials associated with Xi during his postings in different places and those who travelled with him on multiple occasions have been favoured in selections for different positions. The third position in the PSC went to Li Zhanshu, Xi's most trusted ally. Nearly 10 of the 15 new entrants to the political bureau are known to be personally associated with Xi.

The Chinese president has started the process of revamping the party ideology along the lines of the "Xi Jinping Thought for the New Era of Socialism with Chinese Special Characteristics", which has been included in the party's constitution. Wang Huning, the party's principal theorist, joins the PSC to advance his task of refining Xi's ideology.

The party chose to reappoint 10 old members to the 25-member political bureau, a decision-making body.

The official ranked fourth, Wang Yang, might give up his current position as vice-premier and take over as the chair of the top political advisory body, the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference.

Cheers Image

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Suraj » 26 Oct 2017 00:56

SSridhar wrote:New PSC members (apart from Xi himself):

  • LI KEQIANG - A Hu Jintao man but has served Xi very well
  • LI ZHANSHU - A Xi man with friendship going a long way back
  • WANG YANG - A Hu Jintao man
  • WANG HUNING - A close Xi man though he has worked also under Jiang Zemin & Hu Jintao
  • ZHAO LEJI - A key Xi man
  • HAN ZHENG - a Xi man

So, four out of the six PSC members are Xi men, one has Xi's confidence (though a Hu man) and one is a Hu Jintao man

It shows that Xi has stuffed the PSC with his men.

Not just that, but with OLD MEN. All of them are blocking the younger generation, who have sought to be in line for the 2022 succession play, but are now completely excluded. In China, the fecal matter hits the fan every time the toilet is blocked at the top preventing the most ambitious turds from rising up.

What Xi has done is break the long standing Deng's Rules, i.e. only 2 terms, and 2nd conclave picks people into PSC who will constitute next tier. Everyone has so far followed these rules, even the power-hungry Jiang Zemin. Xi has broken these rules. This heralds a point where China is setting itself up for huge political instability in the next ~10 years.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby NRao » 26 Oct 2017 02:10

There is an age limit. Cannot be older than X years.


BTW, just heard that every entity in China, including foreign ones, will have a Communist Party entity embedded, including Disney China! Boeing, EADS, etc.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Suraj » 26 Oct 2017 02:36

Yes there is an age limit, and the rule has been that the sufficiently young (i.e. early-mid 50s at most) next generation leadership is always elevated during the second plenum by each paramount leader, giving them 5 years of understudy role before elevation, and then 10 years in charge for the main leadership, who in turn pick the next generation half way into their regime. Xi was supposed to pick some very high profile and ambitious candidates like Hu Chunhua. The entire current PSC is born in the 1950-57 period, i.e. all 60+ . There will be trouble down the road.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ramana » 26 Oct 2017 03:56

RD Good insight.

However Empress Wu was the one who made Buddhism a state religion in the Tang dynasty....
maybe Xi will be like her.

http://www.theworldofchinese.com/2013/1 ... -buddhist/

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ramana » 26 Oct 2017 03:57

I think Xi Jinping does not trust the new generation. So he will train his own group.
We are seeing a new Chinese Revolution.

Ronald Syme, an Oxford professor launched new history of Octavian Rome using the methods of prosopography.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Roman_Revolution

and

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosopography

Essentially he studied the people around Augustus Caesar and showed how they differed from the ones who were around Julius Caesar and this new Roman Revolution brought in Pax Romana which lasted till Constantine.

The book Roman Revolution is quite a big volume and I got a used copy as a gift from my son knowing my interest in arcane stuff.

I think we should try to get the similar effort to study Xi Jinping and his six cohort to understand the new China.

Look at ref 3 in this link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosopographical_network

and manual from Oxford Uty:

http://prosopography.modhist.ox.ac.uk/c ... abuses.htm

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby kit » 26 Oct 2017 04:07

Suraj wrote:
SSridhar wrote:New PSC members (apart from Xi himself):

  • LI KEQIANG - A Hu Jintao man but has served Xi very well
  • LI ZHANSHU - A Xi man with friendship going a long way back
  • WANG YANG - A Hu Jintao man
  • WANG HUNING - A close Xi man though he has worked also under Jiang Zemin & Hu Jintao
  • ZHAO LEJI - A key Xi man
  • HAN ZHENG - a Xi man

So, four out of the six PSC members are Xi men, one has Xi's confidence (though a Hu man) and one is a Hu Jintao man

It shows that Xi has stuffed the PSC with his men.

Not just that, but with OLD MEN. All of them are blocking the younger generation, who have sought to be in line for the 2022 succession play, but are now completely excluded. In China, the fecal matter hits the fan every time the toilet is blocked at the top preventing the most ambitious turds from rising up.

