Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23586
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 26 Feb 2018 11:05

TKiran wrote:There's some mystery about the Chinese projects and labourers. They are not seen in entire stretch of CPEC or dredging the SCS shoals etc, but the physical infrastructure is seen only after some satellite pictures are taken.

How do they manage such feat of secrecy? How are they fed, how do they manage water and rest etc., For example the Nepal police academy was built in two years. They brought in bricks and mortar in what form, from where and how?

TK, may be they work in the night, away from the prying eyes of the sun-synchronous low-earth orbit satellites!

May be the pictures taken during the construction activity are never released for various reasons.

shiv
BRF Oldie
Posts: 35017
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Pindliyon ka Gooda

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby shiv » 26 Feb 2018 11:49

This is a Google Earth image of Hambantota. Nearby - there are buildings that are built in a shape that appears like "CHINA-SLK" from the air.

But this is odd. Can anyone read Chinese?

https://twitter.com/bennedose/status/967964980174667777

TKiran
BRFite
Posts: 923
Joined: 13 Dec 2009 00:22

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby TKiran » 26 Feb 2018 14:51

SSridhar wrote:
TKiran wrote:There's some mystery about the Chinese projects and labourers. They are not seen in entire stretch of CPEC or dredging the SCS shoals etc, but the physical infrastructure is seen only after some satellite pictures are taken.

How do they manage such feat of secrecy? How are they fed, how do they manage water and rest etc., For example the Nepal police academy was built in two years. They brought in bricks and mortar in what form, from where and how?

TK, may be they work in the night, away from the prying eyes of the sun-synchronous low-earth orbit satellites!

May be the pictures taken during the construction activity are never released for various reasons.


I think it is the duty of India's external intelligence agencies to find out these secret projects and give propaganda in local press that the Chinese are not employing local people etc, so that they don't get free pass to do the projects in secrecy. Ofcourse the Chinese are also going to give counter-propaganda but still...

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7330
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 26 Feb 2018 16:03

X Posted on the Terroristan Thread

China 'didn't want to lose face' by supporting Pakistan at terror funding watchdog meet: Report

NEW DELHI: China backed down from speaking for Pakistan at a recent international meeting on terror because it didn't want to "lose face by supporting a move that's doomed to fail", official unnamed sources told Dawn newspaper.

At first, so sure was Pakistan of China's support in dissuading the US and others from putting it on a terror funding watchlist that its foreign minister even tweeted saying he was "grateful to friends who helped". Days later, foreign minister Khawaja Asif and Pakistan had egg on their face, as reports came in that China remained neutral.

What happened?

Apparently, at first, China did oppose the move to put Pakistan on what's called a 'grey list' of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF). It joined Turkey and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) - represented by Saudi Arabia which wasn't a member in and of itself - in its support for Islamabad, said Dawn.

Soon after, though, the US pushed for an unprecedented second discussion on Pakistan, which was held on February 22, said the Dawn report. And by then, it convinced Saudi Arabia to accept a quid pro quo - 'We will give you full FATF membership if you drop your support for Pakistan'.

Saudi Arabia agreed. That left only two countries - China and Turkey - on Pakistan's side. A minimum of three FATF members are required to oppose a grey-listing.

That's when China informed Pakistan it was backing out of supporting it because it did not want to "lose face by supporting a move that's doomed to fail", official sources told Dawn.

"Pakistan appreciated the Chinese position and conveyed its gratitude to Turkey for continuing to support Islamabad against all odds," the source added.

Earlier this week, sources told TOI that another bargaining point Washington used in getting Beijing to drop its support for Pakistan was pledging support to get China into a top position in the FATF. In fact, India and the US both pledged support to China in return for China's neutrality on Pakistan, sources said to TOI.

Cheers Image

panduranghari
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3751
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby panduranghari » 26 Feb 2018 17:52

Beijing may be able to irritate Hanoi without lasting consequence, but it can’t expect the same with New Delhi. Once, Indian policymakers could see no farther east than the Strait of Malacca. But now they state that both the South China Sea and East China Sea are integral to Indian security. That change, which means India is developing links with East Asia, is in direct response to Chinese provocation in the waters surrounding India’s shores.


Do read it in full.

http://nationalinterest.org/feature/the ... 635?page=2

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23586
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 26 Feb 2018 18:38

The Coming of the Petroyuan? - Shebonti Ray Dadwal, IDSA
In a move that could cause a major shift in global energy markets and also allow it to play a bigger role in the global economy, China is planning the launch of a yuan-denominated oil futures exchange. After several postponements, Beijing is finalising plans to launch its oil futures contract on the Shanghai International Energy Exchange, or what is referred by its acronym, INE, on March 26, 2018. The exchange plans to handle seven kinds of crude, particularly from the Middle East, including Iraq’s Basra Light, Dubai and Oman crude. Chinese oil companies like Sinopec and the small, independent refineries which are referred to as “teapots” that import large consignments from the region, are expected to use the INE.

If all goes according to plan, the launch will provide China with the opportunity to create an Asian crude oil benchmark that would better reflect pricing for the oil imported and consumed in Asia, the world’s top importing region. The move is designed to give China more clout in crude pricing as well as promote its currency as a truly global one.


Petrodollar to Petroyuan?

The critical role of finding an alternate currency to the US dollar (USD) to trade in oil holds the key to currency domination. Most of the oil, with a few exceptions now coming to the fore, is sold and bought in USD, which means all oil consumers have to purchase dollars to buy oil. While the Bretton Woods system allowed the USD to be designated as the international reserve currency, it was the 1974 US-Saudi deal that established and ensured the dollar’s position.

For years now, China has been trying to translate its growing economic strength into global influence, and international acceptance and use of its currency, as in the case of the dollar, would go a long way in allowing it the leverage it seeks. At present, the US dollar retains top position. According to recent International Monetary Fund (IMF) data, the USD accounted for 63.5 per cent of all reserves, followed by the Euro at 20 per cent, while the yuan’s share in the world’s forex reserves is a paltry 1.12 per cent in Q3 2017.1 But China wants the yuan to play an increasingly important role in global trade, and where better than to start with the oil trade.

The Chinese currency did receive a boost, albeit symbolic, in 2016, when the IMF included the yuan in its basket of global currencies that determine the value of its international reserve asset, the Special Drawing Right (SDR). However, thereafter, the yuan depreciated, and Beijing’s efforts to prop up the currency, including by the imposition of curbs on capital outflows, dampened its international appeal. But recently, the Chinese government has been showing signs of relaxing the micro-management of the exchange rate, which resulted in the yuan climbing against the dollar.2

Will the Chinese gambit succeed?

There are some takers for the yuan. Russia and Iran have been using the yuan to settle some oil transactions since 2015. Both countries have been slapped with US sanctions, including banking restrictions, and both export large volumes of crude to China. Venezuela too has shown some interest in trading in yuan, and Angola and Nigeria are also selling some oil and gas in the Chinese currency. And as recently as January 2018, Pakistan’s central bank said it has officially adopted the yuan as a currency for trade with China.3 Several banks, including HSBC and Deutsche Bank, are also picking up the yuan for their currency reserves, which is indicative of the growing acceptance of the yuan as an international currency, although it remains far behind the dollar.4

The real test of the yuan’s international acceptability, however, will be Saudi Arabia. If the Kingdom, which was largely responsible for instituting the USD as the global currency, accepts the yuan, even partly, for its exports to China, that will go a long way in making the Chinese currency more acceptable internationally.

Nevertheless, the success of the yuan oil futures contract will depend largely on market regulation (and room for intervention) on the market, which could deter international investors from bringing huge volumes into the contract. Some analysts believe that while it makes sense for the world’s key oil import market to launch yuan oil futures, it would take years for the yuan to really threaten the supremacy of the “entrenched” petrodollar.

China has long wanted to host a global benchmark. As the world’s top energy importer, it wants more clout in a market worth trillions of dollars. It also wants more international trade overall to be done in renminbi (the yuan’s official name). Hence, pricing oil in yuan would advance both goals.

Conclusion

The setting up of an Asian oil benchmark will reflect the reality of the current oil pricing mechanism, which is dominated by Asia, as against the traditional one that was designed for a time when Asian countries were not major energy consumers. It is therefore understandable that an alternate currency should be instated. But if the yuan has to be accepted as the alternative to the USD and become a safe haven in times of crises, rather than an instrument for trade and portfolio diversification only, China will have to pursue and sustain the reforms it has introduced. Further, global investors continue to buy US treasury bills and bonds whenever they seek a safe haven to park their money. It merits recalling that the US dollar superseded the British pound sterling only after World War II, although the American economy had overtaken Britain’s in the late 1800s.

Therefore, while the US dollar’s continued dominance is neither inevitable nor necessarily desirable, it does not mean that the renminbi/yuan will replace it. Undoubtedly, its use in trade, bond issues and sovereign reserves has grown, that too in a relatively short time. But China’s unreliable or illiquid financial markets remain a major impediment. China will have to pursue reforms to strengthen domestic debt markets, improve corporate governance and bring in more regulatory transparency and enforce the rule of law in order to attract and absorb huge global financial flows.5 There is also the danger that a considerable fall in the US dollar’s value will undoubtedly have ripples in global financial markets, which will affect many of China’s leading trade partners. Therefore, while no one expects the dollar to abdicate its reign just yet, the Shanghai exchange may mark the first sign of cracks forming in the US dollar’s edifice.

nam
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2350
Joined: 05 Jan 2017 20:48

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby nam » 26 Feb 2018 18:50


Soon after, though, the US pushed for an unprecedented second discussion on Pakistan, which was held on February 22, said the Dawn report. And by then, it convinced Saudi Arabia to accept a quid pro quo - 'We will give you full FATF membership if you drop your support for Pakistan'.

Saudi Arabia agreed. That left only two countries - China and Turkey - on Pakistan's side. A minimum of three FATF members are required to oppose a grey-listing.


Earlier this week, sources told TOI that another bargaining point Washington used in getting Beijing to drop its support for Pakistan was pledging support to get China into a top position in the FATF. In fact, India and the US both pledged support to China in return for China's neutrality on Pakistan, sources said to TOI.



So one of the largest sponsor of terror is a full member, preventing any sanctions on itself. Chinese get a VP position to fundamentally make it a toothless organization.

Poor Paks were used by everyone.

TKiran
BRFite
Posts: 923
Joined: 13 Dec 2009 00:22

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby TKiran » 26 Feb 2018 20:59

Next is reserve currency....

When I said this everyone laughed at me...

pankajs
BRF Oldie
Posts: 11070
Joined: 13 Aug 2009 20:56

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby pankajs » 26 Feb 2018 23:14

^^
What are you talking about hanji? Yuan is already a Reserve currency. You need to be sent to the le-education camp.
SSridhar wrote:The Coming of the Petroyuan? - Shebonti Ray Dadwal, IDSA
According to recent International Monetary Fund (IMF) data, the USD accounted for 63.5 per cent of all reserves, followed by the Euro at 20 per cent, while the yuan’s share in the world’s forex reserves is a paltry 1.12 per cent in Q3 2017.1

See generic statements like that can be spun any which way. Be more specific.

1. Do you mean Yuan become the *dominant* Reserve currency? OR does it aspire to join the ranks of the *also ran* like the Euro and Yen?
2. By when do you expect it to take over the mantle from the USD which currently accounts for 63.5% of all reserves?

Iyersan
BRFite
Posts: 358
Joined: 19 Sep 2016 16:13

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Iyersan » 26 Feb 2018 23:37

Hello, heard that XI is going to go on unchallenged for a long time. We can see war coming. Probably XI is the next anti Krishna

Rudradev
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3383
Joined: 06 Apr 2003 12:31

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Rudradev » 27 Feb 2018 02:51

Actually the news of Xi abolishing term-limits to be "President for Rife" is excellent news for India.

1) The devil we know is better than the devil we don't know, for many reasons. e.g.
a) Predictable behaviour patterns directed from the top, in all matters of policy from diplomacy to economy to military strategy. Our foreign policy and defence institutions will have time to learn who they are dealing with and how he prefers to act, and thus anticipate Chinese actions and reactions better than with a constant changing of the guard.
b) Internally to Cheen: playbook addiction. This is especially true in autocratic regimes where there is a single decision maker who surrounds himself with generation after generation of yes-men. They will develop and maintain blind spots that are irreparable just because of prejudice. They will use the same stratagems over and over again, and when they fail, ego will come into play and there will be a doubling-down rather than a reconsideration of the stratagems previously employed. Leadel can never be wlong.

2) Despite his anti-India stance Xi is also stridently anti-West, anti-Abrahamic, and in his own way pro-Dharmic (in the sense of promoting Buddhism as a quasi-state religion). Believe me, it would be much, MUCH worse if the West somehow managed to replace him with a crypto-EJ infiltrator after 2023.