What Xi has done is break the long standing Deng's Rules, i.e. only 2 terms, and 2nd conclave picks people into PSC who will constitute next tier. Everyone has so far followed these rules, even the power-hungry Jiang Zemin. Xi has broken these rules. This heralds a point where China is setting itself up for huge political instability in the next ~10 years.


there is a positive to the authoritarian rule, China has had it and now it is going to face its consequences right in the face ! .. did Xi think he was living in a Mao-like era ? .. the one belt will go to sea literally

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ramana » 26 Oct 2017 04:26

I think we are rushing to conclusions.
China always had the Emperor in Heaven syndrome of a strong central ruler.
Hegel wrote that China was a state with a nation since antiquity.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 26 Oct 2017 04:56

ramana wrote:China always had the Emperor in Heaven syndrome of a strong central ruler.

True, but Xi is going far beyond even the usual Chinese standards. He is already more powerful than Mao. Apart from all the announced positions that Xi has assumed such as the Chairman of the CMC, 'Core Leader' et al, there are many powers that he has taken over from the Prime Minister's Office too. The Prime Minister Li Keqiang is just for decorative purposes as he has been stripped of all decision-making powers. Chou-en-Lai wielded considerable power even during Mao's times. That is not the case with Xi.

Xi is delaying the identification of a successor which is normally done in the second Congress of the President (in Xi's case, in the present one) so that enough grooming can take place. There were two things that everyone was waiting for. One, how many Xi loyalists are brought into the PSC (there was even a speculation that Xi might reduce it from a strength of 7 to 5) and now we have the answer. The second was the anointment of Xi's successor. This has not happened. Far importantly, except for one, Zhao Leji, the others would retire by the next Congress and hence not President/Genral Secretary-material. Zhao Leji is already 60 and therefore he is not considered as Xi's successor eventhough he would not retire by the next Congress based on age limit, which is 68 years. Of course, the age-limit is an unwritten rule but Zhao Leji, because of his age, would not become President. However, he becomes powerful in the new setup as has taken over from Wang Qishan, the anti-corruption chief who sent all potential successor-candidates to jail and smothered opposition to Xi. The two potential and younger candidates, Hu Chunhua and Chen Miner, have not become PSC members much against wide speculation. This clearly shows that Xi is most likely to continue beyond two terms.

The other significant development to note is that the re-constituted Politburo (25 members) has now at least 15 Xi loyalists.

Hegel wrote that China was a state with a nation since antiquity.

In my opinion, only partially true. I do agree with the State part; but, the Emperors have always striven to build the Nation through Sinicization of the accrued lands or even in far away places that were only tributaries and not accrued to the nation as such. Chinese dynasties were aware of the strength of the Nation-State, IMO, though primacy was vested with the State and hence the Emperor.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ramana » 26 Oct 2017 05:40

Very good comments.
At least we are on right track than the chatteratti spouting nonsense no?

Lets see what emerges by doing a mind map and looking at these 7.

Do we have a list of the 25 Politburo members?

I think this Xi Revolution. You have just confirmed it.
What Hegel meant in China the Emperor is the State.

The question I have is what does Xi want to do with the power he has which is more than Mao?

All, try to find article that answer this question from all sources. Western, Eastern Indian where ever the info is?

Wonder where is Rajaram?

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 26 Oct 2017 05:52

ramana wrote:The question I have is what does Xi want to do with the power he has which is more than Mao?


Xi is out and out a Party man. He has announced the dates c. 2021, 2035 and 2050. Therein lies the answer to your question, I suppose.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Philip » 26 Oct 2017 06:38

Mao had Chou-en-Lai by his side who was of global power leader stature in his own right. There was a strong battle tested supporting cast of mil. men too.Here we have XI Gins and a few cocktail mixers ,flunkeys to execute their master's commands.His "thought with Chin characteristics..." is akin to a heavy dose of "ajinomoto" that many are allergic to.Gin is on his own global "Long March" of conquest as Genghiz Khan once did centuries ago.Gwadar to have housing facilities for 500,000 Chinese is a most alarming development.It indicates the eventual de-facto takeover of non-Poonjab Pak by China as its eco-mil juggernaut marches across Asia into the ME and beyond while it's huge navy starts to push back the US in the Pacific.

Gin is a megalomaniac whose equiv. on a far lesser scale of cunning is the Turkish Sultan.One wants a return of the Ottoman empire while the other wants to be the global emperor!