3) The longer Xi continues to dominate at the top, the more corruption and cronyism will increase, and simultaneously the more resentment will build up amongst mid-level functionaries who are excluded from the favoured circle. Which means an overall weakening of institutions, and many opportunities for bheda.

Singha
BRF Oldie
Posts: 66607
Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
Location: the grasshopper lies heavy

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 27 Feb 2018 07:42

Smells like the anti corruption purges were atleast in part to remove powerful potential rivals like bo xilai who could bevome fulcrums of future opposition

Couching power grabs in dharmic terms is a old trick of such regimes

Now all he has are his paltu kuttas who are all leashed

Singha
BRF Oldie
Posts: 66607
Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
Location: the grasshopper lies heavy

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 27 Feb 2018 07:50

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Officials ... %80%932017)

List of people known to be purged, the charges and punishments

Very few got off with being expelled from party and no doubt assets seized

The biggies were sentenced to death some with 2 yr delay to extract self written confessions and torture them more

Most got 15 years in prison, being middle aged soft types not the old long march field generals, all of these men will die in prison

Singha
BRF Oldie
Posts: 66607
Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
Location: the grasshopper lies heavy

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 27 Feb 2018 07:53

Hopefully herr hitler will now surround himself in a echo chamber manned by kietel, jodl, heidrich, goering and himmler ji and banish the rommel, guderian, kliest ,albert speer no-bs types to the far reaches of empire....

Pulikeshi
BRFite
Posts: 1490
Joined: 31 Oct 2002 12:31
Location: Badami

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Pulikeshi » 27 Feb 2018 10:16

shiv wrote:There is ... sort of..
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=7025&start=40


Thank you! Will continue my Beaujolais drinking, running dog Imperialist, Splittist Edumacation on ChinPak and gOBOR on that thread....

nandakumar
BRFite
Posts: 930
Joined: 10 May 2010 13:37

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby nandakumar » 27 Feb 2018 10:36

https://idsa.in/idsacomments/the-coming ... wal_220218
The author is making a fundamental mistake. The EU consists of a number independent nation with separate parliaments, budgets and memberships of the U.N. So trade between these nations constitute external trade and figures in external trade statistics. But since they are also an economic union with a single currency intra EU trade is wrongly counted as part of external trade (from the perspective of choice of currency). Now Germany, the biggest of economies with in EU has only 50% of exports outside the EU. The share of 20% Euro in foreign trade should be reckoned at only half of that number. If we take the base as 90 instead of 100 the dollar share is closer to 70 to 75 rather than 63 as portrayed in that article. In other words the gap between dollar and ZYuan is wider than has been projected.

TKiran
BRFite
Posts: 923
Joined: 13 Dec 2009 00:22

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby TKiran » 27 Feb 2018 11:28

Now expect China to subjugate Saudi Barbaria. They calculated that there are three members required for FATF designation of Pakistan in 'grey list' to be defeated, but US pulled off Saudi Barbaria.

Expect a palace coup or something like that in Saudi Barbaria in two years time. 'How?' will be worked out by China, but the target has been locked.

yensoy
BRFite
Posts: 1340
Joined: 29 May 2002 11:31
Location: USA

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby yensoy » 27 Feb 2018 11:58

TKiran wrote:Now expect China to subjugate Saudi Barbaria. They calculated that there are three members required for FATF designation of Pakistan in 'grey list' to be defeated, but US pulled off Saudi Barbaria.

Expect a palace coup or something like that in Saudi Barbaria in two years time. 'How?' will be worked out by China, but the target has been locked.


China has one tool in its toolbox - money. How will that tool help sway anything in Saudi Arabia, which is pretty flush with money - deficits notwithstanding (and which can be recovered by sending a few cousins/businessmen on a spa retreat) ? Do you think US/Israel will stand by idly while China takes over? Sorry, that just isn't going to happen.

Prasad
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7253
Joined: 16 Nov 2007 00:53
Location: Chennai

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Prasad » 27 Feb 2018 12:37

Only way to influence Saudi is to play the Iran card.

V_Raman
BRFite
Posts: 459
Joined: 04 Sep 2008 22:25

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby V_Raman » 27 Feb 2018 13:13

Well I had a standing bet with five of my Chinese colleagues that Xi will stay beyond 2 terms. They told me today that they lost the bet and are now worried for the future.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10248
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby arun » 27 Feb 2018 17:36

X Posted from the Terroristan thread. The conduct of the PRC at FATF will need to be closely monitored.

The Peoples Republic of China’s Foreign Ministry on Higher than Himalaya’s, Deeper than Indian Ocean, Sweeter than Honey, As close as Lips to Teeth Iron Brother, the Mohammadden Terrorism Fometing Islamic Republic of Pakistan getting hit with a FATFa from FATF :

Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Lu Kang's Regular Press Conference on February 27, 2018 ….

Q: Pakistan has been at the forefront of the war against terrorism. How do you see the role of the international community in supporting Pakistan in its efforts to counter terrorism?

A: As my colleaues and I have said many times, the Pakistani government and its people have contributed and sacrificed enormously for the fight against terrorism. Their hard efforts, both in terms of ground operations and in the field of terrorism financing, are there for all to see.

Meanwhile, we’ve been calling on all relevant parties of the international community to view and evaluate Pakistan’s counter-terrorism efforts in an objective and fair way, instead of just pointing fingers at Pakistan out of bias. As an all-weather strategic cooperative partner for Pakistan, China will continue to enhance communication, coordination and cooperation with Pakistan on counter-terrorism.

Q: Reports say that China has not opted to bail out Pakistan in the recent Financial Action Task Force meeting, resulting in a kind of situation where Pakistan has to face sanctions. Can you comment on this?

A: I just talked about China’s take on Pakistan’s efforts and contributions on international counter-terrorism, so I won’t repeat it. As I specifically pointed out, the efforts and contributions made by Pakistan can also be seen in the field of terrorism financing. In recent years, Pakistan has made important progress in actively strengthening financial regulations to combat terror financing. China highly recognizes that and hopes all relevant parties of the international community could arrive at an objective and fair conclusion on that.

Clicky FMPRC


India also hopes that the PRC highly recognizes that PRC as a relevant party of the international community could arrive at an objective and fair conclusion on the matter of the solid track record of its Higher than Himalaya’s, Deeper than Indian Ocean, Sweeter than Honey, As close as Lips to Teeth Iron Brother, the Mohammadden Terrorism Fometing Islamic Republic of Pakistan, in fomenting Terrorism.

MEA Spokesman Raveesh Kumars Tweet:

Congratulations to China on its election as Vice President of Financial Action Task Force at the #FATF plenary mtg. on 23 February 2018. We remain hopeful that China would uphold & support the objectives & standards of FATF in a balanced, objective, impartial & holistic way.

Clicky MEA Tweet

panduranghari
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3751
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby panduranghari » 28 Feb 2018 00:29

nandakumar wrote:https://idsa.in/idsacomments/the-coming-of-the-petroyuan_srdadwal_220218
The author is making a fundamental mistake. The EU consists of a number independent nation with separate parliaments, budgets and memberships of the U.N. So trade between these nations constitute external trade and figures in external trade statistics. But since they are also an economic union with a single currency intra EU trade is wrongly counted as part of external trade (from the perspective of choice of currency). Now Germany, the biggest of economies with in EU has only 50% of exports outside the EU. The share of 20% Euro in foreign trade should be reckoned at only half of that number. If we take the base as 90 instead of 100 the dollar share is closer to 70 to 75 rather than 63 as portrayed in that article. In other words the gap between dollar and ZYuan is wider than has been projected.



Actually Eurozone as a block which has the same currency is running a surplus compared to the united states which though a nation state- has individual states with individual laws. Also the advantage euro has over dollar (or yuan for that matter) is its not controlled by the central bank of one nation. Yes Germany has a huge economy while the poverty stricken Greece has a smaller economy. But these internal imbalances do not have a direct effect on Euro itself. The adjustment pressure is felt by the politicians. The politicians in turn get new central bankers in. The bankers in turn (with finance ministry) go to ECB and plead. It falls on deaf ears. Remember Yanis Varoufakis and his shenanigans with ECB.

When we hear about Yuan become future reserve, I ask this- how many national central banks today - TODAY- hold yuan reserves? May be 3. How many hold Euros? Over 100. including the oil producers, all OPEC, the USA, the BRICS...PRETTY MUCH all who matter. This is an ample proof Yuan wont ever EVER be a reserve currency. There is a lot of catching up to do.

Zhou Xiaochuan is about to be replaced most likely by Guo Shuqing. Guo is a dove. He is more dovish than Janet Yellen. He will inflate the yuan to eternity if he has to. With people like those the central bank governors will be worried more about the depreciation of their reserves than the stability of their own currencies.

nandakumar
BRFite
Posts: 930
Joined: 10 May 2010 13:37

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby nandakumar » 28 Feb 2018 10:23

According to IMF data, Chinese Renminbi accounted for just one percent of Central Bank's official foreign exchange reserves as of third quarter 2017.
http://data.imf.org/?sk=E6A5F467-C14B-4 ... 09EC4E62A4

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23586
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 28 Feb 2018 12:34

Vietnam and India to discuss South China Sea - The Hindu
Vietnam will take up South China Sea-related issues during the March 2-4 visit by President Tran Dai Quang. Speaking to the media here [New Delhi] on Tuesday, the Ambassador of Vietnam said that Hanoi wished to fully utilise the comprehensive strategic partnership with India and was likely to sign a civil nuclear agreement during the visit.

“South China Sea issue will be discussed between leaders as the situation in the South China Sea is complicated. Some positive developments have taken place but the ground reality remains problematic,” said Ambassador Ton Sinh Thanh. Beijing’s claims over most of the South China Sea is a major issue between the two countries, and Hanoi has been one of the more vocal countries in the 10-member ASEAN grouping to find a solution to China’s expansionist policy in the crucial water body. The Ambassador however assured that his country remained committed to maintaining cordial ties with Beijing.

He clarified that Vietnam had not yet firmed up its position on the ‘One Belt, One Road’ initiative of China and said, “OBOR is a big project, we need to look into it whether it is good for the country or not, will then take a position on this.”

Areas of convergence

The visit, he said, would provide India and Vietnam an opportunity to build on the areas of convergence in the strategic domain. The envoy acknowledged India’s support in capacity building by the Vietnamese naval forces and said that the Vietnamese army and the air force are in the process of considering some hardware purchase from India.

The presidential visit will begin with a stopover at Bodhgaya where Mr. Tran will reach on March 2. The delegation will reach New Delhi later on the same day and both sides will hold official talks on March 3.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23586
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 28 Feb 2018 14:49

Critics of Xi defy Internet censors - AFP
China’s propaganda machine kicked into overdrive on Tuesday to defend the Communist Party’s move to scrap term limits for President Xi Jinping as critics on social media again defied censorship attempts.

The country has shocked many observers by proposing a constitutional amendment to end the two-term limit for Presidents, giving Mr. Xi a clear path to rule the country for life.

The National People’s Congress (NPC) is certain to endorse the move next week, meaning that Mr. Xi can stay as President beyond 2023.

‘Vote against it’

Li Datong, a former editor at the state-run China Youth Daily , posted a draft letter urging legislators to vote against the move — which would abolish term limits set in 1982 under Deng Xiaoping to prevent a return to the decades of chaos under Mao Zedong.

“It was the highest and most effective legal restriction meant to prevent autocracy or putting individuals above the party and the state,” said the letter. It was not sent to legislators but shared with hundreds of people in a private group on China’s WeChat phone messaging app.

“Lifting the term limits of national leaders will be ridiculed by civilised nations all over the world and also sow the seeds of chaos for China,” said the text posted on Monday. WeChat users trying to share screenshots of the letter saw their posts blocked.

Deletion of phrases

Censors have scrambled to delete all dissenting comments on social media — even the word “disagree” is blocked — but users of the Twitter-like Weibo website kept speaking out on Tuesday, two days after the party Central Committee announcement. “So pathetic, we have 1.3 billion people, no one can resist,” wrote one user.

Another lamented the lack of political reform: “I once believed that I could see a President elected by one man, one vote in my lifetime.” Scores of terms have been blocked, according to a list of dozens of words compiled by U.S.-based Internet tracker China Digital Times — including “my emperor”; “ascend the throne”; “I oppose”; “lifelong”; and “Winnie the Pooh” — the portly cartoon bear to which Xi has been compared.

The NPC, at its annual full session, will also formally approve a second five-year presidential term for Mr. Xi, who is Communist Party chief and head of the armed forces in addition to being head of state. Legislators will add his eponymous political philosophy to the state Constitution.

State media defended the amendment in editorials that lavished praise on the party’s overall leadership.