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby SSridhar » 26 Oct 2017 06:47

I consider the strengthening (which was not surprising) of Xi after the 19th Congress as going to be a rough period for the region and the world. Amidst all this gloom, one small consolation is that within the Party, Xi could not have everything his own way. However much he wanted his thoughts to be included in the Constitution simply as "Xi's Thoughts" in line with those of the Chairman, it did not end up like that. It ended up in a much narrower way, "Xi Jinping thought on socialism with Chinese characteristics for a New Era". So, obviously, however weak it might be, there *IS* some pushback within the Party. This is also evidenced by the inclusion of some non-Xi loyalists in the PSC & the Politburo. Whether it will have an impact on Xi or whether he would allow such inimical forces, only time has to tell. IMO, the anti-Xi faction is a mere cosmetic.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Prem » 26 Oct 2017 07:19

Failure of C-PEC will be failure of Xi at home and abroad. This provide huge leverage to India and others in the region. Take GB or Balochistan out and Xi is sent to play Wii by Chinese Commie Party honchos.

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Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby Peregrine » 26 Oct 2017 15:05

Changes to Chinese government line-up give Xi Jinping indefinite power

BEIJING: China's Communist Party has broken with recent tradition by failing to include a clear successor to President Xi Jinping in its new leadership . None of the members of the seven-man line-up are young enough to be heir to the President, suggesting he could stay in power beyond 2022.

The party had already elevated President Xi's status by inserting "Xi Jinping Thought" into the party's constitution alongside past leaders Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping. Professor Kerry Brown, associate fellow in Chatham House's Asia programme, told The Independent the line-up leaves the space open for Xi to continue as leader of the party indefinitely.

Brown said Xi could continue as head of the Communist Party even after he had finished two terms as president, serving as long as his health or political circumstances allowed. "The presidency isn't where the power is, the power is with the party. In theory, he could stay on for 15 or 20 years," he explained.
"It's deeply dependent on what the political circumstances are in three or four years time. If he's done a great job and people still think he's great, then he's got a good chance of staying on." He added that the President's stronger position means he could take a harder line on North Korea and China's desire to expand into the South China Sea.

Apart from President Xi, Premier Li Keqiang was the only one to retain his spot amid sweeping changes on the Politburo Standing Committee+ , the height of power in the world's second-largest economy. Li Zhanshu, Wang Yang, Wang Huning, Zhao Leji and Han Zheng were promoted, replacing five retiring members including anti-corruption chief Wang Qishan, a key Xi ally. All seven are in their sixties, and for the first time no Standing Committee member will have been born before the 1949 Communist revolution.

No women have ever made it onto the Politburo Standing Committee, despite the list of delegates being hand-crafted to burnish the party's image as "representative of the masses". In the new Politburo, only one of 25 members is a woman. Sun Chunlan, the head of the party body charged with outreach to non-Communists, is in her second term and is likely to retire in five years. China ranked 74th in political empowerment of women out of 144 countries in the World Economic Forum's global Gender Gap Report last year.

Xi said his return as general secretary constituted "not just approval of my work but also encouragement that will spur me on." He added: "In this new context, we must get a new look and more importantly, make new accomplishments," he said in comments to reporters at a brief ceremony at the Great Hall of the People to introduce the new Politburo Standing Committee.

The makeup of the committee reflects the President's efforts to foster party unity by striking a balance between different interest groups in the 89-million member organization as he seeks to better position a reinvigorated party to dominate China's affairs at home and abroad. They will assume responsibility for running the rubber-stamp legislature, the National People's Congress and its advisory body, the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, and assume a range of portfolios, including those responsible for propaganda, party discipline, ethnic and Taiwan affairs and science and technology.

Xi has made his wide-ranging anti-corruption campaign the hallmark of his first five years in office. While popular among ordinary Chinese, it is seen as part of a drive to purge his rivals and political opponents and boost supervision over the party at all levels. Alongside the campaign, the President has overseen one of the harshest crackdowns on civil society aimed at crushing dissent and activism among lawyers and rights advocates.

The new leaders will face challenges that include reining burgeoning levels of debt seen as the biggest threat to economic stability and managing trade tensions with Washington and Europe over China's excess production of steel and other goods. They will also have to tackle the risk of war over neighbouring ally North Korea's nuclear program, manage the crucial relationship with the US and navigate delicate ties with Southeast Asian nations wary of Beijing's expansion in the disputed South China Sea.

President Xi has outlined his vision of strengthening the party's role in Chinese life and shepherding China's rise to prominence at a time when the United States and others in the West are seen to be in retreat.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby ramana » 26 Oct 2017 19:23

Peregrine wrote:Changes to Chinese government line-up give Xi Jinping indefinite power

BEIJING: China's Communist Party has broken with recent tradition by failing to include a clear successor to President Xi Jinping in its new leadership . None of the members of the seven-man line-up are young enough to be heir to the President, suggesting he could stay in power beyond 2022.