The English-language China Daily said the lifting of the presidential term limit “has been necessitated by the need to perfect the Party and the State leadership system”.

rsingh
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3325
Joined: 19 Jan 2005 01:05
Location: Pindi
Contact:

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby rsingh » 28 Feb 2018 16:58

^^^^
Start of demise of middle kingdom. Power corrupts.

Rudradev
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3383
Joined: 06 Apr 2003 12:31

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Rudradev » 28 Feb 2018 22:19

Meanwhile, Wilsonians in the US finally arrive at the realization that "economic freedom leads to political freedom"... the determinist fallacy that was the bedrock of the Wilsonian/Hamiltonian compact to bring China into WTO under Bill Clinton... has been completely disproved. Kissinger murdabad!

http://foreignpolicy.com/2018/02/26/glo ... e-monster/

Globalization Has Created a Chinese Monster
Xi Jinping's dictatorship isn't what the end of history was supposed to look like.

By Emile Simpson | February 26, 2018, 3:13 PM

On Sunday, the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee recommended ending the two-term limit on the presidency, paving the way for President Xi Jinping to stay in office indefinitely. This surely marks the end of an era — and not just for China, but also for the West.

For the West, the era in question started with the end of the Cold War, as old enemies became “emerging markets.” China had already started opening its markets to foreign investment since 1978 under Deng Xiaoping’s reforms. But only in the 1990s did the private sector take off there, and Western firms promptly rushed in to profit from the breakneck speed of Chinese economic growth.

The beauty of the post-Cold War emerging market story was that it was apolitical. Recall the famous identification of the leading emerging markets by Jim O’Neill in 2001 as the “BRICs” (Brazil, Russia, India, China) — four states from different groupings during the Cold War now viewed together as the leading protagonists in a new era of peaceful globalization under the Pax Americana. Some called it the end of history.

But this apolitical approach was premised on the assumption, inherited from the Cold War, that democracy and capitalism go hand in hand, and that the extension of free markets would bring global convergence to the Western economic model, as the Washington Consensus predicted.

Confidence in globalization saw massive amounts of Western capital and intellectual property flow to emerging markets, above all to China. But few in the West registered the geopolitical significance of this at the time. Instead, they praised the economic growth story. And not without good reason: the integration of China into global markets lifted a billion people out of poverty. It remains a testament to the material benefits of removing geopolitical obstructions from the development of global business.

But this story of global cosmopolitan peace has been on the rocks for some time. Russian privatization in the 1990s ultimately produced a mafia state controlled by an oligarchy. More broadly — with a few exceptions, mainly in Eastern Europe, where democracy did take hold (current problems notwithstanding) — capitalism has expanded since the end of the Cold War in spite of democracy, not alongside it.

And nowhere is this more evident than in China. It’s now abundantly clear that despite the pious neoliberal belief in the transformative power of free markets to encourage “reform,” China is headed toward more, not less autocracy. Indeed, it might not be an exaggeration to say that China has broken a path toward a new form of totalitarianism in which one man will sit atop a police state with access to ubiquitous data gathered about citizens by social media and online shopping platforms and a vast human and electronic surveillance apparatus to track their every move. Look no further than the ghastly “social credit score” system that Beijing wants to roll out by 2020 to get a sense of how wrong the idea has proven to be that free markets will bring about democratic change, or even minor liberalizing reform in China. A billion people may have been lifted out of poverty, but only to find themselves living under cyber-totalitarianism.

The geopolitical consequences of this realization could be very profound indeed.
In the Cold War, the West faced totalitarian communist regimes whose economic model and political system were both alien to what the “free world” claimed to stand for. Of course, the link between capitalism and democracy was always tenuous, not least given the reality that many of the West’s allies were not democratic. But now, if it was ever in doubt, we know for sure that capitalism and democracy don’t have to go together: Capitalism is up for grabs, and you don’t even need to support the Pax Americana to plug into it.

How does this end? We don’t yet know, but the question may well come to be the defining feature of a new geopolitical phase the world seems to have entered. Note how far removed from the happy story of liberal globalization is the language of the Trump administration’s December 2017 National Security Strategy: “China and Russia challenge American power, influence, and interests, attempting to erode American security and prosperity.”

Admittedly, this comes in the context of a presidency that bizarrely refuses to carry out U.S. congressional sanctions on Russia for interference in the U.S. 2016 elections. But the more important point is that Western states and their citizens are becoming increasingly alert to the need fundamentally to reappraise the value of the integrated global capitalism they have more or less promoted since the early 1990s. I am not talking about a reappraisal in light of the inequality that economic growth has produced, or the massive outsourcing of manufacturing jobs that created rust belts on both sides of the Atlantic, which is a separate discussion. Rather, this reappraisal concerns the inconvenient truth, which surely now is undeniable, that the West’s own economic policy has encouraged, if unwittingly, the rise of deeply illiberal regimes in much of the former communist world.

What practical effect this produces in the foreign and economic policies of the West depends, on the one hand, on the extent to which the West is prepared to sacrifice material wealth in support of its public values; and, on the other hand, on the extent to which authoritarian states, above all Russia and China, attempt to export their values abroad. One could list any number of areas where this dilemma will play out, but the most important near-term litmus test will be whether the West responds to China’s Belt and Road Initiative as a benign economic project, or as a geopolitical threat.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
The apolitical image of the emerging market that underpinned an era of rapid globalization since the end of the Cold War certainly had its attractions, not least the potential to alleviate poverty at a large scale. But today it looks ugly, as it turns out that many of them were not emerging toward anything like the democratic values of most developed markets.

The dogmatic claim that economic freedom leads to political freedom, which underpinned much of the laissez-faire approach behind post-Cold War economic policy between the West and authoritarian regimes, now looks naive. China has proven there is no necessary relationship between them. Only true believers can still hang on to the idea that capitalism will eventually nudge China to a more liberal place, just not yet.



chola
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3572
Joined: 16 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: USA

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby chola » 28 Feb 2018 22:54

rsingh wrote:^^^^
Start of demise of middle kingdom. Power corrupts.


That would be to presume they are not corrupt now or were not corrupt when they began this transformation from turd world chithole in the 1970s to what they are now — a third world chithole with first world infrastructure and an US/Japan-style printing press.

My thought is it makes little difference in the short-term.

But we can hope they become a North Korea in the long-term. But even that is hard to envision since they are mercantile to the core and had remained so even under all the previous dictators since Deng.

Peregrine
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7330
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Peregrine » 01 Mar 2018 01:00

As Xi tightens grip on China, US sees conflict ahead

WASHINGTON: A few weeks after Steve Bannon left the White House in August, he was invited to a dinner at the Council on Foreign Relations to discuss US policy toward China. With his unbridled China bashing and dark talk of a looming conflict in the Pacific, Bannon expected to be roughed up by the group, which included China scholars, writers and veterans from past Republican and Democratic administrations.

Bannon’s hosts were hard on him but not in the way he expected. Rather than faulting him or his former boss, US President Donald Trump, for their hostile approach, they pressed him on why Trump had not followed through with his tough talk about trade and North Korea. “I walked out of there thinking, ‘Something has changed with the elite,'” he recalled.

China’s relentless rise and its more recent embrace of repressive tactics that recall the Mao era — a process accelerated by President Xi Jinping’s bid to stay in power indefinitely — have fractured a deeply rooted consensus in Washington about the long-term direction of its relationship with Beijing.

Gone is a widespread agreement among diplomats, scholars and businesspeople that China is gradually converging with the United States and, therefore, that Americans should work to manage any flare-ups between the two countries. With China now unabashedly charting its own course — one that diverges from rather than converges with the liberal democracies and market economies of the West — conflict, many say, is inevitable.

“Even those who are the most optimistic, hopeful and in some ways romantic about the US-China relationship have been forced to confront a new China,” said Kurt M. Campbell, who, as an assistant secretary of state for East Asian affairs, was an architect of the Obama administration’s policy of pivoting toward the East.

Xi’s power grab has thrown this new China into stark relief, “exacerbating the fault line that already exists between China and the liberal democracies of the world,” said Orville Schell, the director of the Center on US-China Relations at the Asia Society.

The disillusionment with China, he said, began setting in long before Xi cemented his grip on the Politburo. Be it saber-rattling in the South China Sea, proselytizing on US college campuses, theft of corporate secrets or censorship of the web, China has alienated one constituency after another in the United States.

“The military is gone, the press is gone, the intellectuals are gone, civil society is gone, and now the businessmen are gone,” said Schell, who arranged the dinner for Bannon and has deep ties to China. “If you’re taking the long view, you’d have to say we’re on diverging pathways.”

Beyond a general spike in tensions, however, the results of this widening divide are difficult to predict, experts and former officials said, because it is occurring against a backdrop of uncertainty in Beijing and Washington.

Xi’s ascension, experts said, reflects not only his formidable power but also China’s economic instability. Markets were rattled by news last week that the Chinese government seized the Anbang Insurance Group, a debt-ridden conglomerate that owns the Waldorf Astoria hotel and once negotiated to invest in a Manhattan skyscraper owned by the family of the president’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

Trump’s handling of China reflects not only his protectionist trade agenda and America First foreign policy but also his reluctance to antagonize Xi personally — a peculiar deference that prompted the tough questions directed at Bannon over dinner.

For all his thunderous criticism of China as an economic predator, Trump has yet to impose a sweeping trade sanction against it. He declined to label China a currency manipulator last year because he said the timing was bad: Xi had agreed to help the United States press North Korea to curb its nuclear and missile programs.

“China, we probably lost $504 billion, last year, on trade,” Trump said Monday at a meeting with governors, a day after Xi’s bid to lead indefinitely became public. But he added: “I think that President Xi is unique. He’s helping us with North Korea.”

The White House is preparing tariffs on steel and aluminum that would target China and other exporters. It has conducted an investigation into China’s theft of intellectual property, which could result in restrictions on Chinese investment in the United States and retaliatory measures against its consumer electronics products.

Domestic politics, in a year of midterm elections, may drive Trump to take a harder line. Democrats, who are historically closer to Trump on trade than most Republicans, have signaled that they will use the president’s tough-on-China stance against him if he does not act soon.

“Now that it’s clear that President Xi isn’t going anywhere, getting tough on China is even more of an imperative,” said Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader. “If President Trump and Congress don’t crack down on their rapacious trade practices,” he added, “China will continue eating our lunch for years to come.”

Corporate America has long acted as a lubricant for the relationship, prodding the United States to bring China into the World Trade Organization and lobbying against punitive trade practices. But after years of struggling to break into Chinese markets, suffering the theft of their corporate secrets, many US companies are exhausted.

“You’re hearing businesses that work in China use words like reciprocity and retaliation far more than you ever have,” said Scott Mulhauser, a former chief of staff at the US Embassy in Beijing. “Folks are increasingly frustrated and wrestling with how best to deal with it.”

The frustration is not across the board: Manufacturers tend to be more fed up than Wall Street, which continues to do lucrative investment-banking business with the Chinese government. Technology companies have soured on China, although the market is so vast that they are still willing to consider concessions they would make nowhere else in the world.

The Trump administration reflects those fissures. Advisers like Gary Cohn, director of the National Economic Council, and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who both worked at Goldman Sachs, have persuaded Trump to hold off on tough trade measures against China in the past.

But there are signs that the White House’s nationalist wing is ascendant. Peter Navarro, an economist whose books include “Death by China” and “The Coming China Wars,” is to be promoted, and his ideas seem again in vogue with the president.

On the issue of national security, the administration enshrined a harsher stance toward China in the president’s National Security Strategy. The report characterized China in Cold War-like terms, as a revisionist power that will try “to erode American security and prosperity.”

China’s influence on bastions of higher education has also come under scrutiny. The director of the FBI, Christopher A. Wray, testified recently that he believed universities were underestimating the ability of Chinese students to collect valuable national security intelligence. He expressed concern about the Confucius Institute, a global learning network sponsored by the Chinese government, whose expansion has elicited criticism over whether it is a tool to influence public opinion about China.

By itself, some former officials said, Xi’s move to stay in power should not augur greater conflict with the United States. He is expected to elevate Wang Qishan to vice president and give him a major role in managing the relationship. And he dispatched a senior economic adviser, Liu He, to Washington this week to meet with the administration. Both men are known and respected in the United States.

“I don’t think there’s something inherent in dictatorships and one-man rule that causes clashes with US interests, other than, of course, the conflict in values,” said Jeffrey A. Bader, a former China adviser to President Barack Obama.

For some China hands, the wave of disillusionment reflects unrealistic hopes about how much China was ever going to converge with the United States. John Thornton, a former Goldman Sachs president who has taught at Tsinghua University in Beijing, said that in a chaotic world, the two countries should focus on what unites, rather than what divides, them.