{Xi is 64. He has only 4 more years i.e. 2021. However his term as General Secy is for 5 years which brings it to 2022.}

The party had already elevated President Xi's status by inserting "Xi Jinping Thought" into the party's constitution alongside past leaders Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping. Professor Kerry Brown, associate fellow in Chatham House's Asia programme, told The Independent the line-up leaves the space open for Xi to continue as leader of the party indefinitely. :?:

Brown said Xi could continue as head of the Communist Party even after he had finished two terms as president, serving as long as his health or political circumstances allowed. "The presidency isn't where the power is, the power is with the party. In theory, he could stay on for 15 or 20 years," he explained.

"It's deeply dependent on what the political circumstances are in three or four years time. If he's done a great job and people still think he's great, then he's got a good chance of staying on." He added that the President's stronger position means he could take a harder line on North Korea and China's desire to expand into the South China Sea.

Apart from President Xi, Premier Li Keqiang was the only one to retain his spot amid sweeping changes on the Politburo Standing Committee+ , the height of power in the world's second-largest economy. Li Zhanshu, Wang Yang, Wang Huning, Zhao Leji and Han Zheng were promoted, replacing five retiring members including anti-corruption chief Wang Qishan, a key Xi ally. All seven are in their sixties, and for the first time no Standing Committee member will have been born before the 1949 Communist revolution.

No women have ever made it onto the Politburo Standing Committee, despite the list of delegates being hand-crafted to burnish the party's image as "representative of the masses". In the new Politburo, only one of 25 members is a woman. Sun Chunlan, the head of the party body charged with outreach to non-Communists, is in her second term and is likely to retire in five years. China ranked 74th in political empowerment of women out of 144 countries in the World Economic Forum's global Gender Gap Report last year.

Xi said his return as general secretary constituted "not just approval of my work but also encouragement that will spur me on." He added: "In this new context, we must get a new look and more importantly, make new accomplishments," he said in comments to reporters at a brief ceremony at the Great Hall of the People to introduce the new Politburo Standing Committee.

The makeup of the committee reflects the President's efforts to foster party unity by striking a balance between different interest groups in the 89-million member organization as he seeks to better position a reinvigorated party to dominate China's affairs at home and abroad. They will assume responsibility for running the rubber-stamp legislature, the National People's Congress and its advisory body, the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, and assume a range of portfolios, including those responsible for propaganda, party discipline, ethnic and Taiwan affairs and science and technology.

Xi has made his wide-ranging anti-corruption campaign the hallmark of his first five years in office. While popular among ordinary Chinese, it is seen as part of a drive to purge his rivals and political opponents and boost supervision over the party at all levels. Alongside the campaign, the President has overseen one of the harshest crackdowns on civil society aimed at crushing dissent and activism among lawyers and rights advocates.

The new leaders will face challenges that include reining burgeoning levels of debt seen as the biggest threat to economic stability and managing trade tensions with Washington and Europe over China's excess production of steel and other goods. They will also have to tackle the risk of war over neighbouring ally North Korea's nuclear program, manage the crucial relationship with the US and navigate delicate ties with Southeast Asian nations wary of Beijing's expansion in the disputed South China Sea.

President Xi has outlined his vision of strengthening the party's role in Chinese life and shepherding China's rise to prominence at a time when the United States and others in the West are seen to be in retreat.

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Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (09-08-2014)

Postby vijaykarthik » 26 Oct 2017 20:32

^ {Xi is 64. He has only 4 more years i.e. 2021. However his term as General Secy is for 5 years which brings it to 2022.}

I think its OK to stay on till the next congress for anyone in the politburo. Its just that if people are beyond 67, they are asked to moved on and anyone who is less than 67 are allowed to stay (so potentially, one could be 67 and go on till 72 before they retire). It remains to be seen if Xi will last in the 20th as a member of the gang of 7. If he is an out and out party member, he will move on. Else, he might be kicked out.

My prediction is that he will have a lot to contend with before the next plenum. He is going to have trouble and really won't last till the next congress.

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Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 26 Oct 2017 20:44

There is urgent need to understand the new China after the 19th Congress which concluded on 24 October 2017 which elevated Xi Jinping to Mao and Deng's status.

Please no one liners or emoticons.
Thanks,

ramana

Will x-post relevant posts from the other thread....

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Re: Understanding New China after 19th Congress

Postby ramana » 26 Oct 2017 20:46

First is an appraisal of the changes in PLA by Brig. V. Mahalingam CLAWS.

shiv wrote:To understand limitation of Chinese President Xi Jinping read
https://t.co/Laz4HBVEer


This pdf is important from Indian point of view as it describes the restructuring of PLA.

Being the largest neighbor for India it is good to be aware of changes in PLA.


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