“At one end of the spectrum is order and at the other end is disorder,” Thornton said. “China and the United States are clearly on the same end of the spectrum.”

Cheers Image

chola
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3572
Joined: 16 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: USA

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby chola » 01 Mar 2018 01:57

^^^ This is long in the making and hardly surprising. But what really changed?

Obama put more tariffs on chini products than even Trump. Clinton sent US carriers through the Taiwan Straits decades before Trump and the current FON deployments in the SCS.

The unsettling thing about Cheen is its patience and steadfastness in clinging to its advantages which is in trade and commerce. Another rising dictatorship might have challenged the US openly by now and would have been crushed by the US military.

But Cheen never fights and so grows ever more larger and powerful through its industrial and commercial bases until the day everything is fait accompli.

Unless there is someone to instigate war with Cheen, the CCP will continue with their current strategy.

panduranghari
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3751
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby panduranghari » 01 Mar 2018 02:52

Chinese all through their history still cannot come to accept a concept of peaceful transfer of power. Until jinping declared himself an emperor, at least CCP for all its flaws had a peaceful transfer of power within the elite factions.

With the elimination of the elite factions, the dominant xi faction will get more ruthless as the have to keep looking over their shoulders. Distraction of the sheeple by diversionary wars becomes more likely. Doklam was perhaps jinping undoing, where he lost the battle. Perhaps to regain the initiative he had to go on a purge. Perhaps he would not have elevated himself if it was not for the loss of face.

Senior jinping was paraded by student communist militia with a plaque around his neck stating he was a traitor.

With this hindsight, IMO, this move by jinping makes no sense.

Perhaps there will be even more bloodshed in the coming years. All said and done, BRI is unofficially dead. Only those who live under a rock and those pesky terrorist Pakis will invite Chinese with open arms.

Would be curious what Kremlin makes of this.

chola
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3572
Joined: 16 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: USA

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby chola » 01 Mar 2018 03:02

^^^ The Kremlin? Why should they give it a second thought? They already have a dictator for life in Putin.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23586
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Mar 2018 15:29

Philippines says in talks with China state firm on joint sea exploration - AFP
The Philippines said Thursday it is in talks with a Chinese state firm for joint South China Sea energy resource exploration and extraction, in a proposed deal described by President Rodrigo Duterte as akin to "co-ownership" of contested areas.

The two countries have long been embroiled in a bitter dispute over their competing claims to the region -- with China claiming nearly the entire sea -- but Duterte has in recent years softened his predecessors' policy of opposing Beijing's claims.

Duterte said Wednesday an arrangement to turn two of the rival claimants virtual joint owners of the strategic and supposedly oil and gas-rich sea was preferable to the "massacre" of Filipino troops in a war with China.

"Now their (Beijing's) offer is joint exploration, which is like co-ownership. It's like the two of us would be the owners. I think that's better than fighting," he said during a visit to the war-torn southern city of Marawi.

Negotiations between the Philippines and China over South China Sea exploration were raised last month by Filipino Foreign Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano.

Presidential spokesman Harry Roque provided more detail Thursday, specifying that talks were underway between the Philippines' energy department and an unnamed Chinese state firm, and that extraction of energy resources was now on the table.


He did not specify which specific area of the sea was under discussion.

Brunei, Malaysia, Taiwan and Vietnam also claim all or part of the sea. Proposed cooperation between Manila and Beijing has caused alarm among neighbouring Southeast Asian countries in the past.

"We might enter into an agreement with a Chinese-owned corporation, not the Chinese state itself," Roque said in an interview aired on ABS-CBN television, adding the company he declined to name was state-owned.

"I know that they're discussing, they're moving forward and it's likely to happen," he added without giving a timetable or the exact terms of the proposed deal.

"This will now actually entail joint exploration and possible exploitation of natural resources."

'Alternative sources'

Duterte's willingness to cooperate with China marks a turnaround from predecessor Benigno Aquino's stance accusing Beijing of encroaching, occupying, and building structures on reefs and rocks that Manila claims as part of its exclusive economic zone.

Aquino won an international arbitration tribunal ruling in 2016 invalidating Beijing's claims, but Duterte set aside the ruling while courting investments and trade from the Philippines' giant neighbour, the world's second-largest economy.

Cayetano said last month that Manila would consult legal experts to make sure any accord would not infringe on Philippine sovereign rights.

"It's not that we have no choice. We can go back and say, 'Fine, no one benefits from the resources now'. But come on, we're trying to look for alternative sources of energy," Roque said Thursday.

He said Filipino firms could not do it on their own and would need Chinese capital, while noting that "when a Filipino company attempted to explore on its own they were met by Chinese warboats (gunboats)."

He was referring to a 2011 incident when Manila said Chinese patrol boats harassed a seismic survey vessel chartered by a unit of a Philippine mining company at Philippine-claimed Reed Bank in the South China Sea.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23586
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 01 Mar 2018 20:10

Welcome India's efforts in Act East policy: Tran Dai Quang, Vietnamese president - Economic Times
Edited excerpts:

Q: How do you view the growth in India-Vietnam defence partnership?

A: Defence and security have been effective strategic areas of cooperation. India has actively supported Vietnam in training, capacity building, defence technology transfer and defence credit.

Q: How is Vietnam planning to ramp up economic ties with India?

A: India continues to be among Vietnam’s top ten trading partners as the bilateral trade turnover has increased 16% per annum on average in the past decade. A large number of major Indian firms have established and expanded their footprint in Vietnam. India has given priority to Vietnam in development cooperation and education and training, and paid attention to promoting bilateral cooperation in science and technology, information and communication, energy, oil and gas, agriculture and tourism.

Q: What are the new areas where Vietnam is seeking Indian investments?

A: India ranked 28th among the 126 countries and territories that invested in Vietnam in 2017, with 168 projects and total registered capital of $756 million. Many major Indian corporations, including Tata Group, ONGC and Essar have a sound business in Vietnam. Vietnam encourages more investments from India so that India becomes one of the top investors in Vietnam and the target of $ 15 billion in bilateral trade by 2020 can be realised. Renewable energy, manufacturing, information technology, infrastructure, to name a few, are India’s strengths, for which Vietnam has need. Both sides need to strengthen both bilateral and regional connectivity including air links, roads and maritime links, and digital connectivity.

Q: What is your opinion on India’s Act East Policy?

A: Apart from the bilateral frameworks, both countries have also forged close collaboration and effective mutual support at multilateral fora, especially the United Nations. Vietnam welcomes India’s efforts in and strong commitments to its Act East policy as well as to enhancing the connectivity and development cooperation with ASEAN. As the coordinator of ASEAN-India relations for 2015-2018, Vietnam has worked closely with India to drive the India-ASEAN cooperation forward.

Q: India and Vietnam have just completed ten years of Strategic Partnership and one year of Comprehensive Strategic Partnership. What is your evaluation of India-Vietnam relations?

A:Vietnam and India have enjoyed a long-standing traditional friendship, with various historical and cultural similarities, which was established by President Ho Chi Minh and Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru and nurtured by successive generations of leaders and people of both countries. The two countries established the Strategic Partnership in July 2007 and upgraded it to Comprehensive Strategic Partnership in September 2016. The bilateral political relations have gone from strength to strength thanks to regular mutual visits at the high and lower levels through party-to-party, state-to-state, government-to-government, parliament-to-parliament as well as people-to-people exchanges.

Bilateral cooperation mechanisms, including the Action Plan 2017-2020, have been effectively implemented, thus facilitating enhancement of bilateral cooperation in various areas.

Singha
BRF Oldie
Posts: 66607
Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
Location: the grasshopper lies heavy

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Singha » 01 Mar 2018 22:08

https://www.news18.com/news/world/chine ... top_pos_13

New Delhi: A senior leader of Pakistan’s primary opposition – the PPP – has alleged that Chinese prisoners are being used in the construction work of the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

Nawab Mohammad Yousuf Talpur, a senior leader of Pakistan People’s Party, said this in the lower house, or National Assembly, of Pakistan’s Parliament on Monday. He alleged that a large number of Chinese prisoners were working on development projects of the China Pakistan Economic Corridor.


"I have learnt that prisoners have been brought from Chinese jails and they are constructing roads. They can be involved in crimes so there should be proper security arrangements," Talpur said. He raised the question citing security concerns for Pakistan.


"I assume that a secret or unannounced agreement has been made between the two countries because prisoners cannot be sent from one country to another without taking the host nation into confidence. Chinese construction companies are using prisoners as labourers," he added.

The leader said that a number of Chinese nationals had been arrested in ATM fraud cases, especially in Karachi. "Pakistanis are not capable of carrying out such crimes. I assume that Chinese prisoners are involved in ATM thefts and other computer crimes such as breaking into computers or computer networks," he said.

According to a national daily of Pakistan, the Ministry of Interior showed ignorance about the presence of Chinese prisoners in Pakistan. However, the Special Secretary for Interior, Rizwan Malik, responded by claiming that Chinese workers were being given a three-layer security. "There is a separate security for Chinese nationals who have been working on CPEC projects. Separate arrangements have been made for those who have come for electricity projects."

Talpur later told the Pakistan daily that he had got information that a large number of Chinese prisoners were working on different development projects across the country.

"I contacted an official who confirmed that prisoners had been working in Pakistan. My doubt was strengthened by an ambiguous response from the Ministry of Interior which rather than rejecting my claim just said it was not in the knowledge of the ministry," he told a leading Pakistani daily.

China has invested billions of dollars in its One Belt One Road initiative of which the CPEC and Gwadar port are its investments in Pakistan. However, over past few weeks the CPEC project has been garnering lots of negative publicity for the resistance, sometimes violent, against the China sponsored projects in Pakistan. That’s because the number of kidnapping, extortion and assault cases against Chinese nationals in Pakistan has been on the rise.

Earlier this month, two Chinese business executives of a transportation company were shot by gunmen in the southern city of Karachi, one of who died. China has also issued travel advisories for its nationals in Pakistan

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23586
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Mar 2018 07:28

India-China border situation sensitive, has potential to escalate: Subhash Bhamre - PTI
Eight months after the Doklam standoff, junior defence minister Subhash Bhamre on Thursday said the situation along India's border with China is "sensitive" and it has the potential to escalate.

"At the Line of Actual Control the situation is sensitive as incidents of patrolling, transgression and standoffs have a potential of escalation," he said.


The nearly 4,000-km-long border between the two countries is referred to as Line of Actual Control (LAC).

"While confidence building measures are being enhanced, we shall continue to take all action deemed necessary to ensure sanctity of LAC," the minister of state for defence said, addressing a seminar on the Army's contribution to nation building.

Troops of India and China were locked in a 73-day-long standoff in Doklam from June 16 last year after the Indian side stopped the building of a road in the disputed area by the Chinese army. The face-off ended on August 28.

Sources said China has been keeping its troops in north Doklam and significantly ramping up its infrastructure in the disputed area.

In January, Army Chief General Bipin Rawat had said the time had come for India to shift its focus from borders with Pakistan to the frontier with China, indicating that situation along it was worrying.

Dipanker
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3021
Joined: 14 May 2002 11:31

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Dipanker » 02 Mar 2018 09:39

Could this be the reason why we have not seen any action in Maldives by India? Skipping Dalai Lama meeting, I don't think has happened in the past:

Govt sends out note: Very sensitive time for ties with China, so skip Dalai Lama events

Arjun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4264
Joined: 21 Oct 2008 01:52

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby Arjun » 02 Mar 2018 09:47

Dipanker wrote:Could this be the reason why we have not seen any action in Maldives by India? Skipping Dalai Lama meeting, I don't think has happened in the past:

Govt sends out note: Very sensitive time for ties with China, so skip Dalai Lama events

Seems pretty pusillanimous to me !!

TKiran
BRFite
Posts: 923
Joined: 13 Dec 2009 00:22

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby TKiran » 02 Mar 2018 10:52

It's foolish to send such a note. If the intention is to not give China a reason to attack India on land, that intention is misplaced.

China is going to attack India nevertheless on land, at that time, India will not have any reason to counter-attack and do a Bangladesh to Tibet.

These Babus are pusillanimous and are not doing their duty to defend the sovereignty of India.

SSridhar
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23586
Joined: 05 May 2001 11:31
Location: Chennai

Re: Neutering & Defanging Chinese Threat (15-11-2017)

Postby SSridhar » 02 Mar 2018 12:05



First of all, the very leakage of such a note, if that existed at all, has deprived it of its purpose, IMO. In India, it is so darn difficult to do such things secretively.

Whatever that may be, I do not believe that China is planning to attack in the next two months (the timeframe of this supposed note) !

This may be to do with something else, such as the SRs meeting on the boundary issue (yes, I know that they met only two months back).

But, if the latter is true, it had better be a significant one, otherwise, such a purported note does not stand to reason.


Return to “Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 50 guests